Colorado
School of Mines
1999-2000
Graduate Bulletin
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
1

To CSM Graduate Students
This Bulletin is for your use as a source of continuing
reference. Please save it.
Published by
Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401-1887
Colorado School of Mines Bulletin (USPS 391-690)
Correspondence
Address correspondence to:
Office of Graduate Studies and Research
Colorado School of Mines
1500 Illinois Street
Golden, CO 80401-1887
Main Telephone: (303) 273-3000
Toll Free: 1-800-446-9488
2
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Table of Contents
Academic Calendar .................................4
Registration and Residency ..................17
University Administration / Useful Con-
General Regulations ..............................19
tacts ......................................................5
Office of Graduate Studies and Research .... 5
Tuition, Fees, Financial Assistance ......25
Student Housing .......................................... 5
Tuition ....................................................... 25
Financial Aid ................................................ 5
Fees ......................................................... 25
International Student Services ..................... 5
Student Fees and Descriptions .................. 25
English as a Second Language ................... 5
Payments and Refunds ............................. 26
Registrar’s Office ........................................ 5
Graduate Student Association ..................... 5
Graduate Degrees and Requirements ..29
Academic Departments & Divisions ............. 5
Professional Degree .................................. 29
Master’s Degree Programs - General ........ 29
General Information .................................6
Master of Engineering ............................... 30
Mission and Goals ....................................... 6
Master of Science - Thesis ........................ 30
History of CSM ............................................ 6
Master of Science— Non-Thesis ................ 31
Location ...................................................... 6
Doctor of Philosophy ................................. 31
Administration ............................................. 6
Graduate Degree Programs and ..............
The Graduate School ...............................7
Description of Courses ......................34
Unique Programs ........................................ 7
Chemical Engineering and .............................
Graduate Degrees Offered .......................... 7
Petroleum Refining ................................ 34
Accreditation ............................................... 7
Chemistry and Geochemistry .................... 39
Economics and Business .......................... 44
Admission to the Graduate School ........8
Engineering ............................................... 49
Environmental Science and Engineering .... 60
Student Life at CSM ...............................10
Geochemistry ............................................ 65
Housing .................................................... 10
Geology and Geological Engineering ......... 69
Student Services ....................................... 10
Geophysics ............................................... 80
Student Activities ....................................... 12
Liberal Arts and International Studies ......... 89
Materials Science ...................................... 95
Facilities and Academic Support ..........14
Mathematical and Computer Sciences ..... 102
Computing and Networking ....................... 14
Metallurgical and ...........................................
Office of International Programs ................ 14
Materials Engineering .......................... 108
Public Affairs ............................................. 14
Mining Engineering ................................... 117
Environmental Health and Safety ............... 14
Petroleum Engineering ............................ 123
Arthur Lakes Library .................................. 14
Physics ................................................... 129
Special Programs and Continuing Education
(SPACE) ............................................... 15
Centers and Institutes .........................133
CSM Alumni Association ............................ 15
Office of Women in Science, Engineering and
Directory of the School .......................138
Mathematics (WISEM) .......................... 15
LAIS Writing Center ................................... 15
Appendix ..............................................150
Copy Center .............................................. 16
Research Development and Services ........ 16
Index .....................................................158
Green Center ............................................ 16
Telecommunications Center ...................... 16
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
3

Academic Calendar
Fall Semester
1999
2000
Confirmation/Registration ................................................................................. Aug. 23, Monday ...................... Aug. 21, Monday
Classes start ........................................................................................................ Aug. 24, Tuesday ...................... Aug. 22, Tuesday
Labor Day - Classes in session ........................................................................... Sept. 6, Monday ......................... Sept. 4, Monday
Last day to register, add or drop courses without a “W’ ............................... Sept. 8, Wednesday ................. Sept. 6, Wednesday
Fall Break, Columbus Day ................................................................................. Oct. 11, Monday .......................... Oct. 9, Monday
Mid-term grades due in Registrar’s Office ........................................................ Oct. 18, Monday ....................... Oct. 16, Monday
Last day to withdraw from a course Continuing students/Grad students ........ Nov. 2, Tuesday ......................... Oct. 31, Tuesday
Early Registration Spring Semester ............................................................... Nov. 8-12, Mon.-Fri. .............. Nov. 6-10, Mon.-Fri.
Thanksgiving Recess .................................................................................... Nov. 25-28, Thurs.-Sun. ..... Nov. 23-26, Thurs.-Sun.
Last day to withdraw from a course New undergraduate students ..................... Dec. 3, Friday .............................. Dec. 1, Friday
Classes end ......................................................................................................... Dec. 9, Thursday ....................... Dec. 7, Thursday
Dead Day .............................................................................................................. Dec. 10, Friday ............................. Dec. 8, Friday
Seniors’ lowest possible grades due in Registrar’s Office .............................. Dec. 14, Tuesday ....................... Dec. 12, Tuesday
Final exams ................................................................................................... Dec. 13-16, Mon.-Thurs. ... Dec. 11-14, Mon.-Thurs.
Semester ends ....................................................................................................... Dec. 17, Friday ........................... Dec. 15, Friday
Midyear Degree Convocation .............................................................................. Dec. 17, Friday ........................... Dec. 15, Friday
Final grades due in Registrar’s Office .............................................................. Dec. 20, Monday ....................... Dec. 18, Monday
Winter Recess ........................................................................................................ Dec. 18-Jan. 3 ........... Dec. 16-Jan. 1, Sat.-Mon.
Spring Semester
2000
2001
Confirmation/Registration ................................................................................... Jan. 4, Tuesday ........................... Jan. 2, Tuesday
Classes start ....................................................................................................... Jan. 5, Wednesday .................... Jan. 3, Wednesday
Last day to register, add or drop courses without a “W’ ............................... Jan. 19, Wednesday ................. Jan. 17, Wednesday
Mid-terms grades due in Registrar’s Office ..................................................... Feb. 28, Monday ....................... Feb. 26, Monday
Spring Recess ................................................................................................ March 11-19, Sat.-Sun. ........ March 10-18, Sat.-Sun.
Last day to withdraw from a course ................................................................. March 21, Tuesday .................. March 20, Tuesday
All except new undergrads & 2nd sem freshmen
Registration Field & Summer Terms .............................................................. April 3-7, Mon.-Fri. ............... April 2-6, Mon.-Fri.
Early Registration Fall Semester ................................................................... April 10-14, Mon.-Fri. ........... April 9-13, Mon.-Fri.
Last day to withdraw from a course-new undergrads & 2nd sem freshmen ... April 21, Friday .......................... April 20, Friday
Classes end ........................................................................................................ April 27, Thursday .................. April 26, Thursday
Dead Day ............................................................................................................. April 28, Friday .......................... April 27, Friday
Seniors’ lower possible grades due in Registrar’s Office ................................. May 2, Tuesday .......................... May 1, Tuesday
Final exams ..................................................................................................... May 1-4, Mon.-Thurs. Apr. 30-May 3, Mon.-Thurs.
Semester ends ........................................................................................................ May 5, Friday ............................... May 4, Friday
Commencement ..................................................................................................... May 5, Friday ............................... May 4, Friday
Final grades due in Registrar’s Office ............................................................... May 8, Monday .......................... May 7, Monday
Summer Sessions
2000
2001
Registration, First Field & Summer Thesis ....................................................... May 8, Monday .......................... May 7, Monday
First Field Term starts ......................................................................................... May 8, Monday .......................... May 7, Monday
Last day to register, add or drop courses without a “W” - Field Term .......... May 10, Thursday .................... May 11, Thursday
Memorial Day (Holiday) .................................................................................... May 29, Monday ....................... May 28, Monday
Last day to withdraw from First Field Term ........................................................ June 2, Friday .............................. June 1, Friday
Registration - Summer School ..................................................................... June 15-16, Thurs.-Fri. ........ June 14-15, Thurs.-Fri.
First Field Term ends ........................................................................................... June 16, Friday ........................... June 15, Friday
Field Term grades due in Registrar’s Office ..................................................... June 19, Monday ....................... June 18, Monday
Summer School starts ........................................................................................ June 19, Monday ....................... June 18, Monday
Last day to register, add or drop courses without a W -Summer School ....... June 26, Monday ....................... June 25, Monday
Independence Day (Holiday) ............................................................................... July 4, Tuesday ...................... July 4, Wednesday
Second Field Term begins .................................................................................. July 10, Monday .......................... July 9, Monday
Last day to register, add or drop courses without a W -Second Field Term .. July 13, Thursday ..................... July 12, Thursday
Last day to withdraw from Summer School ....................................................... July 14, Friday ............................. July 13, Friday
Last day to withdraw from Second Field Term ................................................... Aug. 4, Friday .............................. Aug. 3, Friday
Summer School ends ............................................................................................ Aug. 11, Friday .......................... Aug. 10, Friday
Summer School grades due in Registrar’s Office ............................................ Aug. 14, Monday ...................... Aug. 13, Monday
Second Field Term ends ....................................................................................... Aug. 18, Friday .......................... Aug. 17, Friday
Second Field Term grades due in Registrar’s Office ..................................... August 21, Monday .................... Aug. 20, Monday
4
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

University Administration / Useful Contacts
Office of Graduate Studies and
Academic Departments & Divisions
Research
The address for all CSM academic departments and
divisions is
Mailing address
1500 Illinois Street
1500 Illinois Street
Golden, Colorado 80401-1887
Golden, CO 80401-1887
World Wide Web address: http://www.mines.edu/
Telephone
FAX
303 273-3247
303 273-3244
Academic department and division telephone numbers
Phillip R. Romig, Jr.
303-273-3247
are
Dean of Graduate Studies and Research
Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining
M. Jane Kelley
303-273-3248
......................................................... 303 273-3720
Director of Graduate Programs
Chemistry and Geochemistry
jkelley@mines.edu
......................................................... 303 273-3610
Linda L. Powell
303-273-3032
Economics and Business
Graduate Admissions Officer
......................................................... 303 273-3482
lpowell@mines.edu
Engineering
Brenda Neely
303-273-3247
......................................................... 303 273-3650
Student Services
Environmental Science and Engineering
bneely@mines.edu
......................................................... 303 273-3427
Student Housing
Geology and Geological Engineering
Bob Francisco
303-273-3353
......................................................... 303 273-3800
Director of Student Life
Geophysics
Off-Campus Housing Information (OCHI) 303 273-3827
......................................................... 303 273-3450
Financial Aid
Liberal Arts and International Studies
......................................................... 303 273-3750
Roger Koester
303-273-3207
Director of Financial Aid
Materials Science
......................................................... 303 273-3660
Dixie Cirillo
303-273-3206
Graduate Student Financial Aid Advisor
Mathematical and Computer Sciences
......................................................... 303 273-3860
International Student Services
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
Leslie Olsen
303-273-3210
......................................................... 303 273-3770
International Student Advisor
Mining and Earth Systems Engineering
English as a Second Language
......................................................... 303 273-3701
Daniel Niles
303-273-3558
Petroleum Engineering
Registrar’s Office
......................................................... 303 273-3740
Susan Smith
303-273-3200
Physics
Registrar
......................................................... 303 273-3830
Graduate Student Association
Ryan North
303 273-3094
President
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
5

General Information
Mission and Goals
As CSM grew, its mission expanded from the rather
The Colorado School of Mines is dedicated to educating
narrow initial focus on nonfuel minerals to programs in
students and professionals in science, engineering, and
petroleum production and refining as well. Recently it has
associated fields relating to the discovery and extraction of
added programs in materials science and engineering,
the Earth’s resources, their synthesis in materials and
energy and environmental engineering, and a broad range of
energy, their utilization in advanced processes and products,
engineering and applied science disciplines. CSM sees its
and the economic and social systems necessary to ensure
mission as education and research in engineering and
their wise use in a sustainable global society. This mission
applied science with a special focus on the earth science
will be achieved by the creation, integration, and exchange
disciplines in the context of responsible stewardship of the
of knowledge in engineering, the natural sciences, the social
earth and its resources.
sciences and the humanities, and their union within the
CSM long has had an international reputation. Students
processes necessary to enhance the quality of life of the
have come from nearly every nation, and alumni can be
world’s inhabitants. It is accordingly committed to serving
found in every corner of the globe.
the people of Colorado, the nation, and the global commu-
For many years the student body was predominantly
nity by promoting stewardship of the Earth system upon
white male, reflecting the industries CSM served. It gave
which all life and development depend.
one of the early engineering degrees for women to Florence
The Colorado School of Mines is committed to achiev-
Caldwell in 1897, but in many subsequent years there were
ing this mission through the steadfast dedication to the
no female students. Strong recruiting efforts and the opening
following core values as it carries out its teaching, research,
up of traditionally white male industries have changed the
and service roles:
demographics, so that today approximately 23% of the
1. Commitment to highest quality engineering and applied
overall student body are women and 13% of the undergradu-
science education and research.
ates are underrepresented minorities.
2. Emphasis on practicality of curriculum and research.
Location
3. Teaching and mentoring methods that develop problem-
Golden, Colorado, has always been the home of CSM.
solving and critical thinking skills.
Located in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains 20 minutes
4. A campus environment that promotes leadership.
west of Denver, this community of 15,000 also serves as
5. Academic expectations and a culture of learning that
home to the Coors Brewing Company, the National
foster a strong work ethic.
Renewable Energy Laboratory, and a major U.S. Geological
Survey facility that also contains the National Earthquake
History of CSM
Center. The seat of government for Jefferson County,
In 1865, only six years after gold and silver were
Golden once served as the territorial capital of Colorado.
discovered in the Colorado Territory, the fledgling mining
Skiing is an hour away to the west.
industry was in trouble. The nuggets had been picked out of
Administration
streams and the rich veins had been worked, and new
methods of exploration, mining, and recovery were needed.
By state statute, the school is managed by a seven-
member board of trustees appointed by the governor, and
Early pioneers like W.A.H. Loveland, E.L. Berthoud,
the student body elects a nonvoting student board member
Arthur Lakes, George West and Episcopal Bishop George
each year. The school is supported financially by student
M. Randall proposed a school of mines. In 1874 the
tuition and fees and by the state through annual appropria-
Territorial Legislature appropriated $5,000 and commis-
tions. These funds are augmented by government and
sioned Loveland and a Board of Trustees to found the
privately sponsored research, private gift support from
Territorial School of Mines in or near Golden. Governor
alumni, corporations, foundations and other friends.
Routt signed the Bill on February 9, 1874, and when
Colorado became a state in 1876, the Colorado School of
Mines was constitutionally established. The first diploma
was awarded in 1882.
6
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

The Graduate School
Unique Programs
Graduate Degrees Offered
Colorado School of Mines is an institution of engineer-
CSM offers the master of science (M.S.), master of
ing and applied science that long has had a special focus on
engineering (M.E.) and doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) in
natural resources, so it has unique programs in many fields.
Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining; M.S. in
For example, CSM is the only institution in the world that
Chemistry, Ph.D. in Applied Chemistry; M.S., M.E. and
offers doctoral programs in all five of the major earth
Ph.D. in Engineering Systems; M.S. and Ph.D. in Environ-
science disciplines: Geology and Geological Engineering,
mental Science and Engineering; M.S. and Ph.D. in
Geophysics, Geochemistry, Mining Engineering, and
Geochemistry; M.E. Geological Engineer, M.S. and Ph.D. in
Petroleum Engineering. It also has one of the few Metallur-
Geology, M.S. and Ph.D. in Geological Engineering; M.E.,
gical and Materials Engineering programs in the country
M.S. and Ph.D. in Geophysical Engineering, M.S. and
that still focuses on the complete materials cycle from
Ph.D. in Geophysics; M.S. and Ph.D. in Materials Science;
mineral processing to finished advanced materials.
M.S. and Ph.D. in Mathematical and Computer Sciences;
In addition to the traditional programs defining the
M.E., M.S. and Ph.D. in Metallurgical and Materials
institutional focus, CSM is pioneering both undergraduate
Engineering; M.S. and Ph.D. in Mineral Economics; M.S.
and graduate interdisciplinary programs. The School
and Ph.D. in Mining and Earth Systems Engineering; M.E.
understands that solutions to the complex problems
Engineer of Mines; M.E. Petroleum Engineer; M.S. and
involving global processes and quality of life issues require
Ph.D. in Petroleum Engineering; M.S. in Physics and Ph.D.
cooperation among scientists, engineers, economists, and
in Applied Physics.
the humanities.
Professional Degrees offered are Geological Engineer-
A model for such programs is the Engineering Division,
ing, Engineering Geology, Hydrogeology, Exploration
which combines civil, electrical, and mechanical engineer-
Geosciences, Geophysics, Geophysical Engineer, Petroleum
ing in a nontraditional curriculum and offers graduate
Engineering, and Engineer of Mines.
degrees in engineering systems. Similarly, graduate degree
The Division of Liberal Arts and International Studies
programs in economics and business, environmental science
offers two graduate certificate programs with specialization
and engineering, and materials science make the interdisci-
in International Political Economy (IPE) and International
plinary connections between traditional engineering and
Political Economy of Resources (IPER).
science fields, emphasizing a broad exposure to fundamental
Accreditation
principles while, at the same time, cross-linking information
from the traditional fields to generate the insight needed for
Colorado School of Mines is accredited through the level
technological breakthroughs in research and development.
of the doctoral degree by the Commission on Institutions of
Higher Education of the North Central Association of
Coordinated by the several departments involved, these
Colleges and Schools. The Engineering Accreditation
interdisciplinary programs contribute to CSM’s leadership
Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and
role in addressing the problems and developing solutions
Technology accredits undergraduate degree programs in
that will enhance the quality of life for all of earth’s
chemical and petroleum-refining engineering, engineering,
inhabitants in the next century.
engineering physics, geological engineering, geophysical
engineering, metallurgical and materials engineering,
mining engineering and petroleum engineering. The
American Chemical Society has approved the degree
program in the Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
7

Admission to the Graduate School
Admission Requirements
Admission Procedure
The Graduate School of Colorado School of Mines is
Applying for Admission
open to graduates from four-year programs at recognized
To apply for graduate studies, contact the
colleges or universities. Admission to all M.E., M.S., and
Graduate School
Ph.D. programs is competitive, based on an evaluation of
Colorado School of Mines
undergraduate performance, test scores and references. The
1500 Illinois Street
undergraduate background of each applicant is evaluated
Golden, Colorado 80401-1869
according to the requirements of each department outlined
later in this section of the Bulletin. Except in the case of
for the admission packet, or apply electronically on the
approved 5-year programs, a student may not be a candidate
World Wide Web. Our Web address is
for a graduate and an undergraduate degree at the same time.
http://www.mines.edu
Follow the procedure outlined below.
Categories of Admission
1. Application: Either send for an application form or
There are four categories of admission to graduate
find one online at www.mines.edu. In the paper packet or on
studies at Colorado School of Mines: regular, provisional,
the Web you will find the application and instructions on
special, and nondegree.
how and when to apply.
Regular Degree Students:
2. Transcripts: Send to the Graduate School two official
Applicants who meet all the necessary qualifications as
transcripts from each school previously attended. The
determined by the program to which they have applied are
transcripts may accompany the application or may be sent
admitted as regular graduate students.
directly by the institution attended. International students’
transcripts must be in English or have an official English
Provisional Degree Students:
translation attached.
Applicants who are not qualified to enter the regular
3. Letters of Recommendation: For the M.S. and Ph.D.
degree program directly may be admitted as provisional
programs, ask three people who know your personal
degree students for a trial period not longer than 12 months.
qualities and scholastic or professional abilities to mail a
During this period students must demonstrate their ability to
letter of recommendation directly to the Graduate School. At
work for an advanced degree. After the first semester, the
least two of the letters should be from people acquainted
student may request that the department review his or her
with the scholastic abilities of the applicant. The number of
progress and make a decision concerning full degree status.
letters of recommendation varies by program; applicants
With department approval, the credits earned under the
should see the application packet for specific instructions.
provisional status can be applied towards the advanced
degree.
4. Graduate Record Examination: Most departments
require the General test of the Graduate Record Examination
Special Graduate Students:
for applicants seeking admission to their programs.
The Graduate School may admit as Special Graduate
Computerized exams are now available through the
Students a limited number of applicants from abroad. All
computer-based testing program. Refer to the GRE Bulletin
such students who attend class or audit courses at Colorado
for information on how to apply. Refer to the section
School of Mines must register and pay the appropriate
Graduate Degree Programs and Courses by Department or
nonresident tuition and fees for the credits taken.
the Graduate School application packet to find out if you
Nondegree Students:
must take the GRE examination. For information about the
Practicing professionals may wish to update their
test, write to Graduate Record Examinations, Educational
professional knowledge or broaden their areas of compe-
Testing Service, PO Box 6000, Princeton, NJ 08541-6000.
tence without committing themselves to a degree program.
5. English Language Requirement: Students whose
They may enroll for regular courses as nondegree students.
native language is not English must score at least 550 on the
Inquiries and applications should be made to Professional
TOEFL examination (Test of English as a Foreign Lan-
Outreach, Office of Special Programs and Continuing
guage) or 213 on the computer-based examination and have
Education, CSM, Golden, CO 80401-0028. Phone: 303-
the results sent to the Graduate School. Contact local
273-3493; FAX 303-273-3314. A person admitted as a
American embassies or write to TOEFL Services, P.O. Box
nondegree student who subsequently decides to pursue a
6151, Princeton, NJ 08541-6151, USA, (Telephone 609-
regular degree program must apply and gain admission to
771-7100) for information about the TOEFL examination. If
the Graduate School. Credits earned as a nondegree student
a TOEFL exam score indicates that the applicant will be
may be transferred into the regular degree program if the
handicapped academically, as a condition for admission the
student’s graduate committee and the Graduate Dean
approve.
8
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

applicant may be required to enroll in the INTERLINK
Health Record and Additional Steps
Language program at CSM until the required proficiency is
When they first enroll at CSM, all students must
achieved.
complete the student health record form which is sent to
6. Additional instructions for admission to graduate
them when they are accepted for enrollment. Students must
school specific to individual departments are contained in
submit the student health record, including health history,
the application for admission.
medical examination, and record of immunization, in order
Financial Assistance
to complete registration.
To apply for financial assistance, complete the applica-
Questions can be addressed to the Coulter Student
tion for assistantship included in the paper application
Health Center, 1225 17th Street, Golden, CO 80401-1869.
packet or in the Financial Assistance section of the online
The Health Center telephone numbers are 303-273-3381
application.
and 303-279-3155.
Application Review Process
When the application materials are received by Graduate
International Students
Admissions, they are processed and sent to the desired
Qualifying international students (see Admission
program for review. The program transmits its recommenda-
Requirements above) apply for graduate study by following
tions for admission back to the Graduate Dean, who notifies
steps one through six listed in this section.
the applicant.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
9

Student Life at CSM
Housing
Residence hall rooms are rented by academic year; costs
CSM currently has two student housing complexes:
range from $2,581 for a traditional double room to $3,434
Prospector Village, and Mines Park.
for a single in Weaver Towers. All students in residence
halls must also choose a dining hall meal plan. Meal plans
Prospector Village
range from $1,864 to $2,442.
The Prospector Village complex on the west edge of the
Off-Campus Rooms and Apartments
campus has 69 apartment units. Units are predominately two
bedrooms, and a few have one or three bedrooms. All units
Golden has a number of apartment and condominium
have two levels, with the bedrooms and bathroom on the
complexes, and some students live in rooms in private
upper level and a kitchen and living area on the lower level.
homes. CSM has no part in contractual obligations between
Residents of the complex must be enrolled for at least 10
students and private landlords.
credit hours or 6 thesis hours both fall and spring, either be
A publication called The Off-Campus Housing Informa-
married, or have custody of their children at least 50% of
tion (OCHI), produced by the CSM housing office, has lists,
the time.
numbers, and general information about off-campus
Monthly rents for Prospector Village units are
housing. Students can call 303-273-3827 or write to OCHI
to get a copy of the list.
$446.00 for a 1-bedroom,
OCHI
$490.00 for a 2-bedroom, and
CSM Student Life Office
$541.00 for a 3-bedroom unit.
Golden, Colorado 80401
Mines Park
Student Services
The Mines Park apartment complex is located west of the
6th Avenue and 19th Street intersection on 55 acres owned
Ben H. Parker Student Center
by CSM. Construction completed in 1998 offers 1 & 2
The Ben H. Parker Student Center has a dining hall,
bedroom units in family housing and 1, 2, & 3 bedroom
meeting rooms, offices for student activities, a bookstore, a
units in other areas. Principle residents must be full time
game room, and the Integral Club lounge and snack bar.
students.
Several dining hall meal plans for the cafeteria are available
for all students.
Units are complete with refrigerators, stoves, dishwash-
ers, cable television and campus phone hook-ups, and T-1
The Student Center remodeling and addition was
connections to the campus network system. There is a
completed February 1996. The new addition houses more
community center which contains the laundry facility and
meeting rooms, a food court, and an outdoor recreation
recreational/study space.
department.
Rates are as follows:
Office for Student Development and Academic
Family Housing
Services
Counseling: The SDAS Office at 1400 Maple Street
1 bedroom
$500/mo
offers personal and career counseling, a 300-volume
2 bedroom
$575/mo
resource library, skills development, and wellness-related
Apartment Housing
materials. Students can find individual help and group
1 bedroom
$500/mo
presentations, presented by professional counselors on
2 bedroom
$675/mo
topics such as stress management, relaxation, assertiveness,
3 bedroom
$900/mo
time management, and alcohol/drug education.
For an application to any of the campus housing options,
Academic Services: Individual sessions for graduate
please contact the housing office at (303) 273-3350 or visit
students are available through SDAS. Topics include
them in the Ben Parker Student Center.
effective studying and preparation for qualifying or
comprehensive exams, memory skills, rapid reading of
Campus Residence Halls
technical material, and learning styles. Graduate students are
Four residence halls located on campus have the
welcome to avail themselves of other services offered by
traditional double rooms and common bathrooms, and our
SDAS, such as free tutoring or weekly workshops in
fifth Residence Hall. Weaver Towers, has suites for seven to
introductory calculus, chemistry, or physics.
eight people with two private bathrooms and a common
living room.
International Student Services
The International Student Office advises international
students, coordinates the Host Family Program, and holds
10
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

orientation programs for new foreign students at the
provide health-promotion events for students groups and
beginning of each semester. The international student
residence hall program.
advisor processes student visas and work permits.
The Student Health Center is open Monday through
For more information, call the International Student
Friday 8-12 and 1-4:45 P.M. It is staffed by RN’s through-
Services office at 303-273-3210 or FAX 303-273-3099.
out the day. Physician’s coverage is provided by family
INTERLINK Language Center
practice physicians who are on site for two hours daily and
on-call at all times. To be eligible for care, students must be
The INTERLINK Language program at CSM combines
enrolled currently; have paid the Health Center fee if they
intensive English language instruction with training in skills
are part time and have a completed Health History Form on
necessary for successful academic and social life at an
file at the Health Center.
American engineering university. Designed to address the
special linguistic needs of science and technology students,
Supervised by Vice President and Dean of Student Life.
its curriculum focuses on reading, writing, grammar,
Phone: (303) 273-3381; FAX: (303) 279-3155.
listening, conversation, pronunciation, and study skills.
Mandatory Health Insurance
Instruction is offered in nine-week sessions at six levels of
Colorado School of Mines requires health insurance as a
proficiency. At the successful completion of the fifth level, a
condition of enrollment for all CSM students enrolled in a
qualified student can understand, take notes on academic
degree program for seven (7) credit hours or more. For
lectures, make oral presentations, read scholarly books and
students without health insurance coverage, the School
journals, conduct library research, and write essays and
offers an insurance plan. Additional coverage for spouses
research papers.
and children is also available.
The program is open to adults who have completed
All international students are, however, required to enroll
secondary school in good standing (grade point average of
in the CSM Plan, regardless of the existence of their own
C+ or above) and are able to meet their educational and
personal health coverage. There are two exceptions to this
living expenses. For further information write INTERLINK
requirement: (1) the international student has an insurance
Language Center at
policy approved by the CSM International Student Office;
Colorado School of Mines,
or (2) the international student is receiving benefits for a
1500 Illinois Street,
health insurance claim that would otherwise be pre-existing
Golden, CO 80401
under the CSM Plan. Additional coverage for spouses and
Call 303-273-3516 or FAX 303-273-3529.
children is also available.
Identification Cards
NOTE: The Coulter Student Health Center fee and
required health insurance are two separate programs.
Identification cards are made in the Student Activities
Office in the Parker Student Center, and all new students
Motor Vehicles, Parking
must have an identification card made as soon as possible
All motor vehicles on campus must be registered with
after they enroll. Students must have a valid ID to check
the campus Department of Public Safety, 1306 Maple Street,
material out of the CSM Library and may need it to attend
and must display the CSM permit. Vehicles must be
various CSM activities.
registered at the beginning of each semester or within 10
Each semester the Student Activities Office issues
days of bringing the vehicle onto campus, and updated
validation stickers for student ID’s, and students can replace
whenever you change your address.
a lost, stolen, or damaged identification cards for a small
Career Center
fee.
The Career Center helps graduate students look for
Student Health Center
engineering-related employment. Each year industry and
The Student Health Center, located at 17th and Elm,
government representatives visit the campus to interview
provides primary health care to CSM students and their
students and explain employment opportunities. Fall is the
spouses. Students pay a $36 fee each semester which entitles
major recruiting season for both summer and permanent
them to unlimited visits with a physician or nurse as well as
positions, but interviews take place in the spring as well. In
limited prescription and over-the-counter medications.
order to interview, students must register with the Career
Spouses of enrolled students may also pay the fee and
Center by submitting copies of a résumé and completing a
receive the same services. The health center also provides
registration and permission form.
wellness teaching, immunizations, allergy shots, flu shots,
A ‘Career Manual’ is available to help in résumé writing,
nutrition counseling and information regarding a wide range
interviewing, and off-campus job searches, and students can
of health concerns. Staff members are also available to
get individual critiques of résumés and letters and job search
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
11

advice. Directories and other search materials from the
Through funds collected as student fees, ASCSM strives
Career Center library can be checked out, many workshops
to ensure a full social and academic life for all students with
are offered throughout the year on job search topics, and
its organizations, publications, and social events.
video-taped practice interviews are available.
The Mines Activity Council (MAC) serves the ASCSM
Each fall the Career Center sponsors a Career Day to let
as the campus special events board. Most student events on
students explore career options with exhibiting employers.
campus are planned by the MAC committees. Committees
Information on full-time, part-time, summer and CO-OP
are the Friday Afternoon Club (FAC) committee, which
jobs is posted in the Career Center as well as on bulletin
brings comedians and other performers to campus on most
boards around campus. Registered students are often
Fridays in the academic year; the Special Events committee,
referred directly to employers. For information phone: 303-
which coordinates events like the annual Back-to-School
273-3235.
Bash, Discount Sport Nights at professional sporting events,
and one-time specialty entertainment; the E-Days commit-
Oredigger Student Newspaper
tee; and the Homecoming committee.
The Oredigger student newspaper, published on a regular
basis during the school year, contains news, features, sports,
letters, and editorials of interest to students, faculty, and the
Special Events
Golden community.
Research Fair: GSA presently co-sponsors a graduate
Veterans’ Benefits
paper competition with Sigma XI during CSM’s spring
semester Engineering Days (E-Days). The fair is designed to
The Registrar’s Office offers veterans counseling
give graduate students the opportunity to make a presenta-
services for students attending the School and using
tion in a professional conference setting about research they
educational benefits from the Veterans Administration.
have been working on. At the conclusion of the event, cash
prizes are awarded to graduate students whose papers
Student Activities
exhibit outstanding contributions to their areas of study.
Student government committees, professional societies,
International Day is planned and conducted by the
living group organizations, special events, honor societies,
International Student Organization. It includes exhibits and
and interest group organizations add a balance to the CSM
programs designed to further the cause of understanding
community and offer participants the chance to develop
among the countries of the world. The international dinner,
leadership and management skills. The Student Activities
including entertainment and samples of foods from
office can give you an up-to-date list of recognized campus
countries all over the world, is one of the top campus social
organizations and more information about them.
events of the year.
Student Government
Winter Carnival, sponsored by Blue Key, is an all-school
The Graduate Student Association was formed in 1991
ski day held each year at one of the nearby ski slopes.
and is recognized by CSM and the National Association of
Homecoming weekend is one of the high points of the
Graduate-Professional Students (NSGPS). GSA’s primary
entire year’s activities. Events include a football rally and
goal is to improve the quality of a graduate education, offer
game, campus decorations, election of Homecoming queen
academic support for graduate students, and provide social
and beast, parade, burro race, and other contests.
interaction.
Engineer Days are held each spring. The three-day affair
GSA takes an active role in university affairs and
is organized entirely by students. Contests are held in
promotes the rights and responsibilities of graduate students.
drilling, hand-spiking, mucking, oil-field olympics, and
GSA also serves to develop university responsibility to non-
softball, to name a few. Additional events include a
academic concerns of graduate students. GSA is funded
fireworks display, an E-Day concert, and the traditional
through and works with Associated Students of the
orecart push.
Colorado School of Mines and is presently represented on
GSA Fall and Spring Blowout: GSA sponsors parties
the Faculty Senate, Graduate Council, and Associated
twice a year for graduate students. Held in the late spring
Students of CSM. Phone: 303-273-3094.
and early fall at local parks, they let graduate students take a
The Associated Students of the Colorado School of
break from studying.
Mines works to advance the interest and promote the
Honor Societies
welfare of CSM and of all students, and to foster and
Honor societies recognize the outstanding achievements
maintain harmony among those connected with or interested
of their members in scholarship, leadership, and service.
in the school, including students, alumni, faculty, trustees,
Each of the CSM honor societies recognizes different
and friends.
achievements by our students. The Colorado School of
12
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Mines honor societies, and their representative areas, are as
Professional Societies
follows:
Professional societies are generally student chapters of
Alpha Phi Omega
Service
the national professional societies. As student chapters, the
Alpha Sigma Mu
Metals
professional societies offer a chance for additional profes-
sional development outside the classroom through guest
Blue Key
Service, Scholarship, Activities
speakers, trips, and interactive discussions about the current
Kappa Kappa Psi
Band
activities in the profession. Many of the organizations also
Kappa Mu Epsilon
Mathematics
offer internships, fellowships, and scholarships. The
National Society of Pershing Rifles
Military Science
Colorado School of Mines chapters are as follows:
Order of Omega
Greek Scholarship
American Asssociation of Drilling Engineers (AADE)
Pi Epsilon Tau
Petroleum Engineering
American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Sigma Pi Sigma
Physics
American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE)
Tau Beta Pi
Engineering
American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical & Petroleum
Engineers (AIME)
Interest Organizations
American Ceramic Society (Am. Cer. Soc.)
Interest organizations meet the special and unique needs
American Chemical Society (ACS)
of the CSM student body by providing specific co-curricular
American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
activities. These organizations are:
American Society of Metals (ASM International)
Association of Geoscience Students (AGS)
American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
Band
American Welding Society
Campus Crusade for Christ
Association of Engineering Geologists (AEG)
College Republicans
Association of General Contractors (AGC)
Chorus
Institute of Electrical & Electronic Engineers (IEEE)
CSM Ambassadors
International Society for Measurement and Control (ISA)
Earthworks
Society of American Military Engineers (SAME)
Fellowship of Christian Athletes
Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE)
Hawaii Club
Society of Economic Geologists (SEG)
Math Club
Society of Mining Engineers (SME)
Mines Little Theatre
Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE)
Non-Traditional Students
Society of Physics Students (SPS)
Students for Creative Anachronism
Society of Graduate Geophysics Students (SGGS)
Young Democrats
Society of Women Engineers (SWE)
International & Minority Organizations
The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society of AIME
International and minority organizations provide the
Recreational Organizations
opportunity to experience different cultures while at Mines
Recreational organizations give students with similar
and help the students from those cultures adjust to Mines
recreational interests the chance to participate as a group in
campus life. These organizations include
the activities. Most of the recreational organizations
Afro-Caribbean Students Union
compete on both the local and regional levels at tournaments
Chinese Student Association
during the school year. These clubs are:
International Student Organization (ISO)
Billiards Club
Japanese Student Association (JSA)
Caving Club
Muslim Student Association (MSA)
Cheerleading
Taiwanese Student Association
Kayak Club
American Indians in Science & Engineering (AISES)
Racquetball Club
Asian Student Association (ASA)
Rugby Club
National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE)
Shooting Club
Hispanic Professional Engineers & Scientists (SHPES)
Ski Club/Team
Men’s Volleyball
Women’s Soccer
BMOC (Big Men on Campus)
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
13

Facilities and Academic Support
Computing and Networking
OIP is located in 109 Stratton Hall. For more specific
The Computing Center, which is housed on the second
information about study abroad and other international
floor of the Green Center, provides computing and network-
programs, contact OIP at 384-2121.
ing services to meet instructional and research needs and to
Public Affairs
support the academic mission of the Colorado School of
The Public Affairs Department encompasses three areas
Mines. Computer accounts and services are available to
— media relations, community relations and publications.
registered students and current faculty members and staff.
The department keeps the news media and general public
Information about services including activation of new
informed about happenings within the CSM community.
accounts and the hours during which the Computing Center
The President has delegated to Public Affairs the
is open is available in a brochure which may be picked up at
responsibility of speaking for the institution in the day-to-
the Front Desk in Room 231 (303-273-3431) and on the
day conduct of business. Public Affairs personnel also assist
Computing Center’s web page at http://www.mines.edu-
faculty, staff and students in initiating and responding to
Academic/computer/. Problem reports can be made at the
media. The news and information staff produce articles on
Front Desk or emailed to trouble@mines.edu.
faculty, research, staff and student activities for both internal
The campus network provides access to campus
and external audiences for use in print and broadcast media.
computing resources and to the Internet, including email
To obtain news coverage of an activity or event, call the
and the World Wide Web. Centrally managed resources
Public Affairs office as far in advance as possible.
include Unix systems which are available 24 hours per day
The department produces Mines Today, a magazine
except for occasional maintenance.
published quarterly for the campus community and friends
Workrooms in the Computing Center contain networked
of the school. CSM Update is also published by this
PCs and workstations. Also available are printers, scanners,
department and is distributed to faculty and staff on campus
and digitizers. Aacademic departments which support
every month during the school year and once each summer.
specialized applications manage access to computer labs in
To ensure quality and consistency, all publications are
their buildings. The Arthur Lakes Library has a computer
required to adhere to guidelines which can be obtained from
cluster on the main floor of the building. Network access is
the Office of Public Affairs. Public Affairs advises CSM
also provided in residence halls and Mines Park for students
departments on the selection of vendors for writing, editing,
who bring their own computers to campus and modem pools
design, photography, production, printing, and distribution.
provide access to the network for off-campus residents.
Public Affairs maintains World Wide Web pages at
It is important for all users of the Colorado School of
www.mines.edu/All_about/public/. Included on these pages
Mines computing resources to observe the CSM Policies for
are the CSM Experts Database and official CSM press
Resource Usage (available on the web page or at the Front
releases.
Desk) and all legal and ethical guidelines for use of those
services.
Environmental Health and Safety
Office of International Programs
The Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) office is
located in Chauvenet Hall. Five full-time employees in the
The Office of International Programs (OIP) fosters and
EHS office provide a wide variety of services to students
facilitates international education, research and outreach at
staff and faculty members. Functions of the EHS office
CSM. OIP is administered by the Office of Academic
include: hazardous waste collection and disposal; chemical
Affairs.
procurement and distribution; assessment of air and water
The office works with the departments and divisions of
quality; fire safety; general industrial safety; industrial
the School to: (1) help develop and facilitate study abroad
hygiene; health physics; and recycling. The staff of the EHS
opportunities for CSM undergraduates and serve as an
office is ready to respond to requests for information and
informational and advising resource for them; (2) assist in
services form parents and students. Please call us at 273-
attracting new international students to CSM, (3) serve as an
3316. We work for you!
information resource for faculty and scholars of the CSM
community, promoting faculty exchanges and the pursuit of
Arthur Lakes Library
collaborative international research activities; (4) foster
Arthur Lakes Library is a regional information center for
international outreach and technology transfer programs; (5)
engineering, energy, minerals and materials science, and
facilitate arrangements for official international visitors to
associated engineering and science fields. The library
CSM; and in general, (6) help promote the internationaliza-
provides educational and research resources to support and
tion of CSM’s curricular programs and activities.
enhance the academic mission of CSM. The library staff is
14
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

committed to excellence in supporting the information needs
CSM Alumni Association
of the CSM community and providing access to information
The Mines Alumni Association has served the Colorado
for library users.
School of Mines and its alumni since 1985. Services and
The library collections include more than 500,000
benefits of membership include: Publications include Mines
volumes; approximately 1800 serial titles; over 200,000
Magazine six times each year and an annual directory of all
maps; archival materials on western mining history and
Mines alumni; Career Services, counseling, resume review,
mineral fields; and several special collections. The library is
and job placement services; Section activities providing a
a selective U.S. and Colorado state depository with over
connection to campus and other Mines alumni around the
600,000 government publications, including selected NTIS
world; Connections to Mines through newsletters, and
publications.
invitations to local and annual alumni meetings, reunions,
Access to CSM collections is provided by an online
golf tournament, and other special events; customized
public access catalog and computerized circulation system.
alumni Merchandise through the Miner’s Pick; Awards, both
Students and faculty also have access to catalogs of other
the opportunity to nominate fellow alumni and be nomi-
libraries and various information databases through the
nated; CSM Library privileges to Colorado residents; and an
online system. Terminal access is availabie in the libraryor
assortment of other member benefits. Benefits for the
from any networked computer on campus, including those
Colorado School of Mines are student grants; the Student
in networked CSM residential facilities. Dialup and Internet
Financial Assistance Program; recognition banquets for
access are available from on or off-campus. The library’s
graduating seniors/graduate students; maintenance of alumni
web page can be found at http://www.mines.edu/Academic/
records; alumni volunteer assistance in student recruiting;
library.
and programs enabling alumni input in School program-
ming.
Reference resources include specialized printed indexes
and several hundred on-line databases. Reference librarians
For further information call 303/273-3295, fax 303/273-
provide instruction and personal help as needed, conduct
3583, or write Mines Alumni Association, P.O. Box 1410,
library research sessions for classes, and provide telephone
Golden, CO 80402-1410
reference service and computer-aided research services.
Office of Women in Science,
In addition to material that can be checked out from the
Engineering and Mathematics
CSM library and other associated Colorado libraries,
interlibrary loan service provides for efficient use of
(WISEM)
materials from regional and world-wide libraries.
The WISEM office is located in 300 Guggenheim Hall.
Special Programs and Continuing
The mission of WISEM is to enhance opportunities for
women in science and engineering careers, to increase
Education (SPACE)
retention of women at CSM, and to promote equity and
The SPACE Office sponsors short courses, special
diversity in higher education. The office sponsors programs
programs, and professional outreach programs so practicing
for women students and faculty and produces the Chevron
engineers and other professionals can augment and upgrade
Lecture Series. For further information, contact: Debra K.
their technical skills and remain abreast of recent develop-
Lasich, Interim Director of Women in Science, Engineering
ments in their fields of interest. Short courses, offered both
and Mathematics, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois,
on the CSM campus and throughout the nation, provide
Golden, CO 80401-1869, or call (303) 273-3097.
concentrated instruction in specialized areas and are taught
by faculty members, consultants, or other highly trained
LAIS Writing Center
professionals. Special programs consist of symposia,
The LAIS Writing Center, located in room 263 of the
conferences, and meetings for selected audiences. The
Green Center (phone: 273-3085) is a teaching facility
Professional Outreach Program provides educational
providing all CSM students, faculty, and staff with an
opportunities for those who have not applied to pursue a
opportunity to enhance their writing abilities. The LAIS
degree program at CSM, but who wish to take regularly
Writing Center faculty are experienced technical writers and
scheduled courses on the CSM campus. The SPACE Office
professional writing instructors. The Center assists students
also offers a broad array of courses for K-12 teachers
with all their writing needs, from course assignments, to
through the Teacher Enhancement Program. A separate
scholarship applications, proposals, letters and resumes.
bulletin lists the educational programs offered by the
This service is free to CSM students and includes one-to-
SPACE Office, CSM, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401.
one tutoring and online resources provided in a computer-
Phone: 303-273-3493; FAX: 303-273-3314.
ized, electronic classroom.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
15

Copy Center
Petroleum Hall and Metals Hall are lecture rooms seating
Located on the first floor of Guggenheim Hall, the Copy
130 and 330, respectively. Each room has audio visual
Center offers on-line binding, printed tabs, and halftones.
equipment. In addition, the Green Center houses the
Printing can be done on all paper sizes from odd-sized
modern Computing Center, the Department of Geophysics
originals. Some of the other services offered are GBC and
and the Center for Geoscience Computing.
Velo Binding, folding, sorting and collating, reduction and
Telecommunications Center
enlargement, two sided copying, and color copying. We
The Telecommunications Center is located at the west
have a variety of paper colors, special resume paper and
end of the Plant Facilities building, and provides telephone
CSM watermark for thesis copying. These services are
and voicemail service to the campus, residence halls, and
available to students, faculty, and staff. The Copy Center
Mines Park housing areas. The Telecommunications Center
campus extension is 3202.
also publishes a CSM Campus Directory available anytime
Research Development and Services
to staff, faculty and students on the Web: (mines.edu/
The Office of Research Development (ORD), under the
directory/csm_only/).
Dean of Graduate Studies and Research, coordinates
Local telephone service is provided as part of the
research for the Colorado School of Mines, and promotes
housing rates. The Telecommunications Center provides
research development with industry and government
maintenance for telephone lines and services.
agencies. The research support assists the educational
Voicemail service is provided as an optional service by
program through support of students, faculty, equipment and
subscription. The fee is $45.00 per year, and subscription
research expenses. The Office of Research Services (ORS)
cards are available in the Housing Office or in the Telecom-
provides administrative support for matters concerning
munications Center. The voicemail fee is non-refundable,
research opportunities, proposal preparation, research
except in the case of departure from the campus (refunded at
personnel, payroll, procurement, and contract compliance.
a decreased, monthly prorated rate).
In general, ORS is the School’s principal liaison in
contractual matters and assists the faculty in the legal and
The Telecommunications Center rpovides long distance
administrative aspects of the contract research and grant
services for the Residence Halls and Mines Park housing
program.
areas through individual account codes. Long distance rates
for domestic calling are 0.10 per minute 24 hours a day,
Green Center
seven days a week. International rates are available on
Completed in 1971, the Cecil H. and Ida Green Graduate
request from the Telecommunications Center. Accounts are
and Professional Center is named in honor of Dr. and Mrs.
issued at the beginning of the fall semester, or by request at
Green, major contributors to the funding of the building.
any time. Monthly long distance charges are assessed to
Bunker Memorial Auditorium, which seats 1,386, has a
student accounts each month and invoices are mailed
large stage that may be used for lectures, concerts, drama
directly to students at their campus address. Questions and
productions, or for any occasion when a large attendance is
requests for information for the above services should be
expected.
directed to the Telecommunications Center (303) 273-3000
or 1-800-446-9488.
Friedhoff Hall contains a dance floor and an informal
stage. Approximately 700 persons can be accommodated at
tables for banquets or dinners. Auditorium seating can be
arranged for up to 550 people.
16
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Registration and Residency
Reciprocal Registration
even though circumstances may require extended temporary
Under the Exchange Agreement Between the State
absences from the state.
Supported Institutions in Northern Colorado, full-time CSM
Qualification for resident tuition requires both (1) proof
graduate students may take courses at Colorado State
of adoption of the state as a fixed and permanent home,
University, University of Northern Colorado, and University
demonstrating physical presence within the state at the time
of Colorado (Boulder, Denver, Colorado Springs, and the
of such adoption by obtaining a Colorado driver’s license
Health Sciences Center) at no charge by completing the
and voter registration, and filing Colorado income tax
request form and meeting the required conditions on
returns, etc., together with the expressed intention of making
registration and tuition, course load, and course and space
Colorado the true home; and (2) living within the state for
availability.
12 consecutive months immediately before the first day of
classes for the semester for which residency is sought.
Full vs. Part-time Status - Required
These requirements must be met by one of the following:
Course Load
(a) the father, mother, or guardian of the student if an
Full-time students in thesis-degree programs register for
unemancipated minor, or (b) the student if married or over
15 semester hours (including thesis credits) each semester.
22, or (c) the emancipated minor..
Full-time students in non-thesis programs register for at
The home of the unemancipated minor is assumed to be
least 10 semester hours. Non-thesis students who need less
that of the parents, or if there is a legal guardian of the
than 15 hours to receive their degree may register for the
student, that of such guardian. If parents are separated or
number of hours required to complete their degree program.
divorced, and either separated or divorced parent meets the
Part-time enrollment is limited to students employed
Colorado residency requirements, the minor also will be
more than 32 hours per week outside of CSM. Students
considered a resident. Statutes provide for continued
requesting part-time classification must show the Graduate
resident status, in certain cases, following parents’ move
Office written confirmation of employment each semester in
from Colorado. Please check Colorado Revised Statutes
which part-time status is requested. Part-time students must
1973, 23-7-103(2)(m)(II) for the exact provisions. In a case
meet all residency requirements for their programs. Part-
where a court has appointed a guardian or granted custody,
time students who are working on their thesis research must
it shall be required that the court certify that the primary
register for at least 3 hours per semester of thesis credit.
purpose of such appointment was not to qualify the minor
for resident tuition status.
Residency Qualifications
Students may get additional information from the
Because the State of Colorado pays two-thirds of the cost
Registrar’s Office.
of a resident student’s education, a student is classified as a
resident or nonresident for tuition purposes at the time
Nonresidents Achieving Residency
admission is granted. The classification is based upon
To become a resident of Colorado for tuition classifica-
information furnished by the student submitted on the
tion under state statutes, a student must be domiciled in
application for admission. The continuing student who, due
Colorado for one year or more immediately preceding the
to subsequent events, becomes eligible for resident tuition
first day of class for the semester for which such classifica-
must petition the Registrar’s Office for a change of status.
tion is sought. A person must be emancipated before
domicile can be established separate from the domicile of
All graduate students who are U.S. citizens and who are
the parents. Emancipation for tuition purposes takes place
supported on RA or TA contracts are strongly encouraged to
automatically when a person turns 22 years of age or
become legal residents of Colorado, since non-resident
marries.
tuition will be paid for students on these contracts for their
first year only. After the first year, the student is responsible
The establishment of domicile for tuition purposes has
for the difference between resident and non-resident tuition.
two inseparable elements: (1) a permanent place of
habitation in Colorado and (2) intent to remain in Colorado
A student who willfully gives wrong information to
with no intent to be domiciled elsewhere. The twelve-month
evade payment of nonresident tuition shall be subject to
waiting period does not begin until both elements exist.
serious disciplinary action. The final decision regarding
Documentation of the following is part of the petitioning
tuition status rests with the President of Colorado School of
process to document physical presence: copies of rental
Mines.
arrangements, rent receipts, copy of warranty deed if
Residency Requirements
petitioner owns their personal residence property, and
A person whose legal residence is permanently estab-
verification of dates of employment. Documentation of the
lished in Colorado may continue to be classified as a
following is part of the petitioning process to document
resident student so long as such residence is maintained
intent: Colorado drivers license, motor vehicle registration
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
17

(as governed by Colorado Statute), voter registration,
a $100 late registration fee and will not receive any tuition
payment of Colorado state income taxes, ownership of
fellowships for which they might otherwise be eligible.
residential real estate property in the state (particularly if the
Students who have not registered by mail or by online Web
petitioner resides in the home), any other factor peculiar to
registration and who cannot be on campus for registration
the individual which tends to establish the necessary intent
should contact the Graduate School Office to make other
to make Colorado one’s permanent place of habitation.
arrangements before the penalty date.
Nonresident students wishing to obtain further informa-
Dropping and Adding Courses
tion on the establishment of residency or to apply for
resident status should contact the Registrar’s Office. The
Students may drop or add courses in the Registrar’s
‘Petition for In-State Tuition Classification’ is due in the
office without paying a fee during the first 11 school days of
Registrar’s Office by the first day of classes of the term the
a regular semester, the first four school days of a six-week
student is requesting resident status.
field course, or the first six school days of an eight-week
summer term.
Thesis Registration
After the 11th day of classes through the 10th week,
Students studying for the Master of Engineering degree,
continuing students may drop any course for any reason
the Master of Science degree, and the Ph.D. degree may
with a grade of W. Graduate students in their first semester
enroll for thesis credit under the course numbers 700, 701,
at CSM have through the 14th week of that semester to drop
and 703, respectively. Enrolled students must make
a course. A student must process a form and pay a $4.00 fee
satisfactory progress on their thesis research, which means
for any change in class schedule after the first 11 days of
they must make an appropriate amount of quality effort
class, except in cases beyond the student’s control or
toward completing their work. When assigning a grade, the
withdrawal from school. Forms are available in the
thesis advisor considers the student’s course load and other
Registrar’s Office.
school obligations. See also the discussion of thesis grades
After the 10th (or 14th) week, no drops are permitted
under General Regulations.
except in cases of withdrawal from school or for extenuating
Summer Registration
circumstances upon approval by the Registrar. Unsatisfac-
tory academic performance does not constitute an extenuat-
Students being directly supervised by a thesis advisor or
ing circumstance. Students receive a grade of F in courses
committee member or using any school facilities during the
which are dropped after the deadline without approval.
summer must register for at least three hours of thesis credit
and pay summer session tuition and student health center,
Auditing Courses
student center, and athletic fees. Thesis registration will not
As part of the maximum of 15 semester hours of
be required for students enrolling in courses during the
graduate work, students may enroll for no credit (NC) in a
Summer Session.
course with the permission of the instructor. Tuition charges
Continuous Registration Requirement
are the same for no credit as for credit enrollment.
and Leave of Absence
Students must enroll for no credit before the last day of
registration. The form to enroll for a course for no credit is
To remain in good standing, graduate students must
available in the Registrar’s Office. Grades of NC are
register continuously for fall and spring semesters until
awarded only if all conditions stipulated by course instruc-
completing the program of study. Summer registration is not
tors are met.
required for continuous registration.
Leaves of absence are granted only under exceptional
Registration Deadlines For
circumstances and require prior approval of the Dean of
Defense of Thesis
Graduate Studies as well as the student’s advisor and
Graduate students must be validly registered during the
department head.
term in which they defend their thesis. Sudents must
Students who wish to return to the graduate school after
complete all graduate degree requirements before the last
an unauthorized leave of absence must apply for readmis-
day of registration of a semester to avoid having to register
sion and pay a $200 readmission fee.
for that semester. Students registered for the spring semester
must complete all requirements before the last day of
Late Registration Fee
registration for the summer session or they must register for
Students have five working days at the beginning of each
either the summer or the following fall semester.
semester to complete their registration. Students who fail to
complete their registration during this time will be assessed
18
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

General Regulations
Graduate School Bulletin
all Colorado and Federal laws concerning the manufacture,
It is the responsibility of the graduate student to become
possession, sale, and use of drugs.
informed and to observe all regulations and procedures
Drug Free Schools & Communities Act
required by the program the student is pursuing. Ignorance
This policy informs CSM students of community
of a rule does not constitute a basis for waiving that rule. All
standards and potential consequences (the legal sanctions)
exceptions to the policies stated in the CSM Graduate
for using alcohol or drugs illegally.
Bulletin must be approved by the Graduate Dean. The
Firearms, Explosives, and Other Weapons
Graduate Bulletin current when a graduate student first
Covered in this policy are the general ban on campus of
enrolls gives the requirements the student must meet to
firearms, explosives, and other weapons, exceptions to the
graduate. However, a student can change to the require-
ban, and the firearm storage procedures.
ments in a later catalog published while the student is
enrolled in the graduate school.
Distribution of Literature
Given in this policy are the restrictions on distributing
Curriculum Changes
(including the selling of) literature, newspapers, and
The CSM Board of Trustees reserves the right to change
magazines on school property; the limit on distributing
any course of study or any part of the curriculum to respond
advertising or commercial material (for example, handbills);
to educational and scientific developments. No statement in
the requirements for soliciting and vending on school
this Bulletin or in the registration of any student shall be
property; and the right to picket or demonstrate on campus.
considered as a contract between Colorado School of Mines
and the student.
Unsatisfactory Academic Performance
Unsatisfactory Progress
General Policies of Student Conduct
Progress toward the successful completion of a graduate
In addition to the Dismissal Policy and the Academic
degree is deemed unsatisfactory if any one of the following
Dishonesty Policy described in detail in this section of the
conditions is met:
Graduate Bulletin, the Colorado School of Mines has a
Failure to maintain a cumulative grade-point average of
number of policies which govern student behavior on
no less than 3.0.
campus. Following is a list of those important policies with
Receipt of an In Progress-Unsatisfactory evaluation by
a brief definition or description of each. Copies of the
the student’s thesis advisor for thesis work.
complete text describing each policy are available from the
Receipt of an Unsatisfactory Progress recommendation
Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs.
from the student’s home Department. This recom-
Code of Conduct
mendation may be forwarded to the Graduate School
This policy proscribes student personal behavior, the
by the Department Chair, the student’s thesis
reasons for dismissal or suspension from school, and student
committee, or a Departmental committee charged
disciplinary action.
with this responsibility.
Academic Integrity
Students exhibiting Unsatisfactory Progress by one of
This policy defines academic integrity and academic
the grounds indicated above are placed on academic
dishonesty, and explains student responsibilities and what is
probation. With the occurrence of a second Unsatisfactory
expected of them.
Progress indication, the student shall be subject to discre-
tionary dismissal according to the procedure described
Campus Security
below. Unsatisfactory academic performance as gauged by
This policy is intended to improve security and reduce
either of the following measurements shall result in
crime on campus. It includes the publishing of campus
dismissal of a graduate student: (1) failure to pass the
crime statistics and procedures for reporting crimes.
comprehensive examination after two attempts; or (2) failure
Alcohol Use
to successfully defend the thesis after two attempts.
This policy conforms to state and local laws on alcohol
Dismissal of a graduate student based upon either of the
use, distribution, and consumption. The text restates the
above grounds shall be referred to as a mandatory dismissal.
legal drinking age, designates campus locations for
Initial Determination:
consuming alcoholic beverages, explains procedures for
Unsatisfactory performance on the part of a graduate
planning student events at which alcohol is served, and
student shall be reported to the Dean of Graduate Studies
gives the penalties for violating the policy.
and Research, in a timely manner. If the unsatisfactory
Drug Use
performance requires dismissal of the student, the Dean
Recognizing the threat to health and welfare from the use
shall expeditiously notify the student of that fact in writing.
of illegal drugs. this policy requires CSM students to obey
If the unsatisfactory performance could result in dismissal of
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
19

the student, the Dean shall discuss the matter with the
Initial Determination:
student, the student’s advisor, and, if appropriate, the
Issues regarding plagiarism or falsification of research
student’s committee. The Dean shall also review any
results shall be determined within a reasonable time by a
relevant documents prior to rendering a decision regarding
majority vote of the graduate student’s thesis committee.
dismissal. After following the above procedure, the Dean
Issues regarding cheating on examinations shall be
shall communicate his or her decision to the student in
determined within a reasonable time by the department
writing within a reasonable time.
head, division director, or program director of the affected
Appeal Procedure:
department, division, or program. Individuals charged with
Both mandatory and discretionary dismissals may be
decisionmaking authority hereunder shall discuss the
appealed by a graduate student pursuant to this procedure.
charges with all relevant witnesses and review all relevant
In order to be considered, an appeal hereunder must be: (1)
documents, as appropriate, prior to rendering any decision.
in writing; (2) contain a specific description of the matter
Appeal Procedure:
being appealed; and (3) be received by the Dean no later
All appeals hereunder shall be filed with the Dean of
than 30 days from the date upon which the student received
Graduate Studies and Research, hereinafter the Dean. In
official notification from the Dean regarding the action or
order to be considered, an appeal hereunder must be: (1) in
matter being appealed.
writing; (2) contain a specific description of the matter
Faculty Review Committee:
being appealed; and (3) be received by the Dean no later
Upon receipt of a timely appeal of a discretionary
than 30 days from the date upon which the graduate student
dismissal, the Dean shall appoint a committee of five
received official notification from CSM regarding the action
tenured faculty members to review the matter and, within a
or matter being appealed.
reasonable time, issue a written recommendation thereon to
Faculty Review Committee:
the Dean. During the course of performing this function, the
Upon receipt of a timely appeal, the Dean shall appoint a
committee shall: (1) interview the student, the student’s
committee of five tenured faculty members to review the
advisor, and, if appropriate, the studentÕs committee; (2)
matter and, within a reasonable time, issue a written
review all documentation related to the matter under
recommendation thereon to the Dean. During the course of
consideration; and (3) secure any outside expertise neces-
performing this function, the committee shall: (1) interview
sary to properly consider the appeal. Upon receipt of a
the student and the initial decisionmaker(s); (2) review all
timely appeal of a mandatory dismissal, the Dean may
documentation related to the matter under consideration;
appoint a faculty review committee to provide a recommen-
and (3) secure any outside expertise necessary to properly
dation as set forth above. Alternatively, the Dean may
consider the appeal.
personally perform the duties of the faculty review commit-
Final Decision:
tee and make a decision based thereon.
The final decision regarding all graduate student appeals
Final Decision:
hereunder and the imposition of sanctions, if appropriate,
The final decision regarding all graduate student appeals
shall rest with the Dean.
hereunder shall rest with the Dean.
Sanctions:
Resolution of Conflicts:
Any CSM student who has committed an act of academic
If a conflict or inconsistency is found to exist between
dishonesty as defined above shall be subject to the imposi-
this policy and any other provision of the CSM Graduate
tion of appropriate sanctions up to, and including, dismissal
Bulletin, the provisions of this policy shall govern the
from CSM.
resolution of such conflict or inconsistency.
Resolution of Conflicts:
Academic Dishonesty Policy
If a conflict or inconsistency is found to exist between
this policy and any other provision of the CSM Graduate
Academic Dishonesty:
Bulletin, the provisions of this policy shall govern the
Academic dishonesty means to engage in cheating or
resolution of such conflict or inconsistency.
fraudulent behavior during an academic endeavor at
Colorado School of Mines, hereinafter CSM. Academic
The Public Nature of Research
dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, the following
An advanced degree will normally be granted by
actions: (1) submission of research or writing done by
Colorado School of Mines only if the thesis describing the
another as one’s own, i.e., plagiarism; (2) falsification of
research (in a thesis-degree program) is made public
research results; and (3) giving, requesting, or utilizing
property by its being deposited in the CSM library and made
improper assistance on an examination.
available to the public immediately after it is completed.
20
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

