Level 200 Course Descriptions

LAIS 200: Human Systems

Human Systems is an interdisciplinary historical examination of key systems created by humans—namely, political, economic, social, and cultural institutions—as they have evolved worldwide from the inception of the modern era ca.150) to the present. This course embodies an elaboration of these human systems as introduced in their environmental context in Nature and Human Values and will reference themes and issues explored therein.It also demonstrates the cross-disciplinary applicability of the ‘systems’ concept. Assignments will give students continued practice in writing. Prerequisite: LAIS 100. Semester Hours: 3.

LAIS 220: Introduction to Philosphy
A general introduction to philosophy that explores historical and analytic traditions. Historical exploration may compare and contrast ancient and modern, rationalist and empiricist, European and Asian approaches to philosophy. Analytic exploration may consider such basic problems as the distinction between illusion and reality, the one and the many, the structure of knowledge, the existence of God, the nature of mind or self.
Prerequisite: LAIS 100 and LAIS 200
Semester Hours: 3

LAIS 221: Introduction to Religion
Introduction to Religions has two focuses. We will look at selected religions emphasizing their popular, institutional, and contemplative forms; these will be four or five of the most common religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and/or Islam. The second point of the course focuses on how the Humanities and Social Sciences work. We will use methods from various disciplines to study religion: history of religions and religious thought, sociology, anthropology and ethnography, art history, study of myth, philosophy, analysis of religious texts and artifacts (both contemporary and historical), analysis of material culture and the role it plays in religion, and other disciplines and methodologies. We will look at the question of objectivity; is it possible to be objective? We will approach this methodological question using the concept “standpoint.” For selected readings, films, and your own writings, we will analyze what the “standpoint” is.
Prerequisite: LAIS 100 and LAIS 200
Semester Hours: 3

LAIS 286: Introduction To Government And Politics
The main objective of an introductory global political science course is to get students to think about political questions and political outcomes as products of both unique national histories and political institutions that are common to many countries. The class examines different political systems, contrasting and comparing them, and considers generalizations about political processes and outcomes. The class combines thematic modules with country studies. Students should emerge from the class with knowledge of the terms used in comparative political science such as electoral systems, states, and ideologies, and an understanding of the relationship between political institutions, political culture and political outcomes. The history, key institutions, political issues, cleavages, and major conflicts of six contemporary political systems will be explored: the United Kingdom, Japan, Colombia, Nigeria, Mexico, and South Africa. Attention will be also given to the different methodological approaches to the study of comparative politics
Prerequisite: LAIS 100 and LAIS 200
Semester Hours: 3

LAIS 298: Special Topics
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once.
Prerequisite: LAIS 100 and LAIS 200
Semester Hours: Variable 1 to 6

LAIS 299: Independent Study
Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member. Primarily for students who have completed their Humanities and Social Science requirements. Instructor consent required.
Prerequisite: Independent Study form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar.
Semester Hours: Variable 1 to 6

 

© 2019 Colorado School of Mines | | Equal Opportunity | Privacy Policy | Directories | Text Only | Mines.edu | rss

 
Last Updated: 09/05/2018 08:40:19