All work described in a thesis must be done under the
Students may receive graduate credit for 300-level
supervision of the candidate’s advisory committee, and the
courses only in those interdisciplinary programs which have
thesis must state in detail all results obtained and all
been recommended by both departments and have been
methods and processes used in the research. The statements
approved by the Graduate Council before the students enroll
must be made in such a way that results may be duplicated
in the course. In that case a maximum of nine total hours of
by any competent researcher..
300- and 400-level courses will be accepted for graduate
CSM holds the copyright, but can and will assign it to a
credit.
student or a funding agency if necessary. Assignment of
Graduate Credit for Courses Taken as
copyright does not prevent a faculty member from preparing
Undergraduates
a thesis for publication providing proper credit is given to
the student.
Students can receive credit toward a graduate degree for
graduate courses taken before they enroll in an advanced
Under special circumstances the School may agree to
degree program as long as those courses were not applied to
include proprietary research in a graduate student’s thesis.
an undergraduate degree. Students must receive the prior
The nature and extent of proprietary research reported in the
approval of the Graduate Dean and the course instructor.
thesis must be agreed upon in writing by the principal
investigator, student, and Graduate Dean.
Transfer Credit
Under no circumstances will the research, thesis
Credits from Other Universities:
preparation, thesis defense, and graduation of the student be
Credits earned with grades of B or higher may be
delayed, and the thesis defense will remain open to the
accepted towards a Professional, M.S., or Ph.D. degree by
public. Denial of public access to the written thesis will be
transfer from another recognized institution if approved by
limited to a maximum of 12 months from the date of
the student’s committee and the Graduate Dean. Courses
submittal of the Statement of Work Completion form to the
transferred from another university shall not be used to
Graduate School.
calculate the student’s grade point average.
Making up Undergraduate
Credits Earned as Non-Degree Student:
If a student transfers non-degree credits to a regular
Deficiencies
graduate transcript, they all must be calculated into the
If the department or Graduate School decides that new
student’s overall GPA. Up to nine credits earned as a
students do not have the necessary background to complete
nondegree student may be transferred into the regular degree
an advanced degree, they will be required to enroll in
program if the student’s graduate committee and the
courses for which they will receive no credit towards their
Graduate Dean approve.
graduate degree, or complete supervised readings, or both.
Students are notified of their apparent deficiency areas in
Number of Transfer Credit Allows
their acceptance letter from the Graduate School or in their
Nine hours of transfer credit are allowed for thesis
first interview with their department advisor.
programs; 15 hours are allowed for non-thesis M.S.
Graduate students must attain a B average in deficiency
programs.
courses, and any student receiving a grade of D in a
Independent Study
deficiency course will be required to repeat the course.
For each semester credit hour awarded for independent
Grades for these deficiency courses are recorded on the
study a student is expected to invest approximately 25 hours
student’s transcript, become part of the student’s permanent
of effort in educational activity involved. To register for
record, and are calculated into the overall GPA. Students
independent study or for a “special topics” course, a student
whose undergraduate records are deficient should remove
should get from the Registrar’s Office the form provided for
all deficiencies as soon as possible after they enroll for
that purpose, have it completed by the instructor involved
graduate studies.
and appropriate department/division head, and return it to
Graduate Students in Undergraduate
the Registrar’s Office.
Courses
Course Grades, Thesis Grades, and
Students may receive graduate credit for a maximum of
Probation
nine semester hours of department-approved 400-level
Regular and provisional degree graduate students must
course work not taken to remove deficiencies upon the
maintain a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0 out
recommendation of the graduate committee and the approval
of a possible 4.0 in both graduate and undergraduate
of the Graduate Dean.
courses. Students who fail to maintain a 3.0 average will be
subject to the Unsatisfactory Academic Performance policy
elsewhere in this section.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
21

A grade of C may be acceptable for credit toward a
that graduation, anc cannot be assured inclusion in the
graduate degree only if the student’s cumulative grade-point
graduation program.
average is 3.0 or higher and if 80 percent of the grade points
All graduating students must officially check out of
are earned from grades of B or better. A grade of D is not
School, including paying the mandatory graduation fee.
acceptable towards graduate credit.
Checkout cards may be obtained from the Graduate Office
For thesis credits, students receive a grade of In
and must be completed and returned by the established
Progress-Satisfactory or In Progress-Unsatisfactory based
deadline.
on the thesis advisor’s evaluation of their thesis work while
M.S. and Ph.D. students must complete the checkout
they are continuously enrolled. When the thesis is com-
process within 45 calendar days after a successful defense of
pleted, the student receives a grade of M-Completed.
thesis. Failure to comply with this policy may require a
Students receiving an In Progress-Unsatisfactory thesis
redefense of thesis. Exceptions to this rule are granted only
grade are placed on academic probation by the Graduate
upon request to the Dean of Graduate Studies. Students
Dean. The student’s advisor in consultation with the
must register for the next term unless the graduation
student’s graduate committee may give the student a second
checkout process is completed by the last day of registration
In Progress-Unsatisfactory grade, and if that happens, the
for the following semester.
student’s graduate studies at CSM may be terminated, if the
The awarding of a degree is contingent upon the
Graduate Dean approves.
student’s successful completion of all program requirements
Grade Appeal Process
before the date of graduation. Students who fail to graduate
Student appeals on grades are to be heard by the Faculty
at the time originally anticipated must reapply for the next
Affairs Committee of the CSM Faculty Senate. The appeal
graduation before the appropriate deadline date stated in the
process has the following steps:
Graduate Handbook.
1. The student should attempt to work out the dispute
Students who have completed all of their degree
with the faculty member responsible for the course.
requirements before the specific graduation date, but who
2. If the student is not satisfied with the results of Step 1,
have not applied for graduation can, if necessary, request a
she or he must appeal in writing to the Department
letter from the Graduate Office certifying the completion of
Head/ Division Director, who will appoint a faculty
their programs. The student should apply for the next
member who is familiar with the course material to
graduation, and the diploma will show the date of that
serve as adjudicator.
graduation.
3. If the student is not satisfied with the results of Step 2,
Graduation exercises are held in December and May.
she or he must notify the Department Head/Division
Students eligible to graduate at these times are expected to
Director in writing, and the Department Head/Division
attend their respective graduation exercises. Students may
Director will appoint an ad hoc committee from within
not, under any circumstances, attend graduation exercises
the Department to serve as adjudicator.
before completing all degree requirements.
4. If the student is not satisfied with the results of Step 3,
Diplomas, transcripts, and letters of completion will not
he or she must submit a written statement of the case
be released by the School for any student or graduate who
for the appeal to the Vice President for Academic
has an unsettled obligation of any kind to the School.
Affairs. The VPAA will obtain written statements from
the faculty member who gave the grade, from the
faculty member appointed in Step 2, and from the
Withdrawing from School
faculty committee appointed in Step 3. The VPAA
To officially withdraw from CSM, a graduate student
then will submit all statements to the Faculty Affairs
must process a withdrawal form through the Graduate
Committee for investigation and decision. The
Office. When the form is completed, the student will receive
decision of the Faculty Affairs Committee is final.
grades of W in courses in progress. If the student does not
Graduation
officially withdraw the course grades are recorded as F’s.
Leaving school without having paid tuition and fees will
All students expecting to graduate must submit a
result in the encumbrance of the transcript.
graduation application to the Office of Graduate
Studies.
Nondegree Students
Graduation application deadlines are scheduled well in
A nondegree student is one who has not applied to
advance of the date of Commencement to allow time for
pursue a degree program at CSM but wishes to take courses
engraving diplomas and for printing graduation invitations
regularly offered on campus. Nondegree students register
and programs. Students who submit applications after the
for courses after degree students have registered. Such
stated deadline cannot be guaranteed a diploma dated for
students may take any course for which they have the
22
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

prerequisites as listed in the CSM Bulletin or have the
removed within the four weeks, the Incomplete will become
permission of the instructor. Transcripts or evidence of the
an F unless the Registrar extends the time upon the written
prerequisites are required.
recommendation of the instructor granting the Incomplete.
Progress Grade.
Veterans’ Benefits
A student may receive a grade of In Progress for
Colorado School of Mines is approved by the Colorado
independent study courses extending for more than one
State Approving Agency for Veteran Benefits under chapters
semester. The progress grade has no point value and is used
30, 31, 32, 35, and 1606. Graduate students must register
only for multi-semester courses, such as thesis or certain
for and maintain eight hours of graduate work in any
special project courses, or for special sections of one-
semester to be certified as a full-time student for full-time
semester courses which are spread over two terms. In such
benefits. Any hours taken under the full-time category will
cases, the student receives a grade of PRG, which indicates
decrease the benefits to 3/4 time, 1/2 time, or tuition
that the work is not completed. The independent study grade
payment only.
is replaced by a letter grade when the course work is
Students receiving benefits must report all changes in
completed.
hours, addresses, marital status, or dependents to the
The student must register again in the same course in the
Veterans’ Counseling Office located in the Registrar’s
next semester of attendance. If a progress grade is received
Office as soon as possible to avoid overpayment or
for a course taken in the second semester of the school year,
underpayment. Veterans must see the Veterans’ Counselor
the student may, with the permission of the department
each semester to be certified for any benefits for which they
head, reregister in that course in the summer session, in
may be eligible. In order for veterans to continue to receive
which case the letter grade must be given at the end of the
benefits, they must make satisfactory progress as defined by
summer session.
CSM.
NC Grade.
Grading System
For special reasons and with the instructor’s permission,
Grades.
a student may register in a course for no credit (NC). To
have the grade NC appear on the transcript, the student must
When a student registers in a course, one of the follow-
enroll at registration time as a NC student in the course and
ing grades will appear on the academic record. Grades are
comply with all conditions stipulated by the course
based on the level of performance and represent the extent
instructor. If a student registered as NC fails to satisfy all
of the student’s demonstrated mastery of the material listed
conditions, no record of this registration in the course will
in the course outline and achievement of the stated course
be made.
objectives. These are CSM’s grade symbols and their
values:
Quality Hours and Quality Points.
A
Excellent
For graduation a student must successfully complete a
B
Good
certain number of required semester hours and must
C
Satisfactory
maintain grades at a satisfactory level. The system for
D
Poor (lowest passing)
expressing the quality of a student’s work is based on
F
Failed
quality points and quality hours. The grade A represents
S
Satisfactory, C or better, used at mid-term
four quality points, B three, C two, D one, F none. The
U
Unsatisfactory, below C, used at mid-term
number of quality points earned in any course is the number
WI
Involuntarily Withdrawn
of semester hours assigned to that course multiplied by the
W
Withdrew, No Penalty
numerical value of the grade received. The quality hours
T
Transfer Credit
earned are the number of semester hours in which grades of
PRG In Progress
A, B, C, D, or F are awarded. To compute a grade-point
PRU In Progress Unsatisfactory
average, the number of cumulative quality hours is divided
INC
Incomplete
into the cumulative quality points earned. Grades of W, WI,
NC
Not for Credit
INC, PRG, PRU, or NC are not counted in quality hours.
Z
Grade not yet Submitted
Semester Hours.
M
Thesis Completed
The number of times a class meets during a week (for
Incomplete Grade.
lecture, recitation, or laboratory) determines the number of
If a graduate student fails to complete a course because
semester hours assigned to that course. Class sessions are
of illness or other reasonable excuse, the student receives a
normally 50 minutes long and represent one hour of credit
grade of Incomplete, a temporary grade which indicates a
for each hour meeting. Two to four hours of laboratory work
deficiency in the quantity of work done.
per week are equivalent to 1-semester hour of credit. For the
A graduate student must remove all Incomplete grades
average student, each hour of lecture and recitation requires
within the first four weeks of the first semester of attendance
at least two hours of preparation.
following that in which the grade was received. If not
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
23

Grade-Point Averages.
CSM policy, which is available from the Registrar’s
Grade-point averages are calculated, recorded, and
Office, explains in detail the procedures to be used by the
reported to three decimal places for whatever purposes those
school to comply with the provisions of the Privacy Act.
averages are used.
Students should be aware that such personal information as
names, addresses, telephone numbers, date of birth, major
Access to Student Records
field of study, degrees awarded, last school attended, dates
In compliance with Article 99.6 of the U.S. Department
of attendance, class, honors, and athletic participation is
of Education regulations under the Family Education Rights
considered directory information which may be released by
and Privacy Act, Colorado School of Mines notifies its
the school unless the student notifies CSM in writing before
students each year in the Fall Schedule of Courses of their
the end of the first two weeks of the fall semester the student
rights to inspect and review their education records, to
is registered that he or she does not want that information
correct inaccurate or misleading information through
disclosed.
informal and formal hearings, and to prevent disclosure of
Students can file complaints with the Family Educational
individual student records.
Rights and Privacy Act Office about alleged failures by the
school to comply with the Act.
24
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Tuition , Fees, Financial Assistance
Tuition and fees at CSM are kept at a minimum,
Graduation Fee
consistent with the cost of instruction and the amount of
(includes thesis binding and other expenses)
state funds appropriated to the School.
Professional
$130.00
The following rates are in effect for 1999-2000.
Masters (Thesis)
$235.00
Increases can be expected in subsequent years.
Masters (Non-Thesis)
$145.00
Doctors
$265.00
Tuition
Student Health Plan*
Academic and Field Courses
Fall or
Summer
Sem Hrs
Resident
Non-res
Spring/Summer
Only
Up to 10
$154/sem hr.
$491/sem hr.
Student only
$395.00
131.66
10 or more
$2,308/sem
$7,358/sem
Spouse only
1202.50
400.84
The above are applicable to all academic periods and to
Child(ren) only
812.50
270.84
both graduate and undergraduate courses.
Spouse & Child(ren)
1985.50
661.84
Other Courses and Programs
The Spring Semester includes Summer Session coverage
Executive Master of Science Program
through August.
Environmental Science & Engineering - $16,500
Student Fees and Descriptions
Fees
All students enrolled for 7.0 semester hours or more are
Paying fees entitles students to a ticket to all athletic
charged the following mandatory, non-waivable fees by
events; subscriptions to both the Oredigger, the weekly
CSM. Some of the fees listed are not relevant for graduate
newspaper published by students, and the Prospector, the
students.
student yearbook; use of the Student Health Center and
Health Center Fee: Revenues support physician/medical
Student Center; and participation in student activities.
services to students. $36.00/term
At the end of this subsection on Fees are listed and
Associated Students Fee: Revenues support student
described all possible fees students are charged at CSM.
organizations/events/activities, i.e., newspaper, home-
Regular Semester and Summer Term.
coming, E-Days. $52.00/term
During a regular semester, students taking fewer than
Athletic Fee: Revenues support intercollegiate athletics and
seven credit hours are not required to pay student fees. Any
entitles student entrance to all scheduled athletic events
such student wishing to take part in student activities and
and use of the facilities. $41.00/term
receive student privileges may do so by paying full semester
(or session) fees.
Student Assistance Fee: Funds safety awareness programs,
training seminars for abuse issues, campus lighting, and
The fees are as follows:
parking facility maintenance. $12.50/term
Regular
Summer
On-campus On-campus
Student Services Fee: Revenues support bonded indebted-
Sem**
Fld Term*-*
Summer
Thesis
ness; other student services, i.e., Placement/Co-Op,
Research
Health Ctr***
$45.00*
$17.00*
$22.50*
$18.00*
Student Activities, Student Life, Student Development
Center, and services provided in the student center.
ASCSM
54.00
$110.00/term
Athletics
41.00
20.50
20.50
Student Assist.
12.50
Technology Fee: Funds technology infrastructure and
equipment for maximum student use. The School
Student Svs
110.00*
41.00*
55.00
55.00*
matches the student fee revenues dollar for dollar.
Technology Fee
35.00
17.50
17.50
$35.00/term
Total
$297.50
$58.00
$115.50
$108.50
All degree students enrolled for 7.0 semester hours or
*Fee is per term.
more are charged the following mandatory, waivable fees by
**Students carrying 7 or more credit hours.
CSM:
**Off-campus field term arrangements and payment for
Student Health Insurance: Revenues contribute to a self
transportation, food, lodging, and other expenses must be
insurance pool. $395.00/FY 97-98. At publication,
made with the department concerned. For example, Geology
FY99-00 rates had not been determined.
Field Camp costs, including camping and materials, are
approximately $135.
Students pay the following fees based on enrollment in
***A major medical insurance program is mandatory
specific courses or other circumstances:
unless proof of other insurance is provided.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
25

Late Insurance Waiver Fee: Revenues provide funds for
Payments: CSM must repay to the bank any student funds
the administration of the health insurance program.
for which a student becomes ineligible. Funds collected
$40.00
from the student replace those advances. N/A
Transcript Fee: Revenues support the cost of providing
Grants and Scholarships (Recalled): When students
transcripts. $2.00/term
become ineligible for grant, loan, or scholarship money
Yearbook Fee: Revenues support the publication of the
which they have received, the recall of those funds are
CSM yearbook, the Prospector. $30.00/yr.
reflected. N/A
Add/Drop Charge: Revenues offset the cost of processing
Return Check: The amount of a studentÕs check which has
Add/Drop registration. $4.00 each
been returned for insufficient funds.
Late Registration Fee: Revenues offset the cost of
Return Check Charge: Revenues offset bank fees for
processing late registration. Assessed after 5 days.
returned checks. $20.00
$100.00 (graduate students)
Phonemail Fee: Assessed to students living in the residence
Late Payment Penalty: Revenues offset billing costs for
halls who request voice mail services. (Optional.)
late tuition payments. 1.5% of outstanding balance
The Colorado School of Mines does not automatically
Damage Charges (Housing): Revenues are used to repair
assess any optional fees or charges.
or replace damaged items/rooms in CSM rental units.
Note: Graduate students who register for undergraduate
Residence halls - $50.00; Mines Park & Prospector
courses to satisfy deficiencies may be assessed the same fee
Village - $400.00
that an undergraduate student would pay.
Refrigerator/Microwave Permits: Revenues are used to
offset extra electrical usage consumed by residence hall
Payments and Refunds
occupants who choose to bring these personal items.
$15.00 per permit
Payment Information.
A student is expected to complete the registration
Bike Locker Rental: Revenues provide and maintain locker
process, including the payment of tuition and fees, before
facilities for resident students. $45.00/term
attending class. Students should mail their payments to:
Residence Hall Room Charge: Revenues support mainte-
Cashier Colorado School of Mines 1500 Illinois St. Golden,
nance, improvements, and residence hall administration.
CO 80401-1869 or pay at the Cashier’s Office in
See page 10
Guggenheim Hall. Please write your social security number
Meal Plan Charges: Revenues provide meals and maintain
on payment.
cafeteria equipment for the students on meal plans. See
Late Payment Penalties.
page 10
A penalty will be assessed against a student if payment is
Residence Hall Association Fee: Revenues support social
not received in full by the official day of registration. The
activities for the residence halls. $35.00/year
penalty is described in the schedule of courses for each
semester. If payment is not completed by the sixth week of
Housing and Rental Fees: Rental fees for housing rentals
class, the student may be officially withdrawn from classes.
maintain the rental properties, pay utility charges,
maintain and improve properties. See Housing page 8
Financial Responsibility.
Tuition Paid-Out: CSM has advanced tuition to another
Registration for classes at CSM implies an obligation by
school. Charges are reimbursement request for those
the student to meet all related financial responsibilities in a
advances. Only for sponsored students - paid by sponsor
timely manner. Students who do not fulfill their financial
obligations according to published deadlines are subject to
Books/Supplies Fees: Advances made to or on behalf of the
the following: late payment penalties accrued on any
students. Charges are reimbursement only. Only for
outstanding balance, and the withholding of transcripts. Past
sponsored students - paid by sponsor
due accounts will be turned over to Colorado Central
Computer Usage Fees: Revenues assist in providing
Collection Services in accordance with Colorado law.
institutional/research computing services. $500.00/term -
Collection costs will be added to the student’s account, and
paid by sponsor
delinquencies may be reported to national credit bureaus.
Refunds or Advances: These charges are simply reimburse-
Encumbrances.
ment requests for funds advanced to or on behalf of the
A student will not be permitted to register for future
student. Funds received merely replace those advances.
classes, to graduate, or to get an official transcript of his
N/A
academic record while indebted in any way to CSM.
26
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Refunds.
Students are also expected to make full use of any
Refunds for tuition and fees are made according to the
resources available, including personal and loan funds, to
following schedule: Withdrawal from School
cover expenses, and the School can offer some students
financial aid through graduate research and teaching
100%
First 11 school days in a semester
assistantships and through industry, state, and federal
First 6 school days in an 8-week summer term
fellowships.
First 4 school days in a 6-week field session
Purpose of Financial Aid.
60%
School days 12-16 in a semester
The Graduate School’s limited financial aid is used
School days 7-9 in an 8-week summer term
School days 5-6 in a 6-week field session
1. To give equal access to graduate study by assisting
40%
School days 17-21 in a semester
students with limited personal resources;
School days 10-12 in an 8-week summer term
2. To compensate graduate students who teach and do
School days 7-8 in a 6-week field session
research;
20%
School days 22-26 in a semester
3. To give an incentive to exceptional students who can
School days 13-15 in an 8-week summer term
provide academic leadership for continually improving
School days 9-10 in a 6-week field session
graduate programs.
No refund: After first 26 semester school days
Employment Restrictions and Agreements.
After first 15 8-week summer school days
Students who are employed full time or who are enrolled
After first 10 6-week field session days
part time are not eligible for financial aid through the
Room and board refunds are prorated to the date of
Graduate School.
checkout from student housing. Arrangements must be made
Students who are awarded assistantships must sign an
with the Housing Office.
appointment contract, which gives the terms of appointment
Student health insurance charges are not refundable. The
and specifies the amount of work required. Graduate
insurance remains in effect for the entire semester.
assistants who hold regular appointments are expected to
devote all of their efforts to their educational program and
Thesis Refunds:
may not be otherwise employed without the written
Students registered for thesis hours on a full-time basis
permission of their supervisor and the Graduate Dean.
are entitled to thesis refunds after the check-out process is
Students with assistantships during the academic year must
completed. Students registered for required courses at the
be registered as full time; during the summer session they
time of check-out do not qualify for thesis refunds. The
must be registered for a minimum of three credit hours.
schedule for determining thesis refunds is this:
Aid Application Forms.
Percent
New students interested in applying for financial aid are
Completion date within
refunded
encouraged to apply early. Financial aid forms are included
4 weeks after beginning
75 of semester
in Graduate School application packets and may be filled
8 weeks after beginning
50 of semester
out and returned with the other application papers.
12 weeks after beginning
25 of semester
Industrial Fellowships.
No refund is made after 12 weeks, and no refund is made
Fellowships are available to Colorado School of Mines
for students enrolled for fewer than 15 semester hours
graduate students from the following sources:
during the regular school year or those enrolled for only
American Metals Climax, Inc. (AMAX);
thesis hours in summer session. If tuition was paid from a
American Smelting and Refining Company (ASARCO);
CSM fund source, the refund will be made to the School’s
Arco;
account.
Bethlehem Steel;
Financial Assistance for Graduate Studies
Boettcher Foundation;
Graduate study is a considerable investment of time,
Exxon;
energy, and money by serious students who expect a
Getty;
substantial return not only in satisfaction but also in future
earnings. Applicants are expected to weigh carefully the
Gulf Oil Corporation;
investment they are willing to make against expected
Hui Foundation;
benefits before applying for admission.
International Business Machines (IBM);
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
27

Mobil Oil Company;
Colorado Graduate Fellowships.
Phillips Petroleum Company;
The Dean of Graduate Studies awards Colorado
Shell Companies Foundation, Inc.;
Fellowships based on the student’s academic performance.
St. Joe Minerals Corporation;
Students need to be recommended by their departments.
Sohio;
Graduate Student Loans.
Standard Oil of California (Chevron);
Need-based federal and CSM student loans are available
Standard Oil of Indiana (AMOCO);
for graduate students who need additional funding beyond
Tenneco Oil Company;
their own resources and any assistantships or fellowships
Texaco Inc.;
they may receive. The CSM Graduate Financial Aid
Application and the free application for Federal Student Aid
United Bank of Denver; and the
must be completed to apply for these loan funds.
Viola Vestal Coulter Foundation, Inc.
United States citizenship may be required to receive
Forms are available from the Financial Aid Office, which
these fellowships.
handles student loans. The Financial Aid Office telephone
number is 303-273-3301.
28
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Graduate Degrees and Requirements
Colorado School of Mines offers graduate studies
is admitted, Professional degree course credits may be
leading to a post-baccalaureate Professional degree, thesis
transferred if the department and the Graduate Dean
or non-thesis Master of Science degrees, a Master of
approve.
Engineering degree, and a Doctor of Philosophy degree.
Grades and Time Limitation
This section describes each degree and explains the
Academic grade-point requirements are the same as
requirements for earning each one from CSM.
those for the M.S. degree— see the General Regulations
Professional Degree
section above. All work toward this degree must be
completed within five years.
The CSM Graduate School offers a post-baccalaureate
Professional degree program emphasizing graduate level
Master’s Degree Programs - General
work. Students working toward this degree have all the
Graduate study at CSM can lead to one of a number of
rights and responsibilities of other graduate students.
Master’s degrees, depending on the interests of the student.
This program is intended for people who have been
The number of required semester hours of course work for
employed professionally and desire to return to school to
the degree depends on whether or not the student intends to
enhance their education, or who wish to change their career
write a thesis or engineering report. All M.S. degree
in the resource industries. It is also available to recent B.S.
programs share the same requirements for grades, full-time
graduates who wish to further their education in these fields
and part-time status, transfer credits, advising committees,
without enrolling in a regular graduate program.
minor programs, and admission to candidacy.
Departments Offering the Degree
Five-Year Combined B.S./M.S. Programs
Professional degrees are offered by the Departments of
There are a number of departments that offer five-year
Geology and Geological Engineering, Geophysics, Mining
programs leading to both the B.S. and M.S. degrees.
Engineering, and Petroleum Engineering. Each department
Consult the Graduate Office for information on programs
has its own specific course requirements for the Professional
and requirements.
degree, and students are encouraged to check with the
Grades and Time Limitation
appropriate department or the Graduate Degree Programs
M.S. degree students must maintain a cumulative grade-
section of this Bulletin for these requirements.
point average of at least 3.0 out of a possible 4.0 in both
Program Requirements and Structure
graduate and undergraduate courses. Other details on grades
The Professional degree program requires a minimum of
and academic probation are given in the General Regula-
30 hours of additional course work beyond the Bachelor of
tions section above.
Science degree. Professional degree students must take a
Minor Programs
minimum of 15 credit hours as a registered Professional
Students may choose to have a minor program at the
degree student at CSM.
M.S. level, but the minor program may not be taken in the
The course of study can be structured to meet the needs
major department. A designated minor requires a minimum
of each student, but the department and the Graduate Dean
of nine semester hours of course work. See also the required
must approve the student’s program during the first semester
total program hours listed under each program below.
of enrollment in the program.
If a minor program is declared, a member of the minor
Continuing Study for Master’s or Ph.D.
department serves on the student’s advising committee, and
Even though the Professional degree is intended to be a
the name of the minor will be the name of the minor
final degree, students may transfer from the Professional to
department or other academic program approved by the
a M.S. degree program. To make this transfer, students must
Graduate Council and will appear on the transcript.
apply for the M.S. or Ph.D. program using the normal
Admission to Candidacy
application procedures and be admitted to the department.
During the semester prior to completion of the program,
Applying Credits
the M.S. student submits to the Graduate School an
Course credits taken under the Professional degree
application for Admission to Candidacy. This application
program may be applied to the M.S. degree if the depart-
must be approved by the department head and the M.S.
ment and the Graduate Dean approve.
committee and should contain a complete list of courses
A student who holds a M.S. degree and who is working
(completed, in progress, and proposed) being used toward
towards a Professional degree at the Colorado School of
the degree, including deficiency, transfer, and graduate-level
Mines may apply to the Doctoral program following the
credits.
normal application and admission procedures. If the student
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
29

In a thesis program, Admission to Candidacy must be
on all responsibilities of the academic members (that is,
granted before a student can defend the thesis. Any changes
advising the student on technical matters, reading and
in course program listed on the Admission to Candidacy
critiquing the thesis, attending committee meetings and oral
must be approved by the advising committee, department
examinations, and voting on such examinations).
head, and Graduate School.
If a thesis co-advisor is assigned, the M.S. committee
Master of Engineering
must have at least four members from the home or an allied
department. When appropriate and desirable, faculty
The Master of Engineering Program places more
members outside the student’s home department may serve
emphasis on engineering than does the Master of Science
as the thesis advisor. In that case, a co-advisor must also be
program. Requirements for the Master of Engineering
selected from the student’s home department.
degree include all requirements for the Master of Science
degree with thesis except that students write an engineering
Thesis advisors must be full-time members of the CSM
report instead of a Master’s thesis.
faculty and must hold the rank of professor, associate
professor, assistant professor, research professor, associate
Currently the Master of Engineering degree is offered in
research professor or assistant research professor. When
chemical engineering and petroleum refining, engineering
desired, adjunct professors and off-campus representatives
systems, geological engineering, geophysical engineering,
may serve as co-advisors.
metallurgical and materials engineering, mining engineer-
ing, and petroleum engineering.
Students who choose to have a minor program at the
M.S. level must select a minor representative to serve on the
Required Credits
thesis committee. Minor representatives must be full-time
A minimum of 24 semester hours of acceptable course
members of the CSM faculty.
work plus the engineering report are usually required for the
Shortly after its appointment, the committee meets with
Master of Engineering degree. At least 15 semester hours of
the student to hear a presentation of a proposed course of
course work plus engineering report must be taken at
study and thesis topic. The committee and student must
Colorado School of Mines as a registered graduate student.
agree on a satisfactory program. The thesis advisor then
All regulations on grades and time limits, credit transfer,
assumes the primary responsibility of monitoring the
minor programs, advising, and candidacy are the same as
program and directing the thesis.
those for the Master of Science degree with thesis.
Thesis and Thesis Defense
Master of Science - Thesis
Each candidate for the Master of Science degree with
Required Credits
thesis must write a thesis acceptable to the committee,
department, and the Graduate Dean. The student must first
A minimum of 24 semester hours of acceptable course
receive committee approval of the written thesis proposal at
work plus the M.S. thesis are usually required for the Master
least one semester before the thesis defense.
of Science degree. At least 15 semester hours of course
work plus thesis must be taken at Colorado School of Mines
During the final semester of studies each candidate must
as a registered graduate student.
pass an oral defense of thesis, which may cover course work
as well as the thesis. The oral defense of thesis must be open
The total number of hours required for the overall
to the public and must be scheduled at least one week in
graduate program will be left to the discretion of the
advance of the defense date by using the Thesis Defense
student’s advising committee, but major departments may
Request form available from the Graduate School.
specify that a minimum number of semester hours up to 24
hours of course work be taken in their department.
After approval of the first draft by the thesis advisor, the
candidate submits copies of it to other members of the
Thesis Committee
committee for their concurrence. After the thesis has been
The Graduate Dean approves a thesis committee upon
revised, it is copied and distributed to the committee for
recommendation from the student, thesis advisor, and
final reading at least one week before the oral defense.
academic department head. An M.S. thesis committee
consists of at least three voting members who represent the
Two negative votes will constitute failure regardless of
student’s area of study.
the number of committee members at the defense of thesis
for the master’s degree. A second failure to defend the thesis
Of those committee members, two must be from the
satisfactorily following an initial failure will result in
home or an allied department. Off-campus members can be
automatic termination of the graduate program. In either
assigned to the committee in addition to the regular
case of pass or failure, members voting in the negative may
committee members. Off-campus members are either ex-
file a report on why they voted to fail. A written statement
officio or voting members, and voting members must take
indicating the reasons for failure of the defense of thesis
30
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

examination is prepared by the committee chairperson and
Required Credits
given to the student, with copies to the committee, depart-
The minimum credit hour requirement for the Ph.D. is
ment, and Graduate School. In case of failure of this
90 hours beyond the bachelor’s degree, of which the Ph.D.
examination, the re-examination must be scheduled at least
thesis shall be no fewer than 30 hours.
one week in advance.
Minor Programs
Upon passing the oral defense of thesis the student
All doctoral candidates except those in the Materials
makes any corrections in the thesis and submits the final
Science and Geochemistry programs must take a minor
corrected copy to the Graduate Office for format approval.
program of study in addition to the major field of emphasis.
Format instructions are available in the Graduate Office and
This program of at least 12 semester hours is intended to
should be obtained before beginning to write the thesis.
provide breadth of knowledge in support of the studentÕs
Following format approval the student will submit six
principal research interests.
copies (or seven copies if the student has a co-advisor) of
Whenever possible the minor should include course
the printed thesis to the Library Preservation Unit.
work in departments outside the major department, and the
M.S. students must complete the graduate checkout
course sequence, which must be approved by the student’s
process within 45 calendar days after the successful defense
doctoral committee and department head, should be well-
of thesis. A more detailed explanation of this policy can be
organized and sufficient to define preparation in a secondary
found in the General Regulations scetion of this Bulletin
field.
under Graduation.
Transfer Credit
Master of Science— Non-Thesis
Graduate courses from another recognized institution
In the non-thesis M.S. program students do not research
may be accepted for transfer toward the doctorate if the
and write a thesis as part of their required program but
student achieved a grade of B or better in those courses and
instead take more semester hours of course work. Students
if the student’s doctoral committee and the Graduate Dean
in this program are advised by a faculty advisor instead of a
approve. Courses transferred from another institution are not
thesis committee, and they must meet all candidacy
used to calculate the student’s grade-point average.
requirements except the ones about the thesis.
Doctoral Qualifying Examination
Non-thesis M.S. degrees are offered in Chemical
Each department is authorized to administer a qualifying
Engineering and Petroleum Refining, Environmental
examination to all students entering a doctoral program.
Science and Engineering, Materials Science, Mathematical
This examination, which does not replace the doctoral
and Computer Sciences, Mineral Economics, Mining, and
comprehensive examinations, is especially important for
Petroleum Engineering.
students who have obtained their master’s degree at another
institution.
Candidates for the non-thesis M.S. degree must complete
all requirements for the degree within five years after
In general, students who fail this examination will not be
entering the Graduate School. Time spent on approved
permitted to continue for the doctorate. Normally, the
leaves of absence is included in the five-year time limit.
examination is given after the student has completed two or
three semesters of full-time graduate study beyond the
Required Credits:
baccalaureate.
CSM non-thesis M.S. programs generally require 36
semester hours of course work, although the exact total
Campus Residence Requirement
varies by department. Students can transfer up to 15 hours
Students pursuing graduate degrees shall be in full-time
in non-thesis programs. Students must follow the require-
residence at least two semesters while graduate students at
ments of their departments.
CSM. To be full-time, students must enroll for a minimum
of 15 semester hours during the semester. The Dean of
Doctor of Philosophy
Graduate Studies may grant exceptions upon the recommen-
Course work requirements for the Ph.D. degree are
dation of the studentÕs home department or Ph.D. thesis
established by the major department, and the specific
committee.
program of study for each student is approved by the
Rate of Progress
doctoral committee and Graduate Dean. The thesis must be
The doctoral student, regardless of employment, must
taken at the Colorado School of Mines. Specific course
register for at least three hours each fall and spring semester
work requirements are stated in the section below giving
for a total of six semester hours each year without interrup-
Graduate Degree Programs by Department.
tion unless a leave of absence is obtained from the Graduate
School.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
31

Doctoral Thesis Committee
If the student fails the comprehensive examination, a re-
The Doctoral Committee, appointed by the Graduate
examination may be given on recommendation of the
Dean upon recommendation of the department, has at least
examining committee and approval of the Graduate Dean.
five voting members, and at least three of the committee
The student may be re-examined only once.
members must be from the home or an allied department.
The examining committee must make a written report to
The Doctoral Committee must also have at least one
the Graduate Dean setting forth the results of the compre-
representative from the minor field and a member at large
hensive examination.
who is assigned by the Graduate School. Off campus
Admission to Candidacy
members can be assigned to the committee in addition to the
After passing the comprehensive examination, the
regular committee members. Off campus members are either
student must submit to the Graduate School an application
ex-officio or voting members. Voting members must assume
for Admission to Candidacy. This application must be
all responsibilities of the academic members (i.e., advising
reviewed and signed by the department head and the
the students on technical matters, reading and critiquing the
Doctoral Committee and should contain a complete list of
thesis, attending committee meetings and oral examinations,
courses (completed, in progress, and proposed) being
and voting on such examinations).
presented toward the degree. Admission to Candidacy must
Thesis advisors must be full-time members of the CSM
be granted before the student is permitted to defend the
faculty and must hold the rank of professor, associate
thesis.
professor, assistant professor, research professor, associate
Thesis and Thesis Defense
research professor, or assistant research professor. When
The doctoral thesis must show original research of
desired, adjunct professors and off-campus representatives
excellent quality in a suitable technical field, and it must
may serve as co-advisors.
exhibit satisfactory literary merit.
If a thesis co-advisor is assigned, an additional member
The candidate and advisor together select the subject of
must be added from the home or an allied department. When
the thesis, and then the student submits a written thesis
appropriate and desirable, faculty members outside the
proposal to the committee, who must approve the proposal
student’s home department may serve as the thesis advisor.
at least one semester before the thesis defense.
In that case, a co-advisor must be selected from the student’s
home department.
The thesis advisor is responsible for supervising the
research work and consulting with other Doctoral Commit-
All doctoral candidates, except those in the Materials
tee members on the progress of the work. Since the Doctoral
Science and Geochemistry program, must select a minor
Committee must approve the final thesis, the thesis advisor
representative to serve on the thesis committee. Minor
must consult with the committee on any major change in the
representatives must be full-time members of the CSM
nature of the work. After approval of the first draft by the
faculty.
thesis advisor, the candidate submits copies of it to other
Shortly after its appointment, the Doctoral Committee
members of the committee for their concurrence.
meets with the student to hear the presentation of a proposed
After the thesis has been revised, it is copied and
course of study and thesis subject. The thesis advisor then
distributed to the committee for final reading at least one
assumes the primary responsibility of monitoring the
week before the oral defense. The oral defense must be open
program, directing the thesis, arranging comprehensive
to the public and must be scheduled at least one week in
examinations, and scheduling the thesis defense with the
advance of the defense date.
Graduate Office.
Two negative votes from the Doctoral Committee
Comprehensive Examination
constitute failure of the oral defense of thesis regardless of
The student must satisfactorily complete an examination
the number of committee members at the defense of thesis
covering all phases of major and minor fields at least six
for the doctoral degree. If the student fails again to defend
months before the convocation at which the candidate
the thesis satisfactorily following an initial failure, his or her
expects to receive a degree. This examination in the major
graduate program is terminated. In either case of pass or
and minor fields is a series of written examinations and an
failure, members voting in the negative may file a report on
oral examination. The major department or interdisciplinary
why they voted to fail. A written statement indicating the
program establishes the guidelines governing the structure
reasons for failure of the defense of thesis examination is
of the examining committee and the administration and
prepared by the committee chairperson of the oral examina-
grading of the comprehensive examinations.
tion and submitted to the student, with copies to the
committee, department, and Graduate School. In case of
32
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

failure of this examination, the re-examination must be
Doctoral students must complete the graduation
scheduled at least one week in advance.
checkout process within 45 calendar days after the success-
ful defense of thesis. A more detailed explanation of this
If the student passes the oral defense of thesis, the
policy can be found in the General Regulations section of
student makes any corrections in the thesis and submits the
this Bulletin under Graduation.
final corrected copy to the Graduate Office for format
approval. The student then submits six (or seven) copies of
Each semester the Graduate School provides an official
the approved printed thesis to the Library Preservation Unit.
schedule of deadline dates for defense of thesis, format
approval, and submission of final copies.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
33

Graduate Degree Programs and
Description of Courses
In addition to the general degree requirements described
Required Curriculum:
in the previous pages, the following specific department,
Master of Science Program For Students with Non-
division, or program requirements must also be met:
Engineering Degrees:
The Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining
Chemical Engineering and Petroleum
department recognizes that there are a number of well
Refining
qualified students desiring to enter the field of chemical
ROBERT M. BALDWIN, Professor and Department Head
engineering from the scientific and other engineering
ANNETTE L. BUNGE, Professor
disciplines. To accommodate these students, the department
JAMES F. ELY, Professor
has formulated a two-year master of science program open
RONALD L. MILLER, Professor
to qualified students with undergraduate science and
M. SAMI SELIM, Professor
engineering degrees. The program must be adjusted
E. DENDY SLOAN, Weaver Distinguished Professor
somewhat to fit the background of the student, but will
VICTOR F. YESAVAGE, Professor
normally consist of the courses shown below:
JOHN R. DORGAN, Associate Professor
First Year Fall
Spring
J. THOMAS MCKINNON, Associate Professor
ChEN201
ChEN308
J. DOUGLAS WAY, Associate Professor
ChEN307
ChEN375
DAVID W.M. MARR, Assistant Professor
ChEN357
ChEN418
COLIN A. WOLDEN, Assistant Professor
Second Year Fall
Spring
DAVID T. WU, Assistant Professor
ChEN507
ChEN516
JAMES H. GARY, Professor Emeritus
ChEN509
ChEN518
JOHN O. GOLDEN, Professor Emeritus
In addition to the courses listed, nine more hours of
ARTHUR J. KIDNAY, Professor Emeritus
graduate credit must be earned, three of which must be in
MICHAEL S. GRABOSKI, Research Professor
chemical engineering. Students are expected to maintain a
ROBERT D. KNECHT, Research Professor
cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.00 during their
ROBERT L. MCCORMICK, Research Assistant Professor
first year of residence. Failure to maintain this average will
Degrees Offered:
normally result in suspension.
Master of Engineering (Chemical and Petroleum-
Master of Science Program:
Refining Engineering)
Students entering the Master of Science program with an
Master of Science (Chemical and Petroleum-Refining
accepted undergraduate degree in chemical engineering are
Engineering)
required to take a minimum of 24 semester hours of
Doctor of Philosophy (Chemical and Petroleum-Refining
acceptable course work plus the Masters thesis. All students
Engineering)
must take the four chemical engineering core graduate
courses (ChEN507, ChEN509, ChEN518, and ChEN516)
Program Description:
plus twelve hours of acceptable course work in chemical
The program of study for an advanced degree in
engineering or approved elective fields. Students must
chemical engineering is selected by the student in consulta-
enroll in colloquium (ChEN605) each semester.
tion with the advisor and with the approval of the thesis
committee. Upon approval of the student’s thesis committee,
Doctor of Philosophy Program:
graduate credit may be earned for selected 400-level
The course of study in chemical engineering and
courses. All students are required to enroll for colloquium
petroleum refining for the Ph.D. degree will consist of the
(ChEN605) every semester they attend, but this course
four core courses (ChEN507, ChEN509, ChEN518, and
cannot be used to satisfy the course requirements as
ChEN516) and a colloquium (ChEN605) each semester. The
described below.
Ph.D. student is required to have a minor in a discipline
outside of the department (minimum of 12 semester hours of
Program Requirements:
graduate-level coursework), and two two-hour assignments
See Required Curriculum below.
of supervised teaching (ChEN699, 4 hours total). In
Prerequisites:
addition, 17 hours of chemical engineering graduate
The program outlined here assumes that the candidate for
electives are required with the following restrictions or
an advanced degree will have a background in chemistry,
limitations:
mathematics, and physics equivalent to that required for the
A required six-hour sequence in one of three tracks in
B.S. degree at Colorado School of Mines in Chemical
chemical engineering: thermodynamics, kinetics and
Engineering and Petroleum Refining. Any basic under-
reaction engineering, or transport phenomena. Remaining
graduate course deficiencies must be removed with no
hours are free electives at the 500 or 600 level, with a
resultant credit toward an advanced degree.
34
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

maximum of 2 hours used for Topical Research Seminars
ChEN416. POLYMER ENGINEERING AND TECHNOL-
(ChEN604). The three tracks will consist of the following
OGY Polymer fluid mechanics, polymer rheological
courses:
response, and polymer shape forming. Definition and
Thermodynamics
measurement of material properties. Interrelationships
between response functions and correlation of data and
ChEN520, ChEN609*, ChEN610, ChEN521
material response. Theoretical approaches for prediction of
Kinetics
polymer properties. Processing operations for polymeric
ChEN510, ChEN/CHGN584, ChEN618*
materials; melt and flow instabilities. Prerequisite:
Transport Phenomena
ChEN307, MACS315, or consent of instructor.
ChEN501, ChEN508, ChEN515, ChEN601*, ChEN608,
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ChEN615*
ChEN418. REACTION ENGINEERING Applications of
* Variable credit: may be less than three hours
the fundamentals of thermodynamics, physical chemistry,
Summary of Hours
and organic chemistry to the engineering of reactive
Total Core = 4 courses @ 3 hours each + Colloquium
processes. Reactor design; acquisition and analysis of rate
14 hours
data; heterogeneous catalysis. Relevant aspects of computer-
aided process simulation. Prerequisite: ChEN307,
Total Electives
17 hours
ChEN308, ChEN357, MACS315, CHGN221, CHGN353,
Minor
12 hours
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Supervised Teaching
4 hours
TOTAL
47 hours
ChEN420. MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN CHEMICAL
ENGINEERING Formulation and solution of chemical
Description of Courses
engineering problems using exact analytical solution
ChEN402. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN
methods. Set-up and solution of ordinary and partial
Process simulation and process optimization. Prerequisite:
differential equations for typical chemical engineering
ChEN201, ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN357, ChEN375,
systems and transport processes. Prerequisite: MACS315,
ChEN418, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN375, or consent of instructor. 3
semester hours.
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ChEN403. PROCESS DYNAMICS AND CONTROL
ChEN421. ENGINEERING ECONOMICS Economic
Mathematical modeling and analysis of transient systems.
analysis of engineering processes and systems. Interest,
Applications of control theory to response of dynamic
annuity, present value, depreciation, cost accounting,
chemical engineering systems and processes. Prerequisite:
investment accounting and financing of engineering
ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN375, MACS315, or consent of
enterprises along with taxation, market evaluation and
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
break-even analysis. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 3
ChEN408 NATURAL GAS PROCESSING Application of
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
chemical engineering principles to the processing of natural
ChEN430. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA Theory and
gas. Emphasis on using thermodynamics and mass transfer
chemical engineering applications of momentum, heat, and
operations to analyze existing plants. Relevant aspects of
mass transport. Set up and solution of problems involving
computer-aided process simulation. Prerequisites:
equations of motion and energy. Prerequisite: ChEN307,
ChEN201, ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN357, ChEN375, or
ChEN308, ChEN357, ChEN375, MACS315, or consent of
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ChEN409. PETROLEUM PROCESSES Application of
ChEN440. MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVES IN CHEMI-
chemical engineering principles to petroleum refining.
CAL ENGINEERING Applications of statistical and
Thermodynamics and reaction engineering of complex
quantum mechanics to understanding and prediction of
hydrocarbon systems. Relevant aspects of computer-aided
transport properties and processes. Relations between
process simulation for complex mixtures. Prerequisite:
microscopic properties of materials and systems to macro-
CHGN221, CHGN351 and 353, ChEN201, ChEN357, or
scopic behavior. Prerequisite: ChEN307, ChEN308,
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ChEN357, ChEN375, CHGN351 and 353, CHGN221 and
ChEN415. POLYMER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
222, MACS315, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
Chemistry and thermodynamics of polymers and polymer
semester hours.
solutions. Reaction engineering of polymerization. Charac-
Graduate Courses
terization techniques based on solution properties. Materials
500-level courses are open to qualified seniors with
science of polymers in varying physical states. Processing
permission of the department and the Dean of the Graduate
operations for polymeric materials and use in separations.
School.
Prerequisite: CHGN221, MACS315, ChEN357, or consent
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
35

The 600-level courses are open only to students enrolled
ChEN510. CHEMICAL REACTOR ANALYSIS AND
in the Graduate School.
DESIGN Non-ideal flow effects on reactor design. Stability
ChEN501. ADVANCED HEAT TRANSFER Formulation
of stirred tank and tubular flow reactors. Mass and heat
of the laws governing the transport of energy. Transient and
transfer effects. Modeling of heterogeneous chemical
steady-state analysis for heat conduction. The transport of
reactors. Fluidized bed reactors. Prerequisite: ChEN418 or
thermal energy in fluids in motion; free and forced convec-
equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
tion in laminar and turbulent flow over surfaces and within
ChEN511. INDIVIDUAL STUDIES Individual theoretical
conduits. Prerequisite: ChEN516 or consent of instructor.
or experimental studies under the direction of a department
3 hours lecture-discussion; 3 semester hours.
faculty member, but not leading to a thesis. Course may be
ChEN504. ADVANCED PROCESS ENGINEERING
repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to
ECONOMICS Advanced engineering economic principles
3 semester hours; 6 semester hours maximum credit.
applied to original and alternate investments. Analysis of
ChEN513. SELECTED TOPICS IN CHEMICAL ENGI-
chemical and petroleum processes relative to marketing and
NEERING Selected topics chosen from special interests of
return on investments. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
instructor and students. Course may be repeated for credit
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
on different topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to
ChEN505. NUMERICAL METHODS IN CHEMICAL
3 semester hours lecture/discussion; 1 to 3 semester hours.
ENGINEERING Engineering applications of numerical
ChEN514. ADVANCED STAGED SEPARATIONS
methods. Numerical integration, solution of algebraic
Principles of stagewise separations with major emphasis on
equations, matrix algebra, ordinary differential equations,
multicomponent processes for distillation, absorption, and
and special emphasis on partial differential equations.
extraction. Topics include brief review of ideal phase
Emphasis on application of numerical methods to chemical
separations, classical stage-by-stage multicomponent
engineering problems which cannot be solved by analytical
methods, modern successive approximation methods for
methods. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
multicomponents, general short-cut methods, tray hydraulics
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and efficiency. Prerequisite: ChEN375 or equivalent.
ChEN507. APPLIED MATHEMATICS IN CHEMICAL
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ENGINEERING This course stresses the application of
ChEN515. ADVANCED MASS TRANSFER Fundamental
mathematics to problems drawn from chemical engineering
principles of mass transfer with application to design of
fundamentals such as material and energy balances,
mass transfer processes. Theory of diffusion in gases and
transport phenomena and kinetics. Formulation and solution
liquids for single and multicomponent species. Mass
of ordinary and partial differential equations arising in
transfer in laminar and turbulent flows. Transport analogies,
chemical engineering or related processes or operations are
simultaneous heat and mass transfer, with examples of
discussed. Mathematical approaches are restricted to
drying and humidification processes. Mass transfer with
analytical solutions or techniques for producing problems
chemical reaction; examples of slow intermediate, and fast
amenable to analytical solutions. Prerequisite: Undergradu-
reactions with application to design of mass contactors.
ate differential equations course; undergraduate chemical
Interfacial mass transfer and mass transfer in two-phase
engineering courses covering reaction kinetics, and heat,
flows. Design of packed beds and columns, gas-sparged
mass and momentum transfer.
reactors. Prerequisite: Graduate course in transport
3 hours lecture-discussion; 3 semester hours.
phenomena (ChEN516).
ChEN508. ADVANCED FLUID MECHANICS Develop-
3 hours lecture-discussion; 3 semester hours.
ment of basic conservation equations for momentum
ChEN516. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA Principles of
transfer. Constitutive equations for Newtonian and elemen-
momentum, heat, and mass transfer with application to
tary non-Newtonian fluids. Exact solutions of the Navier-
chemical processes. Flow in ducts and around submerged
Stokes equations. Ordering and approximations. Applica-
objects. Heat conduction and molecular diffusion. Convec-
tions to low and high Reynolds number flows. Prerequisite:
tive heat and mass transfer. Heat- and mass-transfer
ChEN516 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
coefficients. Transport analogies and correlations. Prerequi-
semester hours.
site: ChEN507. 3 hours lecture-discussion; 3 semester
ChEN509. ADVANCED CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
hours.
THERMODYNAMICS Extension and amplification of
ChEN517. PETROLEUM REFINERY PROCESSING
undergraduate chemical engineering thermodynamics.
Composition and evaluation of petroleum crude oils and
Topics will include the laws of thermodynamics, thermody-
other hydrocarbons. Basic refinery processes, including
namic properties of pure fluids and fluid mixtures, phase
operating conditions, chemical reactions, catalysts,
equilibria, and chemical reaction equilibria. Prerequisite:
economics, and pollution control. Emphasis on needs for
ChEN357 or equivalent or consent of instructor. 3 hours
refinery processes, such as: distillation, desulfurization,
lecture; 3 semester hours.
coking, solvent extraction, hydrofining, hydrocracking,
36
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

catalytic cracking, reforming, isomerization, polymerization.
of chemical engineering principles and potential areas of
New process requirements for meeting fuel specifications.
research. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Lecture and/or
Prerequisite: ChEN409 or consent of instructor.
laboratory; 1 to 3 semester hours.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ChEN527. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY This course
ChEN518. REACTION KINETICS AND CATALYSIS
provides students the opportunity to explore technical
Homogeneous and heterogeneous rate expressions.
aspects of many important recent topics in air pollution. The
Fundamental theories of reaction rates. Analysis of rate data
course includes the chemistry, monitoring, health and
and complex reaction networks. Properties of solid catalysts.
environmental effects of air pollution including ozone layer
Mass and heat transfer with chemical reaction. Heteroge-
depletion, acid rain, and global climate change. Technical
neous non-catalytic reactions. Prerequisite: ChEN418 or
aspects of environmental regulations and policy are included
equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
along with interpretation of laboratory experiments, field
measurements, and computer modeling. Prerequisite:
ChEN519. SYNTHETIC FUEL PROCESSES Processes
Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
that generate hydrocarbons from coal, tar sands, and oil
shale. Other energy sources as well as direct conversion
ChEN545. SIMULATION AND MODELING IN CHEMI-
processes will also be considered in view of supply and
CAL PROCESS INDUSTRIES Application of basic
economics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
principles of physics, chemistry, transport phenomena and
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
reaction kinetics to real systems. The philosophy of process
modeling at different levels of complexity is developed and
ChEN520. THERMODYNAMICS OF PHASE EQUILIB-
numerous examples based on the chemical process industry
RIA Application of current theories in multicomponent
and naturally occurring processes are used. Prerequisite:
phase equilibria to the solution of engineering problems.
Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Topics include: introduction to the theory of intermolecular
forces, theory of corresponding states, fugacities in gas and
ChEN584 (CHGN584). FUNDAMENTALS OF CATALY-
liquid mixtures, introduction to the theory of liquids.
SIS The basic principles involved in the preparation,
Prerequisite: ChEN509 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
characterization, testing and theory of heterogeneous and
lecture; 3 semester hours.
homogeneous catalysts are discussed. Topics include
chemisorption, adsorption isotherms, diffusion, surface
ChEN521. CRYOGENIC ENGINEERING Thermodynamic
kinetics, promoters, poisons, catalyst theory and design, acid
analysis of cryogenic systems. Survey of the properties of
base catalysis and soluble transition metal complexes.
cryogenic fluids. Analysis of heat transfer, fluid flow, and
Examples of important industrial applications are given.
separation processes at low temperatures. Introduction to
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
superconductivity and superfluidity. Prerequisite: Consent
semester hours.
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ChEN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMICAL ENGI-
ChEN523. ENGINEERING AND THE ENVIRONMENT
NEERING Pilot course of special topics course. Topics
Discussion of the many engineering problems that arise
chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s).
when man interacts with his environment. Comprehensive
Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite:
treatment of topics such as pollution, thermal pollution,
Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
treatment of industrial and municipal wastes, solid waste
treatment, and the disposal of radioactive wastes. Economic
ChEN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY Individual research
and legislative aspects of these problems will also be
or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member,
considered. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 semester
also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
hours.
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ‘Independent
Study’ form must be completed and submitted to the
ChEN524. COMPUTER-AIDED PROCESS SIMULA-
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
TION Advanced concepts in computer-aided process
simulation are covered. Topics include optimization, heat
ChEN601. ADVANCED TOPICS IN HEAT TRANSFER
exchanger networks, data regression analysis, and separa-
In-depth analysis of selected topics in heat transfer with
tions systems. Use of industry-standard process simulation
special emphasis on chemical engineering applications.
software (Aspen Plus) is stressed. Prerequisite: Consent of
Prerequisite: ChEN501 or consent of instructor. 1 to 3 hours
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
lecture-discussion; 1 to 3 semester hours.
ChEN525. SELECTED TOPICS IN EMERGING CHEMI-
ChEN604. TOPICAL RESEARCH SEMINARS Lectures,
CAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY An introduction to
reports, and discussions on current research in chemical
new chemical engineering technologies. Current examples
engineering, usually related to the student’s thesis topic.
include biotechnology, supercritical fluid extraction and
Sections are operated independently and are directed toward
biomedical engineering. Emphasis is on providing students
different research topics. Course may be repeated for credit.
with appropriate terminologies, identifying new applications
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
37

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 hour lecture-discus-
ChEN615. ADVANCED TOPICS IN MASS TRANSFER
sion; 1 semester hour.
In-depth analyses of selected topics in mass transfer with
special emphasis on chemical engineering applications.
ChEN605. COLLOQUIUM Students will attend a series of
Possible topics include ion-exchange or adsorption
lectures by speakers from industry, academia, and govern-
chromatography, theories of interfacial mass transfer, mass
ment. Primary emphasis will be on current research in
transfer with reaction, and simultaneous heat and mass
chemical engineering and related disciplines, with secondary
transfer. Prerequisite: Graduate mass transfer course
emphasis on ethical, philosophical, and career-related issues
(ChEN515). 1 to 3 hours lecture-discussion; 1 to 3 semester
of importance to the chemical engineering profession.
hours.
Prerequisite: Graduate status. 1 hour lecture; 1 semester
hour.
ChEN618. ADVANCED TOPICS IN REACTION KINET-
ICS Fundamental theories of reaction rates. Basic principles
ChEN607. ADVANCED TOPICS IN CHEMICAL
of chemical kinetics in homogeneous and heterogeneous
ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS In-depth analysis of
systems. Reactions in solution, reactions on surfaces, and
selected topics in applied mathematics with special
composite reactions. Homogeneous catalysis, and isotope
emphasis on chemical engineering applications. Prerequi-
effects in reaction dynamics. Photochemical reactions.
site: CHEN507 or consent of instructor. 1 to 3 hours lecture-
Prerequisite: Graduate reaction engineering course
discussion; 1 to 3 semester hours.
(ChEN518). 1 to 3 hours lecture-discussion; 1 to 3 semester
ChEN608. ADVANCED TOPICS IN FLUID MECHANICS
hours.
In-depth analysis of selected topics in fluid mechanics with
ChEN690. SUPERVISED TEACHING OF CHEMICAL
special emphasis on chemical engineering applications.
ENGINEERING Individual participation in teaching
Prerequisite: ChEN508 or consent of instructor. 1 to 3 hours
activities. Discussion, problem review and development,
lecture-discussion; 1 to 3 semester hours.
guidance of laboratory experiments, course development,
ChEN609. ADVANCED TOPICS IN THERMODYNAM-
supervised practice teaching. Course may be repeated for
ICS Advanced study of thermodynamic theory and applica-
credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, appointment as a
tion of thermodynamic principles. Possible topics include
graduate student instructor, or consent of instructor. 6 to 10
stability, critical phenomena, chemical thermodynamics,
hours supervised teaching; 2 semester hours.
thermodynamics of polymer solutions and thermodynamics
ChEN698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMICAL ENGI-
of aqueous and ionic solutions. Prerequisite: Consent of
NEERING Pilot course of special topics course. Topics
instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s).
ChEN610. APPLIED STATISTICAL THERMODYNAM-
Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite:
ICS Principles of relating behavior to microscopic proper-
Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
ties. Topics include element of probability, ensemble theory,
ChEN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY Individual research
application to gases and solids, distribution theories of
or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member,
fluids, and transport properties. Prerequisite: Consent of
also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ‘Independent
ChEN611. APPLIED STATISTICAL MECHANICS
Study’ form must be completed and submitted to the
Continuation of ChEN610. Advanced applications of
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
statistical thermodynamics and statistical mechanics
ChEN701. GRADUATE THESIS-MASTER OF SCIENCE
including perturbation and integral equation theory,
Library search and laboratory work for the master’s thesis in
computer simulation and theory of electrolytes. Introduction
petroleum refining under the supervision of the graduate
to theory of nonequilibrium systems including Chapman-
student’s advisory committee. 6 semester hours upon
Enskog, Brownian motion and time correlation functions.
completion of report.
Prerequisite: ChEN610 or equivalent; ChEN507 or
equivalent; ChEN509. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ChEN703. GRADUATE THESIS-DOCTOR OF PHILOSO-
PHY Preparation of the doctoral thesis under supervision of
ChEN612. ADVANCED INDIVIDUAL STUDIES
the graduate student’s advisory committee. 30 semester
Advanced theoretical or experimental studies on chemical
hours.
engineering subjects not currently covered in other
department courses. Course may be repeated for credit.
SYGN600. FUNDAMENTALS OF COLLEGE TEACH-
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours; 6
ING Principles of learning and teaching in a college setting.
semester hours maximum credit.
Methods to foster and assess higher order thinking.
Effective design, delivery, and assessment of college courses
or presentations. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, or consent
of instructor. 2 semester hours.
38
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Chemistry and Geochemistry
School of Mines in chemistry. The candidate for an
STEPHEN R. DANIEL, Professor and Department Head
advanced degree in geochemistry should have completed an
DEAN W. DICKERHOOF, Professor
undergraduate program in chemistry or geology which is
RONALD W. KLUSMAN, Professor
equivalent to that required for a bachelor’s degree from an
DONALD L. MACALADY, Professor
accredited university. Deficiencies in one or both of these
PATRICK MACCARTHY, Professor
areas will be determined on an individual basis. For a more
MICHAEL J. PAVELICH, Professor
complete description, refer to the Geochemistry program
KENT J. VOORHEES, Professor
description below.
THOMAS R. WILDEMAN, Professor
Required Curriculum:
SCOTT W. COWLEY, Associate Professor
Applied Chemistry:
MARK E. EBERHART, Associate Professor
The program of study is selected by the student in
E. CRAIG SIMMONS, Associate Professor
consultation with the advisor and thesis committee. Thesis,
DANIEL M. KNAUSS, Assistant Professor
seminar, and the core courses CHGN502 (inorganic),
KEVIN W. MANDERNACK, Assistant Professor
CHGN503 (physical), CHGN505 (organic), and CHGN507
KIM R. WILLIAMS, Assistant Professor
(analytical) are required.
DAVID T. WU, Assistant Professor
M.S. The program of study includes CHGN560,
DAVID M. UPDEGRAFF, Research Professor
CHGN502, CHGN503, CHGN505, CHGN507, and the
FRANCO BASILE, Research Assistant Professor
M.S. thesis research. At least 15 of the required 24 semester
STEVEN F. DEC, Research Assistant Professor
hours of course work must be taken in the Department of
JAMES F. RANVILLE, Research Assistant Professor
Chemistry and Geochemistry at CSM.
RAMON E. BISQUE, Professor Emeritus
KENNETH W. EDWARDS, Professor Emeritus
Ph.D. The program of study includes CHGN560,
GEORGE H. KENNEDY, Professor Emeritus
CHGN660, CHGN502, CHGN503, CHGN505, CHGN507,
DONALD LANGMUIR, Professor Emeritus
a minor (at least 12 hours of graduate level course work)
GEORGE B. LUCAS, Professor Emeritus
and the Ph.D. dissertation research. The student’s thesis
MAYNARD SLAUGHTER, Professor Emeritus
committee may set additional course requirements and will
JOHN T. WILLIAMS, Professor Emeritus
decide on transfer credit.
ROBERT D. WITTERS, Professor Emeritus
Geochemistry:
CHARLES W. STARKS, Associate Professor Emeritus
The program of study is selected by the student in
Degrees Offered:
consultation with his or her advisor and thesis committee.
Master of Science (Chemistry)
Students entering with backgrounds in chemistry will take
Doctor of Philosophy (Applied Chemistry)
more coursework in geology to strengthen their back-
grounds in this discipline; the converse is true for students
Master of Science (Geochemistry)
with a background in geology. Thesis is required. The
Doctor of Philosophy (Geochemistry)
Geochemistry program comprises a core group of courses
All of the Department’s degree programs have been
and four optional tracks: Mineralogy-Petrology, Aqueous-
admitted to the Western Regional Graduate Program. This
Environmental, Ore deposits-Exploration, Organic-
allows residents of Alaska, Arizona, Hawaii, Idaho,
Petroleum. All geochemistry students must complete all core
Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon,
courses. Students may elect any one of the four tracks. The
South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming to register
core courses are CHGC503 - Introduction to Geochemistry,
at Colorado resident tuition rates.
CHGC504 - Methods in Geochemistry, CHGN503 -
Advanced Physical Chemistry. Students may elect courses in
Program Description:
the selected track with advice from their advisors and/or
There are two basic graduate programs offered by the
thesis or dissertation committees. Students with deficient
Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry. Undergraduate
backgrounds in chemistry or geology must complete a
deficiencies of students entering one of these programs will
deficiency course in physical chemistry (for geologists) or
be determined by the Department of Chemistry and
geology (for chemists). Students reside in either the
Geochemistry for applied chemistry students and by the
Department of Geology and Geological Engineering or the
geochemistry faculty for geochemistry students through
Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry.
interviews and placement examinations at the beginning of
Fields of Research:
the student’s first semester of graduate work.
Heterogeneous catalysis, surface chemistry.
Prerequisites:
Organic and analytical chemistry of hydrocarbon fuels;
The candidate for an advanced degree in applied
environmental analytical chemistry of organic com-
chemistry should have completed an undergraduate program
pounds; coordination chemistry with organic ligands.
which is essentially equivalent to that required at Colorado
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
39

Theoretical and descriptive inorganic chemistry; bonding
CHGN422. POLYMER CHEMISTRY LABORATORY (I)
and symmetry; chemistry of materials; use of computers
Prerequisites: CHGN221. 3 hours lab; 1 hour credit.
in chemistry.
CHGN428. INTRODUCTORY BIOCHEMISTRY (I)
Applied aspects of trace element, environmental, and
Introductory study of the major molecules of biochemistry-
aqueous geochemistry.
amino acids, proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, lipids, and
Applications of soil gas to petroleum and mineral explora-
saccharides- their structure, chemistry, biological function,
tion and environmental problems; water quality and
and biosynthesis. Stresses bioenergetics and the cell as a
modeling of biogeochemical processes in constructed
biological unit of organization. Discussion of classical
wetlands used for treatment of acid drainage; sampling
genetics, molecular genetics, and protein synthesis.
design in large-scale environmental studies.
Prerequisite: CHGN221 or permission of instructor. 3 hours
lecture; 3 semester hours.
Environmental microbiology, biogeochemistry of aquatic
and terrestrial environment, stable isotope geochemistry.
CHGN430/MLGN530. INTRODUCTION TO POLYMER
SCIENCE (I) An introduction to the chemistry and physics
Peat and humic substances; analytical chemistry. Geochem-
of macromolecules. Topics include the properties and
istry of igneous rocks; associated ore deposits.
statistics of polymer solutions, measurements of molecular
Polymer synthesis and characterization, thermal stability,
weights, molecular weight distributions, properties of bulk
thermal degradation mechanisms of polymers; mass
polymers, mechanisms of polymer formation, and properties
spectroscopy; chemometrics and chromatography.
of thermosets and thermoplasts including elastomers.
Development and evaluation of teaching methods that foster
Prerequisite: CHGN221 or permission of instructor. 3 hour
higher-level thinking abilities.
lecture, 3 semester hours.
Chemistry and geochemistry of pollutant organics in
CHGN475. COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY (II)
aqueous systems; chemical and physical transformations
Prerequisites: CHGN352, CHGN402. 3 hours lecture; 3
of such pollutants; surface interactions in aqueous
credit hours.
systems.
CHGN490. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION (S)
Theory and simulation of complex materials including
Advanced methods of organic and inorganic synthesis; high-
polymers and powders, complex fluids, phase equilibria,
temperature, high-pressure, inert-atmosphere, vacuum-line,
controlled self-assembly.
and electrolytic methods. Prerequisites: CHGN323,
Separations; field flow fractionation; polymer, colloid, and
CHGN341. 6-week summer field session; 6 credit hours.
particulate characterization; new separation surfaces.
CHGN495. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (I, II, S)
Computational methods for design of materials.
Individual research project under direction of a member of
the Departmental faculty. Prerequisites: Completion of
Description of Courses
chemistry curriculum through the junior year or permission
CHGN401. THEORETICAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
of the department head. 1-6 credit hours.
(I) Periodic properties of the elements. Bonding in ionic and
metallic crystals. Acid-base theories. Inorganic stereochem-
CHGN497. INTERNSHIP (I, II, S) Individual internship
istry. Nonaqueous solvents. Coordination chemistry and
experience with an industrial, academic, or governmental
ligand field theory. Prerequisite: CHGN341 or consent of
host supervised by a Departmental faculty member.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisites: Completion of chemistry curriculum through
the junior year or permission of the department head. 1-6
CHGN402. BONDING THEORY AND SYMMETRY (II)
credit hours.
Introduction to valence bond and molecular orbital theories,
symmetry; introduction to group theory; applications of
CHGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (I, II)
group theory and symmetry concepts to molecular orbital
Topics chosen from special interests of instructor and
and ligand field theories. Prerequisite: CHGN401 or consent
students. Prerequisite: Consent of head of department. 1 to 3
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
semester hours.
CHGN410/MLGN510. SURFACE CHEMISTRY (II)
CHGN499. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH(I, II)
Introduction to colloid systems, capillarity, surface tension
Individual investigational problems under the direction of
and contact angle, adsorption from solution, micelles and
members of the chemistry staff. Written report on research
microemulsions, the solid/gas interface, surface analytical
required for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of head of
techniques, van der Waal forces, electrical properties and
department. 1 to 3 semester hours.
colloid stability, some specific colloid systems (clays, foams
Graduate Courses
and emulsions). Students enrolled for graduate credit in
The following courses are offered at the graduate level.
MLGN510 must complete a special project. Prerequisite:
They will be given if sufficient qualified students register.
DCGN209 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
Some 500-level courses are open to qualified seniors with
semester hours.
40
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

the permission of the department and Dean of the Graduate
spectroscopy. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
School. 600-level courses are open only to students enrolled
lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
in the Graduate School. Geochemistry courses are listed
CHGN510. CHEMICAL SEPARATIONS (II) Survey of
after Chemistry courses.
separation methods, thermodynamics of phase equilibria,
Chemistry Courses
thermodynamics of liquid-liquid partitioning, various types
CHGN502. INORGANIC CHEMISTRY OF METALS (II)
of chromatography, ion exchange, electrophoresis, zone
Detailed examination of topics such as ligand field theory,
refining, use of inclusion compounds for separation,
reaction mechanisms, chemical bonding, and structure of
application of separation technology for determining
inorganic compounds. Emphasis is placed on the correla-
physical constants, e.g., stability constants of complexes.
tions of the chemical reactions of the elements with periodic
Prerequisite: CHGN507 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
trends and reactivities. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3
lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CHGN515/MLGN503. CHEMICAL BONDING IN
CHGN503. ADVANCED PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I (I)
MATERIALS (I) Introduction to chemical bonding theories
Quantum chemistry of classical systems. Principles of
and calculations and their applications to solids of interest to
chemical thermodynamics. Statistical mechanics with
materials science. The relationship between a material’s
statistical calculation of thermodynamic properties. Theories
properties and the bonding of its atoms will be examined for
of chemical kinetics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 4
a variety of materials. Includes an introduction to organic
hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
polymers. Computer programs will be used for calculating
bonding parameters. Prerequisite: Consent of department. 3
CHGN504. ADVANCED PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II (II)
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Application of quantum chemistry, thermodynamics,
statistical mechanics and kinetics to the solid, liquid and gas
CHGN523/MLGN509. SOLID STATE CHEMISTRY (I)
states. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture; 2
Dependence of properties of solids on chemical bonding and
semester hours. Offered alternate years.
structure; principles of crystal growth, crystal imperfections,
reactions and diffusion in solids, and the theory of conduc-
CHGN505. ORGANIC REACTION MECHANISMS (I)
tors and semiconductors. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Detailed discussion of the more important mechanisms of
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours Offered alternate years.
organic reaction. Structural effects and reactivity. The
application of reaction mechanisms to synthesis and
CHGN536/MLGN536. ADVANCED POLYMER SYN-
structure proof. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
THESIS (II) An advanced course in the synthesis of
lecture; 3 semester hours.
macromolecules. Various methods of polymerization will be
discussed with an emphasis on the specifics concerning the
CHGN506. CHEMICAL BONDING THEORY (I)
syntheses of different classes of organic and inorganic
Theoretical basis of bonding with emphasis on molecular
polymers. Prerequisite: CHGN430, ChEN415, MLGN530
orbital approach. Pi electron energy calculations. Spectra of
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours
conjugated systems. Acid-base equilibria. Prerequisite:
Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CHGN560. GRADUATE SEMINAR, M.S. (I, II) Required
Offered alternate years.
for all candidates for the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in
chemistry and geochemistry. M.S. students must register for
CHGN507. ADVANCED ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY (I)
the course during each semester of residency. Ph.D. students
Review of fundamentals of analytical chemistry. Literature
must register each semester until a grade is received
of analytical chemistry and statistical treatment of data.
satisfying the prerequisites for CHGN660. Presentation of a
Manipulation of real substances; sampling, storage,
graded nonthesis seminar and attendance at all departmental
decomposition or dissolution, and analysis. Detailed
seminars are required. Prerequisite: Graduate student status.
treatment of chemical equilibrium as related to precipitation,
1 semester hour.
acid-base, complexation and redox titrations. Potentiometry
and UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry. Prerequisite:
CHGN580/MLGN501. STRUCTURE OF MATERIALS (II)
Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Application of X-ray diffraction techniques for crystal and
molecular structure determination of minerals, inorganic and
CHGN508. ANALYTICAL SPECTROSCOPY (II) Detailed
organometallic compounds. Topics include the heavy atom
study of classical and modern spectroscopic methods;
method, data collection by moving film techniques and by
emphasis on instrumentation and application to analytical
diffractometers, Fourier methods, interpretation of Patterson
chemistry problems. Topics include: UV-visible spectros-
maps, refinement methods, direct methods. Prerequisite:
copy, infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence and phosphores-
Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
cence, Raman spectroscopy, arc and spark emission
Offered alternate years.
spectroscopy, flame methods, nephelometry and turbidim-
etry, reflectance methods, Fourier transform methods in
CHGN581. ELECTROCHEMISTRY (I) Introduction to
spectroscopy, photoacoustic spectroscopy, rapid-scanning
theory and practice of electrochemistry. Electrode potentials,
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
41

reversible and irreversible cells, activity concept. Interionic
CHGN698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (I, II)
attraction theory, proton transfer theory of acids and bases,
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
mechanisms and fates of electrode reactions. Prerequisite:
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
Offered alternate years.
Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
CHGN583/MLGN583. PRINCIPLES AND APPLICA-
CHGN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
TIONS OF SURFACE ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES (II)
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
Instrumental techniques for the characterization of surfaces
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
of solid materials; Applications of such techniques to
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
polymers, corrosion, metallurgy, adhesion science, micro-
‘Independent Study’ form must be completed and submitted
electronics. Methods of analysis discussed: x-ray photoelec-
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
tron spectroscopy (XPS), auger electron spectroscopy
CHGN701. GRADUATE THESIS-MASTER OF SCIENCE
(AES), ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS), secondary ion
(I, II) Preparation of the master’s thesis under the supervi-
mass spectrometry (SIMS), Rutherford backscattering
sion of the graduate student’s thesis committee. Required of
(RBS), scanning and transmission electron microscopy
all candidates for the degree of Master of Science. 6
(SEM, TEM), energy and wavelength dispersive x-ray
semester hours upon completion of thesis.
analysis; principles of these methods, quantification,
instrumentation, sample preparation. Prerequisite: B.S. in
CHGN703. GRADUATE THESIS-DOCTOR OF PHI-
Metallurgy, Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Physics, or
LOSOPHY (I, II) Preparation of the doctoral thesis under
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
the supervision of the graduate student’s thesis committee.
Required of all candidates for the degree of Doctor of
CHGN584/ChEN584. FUNDAMENTALS OF CATALYSIS
Philosophy. 30 semester hours.
(II) The basic principles involved in the preparation,
characterization, testing and theory of heterogeneous and
SYGN600. FUNDAMENTALS OF COLLEGE TEACH-
homogeneous catalysts are discussed. Topics include
ING Principles of learning and teaching in a college setting.
chemisorption, adsorption isotherms, diffusion, surface
Methods to foster and assess higher order thinking.
kinetics, promoters, poisons, catalyst theory and design, acid
Effective design, delivery, and assessment of college courses
base catalysis and soluble transition metal complexes.
or presentations. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, or consent
Examples of important industrial applications are given.
of instructor. 2 semester hours.
Prerequisite: CHGN222 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
Geochemistry Courses
lecture; 3 semester hours.
CHGC503. INTRODUCTION TO GEOCHEMISTRY (I) A
CHGN585. CHEMICAL KINETICS (II) Study of kinetic
comprehensive introduction to the basic principles of
phenomena in chemical systems. Attention devoted to
geochemistry with discussion of elemental distributions,
various theoretical approaches. Prerequisite: Consent of
chemical equilibrium, mineral chemistry and chemical
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered
bonding, the geochemistry of isotopes, organobiological
alternate years.
systems, and low and high temperature water-rock systems.
Prerequisite: Physical chemistry, mineralogy, and petrology.
CHGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (I, II)
3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
CHGC504. METHODS IN GEOCHEMISTRY (II)
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
Sampling of natural earth materials including rocks, soils,
Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
sediments, and waters. Preparation of naturally heteroge-
neous materials, digestions, and partial chemical extractions.
CHGN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
Principles of instrumental analysis including atomic
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
spectroscopy, mass separations, and chromatography.
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
Quality assurance and quality control. Interpretation and
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
assessment of geochemical data using statistical methods.
‘Independent Study’ form must be completed and submitted
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geochemistry or
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
environmental science and engineering. 2 hours lecture; 2
CHGN660. GRADUATE SEMINAR, Ph.D. (I, II) Required
semester hours.
of all candidates for the doctoral degree in chemistry or
CHGC509/GEGN509. INTRODUCTION TO AQUEOUS
geochemistry. Students must register for this course each
GEOCHEMISTRY (I) Analytical, graphical and interpretive
semester after completing CHGN560. Presentation of a
methods applied to aqueous systems. Thermodynamic
graded nonthesis seminar and attendance at all department
properties of water and aqueous solutions. Calculations and
seminars are required. Prerequisite: CHGN560 or equiva-
graphical expression of acid-base, redox and solution-
lent. 1 semester hour.
mineral equilibria. Effect of temperature and kinetics on
42
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

natural aqueous systems. Adsorption and ion exchange
or consent of instructor. Offered in alternate years. 3 hours
equilibria between clays and oxide phases. Behavior of trace
lecture; 3 semester hours.
elements and complexation in aqueous systems. Application
CHGC562/CHGN462. MICROBIOLOGY AND THE
of organic geochemistry to natural aqueous systems. Light
ENVIRONMENT This course will cover the basic funda-
stable and unstable isotopic studies applied to aqueous
mentals of microbiology, such as structure and function of
systems. Prerequisite: CHGN332 or equivalent, or consent
procaryotic versus eucaryotic cells; viruses; classification of
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
micro-organisms; microbial metabolism, energetics,
CHGC511. GEOCHEMISTRY OF IGNEOUS ROCKS (II)
genetics, growth and diversity; microbial interactions with
A survey of the geochemical characteristics of the various
plants, animals, and other microbes. Additional topics
types of igneous rock suites. Application of major element,
covered will include various aspects of environmental
trace element, and isotope geochemistry to problems of their
microbiology such as global biogeochemical cycles,
origin and modification. Prerequisite: Undergraduate
bioleaching, bioremediation, and wastewater treatment.
mineralogy and petrology or consent of instructor. 3 hours
Prerequisite: ESGN301 or consent of Instructor. 3 hours
lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
lecture, 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
CHGC527/GEGN527. ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY OF
CHGC563. ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY (I) An
FOSSIL FUELS AND ORE DEPOSITS (II) A study of
introduction to the microorganisms of major geochemical
organic carbonaceous materials in relation to the genesis and
importance, as well as those of primary importance in water
modification of fossil fuel and ore deposits. The biological
pollution and waste treatment. Microbes and sedimentation,
origin of the organic matter will be discussed with emphasis
microbial leaching of metals from ores, acid mine water
on contributions of microorganisms to the nature of these
pollution, and the microbial ecology of marine and
deposits. Biochemical and thermal changes which convert
freshwater habitats are covered. Prerequisite: Consent of
the organic compounds into petroleum, oil shale, tar sand,
instructor. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
coal and other carbonaceous matter will be studied.
Offered alternate years.
Principal analytical techniques used for the characterization
CHGC564. BIOGEOCHEMISTRY AND
of organic matter in the geosphere and for evaluation of oil
GEOMICROBIOLOGY (I) Designed to give the student an
and gas source potential will be discussed. Laboratory
understanding of the role of living things, particularly
exercises will emphasize source rock evaluation, and oil-
microorganisms, in the shaping of the earth. Among the
source rock and oil-oil correlation methods. Prerequisite:
subjects will be the aspects of living processes, chemical
CHGN221, GEGN438, or consent of instructor. 2 hours
composition and characteristics of biological material,
lecture; 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate
origin of life, role of microorganisms in weathering of rocks
years.
and the early diagenesis of sediments, and the origin of
CHGC530. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY AND
petroleum, oil shale, and coal. Prerequisite: Consent of
GEOCHEMISTRY (II) Mobility of the elements in air,
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
water and the surficial environment. Geochemical cycles of
CHGC570. MINERALOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY OF
elements and constituents of environmental interest. Plant
CLAYS (II) Structure and composition of clay minerals and
composition, animal and human health in relation to the
related phyllo-silicates. Methods of identification. Ion
natural environment. Acid deposition and other processes
exchange and colloid properties. Formation and occurrence
affecting water quality. Environmental aspects of fossil fuel
in rocks and soils. Ceramic and hydrothermal reactions of
processing. Sampling design in large scale environmental
clays and clay-producing systems. Prerequisite: Consent of
studies. Prerequisite: CHGC503 or ESGN500 and
instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
ESGN501. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CHGC586. GEOCHEMICAL PROCESS CONTROL
CHGC552. SILICATE CHEMISTRY (I) Structural
PROGRAMMING (I) Introduction to programming logic as
approach to the chemical and physical characteristics of
applied to geochemical and related geological problems.
silicates and their role in shaping the environment through
Process and instrument control programming. Methods of
geologic processes: magmatic differentiation, weathering,
computer analysis of geochemical data. Prerequisite:
sedimentation. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
Consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3
lecture; 3 semester hours.
semester hours. Offered alternate years.
CHGC555. ENVIRONMENTAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
CHGC610. NUCLEAR AND ISOTOPIC GEOCHEMIS-
(II) A study of the chemical and physical interactions which
TRY (II) A study of the principles of geochronology and
determine the fate, transport and interactions of organic
stable isotope distributions with an emphasis on the
chemicals in aquatic systems, with emphasis on chemical
application of these principles to important case studies in
transformations of anthropogenic organic contaminants.
igneous petrology and the formation of ore deposits. U, Th,
Prerequisites: A course in organic chemistry and
and Pb isotopes, K-Ar, Rb-Sr, oxygen isotopes, sulfur
CHGN503, Advanced Physical Chemistry or its equivalent,
isotopes, and carbon isotopes included. Prerequisite:
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
43

Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
Economics and Business
Offered alternate years.
RODERICK G. EGGERT, Professor and Division Director
CHGC640. SOIL GAS GEOCHEMISTRY AND APPLI-
CAROL A. DAHL, Professor and Director, Joint Degree Program
CATIONS IN THE EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL
in Petroleum Economics and Management
SCIENCES (II) Thermal, chemical and microbiological
JOHN E. TILTON, William J. Coulter Professor
reactions in the production of gases. Quantitative review of
R.E.D. WOOLSEY, Professor and Director, Operations Research
Program
transport of gaseous species in the saturated and unsaturated
JOHN A. CORDES, Associate Professor and Director, Institute for
zones. Sampling and analysis of soil gases. Applications of
Global Resources Policy and Management
soil gas in the earth and environmental sciences, including
GRAHAM A. DAVIS, Associate Professor
exploration, contaminant mapping and global climate
WADE E. MARTIN, Associate Professor
change. Prerequisites: CHGC503, or ESGN500 and
MICHAEL R. WALLS, Associate Professor
ESGN501, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
JANIS M. CAREY, Assistant Professor
semester hours.
SHEKHAR JAYANTHI, Assistant Professor
CHGC699A. SELECTED TOPICS IN GEOCHEMISTRY
JAMES M. OTTO, Research Professor and Deputy Director,
(I, II) Detailed study of a geochemical topic under direction
Institute for Global Resources Policy and Management
of a member of the staff. Work on the same or a different
JOHN STERMOLE, Instructor
topic may be continued through later semesters and
DAVID E. FLETCHER, Professor Emeritus
additional credits earned. Prerequisite: Consent of instruc-
ALFRED PETRICK, JR., Professor Emeritus
tor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
ODED RUDAWSKY, Professor Emeritus
FRANKLIN J. STERMOLE, Professor Emeritus
CHGC699B. SPECIAL TOPICS IN AQUEOUS AND
SEDIMENTARY GEOCHEMISTRY (I, II) Detailed study
Degrees Offered:
of a specific topic in the area of aqueous or sedimentary
Master of Science (Mineral Economics)
geochemistry under the direction of a member of the staff.
Doctor of Philosophy (Mineral Economics)
Work on the same or a different topic may be continued
Program Description:
through later semesters and additional credits earned.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
The Division of Economics and Business offers graduate
programs leading to M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mineral
CHGC699C. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ORGANIC AND
economics. Course work and research emphasize the
BIOGEOCHEMISTRY (I, II) Detailed study of a specific
application of economic principles and business skills to
topic in the areas of organic geochemistry or biogeochemis-
mineral, energy, and environmental issues with the goal of
try under the direction of a member of the staff. Work on the
ensuring that graduates are qualified in four areas:
same or a different topic may be continued through later
Economic Analysis - Production and consumption,
semesters and additional credits earned. Prerequisite:
markets and prices, international trade, government policies,
Consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
efficient use of resources, and economic development.
CHGC699D. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PETROLOGIC
Business and Investment Decision Making - Principles
GEOCHEMISTRY (I, II) Detailed study of a specific topic
of evaluating investment opportunities, management, and
in the area of petrologic geochemistry under the direction of
financing.
a member of the staff. Work on the same or a different topic
may be continued through later semesters and additional
Quantitative Methods - Fundamentals of statistics,
credits earned. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to 3
econometrics, and forecasting.
semester hours.
Communication - Effective writing and speaking.
Program Requirements:
Thesis and nonthesis options are available for the M.S.
degree. The thesis option requires a minimum of 30
semester hours of course work plus a thesis. The nonthesis
option requires a minimum of 39 semester hours of graduate
credit. Both M.S. options include 18 semseter hours of core
courses and 9 semsester hours of course work from 1 of the
3 fields of specialization described below under Required
Curriculum. A Ph.D. degree in mineral economics requires
at least 90 semester hours of course work beyond the
bachelor’s degree, including at least 30 semester hours of
thesis credit for the doctoral dissertation. Credits from
previous graduate work may be transferred as approved by
44
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

the student’s doctoral committee. Ph.D. course requirements
EBGN546 Investments & Portfolio Management
(described below) include 24 semester hours of core
EBGN547 Financial Risk Management
courses; 12 semester hours in a field of specialization; 12
EBGN560 Decision Analysis in the Energy &
semester hours in an approved minor field; and 12 semester
Mineral Industries
hours of approved electives. Approval of the course work
EBGN575 Advanced Mineral Asset Valuation
comes from the student’s doctoral committee.
EBGN580 Exploration Economics
Prerequisites:
Operations Research
Students entering the Master of Science or Doctor of
EBGN525 Introduction to Operations Research
Philosophy programs in Mineral Economics typically hold
EBGN526 Manufacturing Management
undergraduate degrees in some area of engineering, mining,
EBGN528 Simulation
geology, economics, business administration, or resource
EBGN554 Integer Programming
management. Their interests are in advanced studies in
economic analysis, business management practices, and
EBGN555 Linear Programming
quantitative techniques as applied to the mineral and energy
EBGN556 Network Models
industries. Applicants are expected to have completed
EBGN558 Geometric Programming
undergraduate courses in microeconomics, macroeconom-
EBGN690 Advanced Econometrics
ics, calculus, financial accounting, and introductory
Fields of Research:
statistics. Although students lacking these courses can take
Faculty apply a wide variety of economic and business
them at CSM as nondegree credit courses, it may delay their
analytical tools to the study of energy, minerals and related
progress towards their final degree. GRE or GMAT scores
environmental issues. They include those of international
are required for all students.
trade, resource economics, environmental economics,
Required Curriculum:
industrial organization, metal market analysis, energy
For the M.S. degree the following core courses are
economics, applied microeconomics, applied econometrics,
required:
management theory and practice, human resource manage-
ment, finance and investment analysis, management styles,
EBGN 409 Mathematical Economics
exploration economics, decision analysis, utility theory, and
EBGN 504 Economic Evaluation and
corporate risk policy.
Investment Decision Methods
Description of Courses
EBGN 510 Natural Resource Economics
EBGN409. MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS This course
EBGN 511 Microeconomics
covers the mathematical tools needed to read published
EBGN 512 Macroeconomics
economic literature and to do advanced work in economics.
EBGN 590 Econometrics and Forecasting
It includes topics from differential and integral calculus,
For the Ph.D. degree, students complete all the M.S. core
matrix algebra and dynamic programming. Applications are
courses identified above, except for EBGN 504, and also
taken from mineral, energy and environmental issues,
take EBGN 611 (Advanced Microeconomics), EBGN 690
requiring both analytical and computer solutions using such
(Advanced Econometrics), and EBGN 695 (Research
programs as GAMS, Mathematica and SAS. Prerequisites:
Philosophy).
MACS111, EBGN311, EBGN312 or permission of
In addition, M.S. students complete 9 hours (3 courses)
instructor.
and Ph.D. students complete 12 hours (4 courses) in one of
Graduate Courses
the following fields of specialization:
500- and 600-level courses are open to qualified seniors
Economics and Public Policy
with the permission of the department and Dean of Graduate
EBGN530 Energy Economics
Studies and Research.
EBGN535 Economics of Metal Industries and Markets
EBGN504. ECONOMIC EVALUATION & INVESTMENT
EBGN536 Mineral Policies & International Investment
DECISION METHODS Time value of money concepts of
EBGN541 International Trade
present worth, future worth, annual worth, rate of return and
EBGN542 Economic Development
break-even analysis are applied to after-tax economic
analysis of mineral, petroleum and general investments.
EBGN570 Environmental Economics
Related topics emphasize proper handling of (1) inflation
EBGN610 Advanced Natural Resources
and escalation, (2) leverage (borrowed money), (3) risk
EBGN611 Advanced Microeconomics
adjustment of analyses using expected value concepts, and
EBGN690 Advanced Econometrics
(4) mutually exclusive alternative analyses and service
Business Strategy and Finance
producing alternatives. Case study analysis of a mineral or
EBGN506 Mineral Industry Management
petroleum investment situation required in a formal report.
EBGN545 Mineral Industry Finance
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
45

EBGN506. MINERAL INDUSTRY MANAGEMENT The
chains, network flows, integer programming, and geometric
management of production, marketing and finance with their
(nonlinear) modeling, immediately applicable in the
interrelationship, including top management functions.
workplace.
Analysis of case studies reinforce management principles.
EBGN526. MANUFACTURING MANAGEMENT Topics
EBGN510. NATURAL RESOURCE ECONOMICS The
to be covered include forecasting, inventory management,
threat and theory of resource exhaustion; commodity
material requirements planning, aggregate planning,
analysis and the problem of mineral market instability;
capacity planning, and facility layout. Special emphasis will
cartels and the nature of mineral pricing; the environment,
be placed on the role of uncertainty and methods for dealing
government involvement, and mineral policy issues;
with it. Prerequisites: EBGN525 or permission of
international mineral trade. This course is designed for
instructor.
entering graduate students in mineral economics. Prerequi-
EBGN528. SIMULATION Advanced study of simulation
sites: EBGN311, EBGN312 or permission of instructor.
techniques for modeling complex queuing systems, such as
EBGN511. MICROECONOMICS The first of two courses
production lines, computer systems, harbors and airports.
dealing with applied economic theory. This part concen-
Topics include random number and variate generation,
trates on the behavior of individual segments of the
Monte Carlo techniques, using a computer simulation
economy, the theory of consumer behavior and demand, the
language, experimental design, and variance reduction.
theory of production and costs, duality, welfare measures,
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
price and output level determination by business firms, and
EBGN530. ECONOMICS OF ENERGY RESOURCES
the structure of product and input markets. Prerequisites:
Application of models to understand markets for oil, gas,
MACS111, EBGN411, EBGN409 or permission of
coal, electricity, and renewable energy resources. Models,
instructor.
modeling techniques, and issues included in the course are
EBGN512. MACROECONOMICS The development of
supply and demand, market structure, transportation models,
macroeconomic models to determine the equilibrium level
game theory, futures markets, environmental issues, energy
of inflation, interest rates, unemployment and other basic
policy, energy regulation, input/output models, linear and
macroeconomic variables. The impact of government fiscal
nonlinear programming models, energy conservation, and
and monetary policy on these variables and the business
dynamic optimization. The emphasis in the course is on the
cycle, with particular attention to the effects on the mineral
development of appropriate models and their application to
industry. Prerequisites: MACS111, EBGN412 or permis-
current issues in energy markets. Prerequisites: EBGN409,
sion of instructor. Co-requisite: EBGN409.
EBGN511 or permission of instructor.
EBGN513. SEMINAR IN INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY
EBGN535. ECONOMICS OF METAL INDUSTRIES
Early experimentation with small group dynamics relative to
AND MARKETS Metal supply from main product,
economic incentive will be first presented. Hawthorne
byproduct, and secondary production. Metal demand and
experiments, experiments of Asch on perception, analysis of
intensity of use analysis. Market organization and price
case studies of work productivity in minerals, process, and
formation. Public policy, comparative advantage, and
manufacturing industries. Review of work of F. W. Taylor,
international metal trade. Metals and economic develop-
McGregor, and others in terms of optimum working
ment in the developing countries and former centrally
conditions relative to wage and fringe benefits. This course
planned economies. Environmental policy and mining and
has, as its primary aim, the equipping of a future consultant
mineral processing. Students prepare and present a major
to deal with socio-economic, behavioral, psychological, and
research paper. Prerequisites: EBGN510, EBGN511,
political problems in the workplace. This course teaches the
EBGN590 or permission of instructor.
survival, report writing, and presentation skills and cultural
EBGN536. MINERAL POLICIES & INTERNATIONAL
awareness needed for success in the real international
INVESTMENT Identification and evaluation of interna-
business world. Format is case studies, reported and
tional mineral investment policies and company responses
presented.
using economic, business and legal concepts. Assessment
EBGN525. INTRODUCTION TO OPERATIONS
of policy issues in light of stakeholder interests and needs.
RESEARCH This course is an introduction to selected
Theoretical issues are introduced and then applied to case
methods of management science and operations research
studies, policy drafting, and negotiation exercises to assure
applied to operations, management, and planning functions
both conceptual and practical understanding of the issues.
in the minerals, manufacturing, and other industries.
Special attention is given to the formation of national
Emphasis will be on economic modeling of production
policies and corporate decision making concerning fiscal
scheduling, inventory control, supply-chain, and distribu-
regimes, project financing, environmental protection, land
tion, production planning, project planning, and capital
use and local community concerns and the content of
budgeting. There will be an introduction to various
exploration and extraction agreements. Prerequisite:
modeling approaches, such as linear programming, Markov
permission of instructor.
46
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

EBGN541. INTERNATIONAL TRADE Theories and
ming. Survey of application-oriented integer programming
evidence on international trade and development. Determi-
methods. Course emphasis will be on the formulation and
nants of static and dynamic comparative advantage. The
solution of capital budgeting, capital allocation, distribution
arguments for and against free trade. Economic develop-
and personnel problems, and production planning problems.
ment in non-industrialized countries. Sectoral development
Application examples provided for mineral resource,
policies and industrialization. The special problems and
manufacturing, production, processing, and marketing.
opportunities created by extensive mineral resource
Course will concentrate on formulation methods using case
endowments. The impact of value-added processing and
studies and examples from the mineral and other industries.
export diversification on development. Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
EBGN409, EBGN510, EBGN511 or permission of
EBGN555. LINEAR PROGRAMMING Geometric
instructor.
interpretation of linear programming problems, the simplex
EBGN542. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Role of energy
method, the revised simplex method, and the product form
and minerals in the development process. Sectoral policies
of the inverse, duality theory, duel simplex, and applica-
and their links with macroeconomic policies. Special
tions, sensitivity analysis, complementary slackness and
attention to issues of revenue stabilization, resource largesse
applications. The emphasis is on formulation of business
effects, downstream processing, and diversification.
and economic problems as linear programs, including
Prerequisites: EBGN409, EBGN511, EBGN512 or
production planning, staffing, scheduling, blending and
permission of instructor.
product mix applications, and modeling and solving the
problems on the computer. Efficiency and implementation
EBGN545. MINERAL INDUSTRY FINANCE Introduc-
issues are discussed, and advanced topics include decompo-
tion to the fundamentals of corporate finance as they pertain
sition methods for large-scale problems. The aim of the
to the valuation of investments, firms, and the securities
course is to equip students to formulate and solve real world
they issue. Included are the relevant theories associated
problems as linear programs. Prerequisites: MACS111,
with capital budgeting, financing decisions, and dividend
EBGN409 or permission of instructor.
policy. This course provides an in-depth study of the theory
and practice of corporate financial management including a
EBGN556. NETWORK MODELS Network optimization
study of the firm’s objectives, investment decisions, long-
deals with the modeling of optimization problems that
term financing decisions, and working capital management.
contain a very particular type of structure. Topics include
Prerequisites: EBGN305 or permission of instructor.
minimal spanning trees, shortest path algorithms, maximum
flow, minimum cut methods, out-of-kilter and node-chain
EBGN546. INVESTMENT & PORTFOLIO MANAGE-
algorithms. Prerequisites: EBGN 555 or permission of
MENT The environment and process of investment in
instructor.
theory and practice, providing a comprehensive understand-
ing of the dynamics of securities markets, valuation
EBGN558. ECONOMIC & ENGINEERING APPLICA-
techniques and trading strategies for stocks, bonds, and
TIONS OF GEOMETRIC PROGRAMMING
Kuhn-
derivative securities. This includes the mean-variance
Tucker-Karush conditions for optimality. Formulation of
efficient portfolio theory, the arbitrage pricing theory, bond
mathematical models and solution methods using methods
portfolio management, investment management functions
of nonlinear and geometric programming presented.
and policies, and portfolio performance evaluation.
Examples presented defining the relationship of geometric
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
programming to general nonlinear economic models and
engineering design. Course is strictly applications-oriented,
EBGN547. FINANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT Analysis
with main emphasis on engineering design and engineering
of the sources, causes and effects of risks associated with
economic models.
holding, operating and managing assets by individuals and
organizations; evaluation of the need and importance of
EBGN560. DECISION ANALYSIS IN THE ENERGY
managing these risks; and discussion of the methods
AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES Introduction to the science
employed and the instruments utilized to achieve risk
of decision making and risk theory. Application of decision
shifting objectives. The course concentrates on the use of
analysis and utility theory to the analysis of strategic
derivative assets in the risk management process. These
decision problems. Focuses on the application of quantita-
derivatives include futures, options, swaps, swaptions, caps,
tive methods to business problems characterized by risk and
collars and floors. Exposure to interest rate risks and
uncertainty. Choice problems such as decisions concerning
foreign exchange risks will be explored and ways of
major capital investments, corporate acquisitions, new
handling them will be reviewed and critiqued. Prerequi-
product introductions, and choices among alternative
sites: EBGN546 or permission of instructor.
technologies are conceptualized and structured using the
concepts introduced in this course. Prerequisites:
EBGN554. ECONOMIC MODELING WITH INTEGER
EBGN504 or permission of instructor.
PROGRAMMING Survey of economic modeling formula-
tion using methods of integer and mixed-integer program-
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
47

EBGN570. ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS The role
Constrained optimization techniques are used to evaluate the
of markets and other economic considerations in controlling
impact of capital constraints, exploration activity and
pollution; the effect of environmental policy on resource
environmental regulations. Prerequisites: EBGN409,
allocation incentives; the use of benefit/cost analysis in
EBGN510, EBGN511 or permission of instructor.
environmental policy decisions and the associated problems
EBGN611. ADVANCED MICROECONOMICS A second
with measuring benefits and costs. Prerequisites:
graduate course in microeconomics, emphasizing state-of-
EBGN510, EBGN511 or permission of instructor.
the-art theoretical and mathematical developments. Topics
EBGN575. ADVANCED MINERAL ASSET VALUA-
include consumer theory, production theory and the use of
TION The use of stochastic and option pricing techniques in
game theoretic and dynamic optimization tools. Prerequi-
mineral and energy asset valuation. The Hotelling Valuation
site: EBGN409, EBGN511 or permission of instructor.
Principle. The measurement of political risk and its impact
EBGN690. ADVANCED ECONOMETRICS A second
on project value. Extensive use of real cases. Prerequisites:
course in econometrics. Compared to EBGN590, this
EBGN409, EBGN421 or EBGN504, EBGN510, EBGN511
course provides a more theoretical and mathematical
or permission of instructor.
treatment of econometrics; matrix algebra is used; model
EBGN580. EXPLORATION ECONOMICS Exploration
construction and hypothesis testing are emphasized rather
planning and decision making for oil and gas, and metallic
than forecasting. Prerequisites: EBGN409, EBGN590 or
minerals. Risk analysis. Historical trends in exploration
permission of instructor.
activity and productivity. Prerequisites: EBGN510 or
EBGN695. RESEARCH PHILOSOPHY An in-depth
permission of instructor. Offered when student demand is
research project supervised by a faculty member from the
sufficient.
student’s field of specialization. Lectures provide an
EBGN590. ECONOMETRICS AND FORECASTING
overview of methods used in economic research, and
Ordinary least squares and single equation regression
information on how to carry out research and present
models; two stage least squares and multiple equation
research results. Students give a seminar on their research.
econometric models; specification error, serial correlation,
This course must be taken by all Ph.D. students during
heteroskedasticity, and other problems; distributive lag and
spring semester of their second year. Prerequisite: permis-
other extensions; applications to mineral commodity
sion of instructor.
markets; hypothesis testing; forecasting with econometric
EBGN698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS AND
models, time series analysis, simulation, and other tech-
BUSINESS Pilot course or special topics course. Topics
niques. Prerequisite: MACS530 or permission of instructor.
chosen from special intersts of instructor(s) and student(s).
EBGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS AND
Usually the course is offered only once.
BUSINESS Pilot course or special topics course. Topics
EBGN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY Individual research
chosen from special intersts of instructor(s) and student(s).
or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member
Usually the course is offered only once.
when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter,
EBGN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY Individual research
content, and credit hours.
or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member
EBGN701. GRADUATE THESIS: MASTER OF
when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter,
SCIENCE Preparation of the master’s thesis under the
content, and credit hours.
supervision of the graduate student’s advisory committee.
EBGN610. ADVANCED NATURAL RESOURCE
EBGN703. GRADUATE THESIS: DOCTOR OF
ECONOMICS Topics covered include optimal resource use
PHILOSOPHY Preparation of the doctoral thesis under the
in a dynamic context. The tools used are mathematical
supervision of the graduate student’s advisory committee.
programming, optimal control theory and game theory.
48
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Engineering
Program Requirements:
JOAN P. GOSINK, Professor and Division Director
M.E. (Engineering Systems) 30 credit hours
THEODORE A. BICKART, Professor and President
M.S. (Engineering Systems) 30 credit hours
JIN S. CHUNG, Professor
Ph.D. (Engineering Systems) 90 credit hours
D. VAUGHAN GRIFFITHS, Professor
ROBERT J. KEE, George R. Brown Distinguished Professor of
Students must have a faculty supervisor in the Engineer-
Engineering
ing Division to direct and monitor their research, and a
ROBERT H. KING, Professor and Associate Division Director
degree committee to oversee their progress. A Masters
MARK A. LINNE, Professor
student’s committee must have at least three members, two
RAHMAT A. SHOURESHI, Gerard August Dobelman Distin-
of whom must be faculty in the Engineering Division. A
guished Professor of Engineering
Doctoral student’s committee must have at least five
JOHN R. BERGER, Associate Professor
members; at least three members must be faculty in the
MARK T. LUSK, Associate Professor
Engineering Division, and at least one member must be
NIGEL T. MIDDLETON, Associate Professor and Associate Vice-
from the department in which the student is pursuing a
President for Academic Affairs
minor program. Minor programs of at least 12 semester
DAVID R. MUNOZ, Associate Professor
hours, which further the interdisciplinary concept of
GRAHAM G. W. MUSTOE, Associate Professor
engineering systems, are required for doctoral students.
KARL R. NELSON, Associate Professor
Doctoral students must pass a Preliminary Examination,
TERENCE E. PARKER, Associate Professor
which is intended to gauge the student’s capability to pursue
CATHERINE K. SKOKAN, Associate Professor
research in Engineering Systems. The Preliminary Examina-
CHRISTIAN DEBRUNNER, Assistant Professor
tion is based principally on the material in the Engineering
JEAN-PIERRE DELPLANQUE, Assistant Professor
core courses Advanced Engineering Measurements and
WILLIAM A. HOFF, Assistant Professor
Interdisciplinary Modeling and Simulation, as well as
NING LU, Assistant Professor
relevant undergraduate material. The Preliminary Examina-
JOHN A. PALMER, Assistant Professor
tion is given once per year at the beginning of the Spring
LAXIMINARAYAN L. RAJA, Assistant Professor
semester. Normally, Ph.D. students will take the preliminary
JOHN P. H. STEELE, Assistant Professor
Examination in their first year, but it must be taken within
TYRONE VINCENT, Assistant Professor
three semesters of entering the program.
RAY RUICHONG ZHANG, Assistant Professor
SANAA ABDEL-AZIM, Lecturer
Within 18 months after passing the Preliminary Exami-
CANDACE S. AMMERMAN, Lecturer
nation, the Ph.D. student must prepare a written thesis
RON KNOSHAUG, Lecturer
proposal and present it formally to the thesis committee and
THOMAS GROVER, Research Professor
other interested faculty. The Ph.D. Comprehensive Exami-
HAROLD W. OLSEN, Research Professor
nation coincides with the thesis proposal presentation. The
MASAMI NAKAGAWA, Research Associate Professor
student will be questioned about the proposal, as well as
MICHAEL B. McGRATH, Emeritus Professor
other topics within the field of major and minor studies.
GABRIEL M. NEUNZERT, Emeritus Associate Professor
After passing the Comprehensive Examination, the student
will be admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D..
Degrees Offered:
Master of Engineering (Engineering Systems)
At the conclusion of the MS and Ph.D. programs, the
student will be required to make a formal presentation and
Master of Science (Engineering Systems)
defense of his/her thesis research.
Doctor of Philosophy (Engineering Systems)
Applicants for the Master of Science degree must
Program Description:
complete 24 semester hours of approved course work and at
The Engineering Systems Program offers a graduate
least 6 hours of thesis research. The credit-hour requirement
multidisciplinary education that is at the intersections of the
is the same for the Master of Engineering degree, but the
traditional engineering disciplines. The Engineering
thesis is exchanged for a design of development report on a
Division’s faculty represents Civil, Electrical, and Mechani-
comprehensive engineering project. For the Ph.D., at least
cal Engineering, as well as Engineering Science, with much
30 credit hours must be devoted to thesis research. The
of the research occurring at these intersections. It is also
thesis must make a fundamental contribution to the
common to pursue education and research that is at
engineering field.
intersections between Engineering and other disciplines.
Prerequisites:
The program demands academic rigor and depth, yet also
The requirements for admission for the M.E., M.S., and
addresses the real-world problems of advanced engineering
Ph.D. degrees in Engineering Systems are a baccalaureate
and technology. The choice of research topics and course
degree in engineering, a physical science, or math from an
offerings prepares graduates for a range of industrial or
ABET-accredited program or equivalent four-year engineer-
academic careers.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
49

ing program, with a grade-point average over 3.0/4.0;
coupling among the thermal, mechanical, kinematic and
Graduate Record Examination scores of 600 (analytical) and
kinetic character of materials. Investigations draw form
700 (quantitative); and a TOEFL score of 550 or higher for
the basic physical sciences, applied mathematics,
applicants whose native language is not English. Applicants
computational mechanics, and materials engineering.
from an engineering program at CSM are not required to
Current projects consider the flow and compaction of
submit GRE scores.
granular materials, fracture phenomena, phase transitions
The Engineering Graduate committee evaluating an
and recrystallization, bridging of length scales, the
applicant may require that the student take undergraduate
properties of material interfaces, and the effect of
remedial coursework to overcome technical deficiencies,
mechanical loading on the transport properties of multi-
which does not count toward the graduate program. The
phase materials. Researchers in this group typically
committee will decide whether to recommend to the Dean of
investigate basic physical issues through the develop-
Graduate Studies and Research regular or provisional
ment and use of sophisticated numerical simulations and
admission, and may ask the applicant to come for an
experimental studies.
interview.
Power System
Required Curriculum:
Curriculum and research projects in the power-engineering
For both Masters and Ph.D. degrees
program are directly linked to the activities of the CSM
u
National Science Foundation research center for
EGES 501 Advanced Engineering Measurements
u
Advanced Control of Energy and Power Systems
EGES 502 Interdisciplinary Modeling and Simulation
u
(ACEPS). Arizona State University, Purdue University,
EGES 503 Modern Engineering Design and Manage-
and Wichita State University are member institutions in
ment
u
ACEPS. Research projects of this center directly
EGES 504/604 Engineering Systems Graduate Collo-
impacting the utility industry include intelligent
quium
substation diagnostics and predictive maintenance;
Doctoral students must take a minor program of at least
advanced automatic generation control; new sensors for
12 semester hours.
real-time NOx control; optical fiber-based in-situ sensor
Fields of Research:
for health assessment of high voltage transformer;
Advanced Sensing and Automation
electro-magneto-acoustic transducers for monitoring of
transmission and distribution equipment. Several
Projects in this area develop and apply advanced sensing
laboratories as well as direct access to the ACEPS
and automation research to a variety of engineering
member utilities’ facilities provide a unique hands-on
systems. Current multidisciplinary projects span
experience for the graduate students in our power system
traditional electrical, mechanical, and civil engineering,
program.
as well as computer science and other disciplines. A
common thread is the use of signal processing and
Structural Dynamics
intelligent control techniques. Current projects encom-
Emphasis is placed upon analytical description of overall
pass development of machine vision techniques for
structural behavior under external loads (e.g., earthquake
applications in robotics, radar, and medical imaging;
and wind). Study is made of the nature of these loads,
diagnostics and health monitoring for structures and
static or dynamic, and random and deterministic, with
systems, fuzzy logic and neural network techniques in
implications being drawn for design. Students in this
decision processing, intelligent biomedical devices;
area can also have opportunities to participate in the
augmented reality; and intelligent electric-power-system
USGS and international collaboration. Current work
control.
supported by various federal and local agencies and
private sectors includes innovative design of a new
Geomechanics and Environmental Geotechnics
generation of high-rise buildings; active, passive and
The geomechanics and environmental geotechnics area of
hybrid vibration control of such engineering systems as
study actively explores research subjects in the following
offshore structures and civil infrastructures subjected to
fundamental and practical fronts: computational
earthquake motion, turbulent wind and currents;
numerical and analytical methods in geomechanics,
reliability analysis of large-scale engineering systems;
stochastic finite element modeling of heterogeneous
simulation of stochastic processes and fields relevant to
soils, experimental and theoretical investigation on
civil/mechanical engineering issues; wave phenomena
coupled phenomenon in expansive geomaterials, coupled
modeling (e.g., earthquake and wind loads) and its
fluid and chemical transport in partially saturated soils,
engineering applications.
and discrete element modeling of particulate systems.
Thermal Systems
Mechanics and Materials
A number of projects span from traditional mechanical-
Research projects in mechanics and materials focus on the
engineering areas of fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and
static and dynamic behavior of solids and emphasize the
physical gas dynamics, to chemical engineering,
50
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

electrical engineering, mathematics, and material
analysis methods of environmental forces, hydrodynamics,
science. For example, research includes understanding
structural responses, and pipe flows for the design of
combustion-generated pollutant formation and abate-
platform, riser, subsea completion and pipeline systems,
ment, combustion synthesis of materials, and advanced
including environment-hydrodynamic-structure interactions.
material processing using chemically reacting flow. An
System design parameters. Industry practice and the current
important research emphasis is in optical diagnostics to
state-of-the-art technology for deep ocean drilling. Prerequi-
measure composition and flow fields, including real-time
sites: MACS315, EGGN320, EGGN351 and consent of
process sensors. Another important research area is
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
modeling and simulation, especially for complex
EGGN411. MACHINE DESIGN (I, II) Introduction to the
chemically reacting flows. An application here is the
principles of mechanical design. Consideration of the
design and control of processes for the manufacture of
behavior of materials under static and cyclic loading; failure
electronic thin films by chemical vapor deposition.
considerations. Application of the basic theories of
Description of Courses
mechanics, kinematics, and mechanics of materials to the
EGGN400/MNGN400. INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS
design of basic machine elements, such as shafts, keys, and
FOR THE MINERALS AND CONSTRUCTION INDUS-
coupling; journal bearings, antifriction bearings, wire rope,
TRIES (II) Focuses on construction and minerals industries
gearing; brakes and clutches, welded connections and other
applications. Overview and introduction to the science and
fastenings. Prerequisite: EPIC251, EGGN315, and
engineering of intelligent mobile robotics and robotic
EGGN320. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
manipulators. Covers guidance and force sensing, percep-
EGGN413. COMPUTER-AIDED ENGINEERING (I, II)
tion of the environment around a mobile vehicle, reasoning
This course introduces the student to the concept of
about the environment to identify obstacles and guidance
computer-aided engineering. Analytical and computer
path features and adaptively controlling and monitoring the
graphical techniques are used to solve dynamic and
vehicle health. A lesser emphasis is placed on robot
kinematic analysis and synthesis problems. Emphasis is
manipulator kinematics, dynamics, and force and tactile
given to design projects that are aimed at developing skills
sensing. Surveys manipulator and intelligent mobile robotics
for design process, including problem specification,
research and development. Introduces principles and
modeling, analysis and visual display using computer-aided
concepts of guidance, position, and force sensing; vision
design equipment and software. Prerequisite: EGGN320. 3
data processing; basic path and trajectory planning algo-
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
rithms; and force and position control. Prerequisite:
PHGN200/210. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN422. ADVANCED MECHANICS OF MATERIALS
(II) General theories of stress and strain; stress and strain
EGGN403. THERMODYNAMICS II (I, II) Thermody-
transformations, principal stresses and strains, octahedral
namic relations, Maxwell’s Relations, Clapeyron equation,
shear stresses, Hooke’s law for isotropic material, and
fugacity, mixtures and solutions, thermodynamics of mixing,
failure criteria. Introduction to elasticity and to energy
Gibbs function, activity coefficient, combustion processes,
methods. Torsion of noncircular and thin-walled members.
first and second law applied to reacting systems, third law of
Unsymmetrical bending and shear-center, curved beams,
thermodynamics, real combustion processes, phase and
and beams on elastic foundations. Introduction to plate
chemical equilibrium, Gibbs rule, equilibrium of multicom-
theory. Thick-walled cylinders and contact stresses.
ponent systems, simultaneous chemical reaction of real
Prerequisite: EGGN320. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
combustion processes, ionization, application to real
industrial problems. Prerequisite: EGGN351, EGGN371. 3
EGGN430. GLOBAL POSITIONING (II) A follow-up
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
course to basic surveying which answers the fundamental
question Òwhere are you?Ó. Determination of latitude and
EGGN407. INTRODUCTION TO FEEDBACK CON-
longitude by astronomical and by GPS (Global Positioning
TROL SYSTEMS (I, II) System modeling through an
System) from satellites. Reduction of this data through
energy flow approach is presented, and modeling of
conformal and non-conformal projections to NAD’27 and
electromechanical and thermofluid systems are discussed.
NAD’83 State Plane Coordinates, UTM and computer based
Feedback control design techniques using pole-placement,
mapping bases, GIS (Geographic Information Systems). The
root locus, and lead-log compensators are presented. Case
major user of this concept is anybody who uses a map or
studies using real-life problems are presented and analyzed.
who has to add information to a mapping base. Data
Prerequisite: MACS315 and DCGN381 3 hours lecture; 3
gathering will be optional. Prerequisite: EGGN233. 3 hours
semester hours.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN408. INTRODUCTION TO OFFSHORE TECH-
EGGN442. FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR ENGI-
NOLOGY (II) Introduction to practical offshore engineer-
NEERS (II) A course combining finite element theory with
ing/design technology for the exploration, drilling, produc-
practical programming experience in which the multi-
tion and transportation of petroleum in the ocean. Practical
disciplinary nature of the finite element method as a
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
51

numerical technique for solving differential equations is
EGGN464. FOUNDATIONS (I, II) Techniques of subsoil
emphasized. Topics covered include simple ‘structural’
investigation, types of foundations and foundation prob-
element, solid elasticity, steady state analysis, transient
lems, selection of and basis for design of foundation types.
analysis. Students get a copy of all the source code
Prerequisite: EGGN461. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
published in the course textbook. Prerequisite: EGGN320. 3
EGGN466. CONSTRUCTION SITE ENGINEERING (I)
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Construction site investigations. Project planning, manage-
EGGN444. DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES (I) Steel
ment, and scheduling. Construction equipment, materials,
properties; design of tension and compression members;
and methods. Engineering parameters affected by the
beams; bolted and welded connections and plate girders;
geologic environment. Construction organization, bidding,
both elastic and plastic methods will be applied to the
contracts. Prerequisite: Senior standing in EG or GE or
design of a commercial building. Prerequisite: EGGN342. 2
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 field trips required;
hours lecture; 3 hours design lab; 3 semester hours.
3 semester hours.
EGGN445. DESIGN OF REINFORCED CONCRETE
EGGN471. HEAT TRANSFER (I, II) Engineering approach
STRUCTURES (II) Loads on structures, design of columns,
to conduction, convection, and radiation, including steady-
continuous beams, slabs, retaining walls, composite beams,
state conduction, nonsteady-state conduction, internal heat
introduction to prestressed and precast construction.
generation conduction in one, two, and three dimensions,
Prerequisite: EGGN342. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours design lab;
and combined conduction and convection. Free and forced
3 semester hours.
convection including laminar and turbulent flow, internal
and external flow. Radiation of black and grey surfaces,
EGGN450. MULTIDISCIPLINARY ENGINEERING
shape factors and electrical equivalence. Prerequisite:
LABORATORY III Laboratory experiments integrating
MACS315, EGGN351, EGGN371. 3 hours lecture; 3
electrical circuits, fluid mechanics, stress analysis, and other
semester hours.
engineering fundamentals using computer data acquisition
and transducers. Students will design experiments to gather
EGGN473. FLUID MECHANICS II (I) Review of
data for solving engineering problems. Examples are
elementary fluid mechanics and engineering. Two-dimen-
recommending design improvements to a refrigerator,
sional internal and external flows. Steady and unsteady
diagnosing and predicting failures in refrigerators, computer
flows. Fluid engineering problems. Compressible flow.
control of a hydraulic fluid power circuit in a fatigue test,
Computer solutions of various practical problems for
analysis of structural failures in an off-road vehicle and
mechanical and related engineering disciplines. Prerequisite:
redesign, diagnosis and prediction of failures in a motor/
EGGN351 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
generator system.. Prerequisites: DCGN381, EGGN383,
semester hours.
EGGN250, EGGN352, EGGN350, EGGN351, EGGN320;
EGGN478. ENGINEERING DYNAMICS (I) Applications
concurrent enrollment in EGGN407. 3 hours lab; 1 semester
of dynamics to design, mechanisms and machine elements.
hour.
Kinematics and kinetics of planar linkages. Analytical and
EGGN451. HYDRAULIC PROBLEMS (I) Review of
graphical methods. Four-bar linkage, slider-crank, quick-
fundamentals, forces on submerged surfaces, buoyancy and
return mechanisms, cams, and gears. Analysis of nonplanar
flotation, gravity dams, weirs, steady flow in open channels,
mechanisms. Static and dynamic balancing of rotating
backwater curves, hydraulic machinery, elementary
machinery. Free and forced vibrations and vibration
hydrodynamics, hydraulic structures. Prerequisite:
isolation. Prerequisite: EGGN315; concurrent enrollment in
EGGN351. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MACS315. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN461. SOIL MECHANICS (I, II) Fundamental
EGGN481. ADVANCED ELECTRONICS AND DIGITAL
relations, methods of soil classification, seepage and water
SYSTEMS (I, II) Device models; transistors as amplifiers,
flow in soils, consolidation and settlement, shear strength
switches, and gates; integrating differentiating wave shaping
and deformation characteristics, slope stability analysis,
and signal processing circuits. Small scale (SSI), medium
lateral earth pressures and bearing capacity. Special
scale (MSI), large scale (LSI) integration; logic components,
emphasis will be placed on earth structures, porous flow,
subsystems; analog-to- digital and digital-to-analog
slope stability, retaining walls and foundation reactions.
conversion techniques. Laboratory experience, evaluation,
Prerequisite: EGGN320 or concurrent enrollment. 3 hours
application and extension of lecture concepts. Prerequisite:
lecture; 3 semester hours.
DCGN381 and EGGN250 or PHGN317 or consent of
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
EGGN463. SOIL MECHANICS LABORATORY (I, II)
Methods of sampling and testing soils for engineering
EGGN482. MICROCOMPUTER ARCHITECTURE AND
purposes. Prerequisite: EGGN461 or concurrent enrollment.
INTERFACING (II) Microprocessor and microcontroller
3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
architecture focusing on hardware structures and elementary
machine and assembly language programming skills
essential for use of microprocessors in data acquisition,
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Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

control and instrumentation systems. Analog and digital
develop student creativity, use of design methodology and
signal conditioning, communication, and processing. A/D
application of prior course work paralleled by individual
and D/A converters for microprocessors. RS232 and other
study and research. Prerequisites: EGGN342 or EGGN382
communication standards. Laboratory study and evaluation
and concurrent enrollment in EGGN407 and EGGN481,
of microcomputer system; design and implementation of
orconcurrent enrollment in EGGN411, and permission of
interfacing projects. Prerequisite: EGGN481 or consent of
the Capstone Design Course Committee. 1 hour lecture; 6
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
hours lab; 3 semester hours.
EGGN483. INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION
EGGN492. SENIOR DESIGN II (I, II) This is the second of
AND SIGNAL PROCESSING (I) Signal classification;
a two-semester course sequence to give the student
Fourier transform; filtering; sampling; signal representation;
experience in the engineering design process. This course
modulation; demodulation; applications to broadcast, data
will consist of a single comprehensive design project
transmission, and instrumentation. Prerequisite: EGGN382
covering the entire semester. Design integrity and perfor-
or consent of department. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4
mance are to be demonstrated by building a prototype or
semester hours.
model and performing pre-planned experimental tests,
wherever feasible. Prerequisite: EGGN491 1 hour lecture; 6
EGGN484. POWER SYSTEMS ANALYSIS (I) Power
hours lab; 3 semester hours.
systems, three-phase circuits, per unit calculations, system
components, stability cirteria, network faults, system
EGGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGINEERING (I, II)
instrumentation, system grounding, load-flow, economic
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
operation. Prerequisite: EGGN384 or EGGN389. 3 hours
special interest of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
lecture; 3 semester hours.
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
EGGN485. INTRODUCTION TO HIGH POWER
ELECTRONICS (II) Power electronics are used in a broad
EGGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
range of applications from control of power flow on major
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
transmission lines to control of motor speeds in industrial
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
facilities and electric vehicles, to computer power supplies.
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
This course introduces the basic principples of analysis and
‘Independent Study’ form must be completed and submitted
design of circuits utilizing power electronics, including AC/
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
DC, AC/AC, DC/DC, and DC/AC conversions in their
Graduate Courses
many configurations. Prerequisite: EGGN407 or concurrent
500-level courses are open to qualified seniors with the
enrollment. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
permission of the department and Dean of the Graduate
EGGN487. ENGINEERING CONTROL LABORATORY I
School.
(II) Experiments to verify principles of feedback control
EGES501. ADVANCED ENGINEERING MEASURE-
systems. Prerequisite: EGGN486 or concurrent enrollment.
MENTS (I) Introduction to the fundamentals of measure-
3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
ments within the context of engineering systems. Topics
EGGN488. RELIABILITY OF ENGINEERING SYSTEMS
that are covered include: errors and error analysis, modeling
(I) This course addresses uncertainty modeling, reliability
of measurement systems, basic electronics, noise and noise
analysis, risk assessment, reliability-based design, predictive
reduction, and data acquisition systems. Prerequisite: EGGN
maintenance, optimization, and cost-effective retrofit of
250, DCGN381 or equivalent, and MACS 323 or equiva-
engineering systems such as structural, sensory, electric,
lent; graduate student status or consent of the instructor. 3
pipeline, hydraulic, lifeline and environmental facilities.
hours lecture, 1 hour lab; 4 semester hours.
Topics include introduction of reliability of engineering
EGES502. INTERDISCIPLINARY MODELING AND
systems, stochastic engineering system simulation, fre-
SIMULATION (I) Introduce modern simulation and
quency analysis of extreme events, reliability and risk
modeling techniques, as used to solve traditional and
evaluation of engineering systems, and optimization of
multidisciplinary engineering problems. Static and dynamic
engineering systems. Prerequisite: MACS323. 3 hours
phenomena are described in space and space-time domains
lecture; 3 semester hours.
as well as in transform space. Analytical as well as computa-
EGGN491. SENIOR DESIGN I (I, II) The first of a two-
tional solution methods are developed and applied for linear
semester course sequence giving the student experience in
and nonlinear systems. Simulation and modeling ap-
the engineering design process. Realistic, open-ended
proaches are applied to solve multidisciplinary engineering
design problems are addressed at the conceptual, engineer-
problems. Prerequisite: This is an introductory graduate
ing analysis, and the synthesis stages, and include economic
class. The student must have a solid understanding of linear
and ethical considerations necessary to arrive at a final
algebra, calculus, ordinary differential equations, and
design. Several design projects are completed during the
Fourier theory. 3 hours lecture; 1 hour lab; 4 semester hours.
two-semester sequence. The design projects are chosen to
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
53

EGES503. MODERN ENGINEERING DESIGN AND
Systems, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
PROJECT MANAGEMENT (II) Contemporary technical
hours.
and behavioral issues in engineering design and project
EGES512. COMPUTER VISION (II) Computer vision is
management. Implementation of project organization
the process of using computers to acquire images, transform
techniques to plan thesis research projects or projects
images, and extract symbolic descriptions from images.
selected at the beginning of the semester. Elements of
This course concentrates on how to recover the structure
quality control in manufacturing and numerous marketing
and properties of a possibly dynamic three-dimensional
tools. Prerequisite: EGGN 491 and EGGN 492, or equiva-
world from its two-dimensional images. We start with an
lent senior design project experience, or equivalent
overview of image formation and low level image process-
industrial design experience, or consent of the Engineering
ing, including feature extraction techniques. We then go
Division. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
into detail on the theory and techniques for estimating
EGES504. ENGINEERING SYSTEMS SEMINAR (II)
shape, location, motion, and recognizing objects. Applica-
This is a seminar and discussion forum for graduate students
tions and case studies will be discussed from areas such as
to present their research projects, critique others’ presenta-
scientific image analysis, robotics, machine vision inspec-
tions, understand the breadth of engineering projects across
tion systems, photogrammetry, multimedia, and human
the Division, hear from leaders of industry about the
interfaces (such as face and gesture recognition). Design
contemporary engineering as well as socio-economical,
ability and hands-on projects will be emphasized, using
marketing and behavioral issues facing today’s competitive
image processing software and hardware systems. Prerequi-
business environment. In order to improve communication
site: Linear algebra, Fourier transforms, knowledge of C
skills, each student is required to present a seminar in this
programming language. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
course before his/her graduation from Engineering Systems
EGES514/MNGN. MINING ROBOTICS (I) Fundamentals
graduate program. Also students are required to write
of robotics as applied to the mining industry. The focus is
weekly critiques about materials delivery techniques used in
on mobile robotic vehicles. Topics covered are: mining
the previous week’s seminar by the presenter. Prerequisite:
applications, introduction and history of mobile robotics,
Graduate standing. 1 hour seminar, 1 semester hour.
sensors, including vision, problems of sensing variations in
EGES510. IMAGE AND MULTIDIMENSIONAL SIGNAL
rock properties, problems of representing human knowledge
PROCESSING (I) This course provides the student with
in control systems, machine condition diagnostics, kinemat-
the theoretical background to allow them to apply state of
ics, and path finding. Prerequisite: EGGN 407, or consent
the art image and multi-dimensional signal processing
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
techniques. The course teaches students to solve practical
Fall semesters, every two years.
problems involving the processing of multidimensional data
EGES517. THEORY AND DESIGN OF ADVANCED
such as imagery, video sequences, and volumetric data. The
CONTROL SYSTEMS (II) A unified energy-based
types of problems students are expected to solve are
approach to modeling of dynamic systems is presented to
automated mensuration from multidimensional data, and the
handle transient analysis of complex and integrated
restoration, reconstruction, or compression of multidimen-
processes and systems. Linear, nonlinear, and time varying
sional data. The tools used in solving these problems
systems are analyzed using matrix notation and linear
include a variety of feature extraction methods, filtering
algebra. Concepts of controllability and observability are
techniques, segmentation techniques, and transform
presented. Design techniques for optimal open loop and
methods. Students will use the techniques covered in this
closed loop systems using Hamiltonian and Pontryagin
course to solve practical problems in projects. Prerequisite:
principles are described. Analysis and design of optimal
EGGN 388 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
feedback control systems and design of observers are
EGES511. DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING (I) This
presented. Prerequisite: EGGN 407 or consent of instructor
course introduces the engineering aspects of digital signal
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Spring semester of odd
processing (DSP). It deals with the theoretical foundations
years.
of DSP combined with applications and implementation
EGES518. ROBOT MECHANICS: KINEMATICS,
technologies. While the bulk of the course addresses one-
DYNAMICS, AND CONTROL (I) Mathematical represen-
dimensional signals and emphasizes digital filters, there are
tation of robot structures. Mechanical analysis including
extensions to specialized and contemporary topics such as
kinematics, dynamics, and design of robot manipulators.
sigma-delta conversion techniques. The course will be
Representations for trajectories and path planning for
useful to all students who are concerned with information
robots. Fundamentals of robot control including, linear,
bearing signals and signal-processing in a wide variety of
nonlinear and force control methods. Introduction to off-
applications settings, including sensing, instrumentation,
line programming techniques and simulation. Prerequisite:
control, communications, signal interpretation and diagnos-
EGGN 407, EGGN 400, or consent of instructor. 3 hours
tics, and imaging. Prerequisite: EGGN 483 and EGGN 407,
lecture; 3 semester hours. Fall semesters, ever year, or every
EGGN 388, approved undergraduate coursework in Linear
other year, depending on interest.
54
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

EGES521. MECHATRONICS (II) Fundamental design of
EGES535. INTRODUCTION TO DISCRETE ELEMENT
electromechanical systems with embedded microcomputers
METHODS (DEMS) (II) Review of particle/rigid body
and intelligence. Design of microprocessor based systems
dynamics, numerical DEM solution of equations of motion
and their interfaces. Fundamental design of machines with
for a system of particles/rigid bodies, linear and nonlinear
active sensing and adaptive response. Microcontrollers and
contact and impact laws dynamics, applications of DEM in
integration of micro-sensors and micro-actuators in the
mechanical engineering, materials processing and
design of electromechanical systems. Introduction to
geomechanics. Prerequisites: EGGN320, EGGN315 and
algorithms for information processing appropriate for
some scientific programming experience in C/C++ or
embedded systems. Smart materials and their use as
Fortran, or the consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
actuators. Students will do projects involving the design
semester hours Spring semester of even numbered years.
and implementation of smart-systems. Prerequisite: EGGN
EGES538/PEGN538. INTRODUCTION TO OFFSHORE
381, EGGN 383. EGGN 481 and EGGN 482 recom-
TECHNOLOGY (II) Introduction to offshore engineering
mended. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Spring semes-
technology for exploration, drilling, production and
ters, every other year.
transportation of resources in the ocean. Practical and
EGES523. DESIGN OF DIGITAL CONTROL SYSTEMS
computer-based analysis methods for determining ocean
(II) Discrete system representation in time and z-domain is
waves and spectrum, environmental forces on and motions
described. Difference equations describing dynamic systems
of structures, structural responses, and internal flows for the
are presented. Discrete equivalents of continuous systems
design of platforms, risers, subsea completion and pipeline
are introduced. Stability analysis for digital systems is
systems. Dynamic positioning control and acoustics. Oil
described. Control design focuses on state space representa-
spill flow and control. System design parameters. Industrial
tion. Pole-placement design and digital optimal control
practice and introduction of the state-of-the art technology.
design are covered, including Kalman filtering. Limitations
Prerequisite: MACS315, EGGN351 and EGGN320 or
on control performance are discussed along with robust
consent of instructor 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
control design concepts. Prerequisite: EGGN 407 or consent
EGES539/MNGN539. MARINE MINING SYSTEMS (I)
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours Spring, even
Introduction to ocean resources and exploitation. General
numbered years
review of deep-ocean engineering systems. Deep-seafloor
EGES532/MTGN 545. FATIGUE AND FRACTURE (I)
geotechnology. Exploration, processing and environmental
Basic fracture mechanics as applied to engineering materi-
impact. Overview of technology and systems requirements
als, S-N curves, the Goodman diagram, stress concentra-
of mining systems. Physical environments. Surface systems.
tions, residual stress effects, effect of material properties on
Acoustics and track-keeping control. Seafloor systems and
mechanisms of crack propagation. Prerequisite: Consent of
vehicle track-keeping control. Multiphase flows and pipe
department. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Fall semes-
systems/dynamics. Ocean transshipment. Integrated
ters, odd numbered years. EGES534. SOIL BEHAVIOR (II)
production system and control. Review of environment
The focus of this course is on interrelationships among the
impact and legal issues. Prerequisite: MACS315, EGGN351
composition, fabric, and geotechnical and hydrologic
and EGGN320, GEOC408 or consent of instructor 3 hours
properties of soils that consist partly or wholly of clay. The
lecture; 3 semester hours. Fall semester, every third year.
course will be divided into two parts. The first part provides
EGES540. CONTINUUM MECHANICS (I) Introduction
an introduction to the composition and fabric of natural
to Cartesian tensor analysis; consideration of stress, strain,
soils, their surface and pore-fluid chemistry, and the
and strain rates as tensor quantities including their transfor-
physico-chemical factors that govern soil behavior. The
mation laws; decomposition theorems for stress and strain;
second part examines what is known about how these
constitutive theory of materials; use of conservation
fundamental characteristics and factors affect geotechnical
principles in continuum mechanics. Prerequisite: EGGN322
properties, including the hydrologic properties that govern
and MAGN315 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
the conduction of pore fluid and pore fluid constituents, and
semester hours. Fall semesters, odd numbered years
the geomechanical properties that govern volume change,
shear deformation, and shear strength. The course is
EGES542. FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR ENGI-
designed for graduate students in various branches of
NEERS (II) A course combining finite element theory with
engineering and geology that are concerned with the
practical programming experience in which the multi-
engineering and hydrologic behavior of earth systems,
disciplinary nature of the finite element method as a
including geotechnical engineering, geological engineering,
numerical technique for solving differential equations is
environmental engineering, mining engineering, and
emphasised. Topics covered include simple ‘structural’
petroleum engineering. Prerequisites: EGGN461 Soil
elements, beams on elastic foundations, solid elasticity,
Mechanics, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
steady state analysis and transient analysis. Some of the
semester hours
applications will lie in the general area of geomechanics,
reflecting the research interests of the instructor. Students
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
55

get a copy of all the source code published in the course
differences. Prerequisites: A first course in soil mechanics
textbook. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor 3 hours
or consent of instructor. 3 Lecture Hours, 3 semester hours
lecture; 3 semester hours
EGES550. NUMERICAL METHODS FOR ENGINEERS
EGES543. SOLID MECHANICS OF MATERIALS (II)
(S) Introduction to the use of numerical methods in the
Introduction to the algebra of vectors and tensors; coordi-
solution of commonly encountered problems of engineering
nate transformations; general theories of stress and strain;
analysis. Structural/solid analysis of elastic materials (linear
principal stresses and strains; octahedral stresses; Hooke’s
simultaneous equations); vibrations (roots of nonlinear
Law introduction to the mathematical theory of elasticity
equations, initial value problems); natural frequency and
and to energy methods; failure theories for yield and
beam buckling (eigenvalue problems); interpretation of
fracture. PrerequisiteEGGN320 or equivalent, MACS315 or
experimental data (curve fitting and differentiation);
equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
summation of pressure distributions (integration); beam
deflections (boundary value problems). All course
EGES544. SOLID MECHANICS OF NONLINEAR
participants will receive source code of all the numerical
MATERIALS (II) Introduction to the internal state variable
methods programs published in the course textbook which is
modeling of inelastic deformation. Topics covered include:
coauthored by the instructor. Prerequisite: MACS315 or
review of continuum thermomechanics; physics of plastic
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
deformation in crystalline solids and in geo-materials;
viscoplasticity; rate-independent plasticity; yield criteria;
EGES551. MECHANICS OF INCOMPRESSIBLE
isotropic and kinematic hardening rules; numerical solution
FLUIDS (I) Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids.
of sets of internal state variable equations; numerical
Mechanics of two- and three-dimensional viscous incom-
coupling of internal state variable equations with finite
pressible flows, flows of homogeneous and
element models of elastic deformation. Prerequisite
nonhomogeneous fluids, and engineering applications.
EGGN320 and EGES543 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
Multi-phase flows. Steady and unsteady Bernoulli equation.
lecture; 3 semester hours. Spring semester, even numbered
Similarity of flows. Potential flows and basic source-sink
years.
flows inside and around body. Random ocean waves. Inertia
and damping forces on submerged bodies. Vortex shedding.
EGES545. BOUNDARY ELEMENT METHODS (II)
Engineering applications and computer simulations.
Development of the fundamental theory of the boundary
Prerequisites; EGGN 351 and MACS 315 or consent of
element method with applications in elasticity, heat transfer,
instructor 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
diffusion, and wave propagation. Derivation of indirect and
direct boundary integral equations. Introduction to other
EGES552. VISCOUS FLOW AND BOUNDARY
Green’s function based methods of analysis. Computational
LAYERS (I) This course establishes the theoretical
experiments in primarily two dimensions. Prerequisite:
underpinnings of fluid mechanics, including fluid kinemat-
EGES502, EGES540 or consent of instructor 3 hours
ics, stress-strain relationships, and derivation of the fluid-
lecture; 3 semester hours Spring Semester, odd numbered
mechanical conservation equations. These include the
years.
mass-continuity and Navier-Stokes equations as well as the
multicomponent energy and species-conservation equations.
EGES546. ADVANCED ENGINEERING DYNAMICS (I)
Fluid-mechanical boundary-layer theory is developed and
Review of vibration theory as applied to single- and multi-
applied to situations arising in chemically reacting flow
degree-of-freedom systems. Free and forced vibrations.
applications including combustion, chemical processing,
Different types of loading-step, sinusoidal, random,
and thin-film materials processing. Prerequisite: EGGN473,
earthquake, periodic. Transmissibility. Importance of
or CHEN430, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
resonance. Role of damping. Natural frequencies. Modal
semester hours.
superposition method. Rayleigh damping. Numerical
solution techniques. Introduction to dynamic analysis by
EGES553. ENGINEERING HYDROLOGY (I) The
finite element method. Newmark methods for time
hydrologic cycle, precipitation and runoff relationships, and
integration. Hysteretic materials and stiffness degradation.
the Rational Method. Hydrograph analysis and synthesis
Equivalent viscous damping. Liquefaction in geomaterials.
and the unit hydrograph. Basin analysis, flood routing,
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
urban hydrology and design. Prerequisite: EGGN 351, or
semester hours
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Fall
semesters, even years.
EGES548. ADVANCED SOIL MECHANICS (I) Ad-
vanced soil mechanics theories and concepts as applied to
EGES554. OPEN CHANNEL FLOW (II) Fluid mechanics
analysis and design in geotechnical engineering. Topics
applied to flow in natural and manmade channels. The
covered will include seepage, consolidation, shear strength,
principles of momentum and energy, flow resistance in
failure criteria and constitutive models for soil. The course
uniform and non-uniform channels. Backwater and
will have an emphasis on numerical solution techniques to
drawdown curves, channel controls and transitions.
geotechnical problems by finite elements and finite
Gradually, rapidly and spatially varied flow regimes.
56
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Unsteady flow and flood routing methods. Prerequisite:
EGES573. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTATIONAL
EGGN 351, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
TECHNIQUES FOR FLUID DYNAMICS AND TRANS-
semester hours. Spring semesters, odd years.
PORT PHENOMENA (II) Introduction to Computational
Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for graduate students with no prior
EGES559. MECHANICS OF PARTICULATE MEDIA (I)
knowledge of this topic. Basic techniques for the numerical
This course allows students to establish fundamental
analysis of fluid flows. Acquisition of hands-on experience
knowledge of quasi-static and dynamic particle behavior
in the development of numerical algorithms and codes for
that is beneficial to interdisciplinary material handling
the numerical modeling and simulation of flows and
processes in the chemical, civil, materials, metallurgy,
transport phenomena of practical and fundamental interest.
geophysics, physics, and mining engineering. Issues of
Capabilities and limitations of CFD. Prerequisite: EGGN
interest are the definition of particle size and size distribu-
473 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
tion, particle shape, nature of packing, quasi-static behavior
hours.
under different external loading, particle collisions, kinetic
theoretical modeling of particulate flows, molecular
EGES585. ADVANCED HIGH POWER ELECTRONICS
dynamic simulations, and a brief introduction of solid-fluid
(II) Basic principles of analysis and design of circuits
two-phase flows. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3
utilizing high power electronics. AC/DC, DC/AC, AC/AC,
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Fall semesters, every other
and DC/DC conversion techniques. Laboratory project
year
comprising simulation and construction of a power
electronics circuit. Prerequisites: EGGN 385; EGGN 389 or
EGES564. PHYSICAL GASDYNAMICS (I) Selected
equivalent 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
topics in gas-phase thermodynamics for high speed and/or
reacting flows: kinetic theory; transport properties; chemical
EGES588. ADVANCED RELIABILITY OF ENGINEER-
equilibrium; vibrational, rotational and chemical rate
ING SYSTEMS (I) This course addresses uncertainty
processes; statistical mechanics; and the equations of
modeling, reliability analysis, risk assessment, reliability-
radiative transfer from a microscopic viewpoint. Prerequi-
based design, predictive maintenance, optimization, and
site: EGGN351, EGGN371, or consent of instructor. 3
cost-effective retrofit of engineering systems such as
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
structural, sensory, electric, pipeline, hydraulic, lifeline and
environmental facilities. Topics include Introduction of
EGES566. COMBUSTION (II) An introduction to
Reliability of Engineering Systems, Network Modeling and
combustion. Course subjects include: the development of
Evaluation of Complex Engineering Systems, Stochastic
the Chapman-Jouget solutions for deflagration and detona-
Engineering System Simulation, Frequency Analysis of
tion, a brief review of the fundamentals of kinetics and
Extreme Events, Reliability and Risk Evaluation of
thermochemistry, development of solutions for diffusion
Engineering Systems, and Optimization of Engineering
flames and premixed flames, discussion of flame structure,
Systems. Prerequisite: MACS 324 (Probability and
pollutant formation, and combustion in practical systems.
Statistics for Engineers II) 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
Prerequisite: EGGN473, or ChEN430, or consent of
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGES598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGINEERING (I, II)
Pilot course of special topics course. Topics chosen from
EGES567. RADIATION HEAT TRANSFER (I) Review
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually
of radiative properties, blackbody radiation, Planck’s
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Consent of the
distribution, Wien’s Displacement Law, Kirchhoff’s Law,
Instructor. Variable credit; 1 to 6 hours
view factors. Radiation exchange within enclosures with
black and diffuse-gray surfaces. Radiation in absorbing,
EGES599. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I,II) Individual
emitting and scattering (semi-transparent, participating)
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
media. An engineering treatment of gas radiation in
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
enclosures. Prerequisite: EGGN 471, or equivalent or
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 hours
EGES572. MULTIPHASE FLOWS AND TRANSPORT
PHENOMENA WITH DROPLETS AND PARTICLES (II)
EGES604. ENGINEERING SYSTEMS SEMINAR (II)
Derivation of the basic heat, mass, and momentum transfer
This is a seminar and discussion forum for graduate students
equations for the analysis of multiphase flows with droplets
to present their research projects, critique others’ presenta-
and particles. Flow patterns in two-phase pipe flows.
tions, understand the breadth of engineering projects across
Analysis of spray and particulate systems. Formation and
the Division, hear from leaders of industry about the
breakup of droplets. Particle/fluid, particle/wall, particle/
contemporary engineering as well as socio-economical,
particle interactions. Prerequisite: EGGN 552 or consent of
marketing and behavioral issues facing today’s competitive
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Spring
business environment. In order to improve communication
semesters, every other year.
skills, each student is required to present a seminar in this
course before his/her graduation from Engineering Systems
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
57

graduate program. Also students are required to write
411, EGGN 478, or consent of instructor. EGES617
weekly critiques about materials delivery techniques used in
recommended. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Spring
the previous week’s seminar by the presenter. Prerequisite:
semesters, every other year.
Graduate standing. 1 hour seminar; 1 semester hour.
EGES638. OFFSHORE TECHNOLOGY II (I) Surface
EGES617. INTELLIGENT CONTROL SYSTEMS (II)
waves, dynamics of the ocean, and ice mechanics are
Fundamental issues related to the design on intelligent
independently treated. Fluid-structure interactions and ice-
control systems are described. Neural networks analysis for
structure interactions are treated in an integrated approach
engineering systems are presented. Neural-based learning,
with the associated forces and the dynamic responses of
estimation, and identification of dynamical systems are
structures, including flow-induced vibrations. Interdiscipli-
described. Qualitative control system analysis using fuzzy
nary problems of fluid-structure-ice interactions are solved
logic is presented. Fuzzy mathematics design of rule-based
in an integrated approach with computer-aided designs of
control, and integrated human-machine intelligent control
industry problems. Prerequisites: EGES538, EGES551 or
systems are covered. Real-life problems from different
consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture: 3 semester hours.
engineering systems are analyzed. Prerequisite: EGES517,
Fall semester, every other year.
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGES642. ADVANCED FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS
Spring semester of even years.
FOR ENGINEERS (I) Solution of nonlinear equations,
EGES618. SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION AND ADAP-
Transient finite element analysis, Finite elements for
TIVE CONTROL (II) Modeling is the first step in control
nonlinear material behavior, Finite elements for large
design, and for many processes a physical model is not
deformations and contact problems Applications of finite
appropriate for control design, either because it is too
elements in mechanical engineering, materials processing
complex, or because of unknown parameters. System
and geomechanics. Pre-requisites: EGGN320, EGGN315,
identification is an important tool, which with proper use
EGES542 and some scientific programming experience in
can help a control designer develop empirical models from
C/C++ or Fortran, or the consent of the instructor. 3 hours
experimental input/output data. These models are suitable
lecture; 3 semester hours. Fall Semester of even numbered
for control system design. Adaptive control systems can
years.
make use of on-line system identification to continually
EGES649. HYDRODYNAMICS (II) Basic principles of
update the process model and/or control parameters. The
hydrodynamics treat fundamentals, basic equations, and
course will begin with coverage of unconstrained optimiza-
general theorems. Potential solutions include hydrodynamic
tion and maximum likelihood (ML) estimation. Discrete
singularities (sources, sinks, etc) and nonhomogeneous
time dynamic system models are introduced, including
fluids flows. Nonhomogeneous fluids flows related to the
transfer function and state space models, random sequences,
resources recovery technologies. Waves of finite amplitude
and ARMAX and Box-Jenkins model structures. State
in stratified fluid. Surface waves and random waves. Motion
estimation and Kalman filtering is developed. System
by capilarity. Solution methods and engineering applications
identification is then an application of ML estimation to
with computer-aided solutions. Prerequisites : EGES551,
various model structures. The final portion of the course
MACS514 or consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
covers adaptive control as an application of on-line system
semester hours Spring semester, every third year.
identification. Prerequisite: EGGN 517 or EGGN 523 or
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGES657/CHEN657. RADIATION HEAT TRANSFER (I)
Spring, odd numbered years.
Review of radiative properties, blackbody radiation,
Planck’s distribution, Wien’s Displacement Law,
EGES619. APPLIED INTELLIGENT CONTROL AND
Kirchhoff’s Law, view factors. Radiation exchange within
FAILURE DIAGNOSTICS (II) Application of intelligent
enclosures and black and diffuse-gray surfaces. Radiation
control to system diagnostics and failure prediction.
in absorbing, emitting and scattering (semi-transparent,
Fundamentals of machinery condition monitoring and health
participating) media. An engineering treatment of gas
assessment. Survey of techniques used for signal analysis
radiation in enclosures. Prerequisite: EGGN471, or
and interpretation of machine condition. Experiments
equivalent or consent of instructor. 3 lecture hours, 3
involving servo hydraulic, electromechanical drives,
semester hours.
refrigeration, and power electronics, and the detection of
faults in these systems. Presentation of current techniques
EGES658. MOLECULAR SPECTROSCOPY FOR THE
for pattern recognition, signature analysis, sensor fusion,
THERMOSCIENCES (II) A detailed review of spectros-
and intelligent control, including FFT, wavelets, and time-
copy for engineers who use it diagnostics for flowfield
frequency analysis. Failure modes, effects and criticality
research. Introduction to quantum mechanics including the
analysis. Case studies and review of active research in
one-electron atom problem, Zeeman effect and electron
failure prevention and predictive maintenance. Use of
spin. Spectroscopy of multi-electron atoms, with a discus-
expert systems, fuzzy logic, and neural networks for
sion of perturbation solutions to the Schrödinger equation.
intelligent machine decision making. Prerequisite: EGGN
Development of a transition moment, and its relation to the
58
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Einstein A coefficient. Molecular spectroscopy is introduced
EGES699. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I,II) Individual
via the harmonic oscillator and rigid rotator problems.
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
Simple infrared spectroscopy, with the anharmonic
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
oscillators and non-rigid rotators. Electronic transitions &
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
the full diatomic molecular description. Topics such as the
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
rate equations, the density matrix equations, or the spectros-
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 hours.
copy of polyatomic species. Prerequisite: EGES564, or
EGES700. GRADUATE ENGINEERING REPORT -
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MASTER OF ENGINEERING (I,II,S) Laboratory, field,
Spring semesters, every other year (opposite EGES659
and library work for the Master of Engineering Report under
Optical Measurements in Reacting and Nonreacting Flow
the supervision of the student’s advisory committee.
Systems)
Required of candidates for the degree of Master of Engi-
EGES659. OPTICAL MEASUREMENTS IN REACTING
neering. 6 semester hours upon completion of report.
AND NONREACTING FLOW SYSTEMS (II) An
EGES701. GRADUATE THESIS - MASTER OF SCI-
introduction to passive and active optical diagnostic
ENCE (I,II,S) Laboratory, field, and library work for the
techniques for species concentrations, gas temperature and
Master of Science thesis under the supervision of the
flowfield velocity. Radiation methods for particulate and
student’s advisory committee. Required of candidates for
molecular species. Particulate methods for velocity (e.g.
the degree of Master of Science. 6 semester hours upon
Particle Image Velocimetry). Line-of-sight measurements
completion of report.
for both particulate and molecules (e.g. Rayleigh and Mie
scattering, absorption). Spatially resolved measurements
EGES703. GRADUATE THESIS - DOCTOR OF PHI-
including nonresonant scattering (e.g. Raman), linear
LOSOPHY (I,II,S) Laboratory, field, and library work for
resonant methods (Laser Induced Fluorescence) and
the Doctor of Philosophy thesis under the supervision of the
nonlinear methods (e.g. Degenerate Four-Wave Mixing).
student’s advisory committee. Required of candidates for
Prerequisite: EGES501, EGES564, PH optics course (no
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy.
number at present), or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture;
SYGN600. FUNDAMENTALS OF COLLEGE TEACH-
1hour lab; 4 semester hours. Spring semesters, every other
ING Principles of learning and teaching in a college setting.
year (opposite Molecular Spectroscopy).
Methods to foster and assess higher order thinking.
EGES698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGINEERING (I,II)
Effective design, delivery, and assessment of college courses
Pilot course of special topics course. Topics chosen from
or presentations. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, or consent
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually
of instructor. 2 semester hours.
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Consent of the
Instructor. Variable credit; 1 to 6 hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
59

Environmental Science and
program. Students, with advice of faculty, will establish a
Engineering
curriculum which supports the need to complete a compre-
hensive examination and original research dissertation. A
PHILIPPE ROSS, Professor and Division Director
defined minor program must also be completed.
TISSA ILLANGASEKARE, Professor and AMAX Distinguished
Chair
Prerequisites:
RONALD R.H. COHEN, Associate Professor
Candidates for a graduate degree in Environmental
JOHN C. EMERICK, Associate Professor
Science and Engineering should have earned a baccalaureate
LINDA A. FIGUEROA, Associate Professor
degree in a natural science, physical science or engineering
BRUCE D. HONEYMAN, Associate Professor
discipline. Previous coursework must include at least one
KENNETH E. KOLM, Associate Professor
year of physics, calculus through differential equations, and
ROBERT L. SIEGRIST, Associate Professor
one year of general chemistry. All students admitted to the
DIANNE AHMANN, Assistant Professor
program are required to have knowledge of the basic
NEVIS E. COOK, JR., Assistant Professor
concepts and fundamentals of general biology and physical
JUNKO MUNAKATA MARR, Assistant Professor
geology. The Division will provide content outlines of
HELEN E. DAWSON, Research Assistant Professor
essential materials for review of these areas.
ROBERT F. HOLUB, Research Professor
Applicants must have completed all prerequisites prior to
MATTHIAS KOHLER, Research Associate Professor
admission to the program.
Degrees Offered:
Required Curriculum:
Master of Science (Environmental Science and Engineer-
The Division’s curriculum is built around a common
ing)
required core of 23 credit hours. These include:
Doctor of Philosophy (Environmental Science and
ESGN500-Principles of Environmental Chemistry
Engineering)
ESGN500L-Environmental Water Chemistry Lab
Program Description:
ESGN501-Principles of Environmental
The Division of Environmental Science and Engineering
Science & Engineering
offers programs leading to M.S. and Ph.D. degrees.
ESGN502-Environmental Law
ESGN503-Environmental Pollution:
Two M.S. degree options are available: thesis and non-
Characteristics, Sources and Transport
thesis.
ESGN504-Treatment of Waters and Waste
The division also offers a M.S. degree program for
ESGN504L-Treatment of Waters and Waste Lab
individuals who can only attend part-time. This non-thesis,
ESGN505-Experimental Design and
fixed-course-sequence executive program is offered during
Environmental Data Analysis.
evening hours and takes about 26 months to complete. All
ESGN598M-Special Topics in Environmental Microbial
admission, performance and credit hour rules are the same
Processes and Molecular Genetics
as those for the day time program.
Elective coursework beyond the required core may be
The Ph.D. degree in environmental science and engineer-
selected from a combination of courses in the areas of
ing is a research degree which builds upon the M.S. degree
characterization, fate and transport; environmental
program. Students, with advice of faculty, will establish a
remediation; and environmental law, regulatory analysis and
curriculum which supports the need to complete a compre-
decision making.
hensive examination and original research dissertation.
Fields of Research:
Since the program is interdisciplinary in scope, appropriate
Research is focused in four main areas: 1) characteriza-
coursework is available from many CSM departments.
tion, fate, and transport of contaminants; 2) the development
Program Requirements:
of unit processes for water and waste treatment; 3) environ-
The Division offers programs leading to M.S. and Ph.D.
mental remediation; and 4) applied ecology, hydrology, and
degrees. The curriculum is built around a common concen-
natural systems characterization. Within these areas,
tration of 23 credit-hours of core classes. Two M.S. degree
established research programs have developed in the
options are available: thesis and non-thesis. Students
physical/chemical processes controlling non-aqueous phase
following the thesis option must sit for a least 32 credit
liquid (NAPL) transport, the biological treatment of metal-
hours beyond deficiencies and defend a research thesis.
and radionuclide-containing wastes, environmental
Non-thesis option students must complete at least 41
chemistry, in situ remediation of soil and groundwater
semester hours of credit beyond deficiencies. All M.S.
systems, evaluating the role of wetlands in regulating the
students must register for seminar (ESGN598A) for at least
water quality of watersheds, analyzing hydrologic systems,
two semesters.
and modeling environmental systems (water resources and
water quality).
The Ph.D. degree in environmental science and engineer-
ing is a research degree which builds upon the M.S. degree
60
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Description of Courses
exercises that complement lectures given in ESGN500.
ESGN401. FUNDAMENTALS OF ECOLOGY Biological
Topics covered include thermodynamics, weak acids and
and ecological principles discussed and industrial examples
bases, buffers, metal-ion complexation and oxidation/
of their use given. Analysis of ecosystem processes, such as
reduction reactions. This course must be taken concurrently
erosion, succession, and how these processes relate to
with ESGN500. Prerequisites: chemical thermodynamics
engineering activities, including engineering design and
and consent of the instructor; co-enrollment in ESGN500.
plant operation. Criteria and performance standards
3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
analyzed for facility siting, pollution control, and mitigation
ESGN501. PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL
of impacts. North American ecosystems are analyzed.
SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING To introduce students to
Concepts of forestry, range, and wildlife management
some of the important environmental issues facing today’s
integrated as they apply to all the above. Three to four
society. Provides essential background to the field of
weekend field trips will be arranged during the semester.
environmental science and engineering. Various environ-
Prerequisite: ESGN301, or consent of instructor. 3 hours
mental problems and technologies will be examined,
lecture; 3 semester hours.
including water pollution, water and wastewater treatment,
ESGN412. ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY (II)
solid waste treatment and disposal, agriculture pollution
Introduction to general concepts of ecology, biochemistry,
control air pollution and emissions control, and fundamental
toxicology. The introductory material will provide a
principles of ecology. Student will also be introduced to the
foundation for understanding why, and to what extent a
concept of mass balance and the equation of continuity in
variety of products and by-products of advanced industrial-
preparation to studies of environmental models. 3 hours
ized societies are toxic. Classes of substances to be
lecture; 3 semester hours.
examined include metals, coal, petroleum products, organic
ESGN 502. ENVIRONMENTAL LAW (I) This is a
compounds, pesticides, radioactive materials, others.
comprehensive introduction to Environmental Law, policy,
Prerequisites: ESGN301, or consent of instructor. 3 hours
and practice, especially designed for the needs of the
lecture; 3 semester hours.
nonlawyer, environmental quality scientist, engineer,
ESGN430. ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING LABO-
planner, manager, government regulator, consultant, or
RATORY (II) Laboratory techniques for measuring water
citizen activist. It provides an understanding of the complex
quality parameters such as pH, alkalinity, dissolved oxygen,
system of laws, regulations, court rulings, and programs that
ammonia, nitrate, turbidity and solids. Laboratory investiga-
governs environmental quality, pollution, and toxics control
tion in batch reactors of unit processes such as coagulation,
in the U.S. The course reviews all major US EPA enforce-
flocculation, sedimentation, chemical oxidation, biological
ment programs and state and local matching programs.
oxidation, air stripping and digestion. Effect of these
Highlights include how our legal system works, environ-
processes on selected water quality parameters. Selection
mental law fundamentals, the National Environmental
and implementation of sequences of unit processes for
Policy Act, air and water pollution laws (CAA, CWA), EPA
treatment of complex wastes. Prerequisites: ESGN303, and
risk assessment and management, and toxic and hazardous
consent of instructor. 1 hour lecture, 4 hours lab per week; 3
substances laws (RCRA, CERCLA, EPCRA, TSCA,
semester hours.
FIFRA, UST etc.). Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. 3
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ESGN473. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT
Introduction to regulatory, management and engineering
ESGN503. ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION:
aspects of hazardous waste and hazardous site management.
SOURCES, CHARACTERISTICS, TRANSPORT AND
Topics include characterization, recovery, transportation,
FATE (II) The environmental behavior of inorganic
storage, remediation, and disposal of wastes and sites.
chemicals in multimedia environments, including water, air,
Prerequisites: ESGN200, or consent of instructor. 3 hours
sediment and biota. Sources and characteristics of contami-
lecture; 3 semester hours.
nants in the environment are discussed as broad categories,
with some specific examples from the mining, petroleum,
Graduate Courses
and chemical refining industries. Attention is focused on the
ESGN500. PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL
persistence, reactivity, and partitioning behavior of
CHEMISTRY (I) An introduction to chemical equilibria in
contaminants in environmental media. Both steady and
natural waters and engineered systems. Topics covered
unsteady state multimedia environmental models are
include chemical thermodynamics and kinetics, acid/base
developed and applied to contaminated sites. The principles
chemistry, open and closed carbonate systems, precipitation
of contaminant transport in surface water, groundwater, and
reactions, coordination chemistry, adsorption and redox
air are also introduced. The course provides students with
reactions. Prerequisites: Physical chemistry and consent of
the conceptual basis and mathematical tools for predicting
instructor. 2 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
the behavior of contaminants in the environment. Prerequi-
ESGN500L ENVIRONMENTAL WATER CHEMISTRY
sites: Consent of instructor.
LAB (I) This course provides students with laboratory
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
61

ESGN504. TREATMENT OF WATER AND WASTES (II)
dispersion, biological changes in lakes, heat flux in streams;
Unit operations and processes in environmental engineering.
Lagrangian reference frame models; estuarine hydraulics.
Physical, chemical, and biological treatment processes for
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
liquid, gas, and solid wastes of municipal or industrial
semester hours.
origin. Treatment objectives and process theory followed by
ESGN522. SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANT TRANS-
design for selected processes. Prerequisites: Consent of
PORT Physical, chemical, and biological processes
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
governing the transport and fate of contaminants in the
ESGN504L. TREATMENT OF WATERS AND WASTE
subsurface. Theory and development of mass transport
LAB (II) This course provides students with laboratory
models. Applications include predicting the extent of
exercises that complement lectures given in ESGN504.
contaminant migration and assessing the efficiency of
Topics include reactor behavior, sedimentation, coagulation,
remediation techniques. Prerequisites: ESGN503 or consent
sorption, and biological waste treatment. This course must
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
be taken concurrently with ESGN504. Prerequisites:
ESGN525. CHEMISTRY OF SOIL/WATER INTERFACE
Consent of the instructor; co-enrollment in ESGN504. 3
The fate of many elements in the soil/water environment is
hours lab; 1 semester hour.
regulated by sorption reactions. The content of this course
ESGN505. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND ENVIRON-
focuses on the physical chemistry of reactions occurring at
MENTAL DATA ANALYSIS (I) This course covers
the soil-particle/water interface. The emphasis is on 1) the
experimental design and analysis for studies of environmen-
use of surface complexation models to interpret solute
tal media, including those involving characterization and
sorption at the particle/water interface. Prerequisites:
assessment, treatment, and remediation technologies, and
ESGN500 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
compliance monitoring. Principal media covered are water
semester hours.
and wastewaters, soil and sediments, and surface and
ESGN527. ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS ANALYSIS
ground waters. Topics covered include properties of
Basic principles of environmental systems analysis required
environmental datasets, data quality objectives, statistical
in industrial and governmental projects pertaining to
designs for data collection, methods of sample collection
environmental site characterization for natural resource
and analysis, data analysis and visualization, inference
evaluation, human impact on natural systems, and for
making. Issues of data worth and sufficiency for decision-
developing remediation strategies are studied, including
making will also be addressed. Prerequisite: Consent of
terrain analysis, and surface and subsurface characterization
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
procedures and analysis. Basic principles are developed by
ESGN510. ENVIRONMENTAL RADIOCHEMISTRY
investigating and applying systems analysis and site
This course covers the phenomena of radioactivity (e.g.,
characterization techniques to environmental problems.
modes of decay, methods of detection and biological effects)
Prerequisite: ESGN501 or concurrent registration, or
and the use of naturally-occurring and artificial radionu-
consent of instructor. 3 hours lab per week; 3 credit hours.
clides as tracers for environmental processes. Discussions of
ESGN528. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF ENVI-
tracer applications will range from oceanic trace element
RONMENTAL SYSTEMS This is an advanced graduate-
scavenging to contaminant transport through groundwater
level course designed to provide students with hands-on
aquifers. Prerequisites: ESGN500 or consent of instructor.
experience in developing, implementing, testing, and using
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
mathematical models of environmental systems. The course
ESGN513. LIMNOLOGY The course will cover the natural
will examine why models are needed, how they are
chemistry, physics and biology of lakes and rivers as well as
developed, tested, and used as decision-making (or policy-
some basic principles concerning contamination of those
making) tools. Typical problems associated with environ-
water bodies. Topics will include heat budgets; water
mental systems - spatial and temporal scale effects,
circulation and dispersal; sedimentation processes; organic
dimensionality, variability, uncertainty, and data insuffi-
compounds and their transformations; radionuclide
ciency will be addressed. The development and application
limnochronology; redox, metals and other major ions;
of mathematical models will be illustrated using a theme
carbon dioxide system; oxygen; nutrients; planktonnic,
topic such as ‘Global Climate Change,’ ‘In Situ
benthic and other communities; light in water and lake
Bioremediation,’ or ‘Hydrologic Systems Analysis’
modeling. Prerequisites: ESE Masters degree core program
Prerequisites: ESGN503, knowledge of basic statistics and
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
computer programming. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ESGN520. SURFACE WATER QUALITY MODELING
ESGN530. ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING PILOT
This course will cover modeling of rivers, lakes, reservoirs
PLANT LABORATORY Introduction to bench and pilot-
and estuaries. Topics include introduction to numerical
scale experimental methods used in environmental engineer-
methods; modeling of kinetics, discharge of wastewaters
ing. Emphasis is on unit operations associated with water
into a marine environment, sedimentation, growth kinetics,
and wastewater treatment. Investigations typically carried
62
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

out during the semester include: BOD/COD tests, environ-
recontouring, erosion control, soil preparation, plant
mental solids analysis and jar testing; flow pattern analysis
establishment, seed mixtures, nursery stock, and wildlife
with tracers; batch aeration and countercurrent air stripping;
habitat rehabilitation. Practitioners in the field talk on their
activated carbon isotherm determination; absorption and
experiences. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
exchange column ‘breakthrough’ investigations; membrane
lecture; 3 semester hours.
technology evaluation; biotransformations using activated
ESGN562/MTGN527. SOLID WASTE MINIMIZATION
sludge in sequencing batch reactors and biokinetics using
AND RECYCLING (I) This course will examine, using case
respirometry. Includes 6 hours per week in lab. Prerequi-
studies, how industry applies engineering principles to
sites: ESGN500 and ESGN504, or consent of instructor. 3
minimize waste formation and to meet solid waste recycling
semester hours
challenges. Both proven and emerging solutions to solid
ESGN541. BIOCHEMICAL TREATMENT PROCESSES
waste environmental problems, especially those associated
Analysis and design of biochemical processes used to
with metals, will be discussed. Prerequisites: ESGN500 and
transform pollutants. Suspended growth, attached growth,
ESGN504 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
and porous media systems will be analyzed. Common
semester hours.
named biochemical operations used for water, wastewater,
ESGN563. INDUSTRIAL WASTE: CONVERSION AND
and sludge treatment will be discussed. Biochemical systems
MARKETING (II) Case studies are used to illustrate
for organic oxidation and fermentation and inorganic
process technologies applicable to converting industrial
oxidation and reduction will be presented. Prerequisites:
waste to marketable by-products, with particular emphasis
ESGN503 and ESGN504 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
on locating and evaluating suitable consumers. Major
lecture; 3 semester hours.
components of a waste or waste-stream are matched with
ESGN545. ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY (II)
operations using similar components as raw materials. One
Introduction to general concepts of ecology, biochemistry,
then applies process technology to economically meet end-
and toxicology. The introductory material will provide a
user specifications. This course identifies means to become
foundation for understanding why, and to what extent a
sufficiently conversant on customer needs, particularly
variety of products and by-products of advanced industrial-
physical and chemical specifications to maximize plant
ized societies are toxic. Classes of substances to be
productivity, in order to facilitate negotiation of mutually
examined include metals, coal, petroleum products, organic
satisfactory sales contracts. Prerequisites: Consent of the
compounds, pesticides, radioactive materials, and others.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisites: ESGN501, or consent of instructor. 3 hours
ESGN571. ENVIRONMENTAL PROJECT MANAGE-
lecture; 3 semester hours.
MENT Investigates environmental project management and
ESGN551. ENVIRONMENTAL FIELD METHODS AND
decision making from government, industry and contractor
APPLIED PROJECT MANAGEMENT A field-oriented
perspectives. Emphasis is on the (1) economics of project
course designed to prepare students to plan and conduct an
evaluation; (2) cost estimation methods; (3) project planning
environmental characterization and/or develop a site
and performance monitoring; (4) and creation of project
remediation plan. Activities include conceptualization of the
teams and organizational/communications structures.
environmental system at hand, project design, measurement
Extensive use of case studies. Prerequisites: Consent of
and sampling, analysis, and reporting. Students will draw
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
upon their knowledge gained from the core curriculum to
ESGN575. HAZARDOUS WASTE SITE REMEDIATION
design and complete the project, which will focus on an
This course covers remediation technologies for hazardous
actual problem of interest to a firm or governmental agency.
waste contaminated sites, including site characteristics and
Field activities will emphasize initial site characterization
conceptual model development, remedial action screening
and development of an appropriate sampling strategy;
processes, and technology principles and conceptual design.
accepted protocols for sample collection and field measure-
Institutional control, source isolation and containment,
ments in water, air, biota, or other media appropriate to the
subsurface manipulation, and insitu and ex situ treatment
project; and operation, maintenance, and calibration of field
processes will be covered, including unit operations,
instrumentation. Some laboratory and computer time may be
coupled processes, and complete systems. Case studies will
required for sample analysis, data processing, and report
be used and computerized tools for process selection and
preparation. Prerequisites: Completion of ESE core
design will be employed. Field trips will be taken to
curriculum. 3 semester hours.
hazardous waste sites and/or environmental firms and a
ESGN552. RECLAMATION OF DISTURBED LANDS
class project will be completed. Prerequisites: Consent of
Basic principles and practices in reclaiming disturbed lands.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Includes overview of present legal requirements for
ESGN580. INVESTIGATIONS IN ENVIRONMENTAL
reclamation and basic elements of the reclamation planning
SCIENCES (I, II) Independent research and investigations
process. Examination of reclamation methods including
on student’s chosen topic in Environmental Science and
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
63

Engineering. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and division
among the microbes; microbial ecology; and industrial
approval. 1 or more semester hours.
microbiology. Various molecular methods of studying
ESGN591. ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT
microbes are also discussed. Prerequisites: ESGN500 and
Techniques for assessing the impact of mining and other
ESGN501. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
activities on various components of the ecosystem. Training
ESGN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
in the procedures of preparing Environmental Impact
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
Statements. Course will include a review of pertinent laws
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
and acts (i.e. Endangered Species Act, Coordination Act,
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
Clean Air Act, etc.) that deal with environmental impacts.
‘Independent Study’ form must be completed and submitted
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, some
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
field trips; 3 semester hours.
ESGN601. RISK ASSESSMENT Evaluates the basic
ESGN593. ENVIRONMENTAL PERMITTING AND
principles, methods, uses and limitations of risk assessment
REGULATORY COMPLIANCE To acquaint students with
in public and private sector decision making. Emphasis is on
the permit writing process specifically, developing informa-
how risk assessments are made and how they are used in
tion requirements for permit applications, dealing with
policy formation. Discussion of how risk assessments can be
ambiguous regulations, negotiating with permit writers, and
objectively and effectively communicated to decision
dealing with public comment. To develop an understanding
makers and the public. Prerequisite: ESGN502 and one
of the process of developing an economic and legally
semester of statistics or consent of instructor. 3 hours
defensible regulatory compliance program. Prerequisites:
lecture; 3 semester hours.
ESGN502 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
ESGN622. MULTIPHASE CONTAMINANT TRANS-
semester hours.
PORT Principles of multiphase and multicomponent flow
ESGN596. ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS AND DECISION
and transport applied to contaminant transport in the
MAKING Analysis, and comparison of alternative ethical
unsaturated and saturated zones. Focus on immiscible
and philosophical approaches to questions of the relation-
phase, dissolved phase, and vapor phase transport of low
ship between humans and nature, between humans and the
solubility organic contaminants in soils and aquifer
state, and between concepts of good and evil. These
materials. Topics discussed include: capillarity, interphase
approaches are utilized to help explain positions taken by
mass transfer, modeling, and remediation technologies.
various participants in environmental policy and decisions
Prerequisites: ESGN500 or equivalent; ESGN503 or
issues. Emphasis on Western ethical traditions encourages a
ESGN522 or equivalent; or consent of instructor. 3 semester
careful evaluation of how ethical assumptions and proposi-
hours.
tions have influenced the decision making structures and
ESGN698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL
tools which we commonly apply to environmental ques-
SCIENCE (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course.
tions. Contemporary challenges to traditional ethical
Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and
approaches are used to illustrate the content and conse-
student(s). Usually the course is offered only once.
quences of alternative decision-making tools and structures.
Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
hours.
semester hours.
ESGN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
ESGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
SCIENCE (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course.
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
student(s). Usually the course is offered only once.
‘Independent Study’ form must be completed and submitted
Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
hours.
ESGN701. MASTER OF SCIENCE THESIS RESEARCH
ESGN598M. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL
AND PREPARATION (I, II) Required of candidates for the
MICROBIAL PROCESSES AND MOLECULAR GENET-
degree of Master of Science. 6 semester hours upon
ICS Course provides an overview of microbial processes
completion of thesis.
and techniques important to the environmental science and
engineering field. Lecture topics include cell structure and
ESGN703. GRADUATE THESIS - DOCTOR OF
biology of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes; microbial
PHILOSOPHY (I, II, S) Conducted under the supervision
nutrition, growth, and metabolism; microbial genetics;
of student’s doctoral advisor and committee. 30 semester
genetic engineering and biotechnology; metabolic diversity
hours total requried.
64
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Geochemistry
negative votes in the Doctoral Committee constitute failure
WENDY J. HARRISON, Professor Geology and Geological
of the examination.
Engineering
In case of failure of the conprehensive examination, a re-
RONALD W. KLUSMAN, Professor, Chemistry and Geochemistry
examination may be given upon the recommendation of the
DONALD L. MACALADY, Professor Chemistry
Doctoral Committee and approval of the Graduate Dean.
and Geochemistry
Only one re-examination may be given.
SAMUEL B. ROMBERGER, Professor Geology
and Geological Engineering
Prerequisites:
RICHARD F. WENDLANDT, Professor Geology
Each entering student will take placement examinations
and Geological Engineering
stressing the basic principles of chemistry and geology. Each
THOMAS R. WILDEMAN, Professor Chemistry
department recognizes that entering students may not be
and Geochemistry
proficient in both areas. Results of the examinations will be
L. GRAHAM CLOSS, Associate Professor Geology
used to establish deficiency requirements. Credit toward a
and Geological Engineering
graduate degree will not be granted for courses taken to
JOHN B. CURTIS, Associate Professor Geology
fulfill deficiencies.
and Geological Engineering
Required Curriculum:
JOHN D. HUMPHREY, Associate Professor Geology
and Geological Engineering
The Geochemistry program comprises a core group of
E. CRAIG SIMMONS, Associate Professor Chemistry
courses and four optional tracks: Mineralogy-Petrology,
and Geochemistry
Aqueous-Environmental, Ore deposits-Exploration,
KEVIN W. MANDERNACK, Assistant Professor Chemistry
Organic-Petroleum. Satisfactory performance in all core
and Geochemistry
courses is required of all geochemistry students. The core
JOHN E. McCRAY, Assistant Professor, Geology
courses are
and Geological Engineering
CHGC503 - Introduction to Geochemistry
Degrees Offered:
CHGC504 - Methods in Geochemistry
Master of Science (Geochemistry)
CHGN503 - Advanced Physical Chemistry.
Doctor of Philosophy (Geochemistry)
Evidence of a prior graduate-level course in these areas
Program Description:
may be accepted by the thesis committee. Students may
The Geochemistry Program is an interdisciplinary
select any one of the four tracks. Courses in the selected
graduate program administered by the departments of
track are elected with advice from the student’s advisors
Geology and Geological Engineering and Chemistry and
and/or dissertation committees.
Geochemistry. The geochemistry faculty from each
Graduate students resident in the Department of
department are responsible for the operations of the
Chemistry and Geochemistry or the Department of Geology
program. Students reside in either the Department of
and Geological Engineering shall adhere to the seminar
Geology and Geological Engineering, or the Department of
rules and requirements of the department of residence.
Chemistry and Geochemistry.
The Geochemistry Program at CSM has been admitted to
Program Requirements:
the Western Regional Graduate Program. This recognizes
The program of study is selected by the student in
the CSM Geochemistry Program as unique in the region.
consultation with an advisor and thesis committee. Students
Designation of the Geochemistry Program by WRGP
entering with backgrounds in chemistry will take more
allows residents of western states (excluding California) to
coursework in geology to strengthen their backgrounds in
enroll in the program at Colorado resident tuition rates.
this discipline; the converse is true for students with a
Eligible states include Alaska, Arizona, Hawaii, Idaho,
background in geology. Thesis is required. There shall be a
Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon,
formal written proposal for the thesis research. Due to the
South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.
interdisciplinary nature of the Geochemistry Program,
Description of Courses
students are not required to take a minor.
CHGC503. INTRODUCTION TO GEOCHEMISTRY (I) A
Comprehensive Examination
comprehensive introduction to the basic principles of
A comprehensive examination must be taken. It is
geochemistry with discussion of elemental distributions,
expected that this exam will be completed within three years
chemical equilibrium, mineral chemistry and chemical
of matriculation or after the bulk of course work is finished,
bonding, the geochemistry of isotopes, organobiological
whichever occurs later. This examination will be adminis-
systems, and low and high temperature water-rock systems.
tered by the student’s Doctoral committee and will consist
Prerequisite: Physical chemistry, mineralogy, and petrology.
of an oral and a written examination, administered in a
3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
format to be determined by the Doctoral Committee. Two
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
65

GPGN/GEOL503. INTEGRATED EXPLORATION (I)
GEOL516. ADVANCED MINERAL DEPOSITS -
Integration of scientific data in the analysis and modeling of
EPIGENETIC HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS (II) Time-
subsurface reservoir systems. Prerequisite: GPGN315 or
space aspects of metallogenesis in relation to regional and
GEOL501 or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours
local geological evolution of the Earth. Processes leading to
lab; 3 semester hours.
the generation of metalliferous hydrothermal mineralizing
solutions within tectonic and lithologic frameworks, and to
CHGC504. METHODS IN GEOCHEMISTRY (II)
the development of favorable ore-forming environments.
Sampling of natural earth materials including rocks, soils,
Emphasis will be placed on processes responsible for ore
sediments, and waters. Preparation of naturally heteroge-
genesis in magmatic-hydrothermal systems such as porphyry
neous materials, digestions, and partial chemical extractions.
copper-molybdenum-gold deposits, epithermal precious
Principles of instrumental analysis including atomic
metal deposits, metamorphogenetic gold deposits, volcanic
spectroscopy, mass separations, and chromatography.
and sedimentary rock-hosted epigenetic base metal ores and
Quality assurance and quality control. Interpretation and
epigenetic sedimentary-rock hosted and unconformity-
assessment of geochemical data using statistical methods..
related uranium deposits. Prerequisite: GEGN401 or
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geochemistry or
equivalent, or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours
environmental science and engineering. 2 hours lecture; 2
lab; 3 semester hours.
semester hours.
GEGN518. MINERAL EXPLORATION (I) Mineral
CHGC509/GEGN509. INTRODUCTION TO AQUEOUS
industry overview, deposit economics, target selection,
GEOCHEMISTRY (I) Analytical, graphical, and interpre-
deposit modeling, exploration technology, international
tive methods applied to aqueous systems. Thermodynamic
exploration, environmental issues, program planning,
properties of water and aqueous solutions. Calculation and
proposal development. Team development and presentation
graphical expression of acid-base, redox and solution-
of an exploration proposal. Prerequisite: GEOL515,
mineral equilibria. Effect of temperature and kinetics on
GEOL516, or equivalent. 2 hours lecture/seminar; 2 hours
natural aqueous systems. Adsorption and ion exchange
lab; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years: Fall 1996.
equilibria between clays and oxide phases. Behavior of trace
elements and complexation in aqueous systems. Application
CHGC527/GEGN527. ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY OF
of organic geochemistry to natural aqueous systems. Light
FOSSIL FUELS AND ORE DEPOSITS (II) A study of
stable and unstable isotopic studies applied to aqueous
organic carbonaceous materials in relation to the genesis and
systems. Prerequisite: DCGN209 or equivalent, or consent
modification of fossil fuel and ore deposits. The biological
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
origin of the organic matter will be discussed with emphasis
on contributions of microorganisms to the nature of these
CHGC511. GEOCHEMISTRY OF IGNEOUS ROCKS (II)
deposits. Biochemical and thermal changes which convert
A survey of the geochemical characteristics of the various
the organic compounds into petroleum, oil shale, tar sand,
types of igneous rock suites. Application of major element,
coal and other carbonaceous matter will be studied.
trace element, and isotope geochemistry to problems of their
Principal analytical techniques used for the characterization
origin and modification. Prerequisite: Undergraduate
of organic matter in the geosphere and for evaluation of oil
mineralogy and petrology or consent of instructor. 3 hours
and gas source potential will be discussed. Laboratory
lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
exercises will emphasize source rock evaluation, and oil-
GEOL515. ADVANCED MINERAL DEPOSITS -
source rock and oil-oil correlation methods. Prerequisite:
MAGMATIC AND SYNGENETIC ORES (I) Time-space
CHGN221, GEGN438, or consent of instructor. 2 hours
aspects of metallogenesis in relation to regional and local
lecture; 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate
geological evolution of the Earth. Processes leading to the
years. Spring 1999.
formation of ore magmas and fluids within tectonic and
CHGC530. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY AND
stratigraphic frameworks, and to the development of
GEOCHEMISTRY (II) Mobility of the elements in air,
favorable ore-forming environments. Emphasis will be
water and the surficial environment. Geochemical cycles of
placed on processes responsible for ore genesis in magmatic
elements and constituents of environmental interest. Plant
systems, such as layered complexes, carbonatites and
composition, animal and human health in relation to the
pegmatites, and on the submarine hydrothermal processes
natural environment. Acid deposition and other processes
responsible for syndepositional deposits in volcanic and
affecting water quality. Environmental aspects of fossil fuel
sedimentary terrains, including massive base and precious
processing. Sampling design in large scale environmental
metal sulfide ores. Ore deposits in certain sedimentary
studies. Prerequisite: CHGC503 or ESGN500 and
rocks, including copper, paleoplacer gold-uranium, marine
ESGN501. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
evaporite, barite, and phosphate ores are considered in
context of their generative environments and processes.
GEGN530. CLAY CHARACTERIZATION (I) Clay mineral
Prerequisite: GEGN401 or equivalent, or consent of
structure, chemistry and classification, physical properties
instructor. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
(flocculation and swelling, cation exchange capacity, surface
66
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

area and charge), geological occurrence, controls on their
microorganisms, in the shaping of the earth. Among the
stabilities. Principles of X-ray diffraction, including sample
subjects will be the aspects of living processes, chemical
preparation techniques, data collection and interpretation,
composition and characteristics of biological material,
and clay separation and treatment methods. The use of
origin of life, role of microorganisms in weathering of rocks
scanning electron microscopy to investigate clay distribution
and the early diagenesis of sediments, and the origin of
and morphology. Methods of measuring cation exchange
petroleum, oil shale, and coal. Prerequisite: Consent of
capacity and surface area. Prerequisite: GEOL210 and
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
GEGN306 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. 1 hour
GXGN571. GEOCHEMICAL EXPLORATION (I, II)
lecture, 2 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
Dispersion of trace metals from mineral deposits and their
GEGN532. GEOLOGICAL DATA ANALYSIS (I or II)
discovery. Laboratory consists of analysis and statistical
Techniques and strategy of data analysis in geology and
interpretation of data from soils, stream sediments, vegeta-
geological engineering: basic statistics review, analysis of
tion, and rock in connection with field problems. Term
data sequences, mapping, sampling and sample
report required. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 2 hours
representativity, univariate and multivariate statistics,
lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
geostatistics, and geographic information systems (GIS).
GEOL609. ADVANCED PETROLEUM GEOLOGY (II)
Practical experience with geological applications via
Subjects to be covered involve consideration of basic
supplied software and data sets from case histories.
chemical, physical, biological and geological processes and
Prerequisites: Introductory statistics course (MACS323 or
their relation to modern concepts of oil/gas generation
MACS530 or equivalent); and previous or concurrent
(including source rock deposition and maturation), and
enrollment in MACS532 or permission of instructor. 2 hours
migration/accumulation (including that occurring under
lecture/discussion; 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
hydrodynamic conditions). Concepts will be applied to the
CHGC555. ENVIRONMENTAL ORGANIC CHEMIS-
historic and predictive occurrence of oil/gas to specific
TRY (II) A study of the chemical and physical interactions
Rocky Mountain areas. In addition to lecture attendance,
which determine the fate, transport and interactions of
course work involves review of topical papers and solution
organic chemicals in aquatic systems, with emphasis on
of typical problems. Prerequisite: GEGN438.
chemical transformations of anthropogenic organic
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
contaminants. Prerequisites: A course in organic chemistry
CHGC610. NUCLEAR AND ISOTOPIC GEOCHEMIS-
and CHGN503, Advanced Physical Chemistry or its
TRY (II) A study of the principles of geochronology and
equivalent, or consent of instructor. Offered in alternate
stable isotope distributions with an emphasis on the
years. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
application of these principles to important case studies in
CHGC562/CHGN462. MICROBIOLOGY AND THE
igneous petrology and the formation of ore deposits. U, Th,
ENVIRONMENT This course will cover the basic funda-
and Pb isotopes, K-Ar, Rb-Sr, oxygen isotopes, sulfur
mentals of microbiology, such as structure and function of
isotopes, and carbon isotopes included. Prerequisite:
procaryotic versus eucaryotic cells; viruses; classification of
Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
micro-organisms; microbial metabolism, energetics,
Offered alternate years. Spring 1998.
genetics, growth and diversity; microbial interactions with
GEOL615. GEOCHEMISTRY OF HYDROTHERMAL
plants, animals, and other microbes. Additional topics
MINERAL DEPOSITS (I) Detailed study of the geochemis-
covered will include various aspects of environmental
try of selected hydrothermal mineral deposits. Theory and
microbiology such as global biogeochemical cycles,
application of stable isotopes as applied to mineral deposits.
bioleaching, bioremediation, and wastewater treatment.
Origin and nature of hydrothermal fluids and the mecha-
Prerequisite: ESGN301 or consent of Instructor. 3 hours
nisms of transport and deposition of ore minerals. Review of
lecture, 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
wall-rock alteration processes. Fundamental solution
CHGC563. ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY (I) An
chemistry and the physical chemistry of hydrothermal fluids.
introduction to the microorganisms of major geochemical
Prerequisite: GEGN401 or equivalent or consent of
importance, as well as those of primary importance in water
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
pollution and waste treatment. Microbes and sedimentation,
GEOL617. THERMODYNAMICS AND MINERAL
microbial leaching of metals from ores, acid mine water
PHASE EQUILIBRIA (I) Basic thermodynamics applied to
pollution, and the microbial ecology of marine and
natural geologic systems. Evaluation of mineral-vapor
freshwater habitats are covered. Prerequisite: Consent of
mineral solution, mineral-melt, and solid solution equilibria
instructor. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
with special emphasis on oxide, sulfide, and silicate
Offered alternate years. Fall 1998.
systems. Experimental and theoretical derivation, use, and
CHGC564. BIOGEOCHEMISTRY AND
application of phase diagrams relevant to natural rock
GEOMICROBIOLOGY (I) Designed to give the student an
systems. An emphasis will be placed on problem solving
understanding of the role of living things, particularly
rather than basic theory. Prerequisite: DCGN209 or
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
67

equivalent or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
mineralized, from diverse tectonic settings. Prerequisites:
semester hours. Offered alternate years; Fall 1995.
GEOL221, GEOL212, or GEGN307.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours. Offered
GEOL621. PETROLOGY OF DETRITAL ROCKS (II)
alternate years; Fall 1997.
Compositions and textures of sandstones, siltstones, and
mudrocks. Relationship of compositions and textures of
GXGN633. LITHOGEOCHEMICAL MINERAL EXPLO-
provenance, environment of deposition, and burial history.
RATION (II) Principles and application of primary
Development of porosity and permeability. Laboratory
dispersion to the search for metallic mineral deposits.
exercises emphasize use of petrographic thin sections, x-ray
Evaluation of the design, sampling, analytical, and interpre-
diffraction analysis, and scanning electron microscopy to
tational techniques used in lithogeochemical exploration.
examine detrital rocks. A term project is required, involving
Practical laboratory exercises. Term projects required.
petrographic analysis of samples selected by student.
Prerequisite: GXGN571, GEGN401 or equivalent or
Prerequisites: GEOL212 or 210, GEOL221 or equivalent or
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture/seminar/lab; 3
consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3
semester hours. Offered alternate years; Spring 1999.
semester hours. Offered on demand.
GXGN635. SURFICIAL EXPLORATION GEOCHEMIS-
GEOL624. CARBONATE SEDIMENTOLOGY AND
TRY (II) Secondary dispersion processes (mechanical and
PETROLOGY (II) Processes involved in the deposition of
chemical) applied to the search for metalliferous mineral
carbonate sediments with an emphasis on Recent environ-
deposits. A variety of sampling media, analytical proce-
ments as analogs for ancient carbonate sequences. Carbon-
dures, and interpretive techniques are evaluated. Landscape
ate facies recognition through bio- and lithofacies analysis,
geochemistry framework for exploration program design.
three-dimensional geometries, sedimentary dynamics,
Prerequisite: GXGN571 or equivalent or consent of
sedimentary structures, and facies associations. Laboratory
instructor. A course in geomorphology recommended.
stresses identification of Recent carbonate sediments and
3 hours lecture/seminar/lab; 3 semester hours. Offered
thin section analysis of carbonate classification, textures,
alternate years; Spring 1997.
non-skeletal and biogenic constituents, diagenesis, and
CHGC640. SOIL GAS GEOCHEMISTRY AND APPLI-
porosity evolution. Prerequisite: GEOL221 and GEGN306
CATIONS IN THE EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL
or GEGN 307 or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture/
SCIENCES (II) Thermal, chemical, and microbiological
seminar, 2 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
reactions in the production of gases. Quantitative review of
GEOL625. ADVANCED METAMORPHIC PETROLOGY
transport of gaseous species in the saturated and unsaturated
Metamorphic processes and concepts, emphasizing physical
zones. Sampling and analysis of soil gases. Applications of
and chemical controls in the development of mineral
soil gas in the earth and environmental sciences, including
assemblages. Petrographic examination of rock suites from
exploration, contaminant mapping, and global climate
representative metamorphic zones and facies. Emphasis on
change. Prerequisites: CHGC503, or ESGN500 and
the interrelationships of crystallization and deformation and
ESGN501, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
an interpretation of metamorphic history. Prerequisite:
semester hours.
GEGN307 (or equivalent) or consent of instructor. 2 hours
GEOL645. VOLCANOLOGY (II) Assigned readings and
lecture and seminar, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours. Offered
seminar discussions on volcanic processes and products.
alternate years; Fall 1996.
Principal topics include pyroclastic rocks, craters and
GEOL626. ISOTOPE GEOLOGY (II) The application of
calderas, caldron subsidence, diatremes, volcanic domes,
radioactive and stable isotope analysis to problems in
origin and evolution of volcanic magmas, and relation of
igneous and metamorphic petrology and ore genesis. Studies
volcanism to alteration and mineralization. Petrographic
of polymetamorphic terrains with special reference to the
study of selected suites of lava and pyroclastic rocks in the
geochronology of the Front Range. The utilization of
laboratory. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 hour
isotopic tracers to evaluate petrologenic models. The
seminar, 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
distribution of heavy radiogenic and light stable isotopes as
GEOL653. CARBONATE DIAGENESIS AND
indicators of source terrain and subsequent evolution of
GEOCHEMISTRY (II) Petrologic, geochemical, and
mineral deposits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
isotopic approaches to the study of diagenetic changes in
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years;
carbonate sediments and rocks. Topics covered include
Spring 1996.
major near-surface diagenetic environments, subaerial
GEOL628. ADVANCED IGNEOUS PETROLOGY (I)
exposure, dolomitization, burial diagenesis, carbonate
Igneous processes and concepts, emphasizing the genesis,
aqueous equlibria, and the carbonate geochemistry of trace
evolution, and emplacement of tectonically and geochemi-
elements and stable isotopes. Laboratory stresses thin
cally diverse volcanic and plutonic occurrences. Tectonic
section recognition of diagenetic textures and fabrics, x-ray
controls on igneous activity and petrochemistry. Petro-
diffraction, and geochemical/isotopic approaches to
graphic study of igneous suites, mineralized and non-
diagenetic problems. Prerequisite: GEOL624 or equivalent
68
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

or consent of instructor. 4 to 6 hours lecture/seminar/lab; 3
Geology and Geological Engineering
semester hours.
ROGER M. SLATT, Professor and Department Head
GEGN684. CHEMICAL MODELING OF AQUEOUS
WENDY J. HARRISON, Professor
SYSTEMS (II) Provides theoretical background and
MURRAY W. HITZMAN, Professor, Charles F. Fogerty Professor
practical experience in the application of chemical equilib-
of Economic Geology
rium and reaction path models to problems in diverse fields
NEIL F. HURLEY, Professor, Charles Boettcher Distinguished
Chair in Petroleum Geology
of theoretical and applied aqueous geochemistry. Advanced
KEENAN LEE, Professor
topics in aqueous geochemistry are presented and subse-
EILEEN P. POETER, Professor
quently investigated using computer simulation approaches.
SAMUEL B. ROMBERGER, Professor
Includes hands-on experience with the software EQ3/6.
A. KEITH TURNER, Professor
Instruction is provided in the use of basic UNIX commands.
JOHN E. WARME, Professor
The course progressively builds user ability through a wide
RICHARD F. WENDLANDT, Professor
variety of applications including problems in thermody-
L. GRAHAM CLOSS, Associate Professor
namic data quality evaluation, ore deposition, sediment
TIMOTHY A. CROSS, Associate Professor
diagenesis, groundwater evolution, contaminant geochemis-
JOHN B. CURTIS, Associate Professor
try, leachate generation, and enhanced oil recovery treat-
JERRY D. HIGGINS, Associate Professor
ments. Course ends with student presentations of a chemical
GREGORY S. HOLDEN, Associate Professor
modeling study applied to a problem of their choosing.
JOHN D. HUMPHREY, Associate Professor
Prerequisite: GEGN585 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
ERIC. P. NELSON, Associate Professor
lecture/computer lab; 3 semester hours.
JOHN E. McCRAY, Assistant Professor
CHGC699A. SELECTED TOPICS IN GEOCHEMISTRY
RICHARD H. De VOTO, Professor Emeritus
(I, II) Detailed study of a geochemical topic under direction
JOSEPH J. FINNEY, Professor Emeritus
of a member of the staff. Work on the same or a different
THOMAS L.T. GROSE, Professor Emeritus
topic may be continued through later semesters and
JOHN D. HAUN, Professor Emeritus
additional credits earned. Prerequisite: Consent of instruc-
RICHARD W. HUTCHINSON, Professor Emeritus
tor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
KARL R. NEWMAN, Professor Emeritus
CHGC699B. SPECIAL TOPICS IN AQUEOUS AND
ROBERT J. WEIMER, Professor Emeritus
SEDIMENTARY GEOCHEMISTRY (I, II) Detailed study
Degrees Offered:
of a specific topic in the area of aqueous or sedimentary
Professional Degree (Geological Engineering)
geochemistry under the direction of a member of the staff.
Professional Degree (Engineering Geology)
Work on the same or a different topic may be continued
Professional Degree (Exploration Geosciences)
through later semesters and additional credits earned.
Petroleum Exploration & Development Option
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
Mineral Exploration Option
CHGC699C. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ORGANIC AND
Geosciences Option
BIOGEOCHEMISTRY (I, II) Detailed study of a specific
Professional Degree (Hydrogeology)
topic in the areas of organic geochemistry or biogeochemis-
Master of Engineering (Geological Engineer)
try under the direction of a member of the staff. Work on the
Master of Science (Geology)
same or a different topic may be continued through later
Master of Science (Geological Engineering)
semesters and additional credits earned. Prerequisite:
Master of Science (Geochemistry)
Consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
Doctor of Philosophy (Geology)
Doctor of Philosophy (Geochemistry)
CHGC699D. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PETROLOGIC
Doctor of Philosophy (Geological Engineering)
GEOCHEMISTRY (I, II) Detailed study of a specific topic
Program Description:
in the area of petrologic geochemistry under the direction of
a member of the staff. Work on the same or a different topic
The Department of Geology and Geological Engineering
may be continued through later semesters and additional
offers Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees
credits earned. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to 3
in Geology and Geochemistry and Master of Engineering
semester hours.
and Doctor of Philosophy in Geological Engineering.
Geological Engineering degrees require possession or
acquisition of an undergraduate engineering degree or its
equivalent.
Graduate students desiring to study hydrogeology,
geotechnical engineering, and some environmental
applications are generally expected to pursue the Geological
Engineering degree program. Students desiring to study
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
69

petroleum or minerals exploration or development sciences,
(GEGN700 or 702) is determined by the thesis advisor, and
geochemistry and/or geology generally pursue science
is typically at least 6 hours.
degrees. Students are initially admitted to either geoscience
Specific required courses for the degree of Doctor of
or geological engineering degree programs and must receive
Philosophy (Geological Engineering) are the same as for the
approval of the GE department Graduate Advisory Commit-
Master’s degree program in geological engineering. The
tee to switch degree categories.
number of courses required in the specialty area will be
Program Requirements:
determined by the student in conjunction with the doctoral
Geology Degrees:
program committee. It is normally expected that the course
To ensure breadth of background, the course of study for
of study for graduate degrees in geological engineering will
the degrees Master of Science (Geology) and Doctor of
contain strong emphasis in the areas of geology and
Philosophy (Geology) must include at least one semester of
engineering.
graduate work in each of the fields of stratigraphy/sedimen-
The Master’s degree program in geological engineering
tology, structural geology/tectonics, and petrology. At the
includes three components:
discretion of the student’s thesis advisory committee, an
1. Specific Required Courses (7 credits)
appropriate course taken from a degree program other than
Geology may be substituted for one (and only one) of the
a. GEGN 570 Case Histories in Geological Engineer-
fields above. All Master of Science (Geology) and Doctor of
ing and Hydrogeology (3) is required for students
Philosophy (Geology) candidates must also complete an
specializing in geological engineering or ground
appropriate thesis, based upon original research they have
water engineering. GEGN 528 Mining Geology
completed. A thesis proposal and course of study must be
(3) or GEGN 518 Mineral Exploration (3) is
approved by a candidate’s thesis committee prior to
required for students specializing in mining
embarking on substantial work on the thesis research.
geology.
Prospective students should submit the results of the
b. GEGN 532 Geological Data Analysis (3)
Graduate Record Examination with their application for
c. GEOL 607 Graduate Geology Seminar (1)
admission to graduate study. In the event that it is not
2. Specialty Areas (17 credits minimum.)
possible, because of geographic and other restrictions, to
take the Graduate Record Examination prior to enrolling at
This will include about 5-6 courses (predominantly at
Colorado School of Mines, enrollment may be granted on a
500 and 600 level) selected by the student in
provisional basis subject to satisfactory completion of the
conjunction with the Master’s program advisory
examination within the first year of residence.
committee. Specialty areas might include
Geotechnical Engineering, Groundwater Hydrology,
Professional Degree Course Requirements:
Contaminant Hydrology, Subsurface Remediation,
Professional degrees are offered in the fields of Geologi-
Waste Management, Geomorphology, Environmental
cal Engineering, Engineering Geology, Hydrogeology, and
Hazards, Geographic Information Systems, and
Resource Geosciences (Petroleum Exploration and
Mining Geology.
Development Option, Mineral Exploration Option, or
Geosciences Option). Students must complete a 15-unit core
3. Master of Engineering Report (GEGN700) or
course requirement (specific to each degree field) and 15
Master of Science Thesis (GEGN702)
units of appropriate elective courses, to total 30 units. At
The form and content of the engineering report or
least 15 units counted for the degree must be 500-level or
thesis are to be determined by the student and the
above. Personalized course programs are possible with
student’s advisory committee. The engineering report
approval of the Professional Degree Advisor.
and Master’s thesis must demonstrate creative and
Geological Engineering Requirements:
comprehensive ability in the development or
application of geological and engineering principles.
The Master of Engineering (Geological Engineer) and
The format of the engineering report or thesis will
Master of Science (Geological Engineering) academic
follow the guidelines described under the Thesis
programs will require 24 semester hours of course work (a
Writer’s Guide. The engineering report differs from
maximum of 9 semester hours may be 400-level course
a thesis by emphasizing the engineering design
work), plus a Graduate Engineering Report or thesis. Course
approach to problem solving. Typically, a report may
requirements for the M.E. and M.S. degrees in Geological
(a) analyze a specific aspect of a larger problem, (b)
Engineering are the same. An M.E. degree is awarded to
propose a specific design, or (c) focus on engineering
students whose engineering report entails applied engineer-
or economic concepts. Engineering reports are
ing research, while an M.S. may be awarded to students
closely aligned to industrial research reports, and
whose thesis entails fundamental scientific research with a
commonly are undertaken with the cooperation of
purpose of advancing topics in applied engineering. The
industry or governmental agencies. While such
student and the student’s advisory committee determine the
cooperation is not required, it frequently occurs
degree to be awarded. The number of required thesis credits
70
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

because of the applied nature of the topics selected
Professional Degree Programs:
for engineering reports.
Candidates for the Professional Degree must possess an
Specific required courses for the degree of Doctor of
appropriate geosciences undergraduate degree or its
Philosophy (Geological Engineering) are the same as for the
equivalent. Prerequisites are the same as those required for
Master of Engineering (Geological Engineer). It is normally
the Master of Science (Geology) Degree.
expected that the course of study for graduate degrees in
Geological Engineering Programs:
geological engineering will contain strong emphasis in the
The candidate for the degree of Master of Engineering
areas of applied geology and engineering.
(Geological Engineer), Master of Science (Geological
Geochemistry Program Requirements:
Engineering) or Doctor of Philosophy (Geological Engi-
The geochemistry program comprises a core group of
neering) must have completed the following or equivalent
courses and four optional tracks: Mineralogy-Petrology,
subjects, for which credit toward an advanced degree will
Aqueous-Environmental, Ore Deposits-Exploration, and
not be granted.
Organic-Petroleum. Satisfactory performance in all core
Mathematics:
courses is required of all geochemistry students. Required
Four semesters including: Calculus (2 semesters) and
core courses are:
one semester of any two of: calculus III, differential
CHGC 503 Introduction to Geochemistry,
equations, statistics, numerical analysis, linear algebra,
CHGC 504 Geochemical Analysis and
operations research, optimization
CHGN 503 Advanced Physical Chemistry
Basic Science:
Comprehensive Examination
Chemistry (2 semesters)
A comprehensive examination must be taken. It is
Mineralogy/Petrology
expected that this exam will be completed within three years
Physics (2 semesters)
of matriculation or after the bulk of course work is finished,
Stratigraphy/Sedimentation
whichever occurs later. This examination will be adminis-
Physical Geology/Historical Geology
tered by the student’s Doctoral committee and will consist
Computer Programming
of an oral and a written examination, administered in a
Engineering Science:
format to be determined by the Doctoral Committee. Two
Structural Geology and one semester in four of the
negative votes in the Doctoral Committee constitute failure
following subjects:
of the examination.
Physical Chemistry/Thermodynamics
In case of failure of the conprehensive examination, a re-
Soil Mechanics
examination may be given upon the recommendation of the
Statics
Doctoral Committee and approval of the Graduate Dean.
Fluid Mechanics
Only one re-examination may be given.
Dynamics
Rock Mechanics
Prerequisites:
Mechanics of Materials
Geology Programs:
The candidate for the degree of Master of Science
Engineering Design:
(Geology) or Doctor of Philosophy (Geology) must have
Field Geology (6 weeks)
completed the following or equivalent subjects, for which
One semester in two of the following subjects:
credit toward an advanced degree will not be granted.
Mineral Deposits/Economic Geology
Hydrogeology
General Geology
Engineering Geology and one semester in three of the
Structural Geology
following subjects:
Field Geology (6 weeks)
Foundation Engineering
Mineralogy
Engineering Hydrology
Petrology
Geomorphology
Historical Geology
Airphoto Interpretation, Photogeology, or Remote
Stratigraphy
Sensing
Petroleum Geology
Chemistry (3 semesters, including at least 1 semester of
Introduction to Mining
physical or organic)
Introductory Geophysics
Mathematics (2 semester of calculus)
Engineering Geology Design
An additional science course (other than geology) or
Mineral Exploration Design
advanced mathematics
Groundwater Engineering Design
Physics (2 semesters)
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
71

Description of Courses
and mineral resources of the marine environment. Lectures
GEGN401. MINERAL DEPOSITS (I) Introductory
from pertinent disciplines are included. Recommended
presentation of magmatic, hydrothermal, and sedimentary
background: basic college courses in chemistry, geology,
metallic ore deposits. Chemical, petrologic, structural, and
mathematics, and physics. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
sedimentological processes that contribute to ore formation.
Offered alternate years; Spring 1997.
Description of classic deposits representing individual
GEGN438. PETROLEUM GEOLOGY (I) Reservoir rocks,
deposit types. Review of exploration sequences. Laboratory
types of traps, temperature and pressure conditions of the
consists of hand specimen study of host rock-ore mineral
reservoir, theories of origin and accumulation of petroleum,
suites and mineral deposit evaluation problems. Prerequi-
geology of major petroleum fields and provinces of the
site: GEGN316 and DCGN209. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours
world, and methods of exploration for petroleum. Term
lab; 4 semester hours.
report required. Laboratory consists of study of well
GEGN403. MINERAL EXPLORATION DESIGN (I)
samples, plotting of lithologic logs, correlation of electric
Exploration project design: commodity selection, target
and other types of logs, preparation of structure contour
selection, genetic models, alternative exploration ap-
maps. Field problem may be included. Prerequisite:
proaches and associated costs, exploration models, property
GEOL309 or GEOL315; GEGN316 or GPGN386 or
acquisition, and preliminary economic evaluation. Lectures
PEGN316. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
and laboratory exercises to simulate the entire exploration
GEGN439/GPGN439/PEGN439. MULTI-DISCIPLINARY
sequence from inception and planning through implementa-
PETROLEUM DESIGN (II) This is a multi-disciplinary
tion to discovery, with initial ore reserve calculations and
design course that integrates fundamentals and design
preliminary economic evaluation. Prerequisite: GEGN401
concepts in geological, geophysical, and petroleum
or concurrent enrollment. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3
engineering. Students work in integrated teams from each of
sememster hours.
the disciplines. Open-ended design problems are assigned
GEGN404. ORE MICROSCOPY/ FLUID INCLUSIONS
including the development of a prospect in an exploration
(II) Identification of ore minerals using reflected light
play and a detailed engineering field study. Detailed reports
microscopy, micro-hardness, and reflectivity techniques.
are required for the prospect evaluation and engineering
Petrographic analysis of ore textures and their significance.
field study. Prerequisites: GE majors: GEOL308 or
Guided research on the ore mineralogy and ore textures of
GEOL309, GEGN316, GEGN438; PE majors: PEGN316,
classic ore deposits. Prerequisites: GEGN 306, GEGN401,
PEGN 413, PEGN 414 , PEGN 422, PEGN 423, PEGN 424
or consent of instructor. 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
(or concurrent) GEOL308; GP majors: GPGN302,
GPGN303. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
GEGN405. MINERAL DEPOSITS (I) Physical and
chemical characteristics and geologic and geographic setting
GEGN442. ADVANCED ENGINEERING GEOMOR-
of magmatic, hydrothermal, and sedimentary metallic
PHOLOGY (II) Application of quantitative geomorphic
mineral deposits from the aspects of genesis, exploration,
techniques to engineering problems. Map interpretation,
and mining. For non-majors. Prerequisite: GEOL210,
photointerpretation, field observations, computer modeling,
GEOL308, DCGN209 or concurrent enrollment. 2 hours
and GIS analysis methods. Topics include: coastal engineer-
lecture; 2 semester hours.
ing, fluvial processes, river engineering, controlling water
and wind erosion, permafrost engineering. Multi-week
GEOC407. ATMOSPHERE, WEATHER AND CLIMATE
design projects and case studies. Prerequisite: GEGN342
(II) An introduction to the Earth’s atmosphere and its role in
and GEGN468, or graduate standing; GEGN475/575
weather patterns and long term climate. Provides basic
recommended. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester
understanding of origin and evolution of the atmosphere,
hours.
Earth’s heat budget, global atmospheric circulation and
modern climatic zones. Long- and short-term climate
GEGN467. GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING (I) Theory
change including paleoclimatology, the causes of glacial
of groundwater occurrence and flow. Relation of groundwa-
periods and global warming, and the depletion of the ozone
ter to surface water; potential distribution and flow; theory
layer. Causes and effects of volcanic eruptions on climate,
of aquifer tests; water chemistry, water quality, and
El Nino, acid rain, severe thunderstorms, tornadoes,
contaminant transport. Laboratory sessions on water
hurricanes, and avalanches are also discussed. Microcli-
budgets, water chemistry, properties of porous media,
mates and weather patterns common in Colorado. Prerequi-
solutions to hydraulic flow problems, analytical and digital
site: Completion of CSM freshman technical core, or
models, and hydrogeologic interpretation. Prerequisite:
equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered
mathematics through calculus and differential equations,
alternate years; Spring 1996.
structural geology, and sedimentation/stratigraphy, or
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4
GEOC408. INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY (II)
semester hours.
An introduction to the scientific study of the oceans,
including chemistry, physics, geology, biology, geophysics,
72
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

GEGN468. ENGINEERING GEOLOGY AND
GEGN481. ADVANCED HYDROGEOLOGY (I) Lectures,
GEOTECHNICS (I) Application of geology to evaluation of
assigned readings, and discussions concerning the theory,
construction, mining, and environmental projects such as
measurement, and estimation of ground water parameters,
dams, waterways, tunnels, highways, bridges, buildings,
fractured-rock flow, new or specialized methods of well
mine design, and land-base waste disposal facilities. Design
hydraulics and pump tests, tracer methods, and well
projects including field, laboratory, and computer analyses
construction design. Design of well tests in variety of
are an important part of the course. Prerequisite: MNGN321
settings. Prerequisites: GEGN467 or consent of instructor.
and concurrent enrollment in EGGN461/EGGN463 or
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
consent of instructor.
GEGN483. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 semester hours.
GROUNDWATER SYSTEMS (II) Lectures, assigned
GEGN469. ENGINEERING GEOLOGY DESIGN (II) This
readings, and direct computer experience concerning the
is a capstone design course that emphasizes realistic
fundamentals and applications of analytical and finite-
engineering geologic/geotechnics projects. Lecture time is
difference solutions to ground water flow problems as well
used to introduce projects and discussions of methods and
as an introduction to inverse modeling. Design of computer
procedures for project work. Several major projects will be
models to solve ground water problems. Prerequisites:
assigned and one to two field trips will be required. Students
Familiarity with computers, mathematics through differen-
work as individual investigators and in teams. Final written
tial and integral calculus, and GEGN467.
design reports and oral presentations are required. Prerequi-
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
site: GEGN468 or equivalent.
GEGN/GEOL498. SEMINAR IN GEOLOGY OR GEO-
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
LOGICAL ENGINEERING (I, II) Special topics classes,
GEGN470. GROUND-WATER ENGINEERING DESIGN
taught on a one-time bases. May include lecture, laboratory
(II) Application of the principles of hydrogeology and
and field trip activities. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor
ground-water engineering to water supply, geotechnical, or
and department head. Variable credit; 1 to 3 semester hours.
water quality problems involving the design of well fields,
GEGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING
drilling programs, and/or pump tests. Engineering reports,
GEOLOGY OR ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY (I,
complete with specifications, analyses, and results, will be
II) Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field
required. Prerequisite: GEGN467 or equivalent or consent
problems in geological engineering or engineering
of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
hydrogeology. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and
GEGN475. APPLICATIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC INFOR-
department head. Variable credit; 1 to 3 semester hours.
MATION SYSTEMS (I) An introduction to Geographic
GEOL499. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GEOLOGY (I, II)
Information Systems (GIS) and their applications to all areas
Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems
of geology and geological engineering. Lecture topics
in geology. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and
include: principles of GIS, data structures, digital elevation
department. Variable credit; 1 to 3 semester hours.
models, data input and verification, data analysis and spatial
modeling, data quality and error propagation, methods of
Graduate Courses
GIS evaluation and selection. Laboratories will use personal
The following courses are not all offered each academic
computer systems for GIS projects, as well as video
year. Any of those offered for which fewer than five students
presentations. Prerequisite: SYGN101.
have registered may be omitted in any semester. All 500-
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
level courses are open to qualified seniors with permission
of the department and Dean of Graduate School.. The 600-
GEGN476. DESKTOP MAPPING APPLICATIONS FOR
level courses are open only to students enrolled in the
PROJECT DATA MANAGEMENT (I, II) Conceptual
Graduate School.
overview and hands-on experience with a commercial
desktop mapping system. Display, analysis, and presentation
GEOL501. APPLIED STRATIGRAPHY (I) Advanced
mapping functions; familiarity with the software compo-
concepts in stratigraphy with their application to exploration
nents, including graphical user interface (GUI); methods for
and development of fossil fuels and other minerals. Methods
handling different kinds of information; organization and
and techniques of stratigraphic modeling utilizing surface
storage of project documents. Use of raster and vector data
and subsurface data in field and laboratory exercises.
in an integrated environment; basic raster concepts;
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
introduction to GIS models, such as hill shading and cost/
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
distance analysis. Prerequisite: No previous knowledge of
GEGN503/GPGN503/PEGN503. INTEGRATED EXPLO-
desktop mapping or GIS technology assumed. Some
RATION (I) Students work alone and in teams to study
computer experience in operating within a WIndows
reservoirs from fluvial-deltaic and valley fill depositional
environment recommended.
environments. This is a multidisciplinary course that shows
1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour.
students how to characterize and model subsurface reservoir
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
73

performance by integrating data, methods and concepts from
of organic geochemistry to natural aqueous systems. Light
geology, geophysics and petroleum engineering. Activities
stable and unstable isotopic studies applied to aqueous
and topics include field trips to surface outcrops, well logs,
systems. Prerequisite: DCGN209 or equivalent, or consent
borehole cores, seismograms, reservoir modeling of field
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
performance, written exercises and oral team presentations.
GEOL511. HISTORY OF GEOLOGIC CONCEPTS (II)
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Lectures and seminars concerning the history and philoso-
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
phy of the science of geology; emphasis on the historical
GEGN504/GPGN504/PEGN504. INTEGRATED EXPLO-
development of basic geologic concepts. 3 hours lecture and
RATION AND DEVELOPMENT (II) Students work in
seminar; 3 semester hours. Required of all doctoral
multidisciplinary teams to study practical problems and case
candidates in department. Offered alternate years. Spring
studies in integrated subsurface exploration and develop-
1999
ment. The course addresses emerging technologies and
GEOL515. ADVANCED MINERAL DEPOSITS -
timely topics with a general focus on carbonate reservoirs.
MAGMATIC AND SYNGENETIC ORES (I) Time-space
Activities include field trips, 3D computer modeling, written
aspects of metallogenesis in relation to regional and local
exercises and oral team presentation. Prerequisite: Consent
geological evolution of the earth. Processes leading to the
of instructor. 3 hours lecture and seminar; 3 semester hours.
formation of ore magmas and fluids within tectonic and
GEOL505. APPLIED STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY (II)
stratigraphic frameworks, and to the development of
Structural geology with emphasis on solving problems in
favorable ore-forming environments. Emphasis will be
field and lab exercises using systematic analysis by
placed on processes responsible for ore genesis in magmatic
geometric and mapping techniques. Interpretation of the
systems, such as layered complexes, carbonatites and
structural aspects of ore control, fossil fuels, and environ-
pegmatites, and on the submarine hydrothermal processes
mental geology. Relationships between mechanical
responsible for syndepositional deposits in volcanic and
properties and structural behavior of geological materials.
sedimentary terrains, including massive base and precious
Prerequisite: GEGN316 or equivalent.
metal sulfide ores. Ore deposits in certain sedimentary
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
rocks, including copper, paleoplacer gold-uranium, marine
evaporite, barite, and phosphate ores are considered in
GEOL506. PHYSICS OF ROCK DEFORMATION (II) A
context of their generative environments and processes.
material-oriented, mechanistic approach to understanding
Prerequisite: GEGN401 or equivalent, or consent of
brittle and ductile rock deformation. Starts with fundamental
instructor. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
understanding of stress and strain. Physical processes of
rock fracture, friction, and flow will be studied as they relate
GEOL516. ADVANCED MINERAL DEPOSITS -
to earthquakes, crustal fluid movement, creep, and folding.
EPIGENETIC HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS (II) Time-
Emphasis on relating initial and derived microstructure,
space aspects of metallogenesis in relation to regional and
such as grain size, micro-cracks, and intracrystalline
local geological evolution of the earth. Processes leading to
dislocation, to stresses, temperatures, and fluids in the Earth.
the generation of metalliferous hydrothermal mineralizing
Rock anisotropy, heterogeneity, and scale effects discussed.
solutions within tectonic and lithologic frameworks, and to
Prerequisite: GEGN309 or equivalent.
the development of favorable ore-forming environments.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours Offered alternate years,
Emphasis will be placed on processes responsible for ore
Spring 1998
genesis in magmatic-hydrothermal systems such as porphyry
copper-molybdenum-gold deposits, epithermal precious
GEOL507. IGNEOUS AND METAMORPHIC PETROL-
metal deposits, metamorphogenetic gold deposits, volcanic
OGY (I) An overview of igneous and metamorphic
and sedimentary rock-hosted epigenetic base metal ores and
petrology. Presentation of rock associations and examination
epigenetic sedimentary-rock hosted and unconformity-
of the constraints on models for their origin. Emphasis will
related uranium deposits. Prerequisite: GEGN401 or
be on processes. Field trips required. Prerequisite:
equivalent, or consent of instructor.
GEGN307, GEOL422, DCGN209 or consent of instructor.
2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
GEGN518. MINERAL EXPLORATION (I) Mineral
GEGN509/CHGC509. INTRODUCTION TO AQUEOUS
industry overview, deposit economics, target selection,
GEOCHEMISTRY (I) Analytical, graphical and interpretive
deposit modeling, exploration technology, international
methods applied to aqueous systems. Thermodynamic
exploration, environmental issues, program planning,
properties of water and aqueous solutions. Calculation and
proposal development. Team development and presentation
graphical expression of acid-base, redox and solution-
of an exploration proposal. Prerequisite: GEOL515,
mineral equilibria. Effect of temperature and kinetics on
GEOL516, or equivalent. 2 hours lecture/seminar, 2 hours
natural aqueous systems. Adsorption and ion exchange
lab; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years: Fall 1996.
equilibria between clays and oxide phases. Behavior of trace
elements and complexation in aqueous systems. Application
74
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

GEGN527/CHGC527. ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY OF
and GIS analysis methods. Topics include: coastal engineer-
FOSSIL FUELS AND ORE DEPOSITS (II) A study of
ing, fluvial processes, river engineering, controlling water
organic carbonaceous materials in relation to the genesis and
and wind erosion, permafrost engineering. Multi-week
modification of fossil fuel and ore deposits. The biological
design projects and case studies. Prerequisite: GEGN342
origin of the organic matter will be discussed with emphasis
and GEGN468, or graduate standing; GEGN475 or
on contributions of microorganisms to the nature of these
GEGN575 recommended. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3
deposits. Biochemical and thermal changes which convert
semester hours.
the organic compounds into petroleum, oil shale, tar sand,
GEOL543. MODERN SEDIMENTS FIELD PROGRAM
coal, and other carbonaceous matter will be studied.
(S) Detailed field study of modern transitional and shallow
Principal analytical techniques used for the characterization
marine environments of sedimentary deposition. Both
of organic matter in the geosphere and for evaluation of oil
detrital and carbonate environments are included. Emphasis
and gas source potential will be discussed. Laboratory
on energy and mineral resources. Conducted at field
exercises will emphasize source rock evaluation, and oil-
locations such as southeastern United States and the
source rock and oil-oil correlation methods. Prerequisite:
Bahamas. Fees are assessed for field and living expenses
CHGN327, GEGN438, or consent of instructor. 2 hours
and transportation. Prerequisite: Background in sedimentary
lecture; 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate
geology and consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours
years, Spring 1999.
lab; 3 semester hours.
GEGN528/MNGN528. MINING GEOLOGY (I) Role of
GEOL545. INTRODUCTION TO REMOTE SENSING (I)
geology and the geologist in the development and produc-
Theory and application of remote sensing techniques using
tion stages of a mining operation. Topics addressed: mining
visible, infrared, and microwave electromagnetic energy.
operation sequence, mine mapping, drilling, sampling,
Spectral information from cameras and scanning instru-
reserve estimation, economic evaluation, permitting, support
ments, including infrared photography, radar imagery,
functions. Field trips, mine mapping, data evaluation
Landsat imagery, and imaging spectroscopy. Survey of
exercises, and term project. Prerequisite: GEGN401 or
applications to geology and global change. Lab interpreta-
GEGN405 or permission of instructors. 2 hours lecture/
tion of remote sensing imagery and introduction to digital
seminar, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate
image processing. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester
years; Fall 1999.
hours.
GEGN530. CLAY CHARACTERIZATION (I) Clay mineral
GEOL546. GEOLOGIC APPLICATIONS OF REMOTE
structure, chemistry and classification, physical properties
SENSING (II) Application of remote sensing to regional
(flocculation and swelling, cation exchange capacity, surface
geologic studies and to mineral and energy resource
area and charge), geological occurrence, controls on their
assessments. Study of remote sensing techniques, including
stabilities. Principles of X-ray diffraction, including sample
spectral analysis, lineament analysis, and digital image
preparation techniques, data collection and interpretation,
processing. Reviews of case studies and current literature.
and clay separation and treatment methods. The use of
Student participation in discussion required. Prerequisite:
scanning electron microscopy to investigate clay distribution
GEOL545 or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours
and morphology. Methods of measuring cation exchange
lab; 3 semester hours.
capacity and surface area. Prerequisite: GEOL210 or
GEGN306 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. 1 hour
GEGN570. CASE HISTORIES IN GEOLOGICAL
lecture, 2 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
ENGINEERING AND HYDROGEOLOGY (I) Case
histories in geological and geotechnical engineering, ground
GEGN532. GEOLOGICAL DATA ANALYSIS (I or II)
water, and waste management problems. Students are
Techniques and strategy of data analysis in geology and
assigned problems and must recommend solutions and/or
geological engineering: basic statistics review, analysis of
prepare defendable work plans. Discussions center on the
data sequences, mapping, sampling and sample
role of the geological engineer in working with government
representativity, univariate and multivariate statistics,
regulators, private-sector clients, other consultants, and
geostatistics, and geographic informations systems (GIS).
other special interest groups. Prerequisite: GEGN442,
Practical experience with geological applications via
GEGN467, GEGN468, GEGN469, GEGN470 or consent of
supplied software and data sets from case histories.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
Prerequisites: Introductory statistics course (MACS323 or
MACS530 equivalent); and previous or concurrent
GEGN571. ADVANCED ENGINEERING GEOLOGY (I)
enrollment in MACS532 or permission of instructor. 2 hours
Emphasis will be on engineering geology mapping methods,
lecture/discussion; 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
and geologic hazards assessment applied to site selection
and site assessment for a variety of human activities.
GEGN542. ADVANCED ENGINEERING GEOMOR-
Prerequisite: GEGN468 or equivalent. 2 hours lecture, 3
PHOLOGY (II) Application of quantitative geomorphic
hours lab; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years, Fall
techniques to engineering problems. Map interpretation,
1998.
photointerpretation, field observations, computer modeling,
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
75

GEGN574. GEOTECHNICAL ASPECTS OF WASTE
GEGN581. ADVANCED GROUNDWATER ENGINEER-
DISPOSAL (II) Analysis and review of the legal and
ING (I) Lectures, assigned readings, and discussions
technical problems surrounding the shallow land burial of
concerning the theory, measurement, and estimation of
waste materials, with special emphasis on hazardous solid
ground water parameters, fractured-rock flow, new or
waste. Methods of investigation of new and abandoned or
specialized methods of well hydraulics and pump tests,
inactive waste sites. Measurement of contaminant movement
tracer methods. Prerequisite: GEGN467 or consent of
in the ground, design of contaminant and monitoring
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
systems, case histories of field performance, and current
GEGN583. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF
research findings. Prerequisite: GEGN468 and EGGN461/
GROUNDWATER SYSTEMS (II) Lectures, assigned
EGGN463. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered
readings, and direct computer experience concerning the
alternate years, Spring 1996.
fundamentals and applications of finite-difference and
GEGN575. APPLICATIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC INFOR-
finite-element numerical methods and analytical solutions to
MATION SYSTEMS (I) An introduction to Geographic
ground water flow and mass transport problems. Prerequi-
Information Systems (GIS) and their applications to all areas
site: A knowledge of FORTRAN programming, mathemat-
of geology and geological engineering. Lecture topics
ics through differential and integral calculus, and GEGN467
include: principles of GIS, data structures, digital elevation
or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3
models, data input and verification, data analysis and spatial
semester hours
modeling, data quality and error propogation, methods of
GEGN585. HYDROCHEMICAL EVOLUTION AND
GIS evaluation and selection. Laboratories will use
MODELING OF GROUND-WATER SYSTEMS (I)
Macintosh and DOS-based personal computer systems for
Application of hydrologic, geochemical, and isotopic
GIS projects, as well as video-presentations. Visits to local
concepts to the natural evolution of groundwater systems.
GIS laboratories, and field studies will be required. 2 hours
Principles of groundwater evolution in the vadose zone, in
lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours
evaporative environments, wetlands, unconfined and
GEGN576. FUNDAMENTALS OF VECTOR GEO-
confined groundwater systems, and areas of interaquifer
GRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS (I, II) Fundamen-
mixing. Introduction of use of geochemical modeling
tals of relational vector GIS; topological relationships;
techniques to constrain problems of mass transfer and mass
spatial coordinate systems; data capture and conversion;
balance in groundwater systems. Course is designed to
displaying and correcting errors; mapping precision; spatial
provide students with overview of hydrochemistry prior to
data attribute accuracy; and database models. Case studies.
taking advanced numerical modeling courses in hydrology
Prerequisite: GEGN475 or GEGN575.
and geochemistry. Prerequisites: DCGN209 and GEGN467
2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours. Offered on demand.
or equivalent or consent of instructor.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
GEGN 577. VECTOR GIS ANALYSIS FUNCTIONS (I, II)
Classification of relational vector GIS analysis functions;
GEGN/GEOL 598. SEMINAR IN GEOLOGY OR
topological relationships; constructing a database; associat-
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING (I, II) Special topics
ing attributes with spatial data; relating and joining attribute
classes, taught on a one-time basis. May include lecture,
tables; selecting and manipulating data records;
laboratory and field trip activities. Prerequisite: Approval of
edgematching and merging maps; displaying data; query and
instructor and department head. Variable credit; 1 to 3
analysis functions; topological overlay operations; distance
semester hours.
functions. Case studies of spatial analysis projects. Prerequi-
GEGN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING
site: GEGN 475 or GEGN 575, and GEGN 576.
GEOLOGY OR ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY(I, II)
2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours. Offered on demand.
Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems
GEGN 578. GIS PROJECT DESIGN (I, II) Project
in geological engineering or engineering hydrogeology.
implementation of GIS analyses. Projects may be under-
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and department head.
taken by individual students, or small student teams.
Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Documentation of all project design stages, including user
GEOL 599. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GEOLOGY (I,
needs assessment, implementation procedures, hardware and
II). Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field
software selection, data sources and acquisition, and project
problems in geology. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor
success assessment. Various GIS software may be used;
and department. Variable credit; 1 to 3 semester hours.
projects may involve 2-dimensional GIS, 3-dimensional
subsurface models, or multi-dimensional time-series
GEOL605. ADVANCED STRUCTURAL AND TEC-
analyses. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Variable credit,
TONIC PRINCIPLES (I) Seminar discussions on geotec-
1-3 semester hours, depending on project. Offered on
tonic principles, mountain patterns and cycles, type regional
demand.
and areal studies in tectonic style. Comparative tectonics.
Includes field work in nearby areas on specific tectonic
problems, review of recent literature, and tectonic analysis
76
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
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in mineral and fuel exploration. Prerequisite: GEOL309.
interpretation within deep-water depositional systems,
2 hours lecture and seminar, 3 hours field; 3 semester hours.
turbidite models and their evolution, control of reservoir
Offered alternate years, Fall 2001.
characteristics and performance, turbidites within a
sequence stratigraphic framework, and the global occurrence
GEOL606. ADVANCED STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY
of turbidite reservoirs. Laboratory exercises on seismic, well
(REGIONAL) (II) Seminar discussion of the world’s main
log, and core interpretation. Seven day field trip to study
tectonic provinces using modern methods of tectonic
classic turbidites in Arkansas and to develop individual field
analysis; includes discussion of typical structures for each
mapping and interpretation projects. Prerequisites:
province and thorough review of recent literature. Assigned
GEGN438, GEOL501 or equivalents. 3 hours lecture, 3
reports on analysis of regional structural patterns and their
hours lab; 4 semester hours. Offered alternate years. Fall
possible reproduction experimentally. Prerequisite:
1999.
GEOL605. 3 hours lecture and seminar; 3 semester hours.
Offered alternate years, Spring 2000.
GEOL615. GEOCHEMISTRY OF HYDROTHERMAL
MINERAL DEPOSITS (I) Detailed study of the geochemis-
GEOL607. GRADUATE SEMINAR (I, II) Recent geologic
try of selected hydrothermal mineral deposits. Theory and
ideas and literature reviewed. Preparation and oral presenta-
application of stable isotopes as applied to mineral deposits.
tion of short papers. 1 hour seminar; 1 semester hour.
Origin and nature of hydrothermal fluids and the mecha-
Required of all geology candidates for advanced degrees
nisms of transport and deposition of ore minerals. Review of
during their enrollment on campus.
wall-rock alteration processes. Fundamental solution
GEOL609. ADVANCED PETROLEUM GEOLOGY (II)
chemistry and the physical chemistry of hydrothermal fluids.
Subjects to be covered involve consideration of basic
Prerequisite: GEGN401 or equivalent or consent of
chemical, physical, biological and geological processes and
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
their relation to modern concepts of oil/gas generation
GEOL616. ADVANCED MINERAL DEPOSITS (II)
(including source rock deposition and maturation), and
Reviews of current literature and research regarding selected
migration/accumulation (including that occurring under
topics in mineral deposits. Group discussion and individual
hydrodynamic conditions). Concepts will be applied to the
participation expected. May be repeated for credit if
historic and predictive occurrence of oil/gas to specific
different topics are involved. Prerequisite: Consent of
Rocky Mountain areas. In addition to lecture attendance,
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
course work involves review of topical papers and solution
of typical problems. Prerequisite: GEGN438 or consent of
GEOL617. THERMODYNAMICS AND MINERAL
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PHASE EQUILIBRIA (I) Basic thermodynamics applied to
natural geologic systems. Evaluation of mineral-vapor
GEOL611. ADVANCED STRATIGRAPHY (II) Seminar on
mineral solution, mineral-melt, and solid solution equilibria
history and development of stratigraphic concepts and
with special emphasis on oxide, sulfide, and silicate
terminology; sedimentary processes and related facies for
systems. Experimental and theoretical derivation, use, and
detrital, carbonate, and evaporite sequences; tectonics and
application of phase diagrams relevant to natural rock
sedimentation; stratigraphic styles in plate tectonic models.
systems. An emphasis will be placed on problem solving
Field trips and report required. Prerequisite: GEOL214 or
rather than basic theory. Prerequisite: DCGN209 or
equivalent or GEOL501.
equivalent or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
3 hours lecture and seminar; 3 semester hours.
semester hours. Offered alternate years; Fall 1999.
GEOL613. GEOLOGIC RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZA-
GEOL618. EVOLUTION OF ORE DEPOSITS (II) The
TION (I or II) Principles and practice of characterizing
evolutionary changes in major types of ore deposits through
petroleum reservoirs using geologic and engineering data,
time are described, and the causative changes in their
including well logs, sample descriptions, routine and special
geological environments and genetic processes are consid-
core analyses and well tests. Emphasis is placed on practical
ered. The possible significance of these changes to tectonic
analysis of such data sets from a variety of clastic petroleum
processes, and to crustal evolution of the earth are evalu-
reservoirs worldwide. These data sets are integrated into
ated. In this context ore deposits are of interest not only for
detailed characterizations, which then are used to solve
their commercial value, but scientifically, as additional
practical oil and gas field problems. Prerequisites:
guides to the earth’s evolutionary development through 4
GEGN438, GEOL501, GEOL505/605 or equivalents.
billion years of earth history. Prerequisite: GEGN401,
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
GEOL515, GEOL516 or equivalents or consent of instruc-
GEOL614. PETROLEUM GEOLOGY OF DEEP-WATER
tor. 3 hours lectures and/or seminar/lab; 3 semester hours.
CLASTIC DEPOSITIONAL SYSTEMS (I) Course
GEOL621. PETROLOGY OF DETRITAL ROCKS (II)
combines local and regional deep-water sedimentology,
Compositions and textures of sandstones, siltstones, and
sequence stratigraphy, reservoir geology, interpretation of
mudrocks. Relationship of compositions and textures of
outcrops, reflection seismic records, cores and well logs.
provenance, environment of deposition, and burial history.
Focus is on depositional processes, facies and their
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
77

Development of porosity and permeability. Laboratory
according to nature of field study. Consent of instructor and
exercises emphasize use of petrographic thin sections, x-ray
department head is required. Fees are assessed for field and
diffraction analysis, and scanning electron microscopy to
living expenses and transportation. 1 to 3 semester hours;
examine detrital rocks. A term project is required, involving
may be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.
petrographic analysis of samples selected by student.
GEOL645. VOLCANOLOGY (II) Assigned readings and
Prerequisites: GEOL212 or 210, GEOL221 or equivalent or
seminar discussions on volcanic processes and products.
consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture and seminar, 3 hours
Principal topics include pyroclastic rocks, craters and
lab; 3 semester hours. Offered on demand.
calderas, caldron subsidence, diatremes, volcanic domes,
GEOL624. CARBONATE SEDIMENTOLOGY AND
origin and evolution of volcanic magmas, and relation of
PETROLOGY (II) Processes involved in the deposition of
volcanism to alteration and mineralization. Petrographic
carbonate sediments with an emphasis on Recent environ-
study of selected suites of lava and pyroclastic rocks in the
ments as analogs for ancient carbonate sequences. Carbon-
laboratory. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 hour
ate facies recognition through bio- and lithofacies analysis,
seminar, 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
three-dimensional geometries, sedimentary dynamics,
GEOL653. CARBONATE DIAGENESIS AND
sedimentary structures, and facies associations. Laboratory
GEOCHEMISTRY(II) Petrologic, geochemical, and
stresses identification of Recent carbonate sediments and
isotopic approaches to the study of diagenetic changes in
thin section analysis of carbonate classification, textures,
carbonate sediments and rocks. Topics covered include
non-skeletal and biogenic constituents, diagenesis, and
major near-surface diagenetic environments, subaerial
porosity evolution. Prerequisite: GEOL221 and GEGN306
exposure, dolomitization, burial diagenesis, carbonate
or GEGN 307 or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture/
aqueous equlibria, and the carbonate geochemistry of trace
seminar, 2 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
elements and stable isotopes. Laboratory stresses thin
GEOL625. ADVANCED METAMORPHIC PETROLOGY
section recognition of diagenetic textures and fabrics, x-ray
(I) Metamorphic processes and concepts, emphasizing
diffraction, and geochemical/isotopic approaches to
physical and chemical controls in the development of
diagenetic problems. Prerequisite: GEOL624 or equivalent
mineral assemblages. Petrographic examination of rock
or consent of instructor. 4 to 6 hours lecture/seminar/lab; 3
suites from representative metamorphic zones and facies.
semester hours.
Emphasis on the interrelationships of crystallization and
GEGN669. ADVANCED TOPICS IN ENGINEERING
deformation and an interpretation of metamorphic history.
HYDROGEOLOGY Review of current literature and
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture and
research regarding selected topics in hydrogeology. Group
seminar, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate
discussion and individual participation. Guest speakers and
years; Fall 1998.
field trips may be incorporated into the course. Prerequisite:
GEOL628. ADVANCED IGNEOUS PETROLOGY (I)
Consent of instructor. 1 to 2 semester hours; may be
Igneous processes and concepts, emphasizing the genesis,
repeated for credit with consent of instructor.
evolution, and emplacement of tectonically and geochemi-
GEGN670. ADVANCED TOPICS IN GEOLOGICAL
cally diverse volcanic and plutonic occurrences. Tectonic
ENGINEERING Review of current literature and research
controls on igneous activity and petrochemistry. Petro-
regarding selected topics in engineering geology. Group
graphic study of igneous suites, mineralized and non-
discussion and individual participation. Guest speakers and
mineralized, from diverse tectonic settings. Prerequisites:
field trips may be incorporated into the course. Prerequisite:
GEOL221, GEOL212, GEGN306 or GEGN307.
Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours. Offered
alternate years; Fall 1999.
GEGN671. ADVANCED SITE INVESTIGATION
PROJECTS (II) The geological engineer’s role in assess-
GEOL642. FIELD GEOLOGY (S) Field program operated
ment and design for heavy construction projects from the
concurrently with GEGN316 field camp to familiarize the
preliminary site investigation stage through the final design
student with basic field technique, geologic principles, and
stage. An advanced course for the application of siting and
regional geology of Rocky Mountains. Prerequisite:
design methods to complex projects. Prerequisite:
Undergraduate degree in geology and GEGN316 or
GEGN571 or consent of instructor. 1 hour lecture, 6 hours
equivalent. During summer field session; 1 to 3 semester
lab; 3 semester hours. Offered on demand.
hours.
GEGN672. ADVANCED GEOTECHNICS (II) Geological
GEOL643. GRADUATE FIELD SEMINARS (I, II, S)
analysis, design, and stabilization of natural soil and rock
Special advanced field programs emphasizing detailed study
slopes and rock foundations; computer modeling of slopes;
of some aspects of geology. Normally conducted away from
use of specialized methods in earth construction. Prerequi-
the Golden campus. Prerequisite: Restricted to Ph.D. or
site: GEGN468, EGGN461/EGGN463 and MNGN321.
advanced M.S. candidates. Usually taken after at least one
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
year of graduate residence. Background requirements vary
78
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

GEGN675. ADVANCED TOPICS IN GEOGRAPHIC
applications. Conceptual analysis taught via Socratic
INFORMATION SYSTEMS (I, II) Review of current
Dialectic. Students reproduce, analyze, and resolve each
developments and research in specific advanced topics
problem. Each class offers new problems and learning
concerning Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
experiences, thus the course can be repeated for credit with
technology and their applications to all areas of geology and
consent of instructor. By successful completion of this
geological engineering. Topics will include 3-dimensional
course, students earn certification to advise on the Interna-
data systems, the problems of 3-dimensional data structures,
tional Ground Water Modeling Center technical support line
visualization and rendering of complex geological objects,
in a part-time employment mode. Prerequisite: GEGN583 or
interactions with analytical models, and the capabilities of
consent of instructor. 2 hours recitation alternate weeks; 3
new software and hardware. Prerequisites: GEGN575 and
hours lab every week; 2 credit hours.
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
GEGN/GEOL 698. SEMINAR IN GEOLOGY OR
GEGN681. VADOSE ZONE HYDROLOGY (II) Study of
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING (I, II) Special topics
the physics of unsaturated groundwater flow and contami-
classes, taught on a one-time basis. May include lecture,
nant transport. Fundamental processes and data collection
laboratory and field trip activities. Prerequisite: Approval of
methods will be presented. The emphasis will be on analytic
instructor and department head. Variable credit; 1 to 3
solutions to the unsaturated flow equations and analysis of
semester hours.
field data. Application to non-miscible fluids, such as
GEGN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING
gasoline, will be made. The fate of leaks from underground
GEOLOGY OR ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY(I, II)
tanks will be analyzed. Prerequisites: GEGN467 or
Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems
equivalent; Math through Differential Equations; or consent
in geological engineering or engineering hydrogeology.
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and department head.
GEGN683. ADVANCED GROUND WATER MODELING
Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
(II) Flow and solute transport modeling including: 1)
GEOL 699. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GEOLOGY (I,
advanced analytical modeling methods; 2) finite elements,
II). Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field
random-walk, and method of characteristics numerical
problems in geology. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor
methods; 3) discussion of alternative computer codes for
and department. Variable credit; 1 to 3 semester hours.
modeling and presentation of the essential features of a
number of codes; 4) study of selection of appropriate
GEGN700. GRADUATE ENGINEERING REPORT-
computer codes for specific modeling problems; 5)
MASTER OF ENGINEERING (I, II, S) Laboratory, field
application of models to ground water problems; and 6)
and library work for the Master of Engineering report under
study of completed modeling projects through literature
supervision of the student’s advisory committee. Required
review, reading and discussion. Prerequisite: GEOL/
of candidates for degree of Master of Engineering. 6
CHGC509 or GEGN583, and GEGN585 or consent of
semester hours upon completion of report.
instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
GEOL701. GRADUATE THESIS-MASTER OF SCIENCE,
GEGN684. CHEMICAL MODELING OF AQUEOUS
GEOLOGY (I, II, S) Laboratory, field, and library work for
SYSTEMS (II) Provides theoretical background and
the Master’s thesis under supervision of the student’s
practical experience in the application of chemical equilib-
advisory committee. Required of candidates for the degree
rium and reaction path models to problems in diverse fields
of Master of Science (Geology). 6 semester hours upon
of theoretical and applied aqueous geochemistry. Advanced
completion of thesis.
topics in aqueous geochemistry are presented and subse-
GEGN702. GRADUATE THESIS-MASTER OF SCI-
quently investigated using computer simulation approaches.
ENCE, GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING (I, II, S) Labora-
Includes hands-on experience with the software EQ3/6.
tory, field, and library work for the Master’s thesis under
Instruction is provided in the use of basic UNIX commands.
supervision of the student’s advisory committee. Required
The course progressively builds user ability through a wide
of candidates for the degree of Master of Science (Geologi-
variety of applications including problems in thermody-
cal Engineering). 6 semester hours upon completion of
namic data quality evaluation, ore deposition, sediment
thesis.
diagenesis, groundwater evolution, contaminant geochemis-
try, leachate generation, and enhanced oil recovery treat-
GEGN/GEOL703. GRADUATE THESIS-DOCTOR OF
ments. Course ends with student presentations of a chemical
PHILOSOPHY (I, II, S) Conducted under the supervision
modeling study applied to a problem of their choosing.
of student’s doctoral committee. Required of candidates for
Prerequisite: GEGN585 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 30 semester hours.
lecture/computer lab; 3 semester hours.
Geochemical Exploration
GEGN685. APPLIED GROUND-WATER MODELING
GXGN571. GEOCHEMICAL EXPLORATION (I, II)
PROBLEM SOLVING (I, II) Approach to and resolution of
Dispersion of trace metals from mineral deposits and their
technical ground-water modeling problems from industrial
discovery. Laboratory consists of analysis and statistical
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
79

interpretation of data of soils, stream sediments, vegetation,
Geophysics
and rock in connection with field problems. Term report
THOMAS L. DAVIS, Professor and Interim Department Head
required. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture,
ALEXANDER A. KAUFMAN, Professor
3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
KENNETH L. LARNER, Charles Henry Green Professor of
GXGN633. LITHOGEOCHEMICAL MINERAL EXPLO-
Exploration Geophysics
RATION (II) Principles and application of primary
GARY R. OLHOEFT, Professor
dispersion to the search for metallic mineral deposits.
MAX PEETERS, Baker Hughes Professor of Petrophysics
and Borehole Geophysics
Evaluation of the design, sampling, analytical, and interpre-
PHILLIP R. ROMIG, Professor and Dean of Graduate Studies
tational techniques used in lithogeochemical exploration.
and Research
Practical laboratory exercises. Term projects required.
JOHN A. SCALES, Professor
Prerequisite: GXGN571, GEGN401 or equivalent or
ILYA D. TSVANKIN, Professor
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture/seminar/lab; 3
THOMAS M. BOYD, Associate Professor
semester hours. Offered alternate years; Spring 1998.
YAOGUO LI, Associate Professor
GXGN635. SURFICIAL EXPLORATION GEOCHEMIS-
MICHAEL L. BATZLE, Research Associate Professor
TRY (II) Secondary dispersion processes (mechanical and
ROBERT D. BENSON, Research Associate Professor
chemical) applied to the search for metalliferous mineral
VLADIMIR GRECHKA, Research Assistant Professor
deposits. A variety of sampling media, analytical proce-
HENGREN XIA, Research Assistant Professor
dures, and interpretive techniques are evaluated. Landscape
TIMOTHY M. NIEBAUER, Adjunct Associate Professor
geochemistry framework for exploration program design.
WARREN B. HAMILTON, Distinguished Senior Scientist
Prerequisite: GXGN571 or equivalent or consent of
PIETER HOEKSTRA, Distinguished Senior Scientist
instructor. A course in geomorphology recommended.
THOMAS R. LAFEHR, Distinguished Senior Scientist
3 hours lecture/seminar/lab; 3 semester hours. Offered
MISAC N. NABIGHIAN, Distinguished Senior Scientist
alternate years; Spring 1997.
ADEL ZOHDY, Distinguished Senior Scientist
FRANK A. HADSELL, Professor Emeritus
GXGN637. ADVANCED STUDIES IN EXPLORATION
JAMES E. WHITE, Professor Emeritus
GEOCHEMISTRY (I, II) Individual special investigations
ALFRED H. BALCH, Research Professor, Retired
of a laboratory or field problem in exploration geochemistry
under the direction of a member of staff. Work on the same
Degrees Offered
or a different topic may be continued through later semesters
Professional Degree (Geophysics)
and additional credits earned. Prerequisite: GXGN571 and
Master of Engineering (Geophysical Engineer)
consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
Master of Science (Geophysics)
Master of Science (Geophysical Engineering)
Doctor of Philosophy (Geophysics)
Doctor of Philosophy (Geophysical Engineering)
Program Description
Geophysics entails the study and exploration of the
Earth’s interior through physical measurements collected at
the earth’s surface, in boreholes, from aircraft, and from
satellites. Using a combination of mathematics, physics,
geology, chemistry, hydrology, and computer science, a
geophysicist analyzes these measurements to infer properties
and processes within the Earth’s complex interior.
Because the Earth supplies all of our material needs and
is the repository of our waste products, the breadth and
importance of this field of science are evident. Oil compa-
nies and mining firms use the exploratory skills of geophysi-
cists to locate hidden resources throughout the world.
Geophysicists assess the material properties near the Earth’s
surface when sites are chosen for large engineering and
waste-management operations. Geophysical technology is
used in environmental applications such as tracking the flow
of contaminants and searching for groundwater. On the
global scale, geophysicists attempt to unravel Earth
processes and structures from its surface down to its central
80
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

core using measurements of heat distribution and flow;
with the geology and petroleum engineering of existing
gravitational, magnetic, electric, thermal, and stress fields;
oil fields, in an attempt to understand the complex
and ground motion caused by earthquakes or explosions.
properties of petroleum reservoirs. Like CWP, RCP is a
Founded in 1926, the Department of Geophysics at the
multidisciplinary group with faculty members from
Colorado School of Mines is the largest department in the
Geophysics, Petroleum Engineering, and Geology
U.S. specializing in applied geophysical research and
involved. More information about RCP can be obtained
education. Even so, with 12 full-time faculty and class sizes
on the WWW at http://www.mines.edu/academic/
ranging from 12 to 20, students receive individualized
geophysics/rcp.
attention in a close-knit environment. Given the interdisci-
The Rock Physics Laboratory conducts research on the
plinary nature of geophysics, the undergraduate curriculum
physical properties of rocks having varying porosity,
requires students to become thoroughly familiar with
permeability and fluid content. These properties are
geological, mathematical, and physical theory, in addition to
measured at various temperatures and pressures to
exploring the theoretical and practical aspects of the various
simulate reservoir conditions.
geophysical methodologies.
The Near Surface Seismic (NSS) Group is involved in
Traditionally, the resource industry has been, and
research activity related to using surface and borehole,
continues to be, the largest employer of CSM geophysics
multi-component observations in an attempt to quantify
graduates. Within this industry, graduates find employment
the upper 100 meters of the subsurface.
with the major oil companies, contractors involved in
The Environmental Geophysics Group investigates the uses
seismic and borehole logging surveys, and mineral explora-
of complex resistivity and ground-penetrating radar for
tion. Graduates also find employment in the emerging
the characterization of contaminated soils.
engineering and geotechnical industries with positions
offered by government agencies and the myriad of small
The Gravity and Magnetic Research Consortium carries out
contracting firms specializing in shallow subsurface
industry sponsored research in modeling, processing, and
characterization for environmental, water management, and
inversion of gravity and magnetic data. The emphasis is
civil engineering applications.
to develop efficient methods for imaging subsurface
structures by inverting surface, airborne, and borehole
Research Emphasis
observations to infer the below-ground distributions of
The Department conducts research in a wide variety of
density or magnetization, together with their structural
areas mostly related, but not restricted, to applied geophys-
boundaries. Developing fast forward-modeling tech-
ics. Candidates interested in the research activities of a
niques for calculating the gravity, gravity gradient, and
specific faculty are encouraged to obtain a copy of the
magnetic fields from a given distribution of density or
Department’s view book and to contact that faculty member
magnetization is an integral part of the research.
directly. To give perspective candidates an idea of the types
The Center for Petrophysics (CFP) is an inter-disciplinary
of research activities available in geophysics at CSM, a list
facility that performs state-of-the-art research and
of the recognized research groups operating within the
education in all aspects of petrophysics. Solutions to
Department of Geophysics is given below.
problems in the petroleum, mineral, and hazard mitiga-
The Center for Wave Phenomena (CWP) is a
tion industries are hampered by our limited understand-
multi-disciplinary research group with a total of six
ing of rock and soil properties. The CFP is dedicated to
faculty members— four from the Department of Geo-
understanding not only these properties, but also how
physics, and two from the Department of Mathematics
geophysical observations can be used to predict them.
and Computer Sciences. With research sponsored by
More information about CFP can be obtained on the
some 35 companies worldwide in the
WWW at http://lehmann.Mines.EDU/petrophysics.
petroleum-exploration industry, plus U.S. government
Degrees and Program Descriptions
agencies, CWP emphasizes the development of theoreti-
cal and computational methods for imaging of the
The Department offers both traditional, research-oriented
Earth’s subsurface, primarily through use of the
graduate programs and a non-thesis professional education
reflection seismic method. Researchers have been
program designed to meet specific career objectives. The
involved in forward and inverse problems of wave
program of study is selected by the student, in consultation
propagation as well as data processing for data obtained
with an advisor, and with thesis committee approval,
where the subsurface is complex, specifically where it is
according to the student’s career needs and interests.
both heterogeneous and anisotropic. Further information
Specific degrees have specific requirements as detailed
about CWP can be obtained on the WWW at http://
below. In addition, the Department’s Graduate Student
www.cwp.mines.edu.
Society maintains a graduate student handbook of all current
requirements. This handbook can be viewed on the World
The Reservoir Characterization Project (RCP) integrates
Wide Web at http://trident.mines.edu/-sggs/handbook/
the acquisition and interpretation of multicomponent,
intro.html.
three-dimensional seismic reflection and downhole data,
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
81

Professional Degree in Geophysical Engineering
are required to prepare and present a 20 minute oral
The Professional Degree in Geophysical Engineering
presentation of their independent study to the Geophysics
degree is the Department’s non-thesis, post graduate,
faculty and student body. At this time, students should be
degree. The Professional Degree is awarded upon the
prepared to answer questions related to all aspects of the
completion of 38 hours of approved coursework. While
work presented.
individual courses constituting the degree are determined by
Master of Science Degrees: Geophysics and Geophysical
the student, and approved by their program advisor and
Engineering
committee (as described below), courses applied to all
Students may obtain a Master of Science Degree in
professional degrees must satisfy the following criteria.
either Geophysics or Geophysical Engineering. Both
u Candidates are responsible for meeting all of the
degrees have the same coursework and thesis requirements,
deficiency requirements placed on incoming graduate
as described below. Students are normally admitted into the
students as described below.
Master of Science in Geophysics program. If, however, a
u All credits must be the 400 (senior) level or above.
student would like to obtain the Master of Science in
Geophysical Engineering, the course work and thesis topic
u At least (21) credits must be at the 500 (graduate)
must meet the following requirements. Note that these
level or above.
requirements are in addition to those associated with the
u At least (15) credits must be for courses taken within
Master of Science in Geophysics.
the Department of Geophysics at CSM.
u Students must complete, either prior to their arrival at
u In addition, students must include the following
CSM or while at CSM, no less than 16 credits of
courses in their Professional Degree program
engineering coursework.
GPGN599 - Geophysical Investigation (6 credits
u Within the opinion of the Geophysics faculty at large,
total)
the student’s dissertation topic must be appropriate
LICM515 - Professional Oral Communication (1
for inclusion as part of an Engineering degree.
credit)
Students wishing to receive the Master of Science in
GPGN581 - Graduate Seminar(l credit)
Geophysical Engineering should first discuss the possibility
with their advisor and thesis committee. After having done
Upon admission into the Professional Degree program,
this, a formal request should be submitted to the
the Department’s Graduate Advisory Committee (GAC) will
Department’s Graduate Advisory Committee (GAC) that
assign each candidate an interim advisor and make a
fully documents how the student meets, or intends to meet,
preliminary assessment of course deficiencies. Students in
the above two criteria. The GAC will review this material
this program, like students in all of the Department’s
and make a recommendation to the Geophysics faculty at
programs, are free to change advisors as they desire. Unlike
large, who will ultimately decide whether or not the
the Department’s other graduate programs, however,
candidate is eligible for the Master of Science (Geophysical
Professional Degree students are not free to choose their
Engineering) degree.
advisory committees. The GAC acts as the advisory
committee to all Professional Degree students. Professional
Upon admission into the Master of Science degree
Degree candidates are required to meet at least once a
program, the GAC will assign each candidate an interim
semester with the GAC to discuss course requirements,
advisor and make a preliminary assessment of course
deficiencies, and their independent investigation.
deficiencies. Students are responsible for identifying a
Thesis Advisor and Thesis Committee by the end of their
While no formal thesis is required, students obtaining the
second semester in the Master of Science degree program.
Professional Degree must complete, and then report on, an
Students in this degree program are required to meet at least
independent investigation for which six credits are awarded
once a semester with their Thesis Committee to discuss
under GPGN599. The work constituting the independent
course requirements, deficiencies, and research work.
investigation can be completed at CSM under faculty
guidance, or it can be completed in partnership with an
For either Master of Science degree, a minimum of 26
industry sponsor. In either case, the candidate must submit
hours of coursework is required. While individual courses
to his or her advisor and committee a written proposal
constituting the degree are determined by the student, and
describing the scope and content of this work prior to
approved by their advisor and thesis committee, courses
enrolling in GPGN599.
applied to all MS degrees must satisfy the following criteria.
u
As with the other graduate degrees offered by the
All course, transfer, residence, time limit, and thesis
Department of Geophysics, candidates in the Professional
requirements are as described in Graduate Degrees
Degree program are expected to defend their independent
and Requirements section of this document.
investigation in an open oral defense. For the Professional
u A maximum of 9 hours of 400-level coursework may
Degree this requirement is fulfilled as part of enrollment in
be used in fulfillment of the coursework for the
GPGN581. To successfully complete GPGN581, candidates
Master of Science degree.
82
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

u Candidates are responsible for meeting all of the
u All course, minor degree programs, transfer,
deficiency requirements placed on incoming graduate
residence, time limit, and thesis requirements are
students as described below.
enforced as described in Graduate Degrees and
u All credits applied to the thesis must be the 400
Requirements section of this bulletin.
(senior) level or above. Courses required to fulfill
u Students must include the following courses in their
deficiencies, as described below, may be 300 level
Ph.D. program
and lower.
LICM515 - Professional Oral Communication (1
u Students must include the following courses in their
credit)
Master degree program
GPGN681 - Graduate Seminar (l credit)
LICM515 - Professional Oral Communication
GPGN703 - Graduate Thesis - Doctor of Philosophy
(1 credit)
(no fewer than 30 credits)
GPGN581 - Graduate Seminar(l credit)
Upon admission into the Doctor of Philosophy degree
GPGN701 - Graduate Thesis - Master of Science (no
program, the Department’s Graduate Advisory Committee
fewer than 6 credits total these credits are in addition
(GAC) will assign each candidate an interim advisor and
to the 26 hours of required coursework)
make a preliminary assessment of course deficiencies.
Students must demonstrate breadth of geophysical
Students are responsible for identifying a Thesis Advisor
knowledge by completing appropriate course work in
and Thesis committee by the end of their second semester in
Geophysical Theory and Modeling, Experimental Data
the Ph.D. degree program. Students in this program are
Acquisition, Data Processing, and Interpretation. See the
required to meet at least once a semester with their Thesis
latest version of the Graduate Student Handbook (http://
Committee to discuss course requirements, deficiencies, and
trident.mines. edu/-sggs/handbook/intro.html) for courses
research work.
that fulfill these requirements.
In the Doctoral program, students must demonstrate
As described in the Master of Science, Thesis and Thesis
breadth of knowledge by successfully completing a Doctoral
Defense section of this bulletin, all MS candidates must
Comprehensive Examination no later than their fourth
successfully defend their MS thesis in an open oral Thesis
semester in residence. The Comprehensive Examination
Defense. The guidelines of the Thesis Defense enforced by
consists of written and oral examinations in which candi-
the Department of Geophysics follow those outlined in the
dates demonstrate knowledge in fundamental mathematics,
Graduate Bulletin, with one exception. The Department of
physics, and geology as applied to geophysical theory and
Geophysics requires students submit the final draft of their
practice, in addition to demonstrating expertise in one minor
written thesis to their Thesis Committee no less than two
field of study. With the exception of minor field course
weeks prior to the thesis defense date.
requirements, students are not explicitly required to
complete course work in preparation for this examination.
Doctor of Philosophy in Geophysics
Students, in consultation with their Thesis Committee, may
For the Doctor of Philosophy Degree (Ph.D.), at least 90
choose to take courses covering material expected to be on
hours of credit beyond the Bachelors degree is required. Up
the Comprehensive Examination.
to 30 hours of graduate credit can be awarded to a Ph.D.
A common written Comprehensive Examination is
candidate for completion of a Master’ s degree in geophys-
administered to all Ph.D. candidates near the beginning of
ics at CSM or another institution by the candidate’s Ph.D.
the fourth semester. Shortly after the written examination,
Thesis Committee. While individual courses constituting the
individualized oral examinations are given to each candidate
degree are determined by the student, and approved by the
by a committee selected by the Geophysics faculty at large.
student’s advisor and committee, courses applied to all
Based on a student’ s performance on both portions of the
Ph.D. degrees must satisfy the following criteria.
examination, the Geophysics faculty at large determines
u Candidates are responsible for meeting all of the
whether a candidate has successfully demonstrated breadth
deficiency requirements placed on incoming graduate
of knowledge.
students as described below.
In addition to the Comprehensive Examination, the
u All credits applied to the thesis must be the 400
Department’s Qualifying Examination is known as the Oral
(senior) level or above. Courses required to fulfill
Research Examination (ORE). For the ORE, candidates
deficiencies, as described below, may be 300 level
present and defend a piece of research conducted while in
and lower.
residence in the Ph.D. program at CSM. While the exact
u A maximum of 9 hours of 400-level coursework may
nature of the research presented is agreed upon by the
be used in fulfillment of the coursework for the Ph.D.
student and his/her Thesis Committee, many Committees
degree.
choose to use the ORE for students to prepare, present, and
defend their proposal for Ph.D. thesis work. The ORE
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
83

examination must be completed no later than a student’s
necessarily Matlab, is assumed. Prerequisite: PHGN200,
fourth semester in residence.
MACS213, MACS315, MACS349, and GPGN306. 3 hours
As described in the Doctor of Philosophy, Thesis and
lecture; 3 semester hours.
Thesis Defense section of this bulletin, all Ph.D. candidates
GPGN414. ADVANCED GRAVITY AND MAGNETIC
must successfully defend their Ph.D. thesis in an open oral
METHODS (II) Instrumentation for land surface, borehole,
Thesis Defense. The guidelines of the Thesis Defense
sea floor, sea surface, and airborne operations. Reduction of
enforced by the Department of Geophysics follow those
observed gravity and magnetic values. Theory of potential
outlined in the Graduate Bulletin, with one exception. The
field effects of geologic distributions. Methods and
Department of Geophysics requires students submit the final
limitations of interpretation. Prerequisite: GPGN303, or
draft of their written thesis to their Thesis Committee no less
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4
than two weeks prior to the thesis defense date.
semester hours.
For the formats and requirements of the Comprehensive,
GPGN422. ADVANCED ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRO-
Oral Research Examinations, and Thesis Defense, students
MAGNETIC METHODS (I) In depth study of the applica-
are referred to the Department’s Graduate Student Hand-
tion of electrical and electromagnetic methods to crustal
book (http://trident.mines.edu/-sggs/handbook/intro.html).
studies, minerals exploration, oil and gas exploration, and
Graduate Program Deficiencies
groundwater. Laboratory work with scale and mathematical
All graduate programs in Geophysics require that
models coupled with field work over areas of known
applicants have a background that includes the equivalent of
geology. Prerequisite: GPGN308, or consent of instructor. 3
adequate undergraduate preparation in the following areas:
hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
u Mathematics - Calculus, Linear Algebra or Linear
GPGN432. BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICS (II) Principles of
Systems, Differential Equations, Engineering
well log interpretation are developed for the commonly
Mathematics, Computer Programming
available types of logs including resistivity, nuclear, and
u
acoustic. Interrelationships between well log measurements
Chemistry - Chemistry I
and rock properties are emphasized. Prerequisite:
u Physics - Classical Physics
MACS213, MACS315, MACS349, GPGN210, GPGN308,
u Geology - Structural Geology, Stratigraphy, Materials
GPGN302, and GPGN303. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4
of the Earth, Geologic Field Methods
semester hours.
u Geophysics - Introductory courses that include both
GPGN438. GEOPHYSICS PROJECT DESIGN (I, II)
theory and applications in Gravity and Magnetics,
Complementary design course for geophysics restricted
Seismology, Electromagnetism, Borehole Geophys-
elective course(s). Application of engineering design
ics, and Geophysical Field Methods
principles to geophysics through advanced work, individual
u Senior Thesis or Project
in character, leading to an engineering report or senior thesis
and oral presentation thereof. Choice of design project is to
u In addition, candidates in the Doctoral program are
be arranged between student and individual faculty member
expected to have no less than one year of college
who will serve as an advisor, subject to department head
level foreign language skills.
approval. Prerequisite: GPGN302, 303, 308, and comple-
Candidates not prepared in one or more of these areas
tion of or concurrent enrollment in geophysics method
may be admitted into the program if their background and
courses in the general topic area of the project design. 1
demonstrated talents give reasonable expectation that they
hour lecture, 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
can overcome deficiencies during their graduate career.
GPGN439. GEOPHYSICS PROJECT DESIGN (II)
Description of Courses
GEGN439/PEGN439. MULTI-DISCIPLINARY PETRO-
GPGN404. DIGITAL SIGNAL ANALYSIS (I) The
LEUM DESIGN (II) This is a multidisciplinary design
fundamentals of one-dimensional digital signal processing
course that integrates fundamentals and design concepts in
as applied to geophysical investigations are studied.
geological, geophysical, and petroleum engineering.
Students explore the mathematical background and practical
Students work in integrated teams consisting of students
consequences of the sampling theorem, convolution,
from each of the disciplines. Multiple open-end design
deconvolution, the Z and Fourier transforms, windows, and
problems in oil and gas exploration and field development,
filters. Emphasis is placed on applying the knowledge
including the development of a prospect in an exploration
gained in lecture to exploring practical signal processing
play and a detailed engineering field study, are assigned.
issues. This is done through homework assignments that
Several detailed written and oral presentations are made
require the programming and testing of classroom deriva-
throughout the semester. Project economics including risk
tions in Matlab, or some such similar programming
analysis are an integral part of the course. Prerequisites: GP
language, and applying the resulting algorithms to data.
majors: GPGN302 and GPGN303; GE majors: GEGN308
Knowledge of a computer programming language, not
or GEGN309, GEGN316, GEGN438; PE majors:
84
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

PEGN316, PEGN414, PEGN422, PEGN423, PEGN424 (or
GPGN503/GEGN503/PEGN503. INTEGRATED EXPLO-
concurrent). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
RATION AND DEVELOPMENT (I) Students work alone
and in teams to study reservoirs from fluvial-deltaic and
GPGN452. ADVANCED SEISMIC METHODS (I)
valley fill depositional environments. This is a
Historical survey. Propagation of body and surface waves in
multidisciplinary course that shows students how to
elastic media; transmission and reflection at single and
characterize and model subsurface reservoir performance by
multiple interfaces; energy relationships; attenuation factors,
integrating data, methods and concepts from geology,
data processing (including velocity interpretation, stacking,
geophysics and petroleum engineering. Activities include
and migration) interpretation techniques including curved
field trips, computer modeling, written exercises and oral
ray methods. Acquisition, processing, and interpretation of
team presentations. Prerequisite: GEOL501 or consent of
laboratory model data; seismic processing using an
instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
interactive workstation. Prerequisites: GPGN302 and
concurrent enrollment in GPGN404, or consent of instruc-
GPGN504/GEGN504/PEGN504. INTEGRATED EXPLO-
tor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
RATION AND DEVELOPMENT (II) Students work in
multicisciplinary teams to study practical problems and case
GPGN494. PHYSICS OF THE EARTH (II) Students will
studies in integrated subsurface exploration and develop-
explore the fundamental observations from which physical
ment. Students will learn and apply methods and concepts
and mathematical inferences can be made regarding the
from geology, geophysics and petroleum engineering to
Earth’s origin, structure, and evolution. These observations
timely design problems in oil and gas exploration and field
include traditional geophysical observations (e.g., seismic,
development. Activities include field trips, computer
gravity, magnetic, and radioactive) in addition to geochemi-
modeling, written exercises and oral team presentations.
cal, nucleonic, and extraterrestrial observations. Emphasis
Prerequisite: GPGN/GEGN/PEGN503 or consent of
is placed on not only cataloging the available data sets, but
instructor. 3 hours lecture and seminar; 3 semester hours.
on developing and testing quantitative models to describe
these disparate data sets. Prerequisites: GEOL201,
GPGN507. NEAR-SURFACE FIELD METHODS (I)
GPGN302, 303, 306, 308, [Origin & Evolution of Earth],
Students design and implement data acquisition programs
PHGN224, PHGN200, MACS315, and MACS349, or
for all forms of near-surface geophysical surveys. The result
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
of each survey is then modeled and discussed in the context
of field design methods. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
GPGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN GEOPHYSICS (I, II)
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours. Offered fall
New topics in geophysics. Each member of the academic
semester, even years.
faculty is invited to submit a prospectus of the course to the
department head for evaluation as a special topics course. If
GPGN509. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES
selected, the course can be taught only once under the 498
AND PROCESSES IN ROCK, SOILS AND FLUIDS (I)
title before becoming a part of the regular curriculum under
Physical and chemical properties and processes that are
a new course number and title. Prerequisite: Consent of
measurable with geophysical instruments are studied,
department. Credit-variable, 1 to 6 hours.
including methods of measurement, interrelationships
between properties, coupled processes, and processes which
GPGN499. GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION (I, II)
modify properties in pure phase minerals and fluids, and in
Individual project; instrument design, data interpretation,
mineral mixtures (rocks and soils). Investigation of
problem analysis, or field survey. Prerequisite: Consent of
implications for petroleum development, minerals extrac-
department in “Independent Study” form must be completed
tion, groundwater exploration, and environmental
and submitted to the Registrar. Credit dependent upon
remediation. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
nature and extent of project, not to exceed 6 semester hours.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
Graduate Courses
GPGN510. GRAVITY AND MAGNETIC
500-level courses are open to qualified seniors with the
EXPLORATION(I) Instrumentation for land surface,
permission of the department and Dean of the Graduate
borehole, sea floor, sea surface, and airborne operations.
School. 600-level courses are open only to students enrolled
Reduction of observed gravity and magnetic values. Theory
in the Graduate School.
of potential field effects of geologic distributions. Methods
GPGN501. FOUNDATIONS OF GEOPHYSICAL
and limitations of interpretation. Prerequisite: GPGN303,
THEORY (I) Theoretical concepts directly applicable to
GPGN321, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours
contemporary geophysics. Application of cartesian views of
lab; 4 semester hours.
tensors and integral versions of exponential transforms.
GPGN511. ADVANCED GRAVITY AND MAGNETIC
Some modern computing. Prerequisite: GPGN404, and
EXPLORATION (II) Field or laboratory projects of interest
either GPGN492, or PHGN412. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
to class members; topics for lecture and laboratory selected
hours.
from the following: new methods for acquiring, processing,
and interpreting gravity and magnetic data, methods for the
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
85

solution of two- and three- dimensional potential field
Hooke’s law, equation of motion, representation theorems,
problems, Fourier transforms as applied to gravity and
and reciprocity. Representation of seismic sources, seismic
magnetics, the geologic implications of filtering gravity and
moment tensor, radiation from point sources in homoge-
magnetic data, equivalent distributions, harmonic functions,
neous isotropic media. Boundary conditions, reflection/
inversions. Prerequisite: GPGN414 or consent of instructor.
transmission coefficients of plane waves, plane-wave
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab and field; 4 semester hours.
propagation in stratified media. Basics of wave propagation
Offered spring semester, even years.
in attenuative media, brief description of seismic modeling
methods. Prerequisite: GPGN452 or consent of instructor. 3
GPGN519/PEGN519. ADVANCED FORMATION
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EVALUATION (II) A detailed review of well logging and
other formation evaluation methods will be presented, with
GPGN553. INTRODUCTION TO SEISMOLOGY II (II)
the emphasis on the imaging and characterization of
This course is focused on the physics of wave phenomena
hydrocarbon reservoirs. Advanced logging tools such as
and the importance of wave-theory results in exploration
array induction, dipole sonic, and imaging tools will be
and earthquake seismology. Includes reflection and
discussed. The second half of the course will offer in
transmission problems for spherical waves, methods of
parallel sessions: for geologists and petroleum engineers on
steepest descent and stationary phase, point-source radiation
subjects such as pulsed neutronlogging, nuclear magnetic
in layered isotropic media, surface and nongeometrical
resonance, production logging, and formation testing; for
waves. Discussion of seismic modeling methods, fundamen-
geophysicists on vertical seismic profiling, cross well
tals of wave propagation in anisotropic and attenuative
acoustics and electro-magnetic surveys. Prerequisite:
media. Prerequisite: GPGN552 or consent of instructor. 3
GPGN419/PEGN419 or consent of instructor.. 3 hours
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered spring semester,
lecture; 3 semester hours.
even years.
GPGN520. ELECTRICAL AND ELECTROMAGNETIC
GPGN555. INTRODUCTION TO EARTHQUAKE
EXPLORATION (I) Electromagnetic theory. Instrumenta-
SEISMOLOGY (I) Introductory course in observational,
tion. Survey planning. Processing of data. Geologic
engineering, and theoretical earthquake seismology. Topics
interpretations. Methods and limitations of interpretation.
include: seismogram interpretation, elastic plane waves and
Prerequisite: GPGN308 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
surface waves, source kinematics and constraints from
lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours. Offered fall semester,
seismograms, seismicity and earthquake location, magnitude
odd years.
and intensity estimates, seismic hazard analysis, and
earthquake induced ground motions. Students interpret
GPGN521. ADVANCED ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRO-
digital data from globally distributed seismic stations.
MAGNETIC EXPLORATION (II) Field or laboratory
Prerequisite: GPGN501 or GPGN452 or consent of
projects of interest to class members; topics for lecture and
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered spring
laboratory selected from the following: new methods for
semester, odd years.
acquiring, processing and interpreting electrical and
electromagnetic data, methods for the solution of two- and
GPGN558. SEISMIC DATA INTERPRETATION (II)
three-dimensional EM problems, physical modeling,
Practical interpretation of seismic data used in exploration
integrated inversions. Prerequisite: GPGN422 or GPGN520,
for hydrocarbons. Integration with other sources of
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4
geological and geophysical information. Prerequisite:
semester hours. Offered spring semester, even years.
GPGN452, GEOL501 or consent of instructor. 2 hours
lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
GPGN551. WAVE PHENOMENA SEMINAR (I, II)
Students will probe a range of current methodologies and
GPGN561. SEISMIC DATA PROCESSING I (I) Introduc-
issues in seismic data processing, with emphasis on
tion to basic principles underlying the processing of seismic
underlying assumptions, implications of these assumptions,
date for suppression of various types of noise. Includes the
and implications that would follow from use of alternative
rationale for and methods for implementing different forms
assumptions. Such analysis should provide seed topics for
of gain to data, and the use of various forms of stacking for
ongoing and subsequent research. Topic areas include:
noise suppression, such as diversity stacking of Vibroseis
Statics estimation and compensation, deconvolution,
data, normal-moveout correction and common-midpoint
multiple suppression, suppression of other noises, wavelet
stacking, optimum-weight stacking, beam steering and the
estimation, imaging and inversion, extraction of strati-
stack array. Also discussed are continuous and discrete one-
graphic and lithologic information, and cor- relation of
and two-dimensional data filtering, including Vibroseis
surface and borehole seismic data with well log data.
correlation, spectral whitening, moveout filtering, data
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 2 hours seminar; 1
interpolation, slat stacking, and the continuous and discrete
semester hour.
Radon transform for enhancing data resolution and
suppression of multiples and other forms of coherent noise.
GPGN552. INTRODUCTION TO SEISMOLOGY I (I)
Prerequisite: GPGN452 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
Introduction to basic principles of elasticity including
lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered fall semester, odd years.
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Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

GPGN562. SEISMIC DATA PROCESSING II (II) The
principles of the gravimetric, magnetometric and electrical
student will gain understanding of applications of determin-
methods of geophysical prospecting. For each method, the
istic and statistical deconvolution for wavelet shaping,
following questions are discussed: 1) the physical laws and
wavelet compression, and multiple suppression. Both
examples illustrating their application; 2) the physical
reflection-based and refraction-based statistics estimation
properties of rocks and the influence of the medium on the
and correction for 2-D and 3-D seismic data will be covered,
field; 3) the distribution of field generators in the medium;
with some attention to problems where subsurface structure
4) the relevant systems of field equations; 5) methods of
is complex. Also for areas of complex subsurface structure,
solution of the forward problems; 6) approximate methods
students will be introduced to analytic and interactive
of field calculation and their application in geophysics; 7)
methods of velocity estimation. Where the near-surface is
the behavior of the fields as they are applied in the main
complex, poststack and prestack imaging methods such as
geophysical methods; 8) the relationship between the fields
layer replacement are introduced to derive dynamic
and the geometric and physical parameters of the medium.
corrections to reflection data. Also discussed are special
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
problems related to the processing of multi-component
semester hours.
seismic data for enhancement of shear-wave information,
GPGN584. THEORY OF GEOPHYSICAL METHODS II
and those related to processing of vertical seismic profile
(II) This course describes the physical and mathematical
data for separation of upgoing and downgoing P- and S-
principles of the electromagnetic, seismic and nuclear
wave arrivals. Prerequisite: GPGN452 and GPGN561 or
methods of geophysical prospecting. For each method, the
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
following questions are discussed: 1) the physical laws and
Offered spring semester, even years.
examples illustrating their application; 2) the physical
GPGN574. GROUNDWATER GEOPHYSICS (II) Descrip-
properties of rocks and the influence of the medium on the
tion of world groundwater aquifers. Effects of water
field; 3) the distribution of field generators in the medium;
saturation on the physical properties of rocks. Use of
4) the relevant systems of field equations; 5) methods of
geophysical methods in the exploration, development and
solution of the forward problem; 6) approximate methods of
production of groundwater. Field demonstrations of the
field calculation and their application in geophysics; 7) the
applications of the geophysical methods in the solution of
behavior of the fields as they are applied in the main
some groundwater problems. Prerequisite: Consent of
geophysical methods; 8) the relationship between the fields
instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
and the geometric and physical parameters of the medium.
Prerequisite: GPGN583 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
GPGN576. MINING GEOPHYSICS I (I) Introduction to
gravity and magnetic techniques used by the mining
GPGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN GEOPHYSICS (I, II)
industry in exploring for new deposits. The course, intended
New topics in geophysics. Each member of the academic
for graduate geophysics students, will emphasize the
faculty is invited to submit a prospectus of the course to the
theoretical basis for each technique, the instrumentation
department head for evaluation as a special topics course. If
used and data collection, processing and interpretation
selected, the course can be taught only once under the 598
procedures specific for each technique. Prerequisite:
title before becoming a part of the regular curriculum under
GPGN321, GPGN322, MACS111, MACS112, MACS213
a new course number and title. Prerequisite: Consent of
or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture; 1 hour seminar; 3
instructor. Credit-variable, 1 to 6 hours.
semester hours.
GPGN599. GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION MS (I, II)
GPGN577. MINING GEOPHYSICS II (II) Introduction to
Individual project; instrument design, data interpretation,
electrical, radiometric and borehole techniques used by the
problem analysis, or field survey. Prerequisite: Consent of
mining industry in exploring for new ore deposits. The
department and ÒIndependent StudyÓ form must be
course, intended for graduate geophysics students, will
completed and sumbitted to the Registrar. Credit dependent
emphasize the theoretical basis for each technique, the
upon nature and extent of project, not to exceed 6 semester
instrumentation used and data collection, processing and
hours.
interpretation procedures specific for each technique.
GPGN605. INVERSION THEORY (I) Introductory course
Prerequisite: GPGN321, GPGN322, MACS111,
in inverting geophysical observations for inferring earth
MACS112, MACS213 or consent of instructor. 2 hours
structure and processes. Techniques discussed include:
lecture; 1 hour seminar; 3 semester hours.
Monte-Carlo procedures, Marquardt-Levenburg optimiza-
GPGN581. GRADUATE SEMINAR-MS (I, II) Presentation
tion, and generalized linear inversion. In addition, aspects of
describing results of MS thesis research. All theses must be
probability theory, data and model resolution, uniqueness
presented in seminar before corresponding degree is
considerations, and the use of a priori constraints are
granted. 1 hour seminar; 1 semester hour.
presented. Students are required to apply the inversion
methods described to a problem of their choice and present
GPGN583. THEORY OF GEOPHYSICAL METHODS I
the results as an oral and written report. Prerequisite:
(I) This course describes the physical and mathematical
Colorado School of Mines
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MACS315 and knowledge of a scientific programming
constructing plausible models, both spherical and aspheri-
language. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
cal, of the earth. Modeled parameters considered in this
course include seismic velocity, density, temperature,
GPGN606. SIMULATION OF GEOPHYSICAL DATA (II)
composition and state. Specific topics are chosen from those
Efficiency of writing and running computer programs.
of interest to class members. These will be selected from the
Review of basic matrix manipulation. Utilization of existing
following: observations and constraints from earthquakes;
CSM and department computer program libraries. Some
heat flow, thermodynamics, and convection; geomagnetic
basic and specialized numerical integration techniques used
observations and interpretations; gravitational properties
in geophysics. Geophysical applications of finite elements,
and interpretations; and petrophysical and geochemical
finite differences, integral equation modeling, and summary
constraints. Prerequisite: GPGN494 or consent of instructor.
representation. Project resulting in a term paper on the use
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered spring semester,
of numerical methods in geophysical interpretation.
even years.
Prerequisite: GPGN501 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Offered spring semester, odd years.
GPGN698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN GEOPHYSICS (I, II)
New topics in geophysics. Each member of the academic
GPGN651. ADVANCED SEISMOLOGY (I) In-depth
faculty is invited to submit a prospectus of the course to the
discussion of wave propagation in anisotropic and inhomo-
department head for evaluation as a special topics course. If
geneous media. Topics include the GreenÕs function for
selected, the course can be taught only once under the 698
homogeneous anisotropic media, influence of anisotropy on
title before becoming a part of the regular curriculum under
body-wave polarizations and shear-wave splitting,
a new course number and title. Prerequisite: Consent of
traveltime analysis for transversely isotropic models,
instructor. Credit-variable, 1 to 6 hours.
inversion of seismic data in the presence of anisotropy.
Analytic and numerical description of surface waves in
GPGN699. GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION-PHD (I, II)
horizontally layered media, ray theory and dynamic ray
Individual project; instrument design, data interpretation,
tracing for body waves inhomogeneous earth models.
problem analysis, or field survey. Prerequisite: Consent of
Prerequisite: GPGN552 and GPGN553 or consent of
department and ‘Independent Study’ form must be com-
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered fall
pleted and sumbitted to the Registrar. Credit dependent
semester, even years.
upon nature and extent of project, not to exceed 6 semester
hours.
GPGN658. SEISMIC MIGRATION (II) Seismic migration
is the process that converts seismograms, each recorded as a
GPGN700. GRADUATE ENGINEERING REPORT-
function of time, to an image of the earthÕs subsurface,
MASTER OF ENGINEERING (I, II) Laboratory, field, and
which is a function of depth below the surface. The
library work for the Master of Engineering report under
theoretical and practical aspects of finite-difference,
supervision of the student’s advisory committee. Required
Kirchhoff, Fourier transform, and other methods for
of candidates for degree of Master of Engineering. 6
migration are emphasized with numerous computer
semester hours upon completion of report.
programs and exercises. Prerequisite: GPGN657. 3 hours
GPGN701. GRADUATE THESIS-MASTER OF SCIENCE
lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered spring semester, odd
(I, II, S) Required of candidates for the degree of Master of
years.
Science in Geophysics. 6 semester hours upon completion
GPGN681. GRADUATE SEMINAR-PHD (I, II) Presenta-
of thesis.
tion describing results of Ph.D. thesis research. All theses
GPGN703. GRADUATE THESIS-DOCTOR OF PHI-
must be presented in seminar before corresponding degree is
LOSOPHY (I, II, S) Required of candidates for the degree
granted. 1 hour seminar; 1 semester hour.
of Doctor of Philosophy in Geophysics. 30 semester hours.
GPGN692. ADVANCED PHYSICS OF THE EARTH (II)
This course emphasizes the observations, interpretive
methods, external constraints, and assumptions used in
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Graduate Bulletin
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Liberal Arts and International Studies
The LAIS mission is crucial to defining the implications
ARTHUR B. SACKS, Professor and Division Director
of CSM’s commitment to stewardship of the Earth and to
DANIEL CEREZUELLE, 1999-2000 Hennebach
the permanent sustainability of both social organization and
Visiting Professor
environmental resources that such a commitment requires. A
CARL MITCHAM, Professor
good foundation in the subjects provided by the LAIS
BARBARA M. OLDS, Professor
Division is essential for graduating men and women who
EUL-SOO PANG, Professor
can provide the technical means for society’s material needs
JOSEPH D. SNEED, Professor
in a manner that leaves posterity an undiminished level of
RONALD V. WIEDENHOEFT, Professor
both social and environmental quality.
PETER HARTLEY, Associate Professor
Graduate Certificates Offered
KATHLEEN H. OCHS, Associate Professor
In May 1999 the Graduate Council approved the
LAURA J. PANG, Associate Professor
introduction of two graduate certificates, one in Interna-
KAREN B. WILEY, Associate Professor
tional Political Economy (IPE) and one in International
HUSSEIN A. AMERY, Assistant Professor
Political Economy of Resources (IPER), effective fall 1999.
DAVID R. FROSSARD, Assistant Professor
For the first three years, the IPE and IPER programs will be
CATHERINE FLYNN, Lecturer
offered; at the beginning of the fourth year, pending the
JON LEYDENS, Lecturer and Writing Program Administrator
required administrative approvals, it is the intent of the
HEIDI G. LOSHBAUGH, Lecturer
Division of Liberal Arts and International Studies to
SUZANNE M. NORTHCOTE, Lecturer
introduce a Master’s in IPE and in IPER.
BETTY J. CANNON, Emeritus Associate Professor
Graduate Certificate in International Political Economy
W. JOHN CIESLEWICZ, Emeritus Professor
Graduate Certificate in International Political Economy
DONALD I. DICKINSON, Emeritus Professor
of Resources
WILTON ECKLEY, Emeritus Professor
EDWARD G. FISHER, Emeritus Professor
Program Description
T. GRAHAM HEREFORD, Emeritus Professor
The Division offers two graduate certificate programs
JOHN A. HOGAN, Emeritus Professor
with specialization in
GEORGE W. JOHNSON, Emeritus Professor
International Political Economy (IPE)
ANTON G. PEGIS, Emeritus Professor
International Political Economy of Resources (IPER)
THOMAS PHILIPOSE, University Emeritus Professor
The program requires two 15-hour certificates (30 hours
The Liberal Arts and International Studies Division
total). The first 15-hour program is an introduction to the
(LAIS) provides students with an understanding of the
discipline; the second level develops the area of specializa-
cultural, philosophical, social, political, and economic
tion.
contexts in which science and engineering function. LAIS
The objective of the certificate programs is to provide
offerings enable students to learn how their responsibilities
research and analytical skills in the national and suprana-
extend beyond the technical mastery of science and
tional relationships between the state and the market, the
technology to the consequences for human society and the
ramifications of economic policies on socio-political
rest of life on earth. Because of those larger responsibilities,
development, and the consequences of socio-political and
the LAIS mission includes preparing students for effective
environmental policies on economic and cultural transfor-
political and social thought and action.
mations.
The liberal arts exist for their intrinsic value. They are
The IPE track will emphasize the macro dimensions of
the arts of the free mind developing its powers for their own
the role of the state and the market in the international
sake; they are the basis for the free, liberal, unhindered
political economy of development, trade, investment, and
development of intellect and imagination addressing
finance with a specific country or region focus. The IPER
intrinsically worthy concerns. They are essential for
program will specialize in the role of a specific natural
preserving an open, creative, and responsible society. The
resource sector in inter-state relations and global contexts of
liberal arts include philosophy, literature, language, history,
trade, finance, investment, technology transfer, and
political science, the creative arts, and the social sciences
environmental concerns.
generally.
There are four clusters of fields in which the student can
International Studies applies the liberal arts to the study
specialize.
of international political economy, which is the interplay
International Political Economy of a Region (such as
between economic, political, cultural, and environmental
Asia Pacific, Latin America, or the Middle East)
forces that shape the relations among the world’s developed
Economic and Political Geography of World Resources
and developing areas. International Studies focus especially
Global Environmental Policy
on the role of the state and market in society and economy.
International Political Risk Assessment and Mitigation
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
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89

Since many of the courses in the program are currently
5. No foreign language is required at the time of admis-
under development, students must request a list of available
sion, but demonstrated commitment to learn a second
courses from the Division of Liberal Arts and International
and/or third language during the residency in the
Studies.
program is encouraged in order to carry out research
All entering students are required to take four introduc-
projects.
tory courses from each of the four clusters at the first level
Fields of Research
of the certificate program. Students may then opt to advance
The research specialty of the program will parallel the
to the specialized second level certificate program wherein
four clusters of the curriculum. The research methodology
the student is required to specialize in a single field.
of IPE and IPER draws from such diverse disciplinary
Program Requirements
backgrounds as political science, history, economics,
Certificate I in IPE (15 credit hours):
geography, sociology, literature, environmental studies,
International Political Economy of a Region (choose
anthropology, area studies, international affairs and
one: Asia Pacific, Latin America, the Middle East)
relations.
Economic and Political Geography of World Resources
The principal fields of research are international political
Global Environmental Policy
economy of development of a specific region or a country/
International Political Risk Assessment and Mitigation
countries; trade and investment; region-markets and region-
states; international and multilateral governmental and
One additional course to be chosen from the Interna-
nongovernmental organizations; economic and political
tional Political Economy cluster or International Political
geography of resources; global environmental policy and
Risk Assessment and Mitigation cluster.
country-specific or region-specific environmental policy
Certificate I in IPER (15 credit hours):
making and implementation; and international political risk
International Political Economy of a Region (choose
assessment and mitigation with a specific country, countries,
one: Asia Pacific, Latin America, the Middle East)
or region.
Economic and Political Geography of World Resources
Graduate Individual Minor
Global Environmental Policy
Graduate students can earn a minor in Liberal Arts and
International Political Risk Assessment and Mitigation
International Studies if they complete 12 hours of course
One additional IPE course to be either an economics
work from the Selected Topics or Independent Studies
course or a geography course
categories chosen under the supervision of an LAIS advisor.
Certificate II in IPE (15 credit hours):
Note: The Graduate Individual Minor must be approved
9 hours from the first (major) cluster
by the student’s graduate committee and by the LAIS
3 hours from the second (minor) cluster
Division.
3 hours from a non-LAIS field such as economics and
Description of Courses
business, engineering, applied sciences, or the International
Humanities (LIHU)
Political Economy of a Region cluster or the International
LIHU401: THE AMERICAN DREAM: ILLUSION OR
Political Risk Assessment and Mitigation cluster.
REALITY? This seminar will examine ‘that elusive phrase,
Certificate II in IPER (15 credit hours):
the American dream,’ and ask what it meant to the pioneers
9 hours from the environment and/or geography
in the New World, how it withered, and whether it has been
cluster(s)
revived. The concept will be critically scrutinized within
6 hours from environmental economics, resources
cultural contexts. The study will rely on the major genres of
economics, and/or geography
fiction, drama, and poetry, but will venture into biography
Prerequisites
and autobiography, and will range from Thoreau’s Walden to
Kerouac’s On the Road and Boyle’s Budding Prospects.
The requirements for admission to the IPE and IPER
Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
graduate certificate programs are as follows:
SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
1. BS or BA with a cumulative grade point average above
3.0 (4.0 scale)
LIHU402. HEROES AND ANTIHEROES: A TRAGIC
VIEW This course features heroes and antiheroes (average
2. Undergraduate CSM students who do not meet the
folks, like most of us), but because it is difficult to be heroic
overall GPA of 3.0 must have a 3.0 GPA in their
unless there are one or more villains lurking in the shadows,
undergraduate International Political Economy Minor
there will have to be an Iago or Caesar or a politician or a
or Certificate program
member of the bureaucracy to overcome. Webster’s defines
3. No GRE is required.
heroic as ‘exhibiting or marked by courage and daring.’
4. A TOEFL score of 550 or higher is required for students
Courage and daring are not confined to the battlefield, of
who are not native English speakers.
course. One can find them in surprising placesÑin the
community (Ibsen’s Enemy of the People), in the psychiatric
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Colorado School of Mines
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ward (Kesey’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’
s Nest), in the
Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.’s thesis about the ‘unifying ideals
military (Heller’s Catch-22), on the river (Twain’s The
and common culture’ that have allowed the United States to
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn or in a ‘bachelor pad’
absorb immigrants from every corner of the globe under the
(Simon’s Last of the Red Hot Lovers). Prerequisite:
umbrella of individual freedom, and the various ways in
LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
which Americans have attempted to live up to the motto ‘e
3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
pluribus unum’ will also be explored. Prerequisite:
LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
LIHU403. MYTHOLOGY This course is designed to give
seminar; 3 semester hours.
students a familiarity with important Greek myths, espe-
cially in terms of their imaginative and dramatic appeal.
LIHU479. THE AMERICAN MILITARY EXPERIENCE
Considerations regarding the nature of that appeal will
A survey of military history, with primary focus on the
provide means for addressing the social function of myth,
American military experience from 1775 to present.
which is a central issue for the course. The class will also
Emphasis is placed not only on military strategy and
examine various issues of anthropological and philosophical
technology, but also on relevant political, social, and
significance pertaining to the understanding of myth,
economic questions. Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite or
including the issue of whether science is a form of myth.
corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
The final assignment will provide an opportunity to address
Open to ROTC students or by permission of the LAIS
either Greek or non-Greek myth. Prerequisite: LIHU100.
Division.
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3
LIHU480. URBAN QUALITY OF LIFE This course is
semester hours.
intended to engage students with the marvelous potential
LIHU404. TRANSCENDENT VISION Imagination can
and appalling problems of some of the world’s cities.
take us beyond the limits imposed by conventional mecha-
Primary focus will be on cultural history and the designed
nistic thinking about life and the universe. Spiritual vision
environment, including issues of traffic, housing, and
can reveal a living universe of great power, beauty, and
environmental quality. Emphasis will be on the humanistic
intrinsic value. Yet people accept existence in a world
dimensions of a range of issues normally associated with
supposedly built out of dead matter. To transcend ordinary
urban sociology. Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite or
experience, we must set out on an adventure, a journey into
corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
new and strange worlds. Works of imaginative literature
LIHU498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES (1, II)
provide gateways to new worlds in which the universe is a
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
transcendent experience that gives full meaning to existence.
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
This course explores ideas and images of the universe as a
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor
revelation of transcendent value. A major issue considered
consent. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. Variable
in the course is the implication of comparing European and
credit: 1 to 6 semester hours.
Native American world views. Prerequisite: LIHU100.
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3
LIHU499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
semester hours.
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
member. For students who have completed their LAIS
LIHU410. ROMANTICISM TO IMPRESSIONISM
requirements. Instructor consent required. Prerequisite:
Romanticism to Impressionism is a seminar on aspects of
‘Independent Study’ form must be completed and submitted
European (primarily French) cultural history of the
to the registrar. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
nineteenth century. Emphasis is on art and literature from
Variable credit: 1 to 6 hours.
the era of Napoleon I to that of the Third Republic. This is
the age of industrial revolution, rapid growth of cities,
Social Sciences (LISS)
exploitation of the working class, the beginnings of
LISS 410. UTOPIAS/DYSTOPIAS This course studies the
socialism, and the triumph of capitalism. Artists to be
relationship between society, technology, and science using
covered range from Delacroix to Monet; authors include Sir
fiction and film as a point of departure. A variety of science
Walter Scott and Emile Zola. Prerequisite: LIHU100.
fiction novels, short stories, and films will provide the
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3
starting point for discussions. These creative works will also
semester hours.
be concrete examples of various conceptualizations that
historians, sociologists, philosophers, and other scholars
LIHU470. BECOMING AMERICAN: LITERARY
have created to discuss the relationship. Prerequisite: LIHU
PERSPECTIVES This course will explore the increasing
100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
heterogeneity of U.S. society by examining the immigration
3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
and assimilation experience of Americans from Europe,
Africa, Latin America, and Asia as well as Native Ameri-
LISS430. CRITICAL WORLD ISSUES Selected issues of
cans. Primary sources and works of literature will provide
contemporary world affairs, with emphasis on political,
the media for examining these phenomena. In addition,
economic, diplomatic, and military significance, protean
Colorado School of Mines
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1999-2000
91

relationships between the East and West; dynamics of
egoism, utilitarianism, Kantian ethics, and the social
North/South interdependency. Prerequisite: LIHU100.
contract; case studies of societies responding to changes
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
brought by development; and statistical data about the
3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
progress of development worldwide in the past 50 years.
Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
LISS431. GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES Critical
SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
examination of interactions between development and the
environment and the human dimensions of global change;
LISS440. LATIN AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT A senior
social, political, economic, and cultural responses to the
seminar designed to explore the political economy of current
management and preservation of natural resources and
and recent past development strategies, models, efforts, and
ecosystems on a global scale. Exploration of the meaning
issues in Latin America, one of the most dynamic regions of
and implications of ‘stewardship of the Earth’ and ‘sustain-
the world today. Development is understood to be a
able development’. Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite or
nonlinear, complex set of processes involving political,
corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
economic, social, cultural, and environmental factors whose
ultimate goal is to improve the quality of life for individuals.
LISS432. CULTURAL DYNAMICS OF GLOBAL
The role of both the state and the market in development
DEVELOPMENT Role of cultures and nuances in world
processes will be examined. Topics to be covered will vary
development; cultural relationship between the developed
as changing realities dictate but will be drawn from such
North and the developing South, specifically between the
subjects as inequality of income distribution; the role of
U.S. and the Third World. Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequi-
education and health care; region-markets; the impact of
site or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester
globalization; institution-building; corporate-community-
hours.
state interfaces; neoliberalism; privatization; democracy;
LISS434. INTERNATIONAL FIELD PRACTICUM For
and public policy formulation as it relates to development
students who go abroad for an on-site practicum involving
goals. Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
their technical field as practiced in another country and
SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
culture; required course for students pursuing a certificate in
LISS450. AMERICAN MINING HISTORY This course
International Political Economy; all arrangements for this
asks the question, ‘how do we know what happened in the
course are to be supervised and approved by the advisor of
past?’ using Western American mining history as the case
the International Political Economy minor program.
study. The course will include primary texts–those written at
Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
the time that the historical events occurred–and secondary
SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
sources, scholars’ and popularizers’ reconstructions. We
LISS435/535. POLITICAL RISK ASSESSMENT This
will look at several approaches: scholarly studies, such as
course will review the existing methodologies and tech-
labor, technology, quantitative, and social history. Oral
niques of risk assessment in both country-specific and
history will be approached through song and video material.
global environments. It will also seek to design better ways
We will study industrial archaeology by visiting the Western
of assessing and evaluating risk factors for business and
Mining Museum in Colorado Springs. The movie
public diplomacy in the increasingly globalized context of
‘Matewan’ illustrates how Americans make myths out of
economy and politics wherein the role of the state is being
history. Students unfamiliar with mining can earn extra
challenged and redefined. Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequi-
credit by a visit to the CSM experimental mine. In all these
site or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester
cases, we will discuss the standpoint of the authors of
hours.
primary sources and scholarly accounts. We will discuss
LISS436. ETHICS OF GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT This
how we represent all different historical viewpoints and
course looks at Western economic development efforts since
discuss how we know what is historically true–what really
World War II and asks basic questions about this process:
happened. Prerequisite: LIHU 100. Prerequisite or
What is development? How is it done, in practice, by
corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
different actors? What motivates them to practice develop-
LISS455. JAPANESE HISTORY AND CULTURE
ment? The course also asks fundamental questions about the
Japanese History and Culture is a senior seminar taught in
ethics of these development practices: What are the
Japanese that covers Japan’s historical and cultural
philosophical goals of development? How can these goals
foundations from earliest times through the modern period.
be defended (or disputed) within the value systems of
It is designed to allow students who have had three
various cultures from East and West? Is there any ethical
semesters of Japanese language instruction (or the equiva-
context in which development is not an unchallenged good?
lent) to apply their knowledge of Japanese in a social
Is sustainability primarily a technical or an ethical concept?
science-based course. Major themes will include: cultural
Included are discussions of the international ‘development
roots; forms of social organization; the development of
project’ since 1945; globalization; elements of moral
writing systems; the development of religious institutions;
philosophy, including cultural relativism, subjectivism,
the evolution of legal institutions; literary roots; and clan
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structure. Students will engage in activities that enhance
should these policies be? This course will examine these
their reading proficiency, active vocabulary, translation
questions. The examination will be informed by an
skills, and expository writing abilities. Text is in Japanese.
introduction to demographic analysis, population history
Prerequisites: LIHU 100; three semesters of college-level
and the socio-economic determinants of population
Japanese or permission of instructor. Prerequisite or
dynamics. Alternative conceptions of ’optimum sustainable
corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
population’ will provide a framework for examining
population-related natural resource depletion and environ-
LISS460. TECHNOLOGY AND WILDERNESS A seminar
ment change. Public policy responses to population issues
on the values of wild nature in comparison to technological
such as fertility control, immigration limits and foreign aid
values with a view to the impact on environmental manage-
restrictions will be discussed. Prerequisite: LIHU100.
ment policies. Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite or
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3
corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
semester hours.
LISS461. TECHNOLOGY AND GENDER: ISSUES This
LISS498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCE (I, II)
course focuses on how women and men relate to technology.
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
Several traditional disciplines will be used: philosophy,
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
history, sociology, literature, and a brief look at theory. The
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor
class will begin discussing some basic concepts such as
consent. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. Variable
gender and sex and the essential and/or social construction
credit: 1 to 6 semester hours.
of gender, for example. We will then focus on topical and
historical issues. We will look at modern engineering using
LISS499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
sociological studies that focus on women in engineering. We
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
will look at some specific topics including military tech-
member. For students who have completed their LAIS
nologies, ecology, and reproductive technologies. Prerequi-
requirements. Instructor consent required. Prerequisite:
site: LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3
‘Independent Study’ form must be completed and submitted
hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
to the registrar. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
Variable credit: 1 to 6 hours.
LISS470. POWER IN AMERICA: ILLUSIONS AND
REALITIES The course will probe into the realities of
Foreign Languages (LIFL)
power as opposed to illusions and simplistic perceptions. It
A variety of foreign languages is available through the
will address questions such as: does the person or the
LAIS Division. Students interested in a particular language
institution have the power we think they have? How much is
should check with the LAIS Division Office to determine
fact and how much is fiction? Have new forms of power
when these languages might be scheduled. In order to gain
emerged to displace the old? The study will be confined to
basic proficiency from their foreign language study, students
the American scene due to limited time. Prerequisite:
are encouraged to enroll for at least two semesters in
LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
whatever language(s) they elect to take. If there is sufficient
seminar; 3 semester hours.
demand, the Division can provide third- and fourth-semester
LISS480/503. ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND
courses in a given foreign language. No student is permitted
POLICY Seminar on environmental policies and the
to take a foreign language that is either his/her native
political and governmental processes that produce them.
language or second language. Proficiency tests may be used
Group discussion and independent research on specific
to determine at what level a student should be enrolled, but
environmental issues. Primary but not exclusive focus on
a student cannot receive course credit by taking these tests.
the U.S. Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
FOREIGN LANGUAGE POLICY: Students will not
SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
receive credit for taking a foreign language in which they
have had previous courses as per the following formula:
LISS482/504. WATER POLITICS AND POLICY Seminar
on water policies and the political and governmental
If a student has taken one year in high school or one
processes that produce them, as an exemplar of natural
semester in college, he/she will not receive graduation credit
resource politics and policy in general. Group discussion
for the first semester in a CSM foreign language course.
and independent research on specific politics and policy
Likewise, if a student has taken two years in high school or
issues. Primary but not exclusive focus on the U.S.
two semesters in college, he/she will not receive graduation
Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
credit for the second semester, and if a student has taken
SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
three years in high school or three semesters in college, he/
she will not receive graduation credit for the third semester.
LISS484. POPULATION, ENVIRONMENT AND
RESOURCES Will continued global population growth at
LIFL421. SPANISH III Emphasis on furthering conversa-
projected rates exhaust natural resources, damage the
tional skills and a continuing study of grammar, vocabulary,
environment and degrade the quality of human life? Are
and Spanish/American culture. 3 semester hours.
public policies to control population growth needed? What
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
93

LIFL422. ARABIC III Emphasis on furthering conversa-
LIFL498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN A FOREIGN LAN-
tional skills and a continuing study of grammar, vocabulary,
GUAGE (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics
and culture of Arabic-speaking societies. 3 semester hours.
chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s).
Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite:
LIFL423. GERMAN III Emphasis on furthering conversa-
Instructor consent. Variable credit: 1 to 6 semester hours.
tional skills and a continuing study of grammar, vocabulary,
and German culture. 3 semester hours.
LIFL499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
LIFL424. RUSSIAN III Emphasis on furthering conversa-
member. For students who have completed their LAIS
tional skills and a continuing study of grammar, vocabulary,
requirements. Instructor consent required. Prerequisite:
and Russian culture. 3 semester hours.
‘Independent Study’ form must be completed and submitted
LIFL425. FRENCH III Emphasis on furthering conversa-
to the registrar. Variable credit: 1 to 6 hours.
tional skills and a continuing study of grammar, vocabulary,
Communication (LICM)
and French-speaking societies. 3 semester hours.
LICM501. PROFESSIONAL ORAL COMMUNICATION
LIFL426. PORTUGUESE III Emphasis on furthering
A five-week course which teaches the fundamentals of
conversational skills and a continuing study of grammar,
effectively preparing and presenting messages. ‘Hands-on’
vocabulary, and Brazilian culture. 3 semester hours.
course emphasizing short (5- and 10-minute) weekly
LIFL427. CHINESE III Emphasis on furthering conversa-
presentations made in small groups to simulate professional
tional skills and a continuing study of grammar, vocabulary,
and corporate communications. Students are encouraged to
and Chinese culture. 3 semester hours.
make formal presentations which relate to their academic or
professional fields. Extensive instruction in the use of
LIFL428. INDONESIAN III Emphasis on furthering
visuals. Presentations are rehearsed in class two days prior
conversational skills and a continuing study of grammar,
to the formal presentations, all of which are video-taped and
vocabulary, and Indonesian culture. 3 semester hours.
carefully evaluated. 1 hour lecture/lab; 1 semester hour.
LIFL429. JAPANESE III Emphasis on furthering conversa-
tional skills and a continuing study of grammar, vocabulary,
and Japanese culture. 3 semester hours.
94
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Materials Science
C. SURYANARAYANA, Research Professor
CHESTER J. VAN TYNE, FIERF Professor
JOHN J. MOORE, Director, and Department Head of Metallurgical
and Materials Engineering
BAKI YARAR, Professor
DAVID L. OLSON, Lead Scientist, John Henry Moore
GERALD L. DePOORTER, Associate Professor
Distinguished Professor of Physical Metallurgy
*MARK EBERHART, Research Associate Professor
Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry
ROBERT H. FROST, Associate Professor
STEVE DANIEL, Professor and Head of Department
BRAJENDRA MISHRA, Associate Professor, Associate Director,
*DEAN W. DICKERHOOF, Professor
Kroll Institute for Extractive Metallurgy
*KENT J. VOORHEES, Professor
IVAR E. REIMANIS, Associate Professor
THOMAS WILDEMAN, Professor
STEVEN W. THOMPSON, Associate Professor, ISS Professor
SCOTT W. COWLEY, Associate Professor
KELLY T. MILLER, Assistant Professor
STEVEN R. DEC, Research Assistant Professor
LIVIV-IVLIAN PALADE, Research Assistant Professor
DANIEL M. KNAUSS, Assistant Professor
SRIRAM SADAGOPAN, Research Assistant Professor
KIM R. WILLIAMS, Assistant Professor
JOHN P. WISE, Research Assistant Professor
Department of Chemical Engineering and Petroleum
Department of Physics
Refining
F. EDWARD CECIL, Professor
ROBERT BALDWIN, Professor and Head of Department
*REUBEN T. COLLINS, Professor
M. SAMI SELIM, Professor
THOMAS E. FURTAK, Professor
*JOHN R. DORGAN, Associate Professor
VICTOR KAYDANOV, Research Professor
J. DOUGLAS WAY, Associate Professor
FRANKLIN D. SCHOWENGERDT, Professor
*DAVID W.M. MARR, Assistant Professor, Representative of
DON L. WILLIAMSON, Professor and Head of Department
Graduate Affairs
TIMOTHY R. OHNO, Associate Professor
COLIN WOLDEN, Assistant Professor
*DAVID M. WOOD, Associate Professor
DAVID T. WU, Assistant Professor
JON EGGERT, Assistant Professor
Division of Engineering
PETER W. SUTTER, Assistant Professor
JOAN GOSINK, Professor and Head of Department
* Members of the Materials Science Graduate Affairs
ROBERT J. KEE, Professor
Committee; or, Faculty Research-Opportunities Committee
RAHMAT A. SHOURESHI, Gerard August Dobelman
Degrees Offered:
Distinguished Professor of Engineering
Master of Science (Materials Science; thesis option or
*MARK LINNE, Associate Professor
non-thesis option)
MARK LUSK, Associate Professor
DAVID R. MUNOZ, Associate Professor
Doctor of Philosophy (Materials Science)
*GRAHAM MUSTOE, Associate Professor
Program Description:
TERRY PARKER, Associate Professor
The interdisciplinary materials science program is
JOHN R. BERGER, Assistant Professor
administered jointly by the Departments of Chemical
CHRISTOPHER BRAUN, Assistant Professor
Engineering and Petroleum Refining, Chemistry and
JEAN-PIERRE DALPLANQUE, Assistant Professor
Geochemistry, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering,
WILLIAM HOFF, Assistant Professor
Physics and the Division of Engineering. Each department is
JOHN P.H. STEELE, Assistant Professor
represented on both the Governing Board and the Graduate
Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
Affairs Committees which are responsible for the operation
GLEN EDWARDS, Professor and Director of the Center for
of the program. The variety of disciplines provides for
Welding and Joining Research
programs of study ranging from the traditional materials
FREDERICK J. FRAIKOR, Research Professor
science program to a custom-designed program in one of the
JOHN HAGER, Hazen Research Inc., Professor of Extractive
participating departments.
Metallurgy; Director, Kroll Institute for Extractive Metallurgy
*STEPHEN LIU, Professor
Program Requirements:
GERARD P. MARTINS, Professor
Master of Science (thesis option):
DAVID K. MATLOCK, ARMCO Foundation Fogarty Professor;
This Master of Science degree requires a minimum of 24
Director, Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research Center
semester hours of acceptable coursework as outlined under
JOHN J. MOORE, Professor and Head of Department, and
Required Curriculum which follows. In addition, a student
Director, Advanced Coatings and Surface Engineering Laboratory
must submit a thesis and pass a Defense of Thesis examina-
*DAVID L. OLSON, John Henry Moore Distinguished Professor of
tion before their Thesis Committee.
Physical Metallurgy
Master of Science (non-thesis option):
*DENNIS W. READEY, Herman F. Coors Distinguished Professor
in Ceramic Engineering; Director, Colorado Center for
This Master of Science degree requires a minimum of 39
Advanced Ceramics
credits of acceptable coursework as outlined under Required
JOHN G. SPEER, Professor
Curriculum which follows. Consult the section on Graduate
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
95

Degrees and Requirements in this Bulletin for general
technical literature, and culminate in a report submitted to
information on this Master of Science - Non-Thesis degree.
the Faculty Advisor for approval.
Doctor of Philosophy:
Master of Science (non-thesis option) Core Courses:
The Doctor of Philosophy requires a minimum of 42
MLGN500 - Processing, Microstructure and Properties of
semester hours of acceptable coursework, of which
Materials
minimum of 30 hours must be taken at CSM. The course
MLGN501/ CHGN580 - Structure of Materials
work requirements include the core courses listed under
MLGN502/ PHGN440 - Introductory Solid State Physics
Required Curriculum, plus 15 hours of course work in a
MLGN503/ CHGN515 - Chemical Bonding in Materials
selected primary area. A candidate for the degree must also
MLGN504/ MTGN555 - Solid State Thermodynamics
pass both a written qualifying examination and an oral
MLGN511 - Kinetic Concerns in Materials Processing I
comprehensive examination, and must submit a thesis and
MLGN513 - Problem Solving in Materials Science
pass a Defense of Thesis examination before their Thesis
MLGN514 - Experimental Methods and Instrumentation (2
Committee.
hours)
Prerequisites
MLGN517 - Solid Mechanics of Materials
The primary admission requirement for this interdiscipli-
MLGN599 - Case Study - Materials Science
nary program is a Bachelor of Science degree in physical
MLGN601 - Graduate Materials Science Seminar (1 hour)
science or engineering, equivalent to those offered at CSM
In addition to the above, three other graduate-level
in the following departments: Chemistry and Geochemistry,
courses (9 hours); by mutual agreement between the student
Engineering, Chemical Engineering and Petroleum
and Faculty Advisor. The total course-work requirement,
Refining, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering or
including the case-study, is therefore 39 semester-hours
Physics.
beyond the baccalaureate degree.
Deficiency Courses:
Students who have taken the equivalent of any of the
A student admitted to this graduate program who has not
core-courses listed may petition the Materials Science
taken one or all of the following courses (or equivalent) will
Graduate Affairs Committee for transfer credit.
be required to satisfy any such deficiency early in their
program of study: Mechanics Differential Equations Modern
The core-courses requirement for the Doctor of Philoso-
Physics Physical Chemistry/Chemical Thermodynamics
phy degree is listed below. In addition, a minimum of 15
semester-hours of course work in a selected primary area
Required Curriculum:
must be part of the minimum requirement of 42 semester-
1) The Master of Science degree (thesis option) requires
hours beyond the baccalaureate degree.
a minimum of 24 semester-hours of acceptable course work,
Doctor of Philosophy Core Courses:
which must include the required core-courses listed below:
MLGN500 - Processing Microstructures and Properties of
Master of Science (thesis option) Core Courses:
Materials
MLGN500 - Processing, Microstructure and Properties of
MLGN501/ CHGN580 - Structure of Materials
Materials
MLGN502/ PHGN440 - Introductory Solid State Physics
MLGN501/CHGN580 - Structure of Materials
MLGN503/ CHGN515 - Chemical Bonding in Materials
MLGN501/PHGN440 - Introductory Solid State Physics
MLGN504/ MTGN555 - Solid State Thermodynamics
MLGN503/CHGN515 - Chemical Bonding in Materials
MLGN511 - Kinetic Concerns in Materials Processing I
MLGN513 - Problem Solving in Materials Science
MLGN513 - Problem Solving in Materials Science
MLGN514 - Experimental Methods and Instrumentation (2
MLGN514 - Experimental Methods and Instrumentation
hours)
(2 hours)
MLGN601 - Graduate Materials Science Seminar (1 hour)
MLGN517 - Solid Mechanics of Materials
MLGN Elective (9 hours)
MLGN601 - Graduate Materials Science Seminar (1 hour)
Students who have taken the equivalent of any of the
Primary Areas:
core-courses listed may petition the Materials Science
Ceramics; Composites; Electronic Materials; Joining
Graduate Affairs Committee for transfer credit.
Science; Materials Chemistry; Mechanics of Materials;
2) The Master of Science degree (non-thesis option)
Metal and Alloy Systems; Polymeric Materials; Surface/
requires 36 semester-hours of acceptable course work which
Interfaces, Thin Films and Coatings.
must include the required core-courses listed below. In
Thesis Committee Structure:
addition, 3 semester-hours of a case-study devoted to
The M.S. student will invite at least 3 members (one of
independent research must be conducted on a selected
whom is the advisor) to serve on a graduate committee. At
materials-processing or materials-characterization problem.
least one of these members must be from a department other
Typically, this research would incorporate a concise analysis
than that of the advisor.
of various approaches to the problem, as reported in the
96
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

The Ph.D. student will invite 4 members (one of whom
Transformations, microstructure, deformation, fracture
is the advisor) to serve on a graduate committee. At least
Weld metallurgy, materials joining processes
one of these members must be in a department other than
Welding and joining science
that of the advisor. The member at large will be assigned by
Extractive and process metallurgy, electrochemical corro-
the Graduate Dean. External members may be invited to
sion, synthesis of ceramic precursor powders and metal
participate.
powders
For administrative purposes, the student will be resident
Mechanical metallurgy, failure analysis, deformation of
in the advisor’s department.
materials, advanced steel coatings
The student’s graduate committee will have final
Pyrometallurgy, corrosion, materials synthesis, coatings
approval of the course of study.
Chemical and physical processing of materials, engineered
Fields of Research:
materials, materials synthesis
Advanced polymeric materials
Reactive metals Properties and processing of ceramics and
ceramic-metal composites, dielectrics and ferrimagnetics
Fullerene synthesis, combustion chemistry
Phase transformations and mechanisms of microstructural
Transport phenomena, mathematical modeling, kinetic
change, electron microscopy, structure-property
properties of colloidal suspensions, diffusion with
relationships
chemical reaction
Forging, deformation modeling, high-temperature material
Novel separation processes: membranes, catalytical
behavior
membrane reactors, biopolymer adsorbents for heavy
metal remediation of ground surface water
Materials synthesis, interfaces, flocculation, fine particles
Heterogeneous catalysis, reformulated and alcohol fuels,
Optical properties of materials and interfaces
surface analysis, electrophotography
Surface physics, epitaxial growth, interfacial science,
Computer modeling and simulation
adsorption
Characterization, thermal stability, and thermal degradation
Many-body problems
mechanisms of polymers
Experimental condensed-matter physics, thermal and
Crystal and molecular structure determination by X-ray
electrical properties of materials, superconductivity,
crystallography
photovoltaics
Power electronics, plasma physics, pulsed power, plasma
Mössbauer spectroscopy, ion implantation, small-angle X-
material processing
ray scattering, semiconductor defects
Control systems engineering, artificial neural systems for
Computational condensed-matter physics, semiconductor
senior data processing, polymer cure monitoring sensors,
alloys, first-principles phonon calculations
process monitoring and control for composites manufac-
Physical vapor deposition, thin films, coatings
turing
Chemical vapor deposition
Heat and mass transfer, materials processing
Description of Courses (Interdisciplinary
Numerical modeling of particulate media, thermomechanical
Program)
analysis
The interdisciplinary materials science program is
Intelligent automated systems, intelligent process control,
administered jointly by the Departments of Chemical
robotics, artificial neural systems
Engineering and Petroleum Refining, Chemistry and
Ceramic processing, modeling of ceramic processing
Geochemistry, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering,
Alloy theory, concurrent design, theory-assisted materials
Physics and the Division of Engineering. Each department is
engineering, electronic structure theory
represented on both the Governing Board and the Graduate
Physical metallurgy, Ferrous and nonferrous alloy systems
Affairs Committees which are responsible for the operation
Archaeometallurgy, industry and university partnerships
of the program.
Solidification and near net shape processing
The following courses are considered to be part of the
Chemical processing of materials
Materials Science Program. Some have been cross-listed
Processing and characterization of electroceramics (ferro-
between Materials Science and the participating depart-
electrics, piezoelectrics, pyroelectrics, and dielectrics),
ments/division. Other courses not included may be suitable
glass-ceramics for electronic and structural applications,
for inclusion in a graduate program. See the participating
thermodynamic modeling of ferroelectrics
department listings. It should be noted that the course
requirement for graduate-level registration for a MLGN
Applications of artificial intelligence techniques to materials
500-level course which is cross-listed with a 400-level
processing and manufacturing, neural networks for
course-number, will include an additional course-component
process modeling and sensor data processing, manufac-
above that required for 400-level credit.
turing process control
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
97

MLGN500. PROCESSING, MICROSTRUCTURE, AND
MLGN506/MTGN556. TRANSPORT IN SOLIDS (II)
PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS I A summary of the
Thermal and electrical conductivity. Solid state diffusion in
important relationships between the processing, microstruc-
metals and metal systems. Kinetics of metallurgical
ture, and properties of materials. Topics include electronic
reactions in the solid state. Prerequisite: Consent of
structure and bonding, crystal structures, lattice defects and
department. 3 semester hours. (Spring of odd years only.)
mass transport, glasses, phase transformation, important
MLGN507/PHGN540. CONDENSED MATTER I (I)
materials processes, and properties including: mechanical
Principles and applications of the quantum theory of
and rheological, electrical conductivity, magnetic, dielectric,
electrons and phonons in solids: structure, symmetry, and
optical, thermal, and chemical. In a given year, one of these
bonding; electron states and excitations in metals and alloys;
topics will be given special emphasis. Another area of
transport properties; surfaces. Prerequisite: PHGN420 and
emphasis is phase equilibria. Prerequisite: Consent of
PHGN440 or their equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
Instructor 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
hours.
MLGN501/CHGN580. STRUCTURE OF MATERIALS (II)
MLGN508/PHGN541. CONDENSED MATTER II (II)
Principles of crystallography and diffraction from materials.
Principles and applications of the quantum theory of
Properties of radiation useful for studying the structure of
electrons and phonons in solids: phonon states in solids;
materials. Structure determination methods. Prerequisite:
transport properties; electron states and excitations in
Any Physics III course. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
semiconductors and insulators; defects and impurities;
MLGN502/PHGN440. INTRODUCTORY SOLID STATE
amorphous materials; magnetism; superconductivity.
PHYSICS (II) Introduction to the physics of condensed
Prerequisite: MLGN507/PHGN540. 3 hours lecture; 3
matter with an emphasis on periodic crystals, including
semester hours.
geometrical, dynamical, thermal, and electronic properties.
MLGN509/CHGN523. SOLID STATE CHEMISTRY (I)
Discussion of experimental methods including photon and
Dependence on properties of solids on chemical bonding
neutron scattering, charge and heat transport, action of
and structure; principles of crystal growth, crystal imperfec-
simple solid state devices. Prerequisite: Physics III and
tions, reactions and diffusion in solids, and the theory of
MACS315. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. MLGN502
conductors and semiconductors. Prerequisite: Consent of
requires a term project. PHGN440 ABET classification: 3
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered
hrs. engineering science.
alternate years.
MLGN503/CHGN515. CHEMICAL BONDING IN
MLGN510/CHGN410 SURFACE CHEMISTRY (I)
MATERIALS (I) Introduction to chemical bonding theories
Introduction to colloid systems, capillarity, surface tension
and calculations and their applications to solids of interest to
and contact angle, adsorption from solution, micelles and
materials science. The relationship between a materialÕs
microemulsions, the solid/gas interface, surface analytical
properties and the bonding of its atoms will be examined for
techniques, van der Waal forces, electrical properties and
a variety of materials. Includes an introduction to organic
colloid stability, some specific colloid systems (clays, foams
polymers. Computer programs will be used for calculating
and emulsions). Students enrolled for graduate credit in
bonding parameters. Prerequisite: Consent of department. 3
MLGN510 must complete a special project. Prerequisite:
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
DCGN209 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
MLGN504/MTGN555. SOLID STATE THERMODYNAM-
semester hours.
ICS (II) A second course in thermodynamics which applies
MLGN511. KINETIC CONCERNS IN MATERIALS
chemical thermodynamic principles to phase equilibria,
PROCESSING I (I) Introduction to the kinetics of materials
point defects, surfaces and electrochemistry. The application
processing, with emphasis on the momentum, heat and mass
of thermodynamic principles through MaxwellÕs principles
transport. Discussion of the basic mechanism of transport in
will be extended to a broad range of material properties. The
gases, liquids and solids. Prerequisite: MTGN352, MTGN
concepts of irreversible thermodynamics and kinetic
361, MACS315 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
processes are introduced. Prerequisite: Solid State Thermo-
hours.
dynamics I or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MLGN512/MTGN412. CERAMIC ENGINEERING (II)
MLGN505*/MTGN445. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES
Application of engineering principles to nonmetallic and
OF MATERIALS (I) Mechanical properties and relation-
ceramic materials. Processing of raw materials and produc-
ships. Plastic deformation of crystalline materials. Relation-
tion of ceramic bodies, glazes, glasses, enamels, and
ships of microstructures to mechanical strength. Fracture,
cements. Firing processes and reactions in glass bonded as
creep, and fatigue. Prerequisite: MTGN348. 3 hours lecture;
well as mechanically bonded systems. Prerequisite:
3 hours lab; 3*/4 semester hours. * This is a 3 credit-hour
MTGN348 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
graduate-course in the Materials Science Program and a 4
credit-hour undergraduate-course in the MTGN program.
MLGN513. PROBLEM SOLVING IN MATERIALS
SCIENCE (I) Review the theoretical aspects of various
98
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

physical phenomena of major importance to materials
MTGN412, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
scientists. Develop mathematical models from these
semester hours.
theories, and construct quantitative solution procedures
MLGN520 SPECIAL PROBLEMS May comprise indi-
based on analytical and numerical techniques. Prerequisite:
vidual and group study. Not part of thesis. Prerequisite:
MACS315 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
MLGN514. EXPERIMENTAL METHODS AND INSTRU-
MLGN521. KINETIC CONCERNS IN MATERIAL
MENTATION (S) This course consists of two parts, (i) a
PROCESSING II (I) Advanced course to address the
series of classes that describe theory of measurements and
kinetics of materials processing, with emphasis in those
experimental principles and (ii) a series of laboratory visits
processes that promote phase and structural transformations.
to either perform experimental measurements or to see
Processes that involve precipitation, sintering, oxidation,
actual procedures demonstrated. Prerequisite: Consent of
sol-gel, coating, etc., will be discussed in detail. Prerequi-
instructor 1 hour lecture; 1 hour lab; 2 semester hours.
site: MLGN511 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MLGN515/MTGN415. ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES AND
MLGN522/PHGN441. SOLID STATE PHYSICS APPLI-
APPLICATIONS OF MATERIALS (II) Survey of the
CATIONS AND PHENOMENA Continuation of
electrical properties of materials, and the applications of
MLGN502/PHGN440 with an emphasis on applications of
materials as electrical circuit components. The effects of
the principles of solid state physics to practical properties of
chemistry, processing, and microstructure on the electrical
materials including: : optical properties, superconductivity,
properties will be discussed, along with functions, perfor-
dielectric properties, magnetism, noncrystalline structure,
mance requirements, and testing methods of materials for
and interfaces. Graduate students in physics cannot receive
each type of circuit component. The general topics covered
credit for MLGN522, only PHGN441. Prerequisite:
are conductors, resistors, insulators, capacitors, energy
MLGN502/PHGN440 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours/
convertors, magnetic materials, and integrated circuits.
*Those receiving graduate credit will be required to submit
Prerequisites: PHGN200; MTGN311 or MLGN501;
a term paper, in addition to satisfying all of the other
MTGN412/MLGN512, or consent of instructor. 3 hours
requirements of the course.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
MLGN523/MTGN523. APPLIED SURFACE AND
MLGN516/MTGN416 PROPERTIES OF CERAMICS (II)
SOLUTION CHEMISTRY (I) Solution and surface
A survey of the properties of ceramic materials and how
chemistry of importance in mineral and metallurgical
these properties are determined by the chemical structure
operations. Prerequisite: Consent of department. 3 semester
(composition), crystal structure, and the microstructure of
hours. (Fall of even years only.)
crystalline ceramics and glasses. Thermal, optical, and
mechanical properties of single-phase and multi-phase
MLGN525/PHGN525. SURFACE PHYSICS (I) Solid state
ceramics, including composites, are covered. Prerequisites:
physics focusing on the structural and electronic nature of
PHGN200, MTGN311 or MLGN501, MTGN412 or consent
the outer few atomic layers and the gas-surface interations.
of instructor. 3 semester hours: 3 hours lecture
Detailed explanations of many surface analysis techniques
are provided, highlighting the application of these tech-
MLGN517. SOLID MECHANICS OF MATERIALS (I)
niques to current problems, particularly electronic materials.
Review mechanics of materials. Introduction to elastic and
Prerequisite: MLGN502 or equivalent, or consent of
non-linear continua. Cartesian tensors and stresses and
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours (Fall of even
strains. Analytical solution of elasticity problems. Develop
years only)
basic concepts of fracture mechanics. Prerequisite:
EGGN320 or equivalent, MACS315 or equivalent. 3 hours
MLGN530/CHGN430/CRGN415. INTRODUCTION TO
lecture; 3 semester hours. Semester to be offered: Spring
POLYMER SCIENCE (I) An introduction to the chemistry
and physics of macromolecules. Topics include the
MLGN518/MTGN518. PHASE EQUILIBRIA IN CERAM-
properties and statistics of polymer solutions, measurements
ICS SYSTEMS (II) Application of one of four component
of molecular weights, molecular weight distributions,
oxide diagrams to ceramic engineering problems. Emphasis
properties of bulk polymers, mechanisms of polymer
on refractories and glasses and their interaction with
formation, and properties of thermosets and thermoplasts
metallic systems. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
including elastomers. Prerequisite: CHGN327 or consent of
lecture; 3 semester hours.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MLGN519/MTGN419. NON-CRYSTALLINE MATERI-
MLGN531/CRGN416. INTRODUCTION TO POLYMER
ALS (I) An introduction to the principles of glass science-
ENGINEERING (II) This class provides a background in
and-engineering and non-crystalline materials in general.
polymer fluid mechanics, polymer rheological response and
Glass formation, structure, crystallization and properties will
polymer shape forming. The class begins with a discussion
be covered, along with a survey of commercial glass
of the definition and measurement of material properties.
compositions, manufacturing processes and applications.
Interrelationships among the material response functions are
Prerequisites: MTGN311 or MLGN501; MLGN512/
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
99

elucidated and relevant correlations between experimental
placed on the development of properties such as electrical
data and material response in real flow situations are given.
and thermal will also be examined. Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Processing operations for polymeric materials will then be
MTGN311, MTGN348, MTGN351, MTGN352,
addressed. These include the flow of polymers through
MTGN445/MLGN505 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
circular, slit, and complex dies. Fiber spinning, film
lecture; 3 semester hours (Fall of odd years only)
blowing, extrusion and coextrusion will be covered as will
MLGN561 TRANSPORT PHENOMENA IN MATERIALS
injection molding. Graduate students are required to write a
PROCESSING (II) Fluid flow, heat and mass transfer
term paper and take separate examinations which are at a
applied to processing of materials. Rheology of polymers,
more advanced level. Prerequisite: CRGN307, EGGN351 or
liquid metal/particles slurries, and particulate solids.
equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Transient flow behavior of these materials in various
MLGN536/CHGN536. ADVANCED POLYMER SYN-
geometries, including infiltration of liquids in porous media.
THESIS (II) An advanced course in the synthesis of
Mixing and blending. Flow behavior of jets, drainage of
macromolecules. Various methods of polymerization will be
films and particle fluidization. Surface-tension-, electromag-
discussed with an emphasis on the specifics concerning the
netic-, and bubble-driven flows. Heat -transfer behavior in
syntheses of different classes of organic and inorganic
porous bodies applied to sintering and solidification of
polymers. Prerequisite: CHGN430, ChEN415, MLGN530
composites. Simultaneous heat-and-mass-transfer applied to
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours
spray drying and drying of porous bodies. Prerequisites:
ChEN307 or ChEN308 or MTGN461 or consent of
MLGN544/MTGN414 PROCESSING OF CERAMICS (II)
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
A description of the principles of ceramic processing and
the relationship between processing and microstructure.
MLGN563. POLYMER ENGINEERING: STRUCTURE,
Raw materials and raw material preparation, forming and
PROPERTIES AND PROCESSING/MTGN463. POLY-
fabrication, thermal processing, and finishing of ceramic
MER ENGINEERING An introduction to the structure and
materials will be covered. Principles will be illustrated by
properties of polymeric materials, their deformation and
case studies on specific ceramic materials. A project to
failure mechanisms, and the design and fabrication of
design a ceramic fabrication process is required. Field trips
polymeric end items. The molecular and crystallographic
to local ceramic manufacturing operations are included.
structures of polymers will be developed and related to the
Prerequisites: MTGN311, MTGN331, and MTGN412/
elastic, viscoelastic, yield and fracture properties of
MLGN512 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
polymeric solids and reinforced polymer composites.
semester hours.
Emphasis will be placed on forming techniques for end item
fabrication including: extrusion, injection molding, reaction
MLGN550/MTGN450. STATISTICAL PROCESS
injection molding, thermoforming, and blow molding. The
CONTROL AND DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS (I) An
design of end items will be considered in relation to:
introduction to statistical process control, process capability
materials selection, manufacturing engineering, properties,
analysis and experimental design techniques. Statistical
and applications. Prerequisite: MTGN311 or equivalent or
process control theory and techniques will be developed and
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
applied to control charts for variables and attributes
involved in process control and evaluation. Process
MLGN565/MTGN565 MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF
capability concepts will be developed and applied for the
CERAMICS AND COMPOSITES (I) Mechanical proper-
evaluation of manufacturing processes. The theory and
ties of ceramics and ceramic-based composites; brittle
application of designed experiments will be developed and
fracture of solids; toughening mechanisms in composites;
applied for full factorial experiments, fractional factorial
fatigue, high temperature mechanical behavior, including
experiments, screening experiments, multilevel experiments
fracture, creep deformation. Prerequisites: MTGN445 or
and mixture experiments. Analysis of designed experiments
MLGN505, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
will be carried out by graphical and statistical techniques.
semester hours. (Fall of even years only.)
Computer software will be utilized for statistical process
MLGN583/CHGN583. PRINCIPLES AND APPLICA-
control and for the design and analysis of experiments.
TIONS OF SURFACE ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES (II)
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3
Instrumental techniques for the characterization of surfaces
semester hours.
of solid materials. Applications of such techniques to
MLGN552/MTGN552. INORGANIC MATRIX COMPOS-
polymers, corrosion, metallurgy, adhesion science, micro-
ITES I An introduction to the processing, structure,
electronics. Methods of analysis discussed: X-ray photoelec-
properties and applications of metal matrix and ceramic
tron spectroscopy (XPS), auger electron spectroscopy
matrix composites. Importance of structure and properties of
(AES), ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS), secondary ion
both the matrix and the reinforcement and the types of
mass spectroscopy (SIMS), Rutherford backscattering
reinforcement utilized, e.g., particulate, short fiber,
(RBS), scanning and transmission electron microscopy
continuous fiber, and laminates. Special emphasis will be
(SEM, TEM), energy and wavelength dispersive X-ray
100
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

analysis; principles of these methods, quantification,
ing, introduces the needed terminology and describes
instrumentation, sample preparation. Prerequisite: B.S. in
different reactor types. The applied kinetic models relevant
metallurgy, chemistry, chemical engineering, physics, or
to polymerization reaction engineering are then developed.
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Next, mixing effects are introduced; goodness of mixing and
effects on reactor performance are discussed. Thermal
MLGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS Special topic course on a
effects are then introduced and the subjects of thermal
specific subject defined by instructor. Prerequisite: Consent
runaway, thermal instabilities and multiple steady states are
of Instructor 1 to 3 hours.
included. Reactive processing, change in viscosity with the
MLGN599 CASE STUDY MATERIALS SCIENCE (I, II)
extent of reaction and continuous drag flow reactors are
An independent study of a selected materials processing or
described. Polymer devolatilization constitutes the final
material characterization problem involving a thorough
subject of the class. Prerequisites: CRGN518 or equivalent.
analysis of the various solutions reported in the technical
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
literature and/or a thorough industrial survey. The case study
MLGN673. STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF
will prepare a case study report of technical merit. Prerequi-
POLYMERS This course will provide an understanding of
site/Co-requisite: MLGN501, MLGN502, MLGN503,
structure - properties relations in polymeric materials. The
MLGN504, and MLGN511, and MLGN517 or consent of
topics include: phase separation, amorphous structures,
advisor. 3 semester hours.
crystalline structures, liquid crystals, glass-rubber transition
MLGN601 GRADUATE MATERIAL SCIENCE SEMI-
behavior, rubber elasticity, viscoelasticity, mechanical
NAR (I), (II) To develop an understanding of and practice in
properties of polymers, polymer forming processes, and
oral communication. Students will register each semester in
electrical properties of polymers. Prerequisite: MLGN563 or
residence. IPS or IPU grades will be given each semester
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
until the final semester when a final letter grade will be
MLGN696/MTGN696. Vapor Deposition Processes (S)
assigned. Each student will be required to give one seminar
Introduction to the fundamental physics and chemistry
during their program. Attendance at designated Materials
underlying the control of vapor deposition processes for the
Science seminars is also a requirement of the course.
deposition of thin films for a variety of applications, e.g.,
Prerequisite: Graduate standing 1 hour seminar: one
corrosion/oxidation resistance, decorative coatings,
semester hour.
electronic and magnetic thin films. Emphasis on the vapor
MLGN634. POLYMER SOLUTIONS AND THERMODY-
deposition processes and the control of process variables
NAMICS/CRGN609. ADVANCED TOPICS IN THERMO-
rather than the structure and properties of the thin films.
DYNAMICS The phase behavior of polymer solutions is
Prerequisites: MTGN351, MTGN461, or equivalent
dramatically different from their low molecular weight
courses, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
analogs due to the small entropy of mixing associated with
hours.
large polymer molecules. This course begins with a
MLGN698. ADVANCED TOPICS Advanced study of
discussion of classical thermodynamics and the stability of
materials science theory and application of materials science
phases. Statistical mechanics and the partition function for
principles in a specialty area of the instructor’s choosing.
an ideal mixture are reviewed. Next, the solution properties
Not part of thesis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to 3
of an isolated polymer coil in solution are elucidated. This
semester hours.
discussion leads naturally to the description of dilute
solution behavior and its applications. The thermodynamics
MLGN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY Independent study of
of concentrated solutions are then undertaken using Flory-
a materials science topic with guidance of an instructor. Not
Huggins theory. Brownian motion of polymer molecules and
part of thesis. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 1 to 3
the thermodynamics of polymers at interfaces are also
hours.
covered. Prerequisite: MLGN530, MLGN504, or CRGN520
MLGN701. GRADUATE THESIS - MASTER OF
or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
SCIENCE (I, II) Laboratory for Master’s thesis under
MLGN635. POLYMER REACTION ENGINEERING/
supervision of graduate student’s advisory committee.
CRGN618. ADVANCED TOPICS IN REACTION
MLGN703. GRADUATE THESIS - DOCTOR OF
KINETICS This class is aimed at engineers with a firm
PHILOSOPHY (I, II) Preparation of the doctoral thesis
technical background who wish to apply that background to
under supervision of the graduate student’s advisory
polymerization production techniques. The class begins with
committee.
a review of the fundamental concepts of reaction engineer-
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
101

Mathematical and Computer Sciences
which must be completed with a grade point average of
GRAEME FAIRWEATHER, Professor and Department Head
3.375 or higher. The degree is in the area of computational
WILLY A.M. HEREMAN, Professor
applied mathematics, and the core curriculum includes both
RAGHU KRISHNAPURAM, Professor
applied mathematics and computer science courses.
PAUL A. MARTIN, Professor
The Doctor of Philosophy requires 90 semester hours
JUNPING WANG, Professor
beyond the bachelor’s degree, of which no fewer than 30
BARBARA B. BATH, Associate Professor
hours are thesis hours. Doctoral students must pass a
BERNARD BIALECKI, Associate Professor
qualifying examination, a comprehensive examination, and
MAARTEN V. DE HOOP, Associate Professor
complete and defend a dissertation.
WILLIAM C. NAVIDI, Associate Professor
The specific core curriculum requirements can be found
ROBERT G. UNDERWOOD, Associate Professor
in the Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department
ERIK S. VAN VLECK, Associate Professor
Graduate Student Handbook (Call 303 273-3860; FAX 303
XINDONG WU, Associate Professor
273-3875). This handbook also provides an overview of the
TRACY KAY CAMP, Assistant Professor
programs, requirements and policies of the department.
MANAVENDRA MISRA, Assistant Professor
BARBARA M. MOSKAL, Assistant Professor
Prerequisites:
LUIS TENORIO, Assistant Professor
Applied Mathematics:
HUGH KING, Senior Lecturer
Linear algebra
G.GUSTAVE GREIVEL, Lecturer
Vector calculus
TERI WOODINGTON, Lecturer
Ordinary differential equations
WILLIAM R. ASTLE, Professor Emeritus
Advanced calculus (Introduction to real analysis)
ARDEL J. BOES, Professor Emeritus
Applied Statistics:
NORMAN BLEISTEIN, Professor Emeritus
Linear algebra
JOHN DeSANTO, Professor Emeritus
Introduction to probability & statistics
STEVEN A. PRUESS, Professor Emeritus
Degrees Offered:
Advanced calculus (Introduction to real analysis)
Master of Science (Mathematical and Computer
Computer Sciences:
Sciences)
Science - two semesters
Mathematics - two semesters of calculus, at least two
Doctor of Philosophy (Mathematical and Computer
courses from ordinary differential equations, linear algebra,
Sciences)
statistics, discrete math
Program Description:
Data structures
There are three areas of concentration within the
A programming language
department: applied mathematics, applied statistics, and
Upper level courses in at least three of software
computer sciences . Since the requirements for these areas
engineering, numerical analysis, machine architecture/
vary somewhat, they are often considered separately in this
assembly language, comparative languages, analysis of
catalog. However, labeling these as distinct areas is not
algorithms, operating systems
meant to discourage any student from pursuing research
involving more than one. Work in any of these areas can
Fields of Research:
lead to the degree of Master of Science or Doctor of
Applied Mathematics:
Philosophy. Applicants to the graduate program need these
Dynamical Systems
four items: 1. A statement of purpose (short essay) from the
Classical Scattering Theory
applicant briefly describing background, interests, goals at
Classical Wave Propagation
CSM, career intentions, etc. 2. The general Graduate Record
Mathematical Methods for Wave Phenomena
Examination. 3. B or better average in courses in the major
Solution Techniques for Nonlinear PDEs
field. 4. B or better overall undergraduate grade point
Numerical Analysis
average.
Optimal Control
Program Requirements:
Optimization Software
The Master of Science degree (thesis option) requires 24
Seismic Inverse Methods
semester hours of acceptable coursework including the
Symbolic Computing
required core curriculum. Students in this master’s program
must complete and defend a thesis.
Applied Statistics:
Inverse problems in Statistics
The Master of Science degree (non-thesis option)
Resampling Methods
requires 36 semester hours of coursework. Of these, eight
courses (24 semester hours) comprise the core curriculum,
Statistical Genetics
Stochastic Modeling
102
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Computer Sciences:
MACS406. DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS
Artificial Intelligence
(I, II) Divide-and-conquer: splitting problems into subprob-
Data Mining
lems of a finite number. Greedy: considering each problem
Database Management
piece one at a time for optimality. Dynamic programming:
considering a sequence of decisions in problem solution.
Fuzzy Sets
Searches and traversals: determination of the vertex in the
Machine Learning
given data set that satisfies a given property. Techniques of
Mathematical Software
backtracking, branch-and-bound techniques, techniques in
Mobile Networks
lower bound theory. Prerequisite: MACS213 or MACS223,
Neural Networks
MACS262, MACS358. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Pattern Recognition
MACS407. INTRODUCTION TO NUMERICAL METH-
Supercomputing and Parallel Processing
ODS (I, II) Roundoff error in floating point arithmetic,
Description of Courses
conditioning and stability, contemporary mathematical
MACS400. PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING LAN-
software for solutions of linear algebraic systems, curve and
GUAGES (I, II) Study of the principles relating to design,
surface fitting, zeros of nonlinear equations, adaptive
evaluation and implementation of programming languages.
quadrature, multivariate quadrature, initial value problems
Several languages of historical and technical interest are
in ordinary differential equations. Codes and sample drivers
considered as individual entities and with respect to their
are provided. Emphasis is on problem solving and the study
relationships to other languages. Topics discussed for each
of mathematical software using existing packages. Prerequi-
language include: history, design, structural organization,
sites: MACS315, knowledge of computer programming. 3
data structures, name structures, control structures, syntactic
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
structures, and implementation issues. The primary
MACS411. INTRODUCTION TO EXPERT SYSTEMS (I)
languages discussed are FORTRAN, ALGOL, COBOL,
General investigation of the field of expert systems. The first
PASCAL, LISP, ADA, C/C++, JAVA,PROLOG, PERL,
part of the course is devoted to designing expert systems.
BASIC. Prerequisite: MACS262. 3 hours lecture; 3
The last half of the course is implementation of the design
semester hours.
and construction of demonstration prototypes of expert
MACS401. APPLIED ANALYSIS (I) This course is a first
systems. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture;
course in analysis that lays out the context and motivation of
3 semester hours.
analysis in terms of the transition from power series to those
MACS415. INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS AND
less predictable, especially Fourier series, and shows some
COMPUTER VISION (II) General undergraduate-level
of the traps into which even great mathematicians have
introduction of Artificial intelligence techniques in robotics
fallen. The course is taught from an applied perspective.
and computer vision. Reactive robot architectures are
Differentiability, continuity, and convergence are studied in
studied in detail. The course emphasizes hands-on experi-
this setting. Prerequisite: MACS213 or MACS223, and
ence with mobile robots and sensors. Field trips are
MACS332. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
arranged to local industries which manufacture or use
MACS403. DATABASE MANAGEMENT (I, II) Design
robots. Prerequisite: Knowledge of C programming
and evaluation of information storage and retrieval systems,
language, jr or sr standing. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
including defining and building a data base and producing
hours.
the necessary queries for access to the stored information.
MACS428. APPLIED PROBABILITY (II) Basic probabil-
Generalized database management systems, query lan-
ity. Probabilistic modeling. Discrete and continuous
guages, and data storage facilities. General organization of
probability models and their application to engineering and
files including lists, inverted lists and trees. System security
scientific problems. Empirical distributions, probability
and system recovery, and system definition. Interfacing host
plotting, and testing of distributional assumptions. Prerequi-
language to data base systems. Prerequisite: MACS262. 3
site: MACS213 or MACS223 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
hours.
MACS404. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (I) General
MACS434. INTRODUCTION TO PROBABLILITY (I) An
investigation of the Artificial Intelligence field. Approxi-
introduction to the theory of probability essential to applied
mately the first third of the course is devoted to developing
problems in probability and statistics encountered in the
a working knowledge of the LISP programming language.
physical and social sciences, as well as engineering. Topics
The remainder of the course is devoted to exploring various
covered include combinatorics, axioms of probability,
Artificial Intelligence applications such as computer vision,
conditional probability and independence, discrete and
speech analysis, speech generation, robotics, reasoning,
continuous probability density functions, expectation,
knowledge representation, natural language processing and
jointly distributed random variables, Central Limit Theorem,
expert systems. Prerequisite: MACS262, MACS358. 3
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
103

laws of large numbers. Prerequisite: MACS323. 3 hours
assumptions and models. Prerequisite: Consent of depart-
lecture; 3 semester hours.
ment. 1 hour seminar; 1 semester hour.
MACS435. INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL
MACS462. SENIOR SEMINAR II (II) 1 hour seminar; 1
STATISTICS (II) An introduction to statistical theory
semester hour.
essential to applied problems in probability and statistics
MACS498. SPECIAL TOPICS (I, II, S) Selected topics
encountered in the fields of pure and applied science, as
chosen from special interests of instructor and students.
well as engineering. Topics covered include sampling
Prerequisite: Consent of Department Head. 1 to 3 semester
distributions, methods of point estimation, methods of
hours.
internval estimation, significance testing for population
means and variances and goodness of fit, linear regression,
Graduate Courses
analysis of variance. Prerequisite: MACS434. 3 hours
500-level courses are open to qualified seniors with the
lecture; 3 semester hours.
permission of the department and Dean of Graduate School.
MACS440. PARALLEL COMPUTING FOR SCIENTISTS
MACS500. LINEAR VECTOR SPACES (I) Finite
AND ENGINEERS (I) This course introduces all scientists
dimensional vector spaces and subspaces: dimension, dual
and engineers to parallel computing. Students have access to
bases, annihilators. Linear transformations, matrices,
state-of-the-art supercomputers and are taught how to solve
projections, change of basis, similarity. Determinants,
scientific problems on the machines. They are introduced to
eigenvalues, multiplicity. Jordan form. Inner products and
various software and hardware issues related to high
inner product spaces with orthogonality and completeness.
performance computing. Prerequisite: Programming
Prerequisite: MACS401. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
experience in C, consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
MACS502. REAL AND ABSTRACT ANALYSIS (II)
semester hours.
Introduction to metric and topological spaces. Lebesgue
MACS441. COMPUTER GRAPHICS (II) Data structures
measure and measurable functions and sets. Types of
suitable for the representation of structures, maps, three-
convergence, Lebesgue integration and its relation to other
dimensional plots. Algorithms required for windowing,
integrals. Integral convergence theorems. Absolute
color plots, hidden surface and line, perspective drawings.
continuity and related concepts. Prerequisite: MACS401. 3
Survey of graphics software and hardware systems.
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisite: MACS262. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MACS503. FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS (I) Normed linear
MACS442. OPERATING SYSTEMS (I,II) Covers the basic
spaces, linear operators on normed linear spaces, Banach
concepts and functionality of batch, timesharing and single-
spaces, inner product and Hilbert spaces, orthonormal bases,
user operating system components, file systems, processes,
duality, orthogonality, adjoint of a linear operator, spectral
protection and scheduling. Representative operating systems
analysis of linear operators. Prerequisite: MACS502. 3
are studied in detail. Actual operating system components
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
are programmed on a representative processor. This course
MACS506. COMPLEX ANALYSIS II (II) Analytic
provides insight into the internal structure of operating
functions. Conformal mapping and applications. Analytic
systems; emphasis is on concepts and techniques which are
continuation. Schlicht functions. Approximation theorems
valid for all computers. Prerequisite: MACS262,
in the complex domain. Prerequisite: MACS454. 3 hours
MACS341.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
MACS454. COMPLEX ANALYSIS I (I) The complex
MACS510. ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
plane. Analytic functions, harmonic functions. Mapping by
AND DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS (I) Topics to be covered:
elementary functions. Complex integration, power series,
basic existence and uniqueness theory, systems of equations,
calculus of residues. Conformal mapping. Prerequisite:
stability, differential inequalities, Poincare-Bendixon theory,
MACS315. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
linearization. Other topics from: Hamiltonian systems,
MACS455. PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (II)
periodic and almost periodic systems, integral manifolds,
Review of partial differentiation. Linear partial differential
Lyapunov functions, bifurcations, homoclinic points and
equations of the first and second order emphasizing the heat
chaos theory. Prerequisite: MACS315 and MACS332 or
equation, wave equation, and potential equation. Methods
equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
including separation of variables with Fourier series, Sturm-
MACS514. APPLIED MATHEMATICS I (I) The major
Liouville techniques, and procedures to analyze forcing
theme in this course is various non-numerical techniques for
functions. Prerequisite: MACS315. 3 hours lecture; 3
dealing with partial differential equations which arise in
semester hours.
science and engineering problems. Topics include transform
MACS461. SENIOR SEMINAR I (I) Students present
techniques, Green’s functions and partial differential
topics using undergraduate mathematical and computer
equations. Stress is on applications to boundary value
sciences techniques, emphasizing critical analysis of
problems and wave theory. Prerequisite: MACS454 and
MACS455 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
104
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

MACS515. APPLIED MATHEMATICS II (II) Topics
other than Mathematics. Prerequisite: MACS213 or
include integral equations, applied complex variables, an
equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
introduction to asymptotics, linear spaces and the calculus
MACS531. STATISTICAL METHODS II (II, S) Continua-
of variations. Stress is on applications to boundary value
tion of MCSN530. Multiple regression and trend surface
problems and wave theory, with additional applications to
analysis. Analysis of variance. Experimental design (latin
engineering and physical problems. Prerequisite:
squares, factorial designs, confounding, fractional replica-
MACS514. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
tion, etc.) Nonparametric analysis of variance. Topics
MACS518 (GPHY508). BOUNDARY VALUE PROB-
selected from multivariate analysis, sequential analysis or
LEMS IN OCEAN ACOUSTICS AND SEISMOLOGY
time series analysis. Prerequisite: MACS323 or 530 or 535.
The application of boundary value methods to problems in
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
wave theory. Specific applications are to propagation of
MACS532. INTRODUCTION TO DATA ANALYSIS (II)
sound in a bounded ocean waveguide, scattering of sound
Multiple linear and curvilinear regression analysis. Trend
from rough boundaries, and the classical boundary value
surfaces and response surfaces. Analysis of variance and
problems of seismology. Both direct and inverse problems
multiple comparison techniques. Meets concurrently with
are treated. Several of the problems are approached from
MAGN531 for five weeks. Prerequisite: MACS323 or 530
both deterministic and statistical points of view. Offered on
or 535. 3 hours lecture (for 5 weeks); 1 semester hour.
demand. Prerequisite: MACS347 and/or consent of
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MACS534. MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS I (I) The
basics of probability, fundamental discrete, and continuous
MACS520. LINEAR PROGRAMMING (I) Convexity and
probability distributions, sampling distributions, including
geometric interpretation of linear programming problems,
order statistics, and basic limit theorems, including the
the simplex method, the revised simplex method, and the
continuity theorem and the central limit theorem, are
product form of the inverse, duality theory, sensitivity
covered. Prerequisite: Consent of department. 3 hours
analysis, complementary slackness and some of its applica-
lecture; 3 semester hours.
tions. Real world problems and analysis of the efficiency of
the algorithms emphasized. Prerequisite: Consent of
MACS535. MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS II (II) The
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
basics of hypothesis testing using likelihood ration, point
and interval estimation, including consistency, efficiency,
MACS521. NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING (II) Neces-
and sufficient statistics, and some nonparametric methods
sary and sufficient conditions for optimality, convex
are presented. Prerequisite: MACS534 or equivalent. 3
functions, optimal search methods, methods of steepest
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
descent, conjugate gradient and quasi-Newton methods,
Kuhn-Tucker theory, Primal methods, Quadratic program-
MACS538. APPLIED MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS (II)
ming, and other specific programming techniques (such as
An introduction to the theory and applications of multivari-
separable programming, linear fractional, and integer) as
ate statistical analysis with an emphasis on its usage as an
time permits. Prerequisite: MACS520 or consent of
exploratory technique. Topics covered include: inference
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
about mean(s) and co-variances, discriminant analysis,
principal component analysis, canonical correlation
MACS525. MATHEMATICAL CONTROL THEORY (II)
analysis, and factor analysis. Computer programs illustrate
This course is concerned with the analysis and design of
the method. Prerequisite: MACS534 or 530 or 535. 3 hours
complicated (e.g., multivariate) dynamic systems. These
lecture; 3 semester hours.
systems are analyzed principally from the time domain
viewpoint (as opposed to the frequency domain approach).
MACS540. STOCHASTIC PROCESSES (II) Poisson
The fundamental concepts discussed are stability, controlla-
processes, renewal theory, and Markov chains are studied
bility, observability; feedback controllers and other optimal
and applied to the theory of queues. Offered in even-
controllers. These concepts are first discussed for linear
numbered years. Prerequisite: MACS534 or equivalent. 3
systems and then extended to nonlinear as time permits.
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
MACS541. QUEUEING THEORY Structure and tech-
semester hours.
niques for the basic theory. Poisson and non-Poisson with
MACS530. STATISTICAL METHODS I (I, S) Introduction
various input and output distributions. Applications and
to probability, random variables, and discrete and continu-
renewal theory. Offered on demand. Prerequisite:
ous probability models. Elementary simulation. Data
MAGN540 or consent of department. 3 hours lecture; 3
summarization and analysis. Confidence intervals and
semester hours.
hypothesis testing for means and variances. Chi square tests.
MACS542. SIMULATION (I) Advanced study of simula-
Distribution-free techniques and regression analysis.
tion techniques, random number, and variate generation.
Intended primarily for graduate students in departments
Monte Carlo techniques, simulation languages, simulation
experimental design, variance reduction, and other methods
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
105

of increasing efficiency, practice on actual problems.
chaos and fractals, solitons, wavelets, chemical reactions,
Offered every other year. Prerequisite: MACS530. 3 hours
population dynamics, pollution models, electrical circuits,
lecture; 3 semester hours.
signal processing, optimization, control theory, and
industrial mathematics. The course is designed for graduate
MACS544. STATISTICAL QUALITY CONTROL This
students and scientists interested in modeling and using
course is designed to build upon the knowledge of probabil-
symbolic software as a programming language and a
ity and statistics gained in MACS530, MACS323, or the
research tool. It is taught in a computer laboratory. Prerequi-
equivalent. The focus is application of that knowledge to
sites: Senior undergraduates need consent of instructor 3
problems of quality control in an industrial setting. The
hours lecture; 3 semester hours
main goals of the course are introduction of the tools and
language of statistical quality control and statistical process
MACS561. THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS OF
control, and to develop skill in their application. Topics to
COMPUTER SCIENCE (I) Mathematical foundations of
be covered include control charting by variables and
computer science. Models of computation, including
attributes, acceptance sampling, process capability, and
automata, pushdown automata and Turing machines.
economic design of quality control programs. Prerequisites:
Language models, including alphabets, strings, regular
MACS323 or MACS530 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3
expressions, grammars, and formal languages. Predicate
semester hours
logic. Complexity analysis. Prerequisite: MACS262,
MACS358. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MACS545. TIME SERIES Data are modeled and the model
is used to forecast future values. The Box-Jenkins approach
MACS563. PARALLEL COMPUTING FOR SCIENTISTS
is used to determine the model form, estimate parameters,
AND ENGINEERS (I) Students are taught how to use
check for fit, and forecast. Economic and physical data are
parallel computing to solve complex scientific problems.
studied. Computer programs illustrate the methods.
They learn how to develop parallel programs, how to
Seasonal and multidimensional transfer function models
analyze their performance, and how to optimize program
generalize the techniques. Taught on demand. Prerequisite:
performance. The course covers the classification of parallel
Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
computers, shared memory versus distributed memory
machines, software issues, and hardware issues in parallel
MACS547. SPECTRAL ANALYSIS Frequency domain
computing. Students write programs for state of the art high
description of data are considered. The important cycles
performance supercomputers, which are accessed over the
present in data are identified. The statistical problems in
network. Prerequisite: Programming experience in C,
estimation are approached by windowing. Physical and
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 1 hour seminar; 4
economic data are analyzed. Taught on demand. Prerequi-
semester hours
site: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MACS565. DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING SYSTEMS (I)
MACS550. NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF PARTIAL
Introduction to the design and use of distributed computer
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (II) Numerical methods for
systems based on networks of workstations and server
solving partial differential equations. Explicit and implicit
computers. Topics include theory, applications, systems and
finite difference methods; stability, convergence, and
case studies describing current approaches. Prerequisites:
consistency. Alternating direction implicit (ADI) methods.
Undergraduate machine architecture or consent of instructor.
Weighted residual and finite element methods. Prerequisite:
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
MACS315, MACS332, or consent of instructor. 3 hours
lecture; 3 semester hours.
MACS566. ADVANCED DATABASE MANAGEMENT
(II) Advanced issues in database management, with
MACS551. COMPUTATIONAL LINEAR ALGEBRA (II)
emphasis on their application to scientific data. Topics to be
Numerical analysis of algorithms for solving linear systems
covered include: object-oriented database management,
of equations, least squares methods, the symmetric
database rules, distributed databases, database management
eigenproblem, singular value decomposition, conjugate
systems implementation, and management of scientific data.
gradient iteration. Modification of algorithms to fit the
Each student develops a course project, as a vehicle for
architecture. Error analysis, existing software packages.
exploring and applying a database research issue chosen by
Prerequisites: MACS332, MACS407, or consent of
the student. An object-oriented database management
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
system is used in assignments. Prerequisite: MACS403 or
MACS556. MODELING WITH SYMBOLIC SOFTWARE
equivalent 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
(I) Case studies of various models from mathematics, the
MACS567. ADVANCED OBJECT ORIENTED SOFT-
sciences and engineering through the use of a symbolic
WARE ENGINEERING (I) Advanced software engineering
software package, such as MATHEMATICA, MAPLE, or
concepts, with emphasis on how to develop object-oriented
MACSYMA. Based on hands-on projects dealing with
application programs. The entire software lifecycle is
contemporary topics such as number theory, discrete
discussed: requirements analysis, program design, imple-
mathematics, complex analysis, special functions, classical
mentation, debugging and testing. Seamless program
and quantum mechanics, relativity, dynamical systems,
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development is emphasized, in which the development
only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit;
process is an incremental refinement of a computer model of
1 to 6 credit hours.
real-world objects. Examples in the course are from
MACS599. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
scientific application programs. The object-oriented use of
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
the C++ language is taught and used in assignments.
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
Prerequisite: Knowledge of C or C++. 3 hours lecture; 3
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
semester hours.
‘Independent Study’ form must be completed and submitted
MACS570. NEURAL NETWORKS (II) This course
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
explores the theory behind neural networks, and focuses on
MACS610. ADVANCED TOPICS IN DIFFERENTIAL
the application of this technology to real problems in areas
EQUATIONS (II) Topics from current research in ordinary
as diverse as DNA pattern recognition, robot control,
and/or partial differential equations; for example, dynamical
hazardous waste remediation, and forensics. For the
systems, advanced asymptotic analysis, nonlinear wave
prepared student, this course also facilitates a transition
propagation, solitons. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3
from doing coursework to producing publishable research.
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Skills required to understand, critique, and extend existing
research are emphasized. An introductory series of lectures
MACS614. ADVANCED TOPICS IN APPLIED MATH-
is followed by more in-depth study of current research
EMATICS (I) Topics from current literature in applied
topics. Depending on a student’s background, the course
mathematics; for example, wavelets and their applications,
project is either a literature survey or application or
calculus of variations, advanced applied functional analysis,
exploration of a neural network method of the student’s
control theory. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
choice. Prerequisite: MACS404. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
lecture; 3 semester hours.
hours.
MACS616. INTRODUCTION TO MULTI-DIMEN-
MACS571. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (I) Artificial
SIONAL SEISMIC INVERSION (I) Introduction to high
Intelligence (AI) is the subfield of computer science that
frequency inversion techniques. Emphasis on the application
studies how to automate tasks for which people currently
of this theory to produce a reflector map of the earth’s
exhibit superior performance over computers. Historically,
interior and estimates of changes in earth parameters across
AI has studied problems such as machine learning, language
those reflectors from data gathered in response to sources at
understanding, game playing, planning, robotics, and
the surface or in the interior of the earth. Extensions to
machine vision. AI techniques include those for uncertainty
elastic media are discussed, as well. Includes high frequency
management, automated theorem proving, heuristic search,
modeling of the propagation of acoustic and elastic waves.
neural networks, and simulation of expert performance in
Prerequisites: partial differential equations, wave equation
specialized domains like medical diagnosis. This course
in the time or frequency domain, complex function theory,
provides an overview of the field of Artificial Intelligence.
contour integration. Some knowledge of wave propagation:
Particular attention will be paid to learning the LISP
reflection, refraction, diffraction. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
language for AI programming. Prerequisite: MACS262. 3
hours
hours lecture;3 semester hours
MACS650. ADVANCED TOPICS IN NUMERICAL
MACS574. AI IN ROBOTICS AND COMPUTER VISION
ANALYSIS (II) Topics from the current literature in
(II) Advanced treatment of Artificial Intelligence techniques
numerical analysis and/or computational mathematics; for
in robotics and computer vision. Lectures cover the
example, advanced finite element method, sparse matrix
commonly used techniques in robotics and computer vision
algorithms, applications of approximation theory, software
as well as new AI approaches to higher cognitive functions
for initial value ODE’s, numerical methods for integral
such as planning and problem solving. Theory behind
equations. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
current robot architectures and image understanding systems
lecture; 3 semester hours
is emphasized through supplementary readings and case
MACS660. ADVANCED TOPICS IN COMPUTER
studies, discussed in a weekly seminar format. The course
SYSTEMS (II) Topics from the current literature in
supplements the strong theoretical focus with a hands-on
hardware and software computer systems; for example, user
project with one or more mobile robots and sensors. Field
interfaces, object oriented software engineering, database
trips are arranged to local industries which manufacture or
management, computer architectures, supercomputing,
use robots. Prerequisite: MACS404, knowledge of C
parallel processing, distributed processing, and algorithms.
programming language. 3 hours lecture, 1 hour seminar; 4
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
semester hours
semester hours
MACS598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MATHEMATICAL
MACS671. ADVANCED TOPICS IN ARTIFICIAL
AND COMPUTER SCIENCES (I, II) Pilot course or
INTELLIGENCE (I) Topics from the current literature in
special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests
artificial intelligence; for example, robotics, neural net-
of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
107

works, robotics, expert systems, knowledge systems and
Metallurgical and
evidential reasoning. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3
Materials Engineering
hours lecture; 3 semester hours
JOHN J. MOORE, Professor and Department Head
MACS691. GRADUATE SEMINAR (I) Presentation of
GLEN R. EDWARDS, Professor
latest research results by guest lecturers, staff, and advanced
JOHN P. HAGER, Professor
students. Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1 hour
STEPHEN LIU, Professor
seminar; 1 semester hour.
GERARD P. MARTINS, Professor
MACS692. GRADUATE SEMINAR (II) Presentation of
DAVID K. MATLOCK, Professor
latest research results by guest lecturers, staff, and advanced
DAVID L. OLSON, Professor
students. Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1 hour
DENNIS W. READEY, Professor
seminar; 1 semester hour.
JOHN G. SPEER, Professor
CHESTER J. VANTYNE, Professor
MACS693/GPHY562. WAVE PHENOMENA SEMINAR
BAKI YARAR, Professor
(I, II) Current research topics in wave phenomena, largely in
ROBERT H. FROST, Associate Professor
the context of mathematical geophysics. Wave propagation
BRAJENDRA MISHRA, Associate Professor
in fluids and elastic media. Direct modeling, inversion,
IVAR E. REIMANIS, Associate Professor
computer implementation. Prerequisite: Consent of
STEVEN W. THOMPSON, Associate Professor
instructor. 1 hour seminar; 1 semester hour.
KELLY T. MILLER, Assistant Professor
MACS698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MATHEMATICAL
FREDERICK J. FRAIKOR, Research Professor
AND COMPUTER SCIENCES (I, II) Pilot course or
C. SURYANARAYANA, Research Professor
special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests
LIVIV-IVLIAN PALADE, Research ASsistant Professor
of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered
JOHN P. WISE, Research Assistant Professor
only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit;
ELI MATEEVA, Research Associate
1 to 6 credit hours.
GEORGE S. ANSELL, President and Professor Emeritus
W. REX BULL, Professor Emeritus
MACS699. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
GEORGE KRAUSS, Professor University Emeritus
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
WILLIAM M. MUELLER, Vice President for Academic Affairs
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
and Professor Emeritus
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
Degrees Offered:
‘Independent Study’ form must be completed and submitted
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Master of Science (Metallurgical and Materials Engi-
neering)
MACS701. GRADUATE THESIS-MASTER OF SCIENCE
Master of Engineering (Metallurgical and Materials
(I, II) Preparation of the master’s thesis under the supervi-
Engineering)
sion of the graduate student’s advisory committee. 6
semester hours upon completion of thesis. Required of all
Doctor of Philosophy (Metallurgical and Materials
candidates for the degree of Master of Science.
Engineering)
MACS703. GRADUATE THESIS-DOCTOR OF PHI-
Program Description:
LOSOPHY (I, II) Preparation of the doctor’s thesis under
The program of study for the Master of Science or
the supervision of the graduate student’s advisory commit-
Doctor of Philosophy degree in Metallurgical and Materials
tee. 30 semester hours upon completion of thesis.
Engineering is selected by the student in consultation with
her or his advisor, and with the approval of the Thesis
Committee. The program can be tailored within the
framework of the rules of the Graduate School to match the
student’s interests while maintaining the main theme of
materials engineering and processing. There are three Areas
of Specialization within the Department: Physical and
Mechanical Metallurgy; Physicochemical Processing of
Materials; and, Ceramic Engineering.
The Department is home to five research centers: the
Advanced Coatings and Surface Engineering Laboratory, the
Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research Center;
the Colorado Center for Advanced Ceramics; the Center for
Welding and Joining Research; and, the Kroll Institute for
Extractive Metallurgy.
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Program Requirements:
Prerequisites:
The program requirements for the three graduate degrees
The entering graduate-student in the Department of
offered by the Department are listed below:
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering must have
Master of Engineering degree: i) a minimum of 36
completed an undergraduate program equivalent to that
semester hours of acceptable course work; and, ii)
required for the B.S. degree in: Metallurgical and Materials
submittal and successful defense of an engineering
Engineering, Materials Science or a related field. This
report, which presents the results of original research/
should have included a background in science fundamentals
case-study or engineering development (3 semester
and engineering principles. A student who possesses this
hours).
background but has not taken specific undergraduate-
courses in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, will be
Master of Science degree: i) a minimum of 24 semester
allowed to make up these course-deficiencies at the
hours of acceptable course work; and, ii) submittal
beginning of their program of study.
and successful defense of a thesis, which presents the
results of original scientific research or development.
Fields of Research:
Synthesis, processing, and characterization of photovoltaic
Doctor of Philosophy degree: i) a minimum of 42
materials
semester hours of acceptable course work, which may
Optical phenomena of interfaces and composites
include course credits (to be approved by the Thesis
High-Tc superconductors
Committee) presented for the Master’s degree,
Dielectrics and piezoelectrics
provided that degree was in Metallurgical and
Glasses and crystallizable glasses for electronics
Materials Engineering or a similar field. However, at
Ferroelectrics and ferroelectric thin films
least 21 hours of acceptable course work must be
Porous ceramics and ceramic fibers
taken at the Colorado School of Mines; ii) a mini-
Combustion synthesis of advanced materials
mum of 12 semester hours of acceptable course work
Welding and joining of metals and dissimilar materials
in a minor field of study; iii) a passing grade on the
including ceramics and composites
Comprehensive Examinations; and, iv) submittal and
Laser Processing of Materials
successful defense of a thesis, which presents the
Physical metallurgy
results of original scientific research or development.
Mechanical metallurgy
Notes: a) The minor may include course work in
Processing microstructure, and properties of advanced steels
departments outside the Metallurgical and Materials
Oxidation and corrosion of metals and ceramics
Engineering Department, or from one of the Areas of
Interfacial phenomena
Specialization within the Department different from that
Surface characterization of materials
selected by the student as his/her major option. The minor
Composite materials
must be approved by the student’s Doctoral Committee and
Preparation of ceramic powders
the committee member delegated to represent the Minor
Mineral processing
Department.
Flotation and flocculation
b) The comprehensive examinations are specific to the
Pyro-, hydro-, and electro-metallurgy
student’s declared Area of Specialization, and consist of a
Processing of industrial wastes
written and oral component. The written examinations
Plasma synthesis and processing
consist of a general-topics examination and an area-of-
Computer simulation techniques for design of new high-
specialization examination. The oral examination consists
performance materials
of responses by the student to questions on the background,
Thin film/coating, processing, and characterization
rationale and fundamentals related to the student’s research.
Environmentally benign materials processes
A written document summarizing the student’s research is
Semiconductor materials
presented to the Examining Committee (different from the
Powder metallurgy
Thesis Committee) prior to this event. The student delivers
Aerospace structural materials
an oral presentation, reviewing the document at the start of
Failure analysis and fracture mechanics of materials
the (oral) examination. There is a standing schedule to offer
Forming of metals and other materials
the examinations during the last four to five weeks of the
Fatigue of materials
Spring and Fall semesters. However, intent to take the
Description of Courses
examinations must be declared within the first month of the
Undergraduate Courses
intended semester.
A maximum of nine hours of 400-level credits may, with
c) Although there is no formal seminar-course require-
the approval of the Thesis Committee, be applied towards
ment, graduate students, as part of their professional
the course-work requirement for a Master’s degree.
development, are expected to attend the Department
MTGN412/MLGN512.CERAMIC ENGINEERING (II)
seminars scheduled on Thursdays during the Fall and Spring
Application of engineering principles to nonmetallic and
semesters.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
109

ceramic materials. Processing of raw materials and produc-
MTGN421. FLOTATION (I) Solution chemistry and surface
tion of ceramic bodies, glazes, glasses, enamels, and
chemistry as related to froth flotation. Absorption, interfa-
cermets. Firing processes and reactions in glass bonded as
cial free energy, flocculation, and dispersion and flotation
well as mechanically bonded systems. Prerequisite:
kinetics. Prerequisite: MTGN331. Co-requisite: MTGN423
MTGN348. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
MTGN414/MLGN544. PROCESSING OF CERAMICS (II)
MTGN422. PROCESS ANALYSIS AND DEVELOP-
Principles of ceramic processing and the relationship
MENT (II) Aspects of process development, plant design,
between processing and microstructure. Raw materials and
and management. Prerequisite: MTGN331. Co-requisite:
raw materials preparation, forming and fabrication, thermal
MTGN424 or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture; 2
processing, and finishing of ceramic materials will be
semester hours.
covered. Principles will be illustrated by case studies on
MTGN423. FLOTATION LABORATORY (I) Experiments
specific ceramic materials. A project to design a ceramic
to accompany the lectures in MTGN421. Co-requisite:
fabrication process is required. Field trips to local ceramic
MTGN421 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lab; 1 semester
manufacturing operations are included. Prerequisites:
hour.
MTGN311, MTGN331, and MTGN412/MLGN512 or
consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MTGN424. PROCESS ANALYSIS AND DEVELOP-
MENT LABORATORY (II) Projects to accompany the
MTGN415/MLGN515. ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES AND
lectures in MTGN422. Prerequisite: MTGN422 or consent
APPLICATIONS OF MATERIALS (II) Survey of the
of instructor. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
electrical properties of materials, and the applications of
materials as electrical circuit components. The effects of
MTGN429. METALLURGICAL ENVIRONMENT (I) This
chemistry, processing, and microstructure on the electrical
course covers studies of the interface between metallurgical
properties will be discussed, along with the functions,
process engineering and environmental engineering areas.
performance requirements, and testing methods of materials
Wastes, effluents and their point sources in metallurgical
for each type of circuit component. The general topics
processes such as mineral concentration, value extraction
covered are conductors, resistors, insulators, capacitors,
and process metallurgy are studied in context. Fundamentals
energy convertors, magnetic materials, and integrated
of metallurgical unit operations and unit processes with
circuits. Prerequisite: PHGN200, MTGN311 or MLGN501,
those applicable to waste and effluent control, disposal and
MTGN412/MLGN512, or consent of instructor. 3 hours
materials recycling are covered. Engineering design and
lecture; 3 semester hours.
engineering cost components are also included for some
examples chosen. The ratio of fundamentals to applications
MTGN416/MLGN516. PROPERTIES OF CERAMICS (II)
coverage is about 1:1. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. 3
Survey of the properties of ceramic materials and how these
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
properties are determined by the chemical structure
(composition), crystal structure, and the microstructure of
MTGN430. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY OF IRON AND
crystalline ceramics and glasses. Thermal, optical, and
STEELMAKING (I) Physical chemistry principles of blast
mechanical properties of single-phase and multiphase
furnace and direct reduction production of iron and refining
ceramics, including composites, are covered. Prerequisites:
of iron to steel. Discussion of raw materials, productivity,
PHGN200, MTGN311 or MLGN501, MTGN412 or consent
impurity removal, deoxidation, alloy additions, and ladle
of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
metallurgy. Prerequisite: MTGN334. 3 hours lecture; 3
semester hours.
MTGN417. REFRACTORY MATERIALS (I) Refractory
materials in metallurgical construction. Oxide phase
MTGN431. HYDRO- AND ELECTROMETALLURGY (I)
diagrams to explain the behavior of metallurgical slags in
Physical and chemical principles involved in the extraction
contact with materials of construction. Prerequisite: Consent
and refining of metals by hydro- and electrometallurgical
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
techniques. Discussion of unit processes in hyrdometallurgy,
electrowinning, and electrorefining. Analysis of integrated
MTGN419/MLGN519. NON-CRYSTALLINE MATERI-
flowsheets for the recovery of nonferrous metals. Prerequi-
ALS (I) An introduction to the principles of glass science-
site: MTGN334, MTGN351, MTGN461, MTGN352. Co-
and-engineering and non-crystalline materials in general.
requisite: MTGN433 or consent of instructor. 2 hours
Glass formation, structure, crystallization, and properties
lecture; 2 semester hours.
will be covered, along with a survey of commercial glass
compositions, manufacturing processes, and applications.
MTGN432. PYROMETALLURGY (II) Extraction and
Prerequisites: MTGN311 or MLGN501, MTGN412/
refining of metals including emerging practices. Modifica-
MLGN512, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
tions driven by environmental regulations and by energy
semester hours.
minimization. Analysis and design of processes and the
impact of economic considerations. Prerequisite:
MTGN334. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
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MTGN433. HYDRO- AND ELECTROMETALLURGY
will be carried out by graphical and statistical techniques.
LABORATORY (I) Experiments to accompany the lectures
Computer software will be utilized for statistical process
in MTGN431. Co-requisite: MTGN431 or consent of
control and for the design and analysis of experiments.
instructor.
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3
semester hours
MTGN434. DESIGN AND ECONOMICS OF METAL-
LURGICAL PLANTS (II) Design of metallurgical process-
MTGN451. CORROSION ENGINEERING (II) Principles
ing systems. Methods for estimating process costs and
of electrochemistry. Corrosion mechanisms. Methods of
profitability. Performance, selection, and design of process
corrosion protection including cathodic and anodic
equipment. Integration of process units into a working plant
protection and coatings. Examples, from various industries,
and its economics, construction, and operation. Market
of corrosion problems and solutions. Prerequisite:
research and surveys. Prerequisite: MTGN351 or consent of
MTGN351. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MTGN452. CERAMIC AND METAL MATRIX COMPOS-
MTGN436. CONTROL AND INSTRUMENTATION OF
ITES Introduction to the synthesis, processing, structure,
METALLURGICAL PROCESSES (II) Analysis of
properties and performance of ceramic and metal matrix
processes for metal extraction and refining using classical
composites. Survey of various types of composites, and
and direct-search optimization methods and classical
correlation between processing, structural architecture and
process control with the aid of chemical functions and
properties. Prerequisites: MTGN311, MTGN331,
thermodynamic transfer operations. Examples from
MTGN348, MTGN351. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
processes in physicochemical and physical metallurgy.
MTGN453. PRINCIPLES OF INTEGRATED CIRCUIT
Prerequisite: MTGN438 or consent of instructor. 2 hours
PROCESSING (I) An introduction to the electrical
lecture; 2 semester hours.
conductivity of semiconductor materials; qualitative
MTGN438. CONTROL AND INSTRUMENTATION OF
discussion of active semiconductor devices; discussion of
METALLURGICAL PROCESSES LABORATORY (II)
the steps in integrated circuit fabrication; detailed investiga-
Experiments to accompany the lectures in MTGN436.
tion of the materials science and engineering principles
Prerequisite: MTGN436 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
involved in the various steps of VLSI device fabrication; a
lab; 1 semester hour.
presentation of device packaging techniques and the
processes and principles involved. Prerequisite: Consent of
MTGN442. ALLOY AND PHASE STABILITY (II) Phase
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
equilibrium of solid solutions, primary and intermediate
phases, binary and ternary phase equilibrium diagrams,
MTGN456. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY (II) Introduction
multicomponent systems. Phase transformations in ferrous
to electron optics and the design and application of
alloys, hardenability, heat treatment, surface modification,
transmission and scanning electron microscopes. Interpreta-
alloying of steel, precipitation alloys and alloy design for
tion of images produced by various contrast mechanisms.
cast irons, stainless steels, and tool steels. Prerequisite:
Electron diffraction analysis and the indexing of electron
MTGN348 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
diffraction patterns. Laboratory exercises to illustrate
semester hours.
specimen preparation techniques, microscope operation, and
the interpretation of images produced from a variety of
MTGN445/MLGN505. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF
specimens. Prerequisite: MTGN311 or consent of instructor.
MATERIALS (I) Mechanical properties and relationships.
Co-requisite: MTGN458. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
Plastic deformation of crystalline materials. Relationships of
microstructures to mechanical strength. Fracture, creep, and
MTGN458. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY LABORATORY
fatigue. Prerequisite: MTGN348. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours
(II) Experiments to accompany the lectures in MTGN456.
lab; 4 semester hours.
Co-requisite: MTGN456. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
MTGN450/MLGN550. STATISTICAL PROCESS
MTGN461.TRANSPORT PHENOMENA AND REACTOR
CONTROL AND DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS (I) An
DESIGN FOR METALLURGICAL-AND-MATERIALS
introduction to statistical process control, process capability
ENGINEERS (I) Introduction to the conserved-quantities:
analysis and experimental design techniques. Statistical
momentum, heat, and mass transfer, and application of
process control theory and techniques will be developed and
chemical kinetics to elementary reactor-design. Examples
applied to control charts for variables and attributes
from materials processing and process metallurgy. Molecu-
involved in process control and evaluation. Process
lar transport properties: viscosity, thermal conductivity, and
capability concepts will be developed and applied for the
mass diffusivity of materials encountered during processing
evaluation of manufacturing processes. The theory and
operations. Uni-directional transport: problem formulation
application of designed experiments will be developed and
based on the required balance of the conserved-quantity
applied for full factorial experiments, fractional factorial
applied to a control-volume. Prediction of velocity,
experiments, screening experiments, multilevel experiments
temperature and concentration profiles. Equations of
and mixture experiments. Analysis of designed experiments
change: continuity, motion, and energy. Transport with two
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
111

independent variables (unsteady-state behavior). Interphase
MTGN477. METALLURGY OF WELDING LABORA-
transport: dimensionless correlations - friction factor, heat,
TORY (I) Experiments to accompany the lectures in
and mass transfer coefficients. Elementary concepts of
MTGN475. Prerequisite: MTGN475. 3 hours lab; 1
radiation heat-transfer. Flow behavior in packed beds.
semester hour.
Design equations for: Continuous-Flow/Batch Reactors with
MTGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METALLURGICAL
Uniform Dispersion and Plug Flow Reactors. Digital
AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING (I, II) Pilot course or
computer methods for the design of metallurgical systems.
special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests
Laboratory sessions devoted to: Tutorials/Demonstrations to
of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered
facilitate the understanding of concepts related to selected
only once. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 1 to 3
topics; and, Projects with the primary focus on the operating
semester hours.
principles and use of modern electronic-instrumentation for
measurements on lab-scale systems in conjunction with
MTGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Independent
correlation and prediction strategies for analysis of results.
advanced-work leading to a comprehensive report. This
Prerequisites: MACS315, MTGN351 and MTGN352. 2
work may take the form of conferences, library, and
hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
laboratory work. Choice of problem is arranged between
student and a specific Department faculty-member.
MTGN463. POLYMER ENGINEERING (I) Introduction to
Prerequisite: Selection of topic with consent of faculty
the structure and properties of polymeric materials, their
supervisor; “Independent Study Form” must be completed
deformation and failure mechanisms, and the design and
and submitted to Registrar. 1 to 3 semester hours for each of
fabrication of polymeric end items. The molecular and
two semesters.
crystallographic structures of polymers will be developed
and related to the elastic, viscoelastic, yield and fracture
Graduate Courses
properties of polymeric solids and reinforced polymer
Most courses are offered once every two years. However,
composites. Emphasis on forming and joining techniques
those courses offered for which fewer than five students
for end item fabrication including: extrusion, injection
have registered may be cancelled that semester. Courses at
molding, reaction injection molding, thermoforming, and
the 500-level are open to qualified seniors with approval of
blow molding. The design of end items will be considered in
the Department and the Dean of the Graduate School.
relation to: materials selection, manufacturing engineering,
Courses at the 600-level are open only to graduate students
properties, and applications. Prerequisite: Consent of
in good standing. A two-year course-schedule is available in
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
the Department office.
MTGN464. FORGING AND FORMING (II) Introduction
MTGN5ll. SPECIAL METALLURGICAL AND MATERI-
to plasticity. Survey and analysis of working operations of
ALS ENGINEERING PROBLEMS (I) Independent
forging, extrusion, rolling, wire drawing and sheet metal
advanced work, not leading to a thesis. This may take the
forming. Metallurgical structure evolution during working.
form of conferences, library, and laboratory work. Selection
Prerequisites: EGGN320 and MTGN348 or EGGN390. 2
of assignment is arranged between student and a specific
hours lecture; 3 hours lab, 3 semester hours.
Department faculty-member. Prerequisite: Selection of topic
with consent of faculty supervisor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
MTGN466. DESIGN: SELECTION AND USE OF
MATERIALS (II) Selection of alloys for specific applica-
MTGN512. SPECIAL METALLURGICAL AND MATERI-
tions, designing for corrosion resistant service, concept of
ALS ENGINEERING PROBLEMS (II) Continuation of
passivity, designing for wear resistant service, designing for
MTGN511. Prerequisite: Selection of topic with consent of
high temperature service and designing for high strength/
faculty supervisor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
weight applications. Introduction to the aluminum, copper,
MTGN514. DEFECT CHEMISTRY AND TRANSPORT
nickel, cobalt, stainless steel, cast irons, titanium and
PROCESSES IN CERAMIC SYSTEMS (I) Ceramic
refractory metal alloy-systems. Coating science and
materials science in the area of structural imperfections,
selection. Prerequisite: MTGN348. 1 hour lecture, 6 hours
their chemistry, and their relation to mass and charge
lab; 3 semester hours.
transport; defects and diffusion, sintering, and grain growth
MTGN475. METALLURGY OF WELDING (I) Introduc-
with particular emphasis on the relation of fundamental
tion to welding processesÐthermal aspects; metallurgical
transport phenomena to sintering and microstructure
evaluation of resulting microstructures; attendant phase
development and control. Prerequisites: DCGN209 or
transformations; selection of filler metals; stresses; stress
MTGN351; MT311 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture;
relief and annealing; preheating and post heating; difficul-
3 semester hours. (Fall of odd years only.)
ties and defects; welding ferrous and nonferrous alloys; and,
MTGN516. MICROSTRUCTURE OF CERAMIC
welding tests. Prerequisite: MTGN348. Co-requisite:
SYSTEMS (II) Analysis of the chemical and physical
MTGN477. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
processes controlling microstructure development in
ceramic systems. Development of the glassy phase in
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Graduate Bulletin
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ceramic systems and the resulting properties. Relationship
control, recycling, and waste disposal. Examples which
of microstructure to chemical, electrical, and mechanical
incorporate engineering design and cost components are
properties of ceramics. Application to strengthening and
included. Prerequisites: MTGN331 or consent of instructor.
toughening in ceramic composite system. Prerequisite:
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Graduate status or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
MTGN530. ADVANCED IRON AND STEELMAKING (I)
semester hours. (Spring of even years only.)
Physicochemical principles of gas-slag-metal reactions
MTGN517. REFRACTORIES (I) The manufacture, testing,
applied to the reduction of iron ore concentrates and to the
and use of basic, neutral, acid, and specialty refractories are
refining of liquid iron to steel. The role of these reactions in
considered. Special emphasis is placed on the relationship
reactor design— blast furnace and direct iron smelting
between physical properties of the various refractories and
furnace, pneumatic steelmaking furnace, refining slags,
their uses in the metallurgical industry. Prerequisite:
deoxidation and degassing, ladle metallurgy, alloying, and
Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
continuous casting of steel. Prerequisite: DCGN209 or
MTGN351 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
MTGN518/MLGN518. PHASE EQUILIBRIA IN CE-
semester hours. (Fall of even years only.)
RAMIC SYSTEMS (II) Application of one to four
component oxide diagrams to ceramic engineering prob-
MTGN531. THERMODYNAMICS OF METALLURGI-
lems. Emphasis on refractories and glasses and their
CAL AND MATERIALS PROCESSING (I) Application of
interaction with metallic systems. Prerequisite: Consent of
thermodynamics to the processing of metals and materials,
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of odd
with emphasis on the use of thermodynamics in the
years only.)
development and optimization of processing systems. Focus
areas will include entropy and enthalpy, reaction equilib-
MTGN521. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF SIZE
rium, solution thermodynamics, methods for analysis and
REDUCTION AND SIZE SEPARATION (II) Mathematical
correlation of thermodynamics data, thermodynamic
modeling and simulation of size reduction and size
analysis of phase diagrams, thermodynamics of surfaces,
separation operations. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3
thermodynamics of defect structures, and irreversible
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of odd years only.)
thermodynamics. Attention will be given to experimental
MTGN522. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF MIN-
methods for the measurement of thermodynamic quantities.
ERAL CONCENTRATION (II) Mathematical modeling and
Prerequisite: MTGN351 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
simulation of mineral concentration operations, particularly
lecture; 3 semester hours.
flotation. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.. 3 hours
MTGN534. CASE STUDIES IN PROCESS DEVELOP-
lecture; 3 semester hours.
MENT A study of the steps required for development of a
MTGN523/MLGN523. APPLIED SURFACE AND
mineral recovery process. Technical, economic, and human
SOLUTION CHEMISTRY (II) Solution and surface
factors involved in bringing a process concept into commer-
chemistry of importance in mineral and metallurgical
cial production. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
operations. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.1 3 hours
lecture; 3 semester hours.
lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of odd years only.)
MTGN535. PYROMETALLURGICAL PROCESSES (II)
MTGN524. ADVANCED FLOTATION (II) Advanced
The detailed study of a few processes, illustrating the
treatment of the surface chemistry of froth flotation.
application of the principles of physical chemistry (both
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
thermodynamics and kinetics) and chemical engineering
semester hours.
(heat and mass transfer, fluid flow, plant design, fuel
MTGN527/ESGN562. SOLID WASTE MINIMIZATION
technology, etc.) to practice process development. Prerequi-
AND RECYCLING (II) Industrial case-studies, on the
site: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
application of engineering principles to minimize waste
MTGN536. OPTIMIZATION AND CONTROL OF
formation and to meet solid waste recycling challenges.
METALLURGICAL SYSTEMS Application of modern
Proven and emerging solutions to solid waste environmental
optimization and control theory to the analysis of specific
problems, especially those associated with metals. Prerequi-
systems in extractive metallurgy and mineral processing.
sites: ESGN500 and ESGN504 or consent of instructor. 3
Mathematical modeling, linear control analysis, dynamic
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
response, and indirect optimum seeking techniques applied
MTGN529. METALLURGICAL ENVIRONMENT (I)
to the process analysis of grinding, screening, filtration,
Effluents, wastes, and their point sources associated with
leaching, precipitation of metals from solution, and blast
metallurgical processes, such as mineral concentration and
furnace reduction of metals. Prerequisite: Consent of
values extraction— providing for an interface between
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
metallurgical process engineering and the environmental-
MTGN537. ELECTROMETALLURGY (II) Electrochemi-
engineering areas. Fundamentals of metallurgical unit
cal nature of metallurgical processes. Kinetics of electrode
operations and unit processes, applied to waste and effluents
reactions. Electrochemical oxidation and reduction.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
113

Complex electrode reaction. Mixed potential systems.
forming processes.. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3
Electrode position and optimization of electrometallurgical
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of odd years only.)
processes. Batteries and fuel cells. Some aspects of
MTGN545. FATIGUE AND FRACTURE (I) Basic fracture
corrosion. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
mechanics as applied to engineering material, S-N curves,
lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of even years only.)
the Goodman diagram, stress concentrations, residual stress
MTGN538. HYDROMETALLURGY (II) Kinetics of
effects, effect of material properties on mechanisms of crack
liquid-solid reactions. Theory of uniformly accessible
propagation. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
surfaces. Hydrometallurgy of sulfide and oxides. Cementa-
lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of odd years only.)
tion and hydrogen reduction. Ion exchange and solvent
MTGN546. CREEP AND HIGH TEMPERATURE
extraction. Physicochemical phenomena at high pressures.
MATERIALS (II) Mathematical description of creep
Microbiological metallurgy. Prerequisite: Consent of
process. Mathematical methods of extrapolation of creep
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of odd
data. Micromechanisms of creep deformation, including
years only.)
dislocation glide and grain boundary sliding. Study of
MTGN539. PRINCIPLES OF MATERIALS PROCESSING
various high temperature materials, including iron, nickel,
REACTOR DESIGN (II) Review of reactor types and
and cobalt base alloys and refractory metals, and ceramics.
idealized design equations for isothermal conditions.
Emphasis on phase transformations and microstructure-
Residence time functions for nonreacting and reacting
property relationships. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3
species and its importance to process control. Selection of
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of odd years only.)
reactor type for a given application. Reversible and
MTGN547. PHASE EQUILIBRIUM IN MATERIALS
irreversible reactions in CSTR’s under nonisothermal
SYSTEMS (I) Phase equilibrium of uniary, binary, ternary,
conditions. Heat and mass transfer considerations and
and multicomponent systems, microstructure interpretation,
kinetics of gas-solid reactions applied to fluo-solids type
pressure-temperature diagrams, determination of phase
reactors. Reactions in packed beds. Scale up and design of
diagrams. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
experiments. Brief introduction into drying, crystallization,
lecture; 3 semester hours.
and bacterial processes. Examples will be taken from current
metallurgical practice. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3
MTGN548. TRANSFORMATIONS IN METALS (I)
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of odd years only.)
Surface and interfacial phenomena, order of transformation,
grain growth, recovery, recrystallization, solidification,
MTGN541. INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS OF METALS (I)
phase transformation in solids, precipitation hardening,
The electron theory of metals. Classical and quantum-
spinoidal decomposition, martensitic transformation, gas
mechanical free electron theory. Electrical and thermal
metal reactions. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
conductivity, thermoelectric effects, theory of magnetism,
lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of odd years only.)
specific heat, diffusion, and reaction rates. Prerequisite:
MTGN445. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MTGN549. CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS IN FERROUS
ALLOYS (I) Development and review of solid state
MTGN542. ALLOYING THEORY, STRUCTURE, AND
transformations and strengthening mechanisms in ferrous
PHASE STABILITY (II) Empirical rules and theories
alloys. The application of these principles to the develop-
relating to alloy formation. Various alloy phases and
ment of new alloys and processes such as high strength low
constituents which result when metals are alloyed and
alloy steels, high temperature alloys, maraging steels, and
examined in detail. Current information on solid solutions,
case hardening processes. Prerequisite: MTGN348. 3 hours
intermetallic compounds, eutectics, liquid immiscibility.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisite: MTGN445 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
lecture; 3 semester hours.
MTGN551. ADVANCED CORROSION ENGINEERING
(I) Advanced topics in corrosion engineering. Case studies
MTGN543. THEORY OF DISLOCATIONS (I) Stress field
and industrial application. Special forms of corrosion.
around dislocation, forces on dislocations, dislocation
Advanced measurement technique. Prerequisite: MTGN451.
reactions, dislocation multiplication, image forces, interac-
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of even years only.)
tion with point defects, interpretation of macroscopic
behavior in light of dislocation mechanisms. Prerequisite:
MTGN552/MLGN552. INORGANIC MATRIX COMPOS-
Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ITES Introduction to the processing, structure, properties
(Fall of odd years only.)
and applications of metal matrix and ceramic matrix
composites. Importance of structure and properties of both
MTGN544. FORGING AND DEFORMATION MODEL-
the matrix and the reinforcement and the types of reinforce-
ING (I) An examination of the forging process for the
ment utilized— particulate, short fiber, continuous fiber, and
fabrication of metal components. Techniques used to model
laminates. Emphasis on the development of mechanical
deformation processes including slab equilibrium, slip line,
properties through control of synthesis and processing
upper bound and finite element methods. Application of
parameters. Other physical properties such as electrical and
these techniques to specific aspects of forging and metal
thermal will also be examined. Prerequisite/Co-requisite*:
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MTGN311, MTGN348, MTGN351, MTGN352,
creep, viscoplastic, cyclical hardening and nonisothermal
MTGN445/ML505*; or, consent of instructor. 3 hours
behavior will be discussed. Experimental methods and data
lecture; 3 semester hours. (Summer of even years only.)
analysis to determine various constitutive parameters will be
described. The use of these models in computer codes
MTGN553. STRENGTHENING MECHANISMS(II) Strain
(especially finite element analyses) will be presented.
hardening in polycrystalline materials, dislocation interac-
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
tions, effect of grain boundaries on strength, solid solution
semester hours. (Fall of even years only.)
hardening, martensitic transformations, precipitation
hardening, point defects. Prerequisite: MTGN543 or
MTGN565 MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CERAMICS
concurrent enrollment. 3 hours lecture;3 semester hours.
AND COMPOSITES (I) Mechanical properties of ceramics
(Spring of even years only.)
and ceramic-based composites; brittle fracture of solids;
toughening mechanisms in composites; fatigue, high
MTGN554. OXIDATION OF METALS (II) Kinetics of
temperature mechanical behavior, including fracture, creep
oxidation. The nature of the oxide film. Transport in oxides.
deformation. Prerequisites: MTGN445 or MLGN505, or
Mechanisms of oxidation. The protection of high- tempera-
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall
ture metal systems. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3
of even years only.)
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of even years only.)
MTGN571. METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS
MTGN555/MLGN504. SOLID STATE THERMODYNAM-
ENGINEERING LABORATORY Basic instruction in
ICS (I) Thermodynamics as applied to solid state reactions,
advanced equipment and techniques in the field of mineral
binary and ternary phase diagrams, point, line and planar
processing, extraction, mechanical or physical metallurgy.
defects, interfaces, and electrochemical concepts. Prerequi-
Prerequisite: Selection and consent of faculty instructor. 3 to
site: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
9 lab hours; 1 to 3 semester hours.
MTGN556/MLGN506. TRANSPORT IN SOLIDS (I)
MTGN580. ADVANCED WELDING METALLURGY (II)
Thermal and electrical conductivity. Solid state diffusion in
Weldability, defects, phase transformations, heat flow,
metals and metal systems. Kinetics of metallurgical
preheat treatment, post-heat treatment, heat affected zone,
reactions in the solid state. Prerequisite: Consent of
microstructure, and properties. Prerequisite: Consent of
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of even
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of even
years only.)
years only.)
MTGN557. SOLIDIFICATION (I) Heat flow and fluid flow
MTGN581. WELDING HEAT SOURCES AND INTER-
in solidification, thermodynamics of solidification, nucle-
ACTIVE CONTROLS (I) The science of welding heat
ation and interface kinetics, grain refining, crystal and grain
sources including gas tungsten arc, gas metal arc, electron
growth, constitutional supercooling, eutectic growth,
beam and laser. The interaction of the heat source with the
solidification of castings and ingots, segregation, and
workpiece will be explored and special emphasis will be
porosity. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture;
given to using this knowledge for automatic control of the
3 semester hours. (Fall of odd years only.)
welding process. Prerequisite: Graduate status or consent of
MTGN560. ANALYSIS OF METALLURGICAL FAIL-
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of odd
URES (II) Applications of the principles of physical and
years only.)
mechanical metallurgy to the analysis of metallurgical
MTGN582. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF WELDED
failures. Nondestructive testing. Fractography. Case study
JOINTS (II) Mechanical metallurgy of heterogeneous
analysis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture;
systems, shrinkage, distortion, cracking, residual stresses,
3 semester hours. (Spring of odd years only.)
mechanical testing of joints, size effects, joint design,
MTGN561. PHYSICAL METALLURGY OF ALLOYS
transition temperature, fracture. Prerequisite: Consent of
FOR AEROSPACE (I) Review of current developments in
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of odd
aerospace materials with particular attention paid to titanium
years only.)
alloys, aluminum alloys, and metal-matrix composites.
MTGN583. PRINCIPLES OF NON-DESTRUCTIVE
Emphasis is on phase equilibria, phase transformations, and
TESTING AND EVALUATION (I) Introduction to testing
microstructure-property relationships. Concepts of innova-
methods; basic physical principles of acoustics, radiography,
tive processing and microstructural alloy design are
and electromagnetism; statistical and risk analysis; fracture
included where appropriate. Prerequisite: Consent of
mechanics concepts; design decision making, limitations
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of even
and applications of processes; fitness-for- service evalua-
years only.)
tions. Prerequisite: Graduate status or consent of instructor.
MTGN564 CONSTITUTIVE MODELING OF MATERIAL
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of odd years only.)
BEHAVIOR (I) Examination of various constitutive models
MTGN584. NON-FUSION JOINING PROCESSES (II)
which are used to characterize material behavior. Models for
Joining processes for which the base materials are not
elastic behavior, strain hardening, strain-rate hardening,
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
115

melted. Brazing, soldering, diffusion bonding, explosive
content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ‘Independent Study’
bonding, and adhesive bonding processes. Theoretical
Form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. 1 to
aspects of these processes, as well as the influence of
3 semester hours for each of two semesters.
process parameters. Special emphasis to the joining of
MTGN631. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA IN METAL-
dissimilar materials using these processes. Prerequisite:
LURGICAL AND MATERIALS SYSTEMS Physical
Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
principles of mass, momentum, and energy transport.
(Spring of odd years only.)
Application to the analysis of extractive metallurgy and
MTGN586. DESIGN OF WELDED STRUCTURES AND
other physicochemical processes. Prerequisite: MACS315
ASSEMBLIES Introduction to the concepts and analytical
or equivalent, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
practice of designing weldments. Designing for impact,
semester hours.
fatigue, and torsional loading. Designing of weldments
MTGN671 ADVANCED MATERIALS LABORATORY (I)
using overmatching and undermatching criteria. Analysis of
Experimental and analytical research in the fields of mineral
combined stresses. Designing of compression members,
dressing, production, mechanical, chemical, and/or physical
column bases and splices. Designing of built-up columns,
metallurgy. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to 3
welded plate cylinders, beam-to-column connections, and
semester hours; 3 semester hours.
trusses. Designing for tubular construction. Weld distortion
and residual stresses. Joint design. Process consideration in
MTGN672. ADVANCED MATERIALS LABORATORY
weld design. Welding codes and specifications. Estimation
(II) Continuation of MTGN671. 1 to 3 semester hours.
of welding costs. Prerequisite/Co-requisite: MACS315 or
MTGN696/MLGN696. VAPOR DEPOSITION PRO-
equivalent, EGGN320 or equivalent, MTGN475 or consent
CESSES (II) Introduction to the fundamental physics and
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Summer of
chemistry underlying the control of deposition processes for
odd years only.)
thin films for a variety of applications— corrosion/oxidation
MTGN587. PHYSICAL PHENOMENA OF WELDING
resistance, decorative coatings, electronic and magnetic.
AND JOINING PROCESSES (I) Introduction to arc
Emphasis on the vapor deposition process variables rather
physics, fluid flow in the plasma, behavior of high pressure
than the structure and properties of the thin films. Prerequi-
plasma, cathodic and anodic phenomena, energy generation
sites: MTGN351, MTGN461, or equivalent courses or
and temperature distribution in the plasma, arc stability,
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
metal transfer across arc, electron beam welding processes,
(Summer of odd years only.)
keyhole phenomena. Ohmic welding processes, high
MTGN697. MICROSTRUCTURAL EVOLUTION OF
frequency welding, weld pool phenomena. Development of
COATINGS AND THIN FILMS (I) Introduction to aqueous
relationships between physics concepts and the behavior of
and non-aqueous chemistry for the preparation of an
specific welding and joining processes. Prerequisite/Co-
effective electrolyte; for interpretation of electrochemical
requisite: PHGN300, MACS315, MTGN475, or consent of
principles associated with electrodeposition; surface science
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of even
to describe surface structure and transport; interphasial
years only.)
structure including space charge and double layer concepts;
MTGN591. PHYSICAL PHENOMENA OF COATING
nucleation concepts applied to electrodeposition;
PROCESSES (I) Introduction to plasma physics, behavior
electrocrystallization including growth concepts; factors
of low pressure plasma, cathodic and anodic phenomena,
affecting morphology and kinetics; co-deposition of non-
glow discharge phenomena, glow discharge sputtering,
Brownian particles; pulse electrodeposition; electrodeposi-
magnetron plasma deposition, ion beam deposition, cathodic
tion parameters and control; physical metallurgy of
arc evaporation, electron beam and laser coating processes.
electrodeposits; and, principles associated with vacuum
Development of relationships between physics concepts and
evaporation and sputter deposition. Factors affecting
the behavior of specific coating processes. Prerequisite/Co-
microstructural evolution of vacuum and sputtered deposits;
requisite: PHGN300, MACS315, or consent of instructor. 3
nucleation of vapor and sputtered deposits; modeling of
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of odd years only.)
matter-energy interactions during co-deposition; and,
Thornton’s model for coating growth. Prerequisite/co-
MTGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METALLURGICAL
requisite: MACS315, MTGN351, MTGN352, or consent of
AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING (I,II) Pilot course or
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Summer of
special topics course. Topics chosen according to special
even years only.)
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course
is offered only once. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
MTGN698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METALLURGICAL
Variable hours lecture/lab; 1 to 6 semester hours.
AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING (I, II) Pilot course or
special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests
MTGN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I,II) Individual
of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
only once. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.. 1 to 3
member. Student and instructor to agree on subject matter,
semester hours per semester.
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MTGN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
Mining Engineering
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
TIBOR G. ROZGONYI, Professor and Department Head
member. Student and instructor to agree on subject matter,
M.U. OZBAY, Professor
content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ‘Independent Study’
LEVENT OZDEMIR, Professor and
Form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. 1 to
Director of Earth Mechanics Institute
3 semester hours for each of two semesters.
KADRI DAGDELEN, Associate Professor
MATTHEW J. HREBAR, III, Associate Professor
MTGN70l. GRADUATE THESIS-MASTER OF SCIENCE
MARK KOTCHA, Assistant Professor
(I, II) Master’s thesis supervision by student’s advisor in
MIKLOS D. G. SALAMON, Professor Emeritus
collaboration with the Thesis Committee.
Degrees Offered:
MTGN703. GRADUATE THESIS-DOCTOR OF PHI-
Master of Engineering (Engineer of Mines)
LOSOPHY (I, II) Doctoral thesis supervision by student’s
advisor in collaboration with the Thesis Committee.
Master of Science (Mining and Earth Systems Engineer-
ing)
Doctor of Philosophy (Mining and Earth Systems
Engineering)
Program Description:
The program has two distinctive, but inherently
interwoven specialties.
The Mining Engineering area or specialty is predomi-
nantly for mining engineers and it is directed towards the
traditional mining engineering fields. Graduate work is
normally centered around subject areas such as mine
planning and development and computer aided mine design,
rock mechanics, operations research applied to the mineral
industry, mine mechanization, mine evaluation, finance and
management and similar mining engineering topics.
The Earth Systems Engineering area or specialty is
designed to be distinctly interdisciplinary by merging the
mining engineering fundamentals with civil, geotechnical,
environmental or other engineering into advanced study
tracks in earth (rock) systems, rock mechanics and earth
(rock) structural systems, underground excavation, and
construction systems. This specialty is open for engineers
with different sub-disciplinary backgrounds, but interested
in working and/or considering performing research in
mining, tunneling, excavation and underground construction
areas.
Graduate work is normally centered around subject areas
such as site characterization, environmental aspects,
underground construction and tunneling (including
microtunneling), excavation methods and equipment,
mechnization of mines and underground construction,
environmental and management aspects, modeling and
design in geoengineering.
Program Requirements:
The Master of Science degree in Mining and Earth
Systems Engineering has two options available. Master of
Science - Thesis and Master of Science - Non-Thesis.
Thesis Option requires a minimum of 24 semester credit
hours of course work, approved by student’s graduate
committee, plus a master’s thesis. The Master of Science -
Non-Thesis option must complete a minimum of 36 credit
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
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hours of course work of which 6 credit hours may be
Computerized Mine Design and Related Applications
applied towards the analytical report writing, if required.
(including Geostatistical Modeling)
The Master of Engineering degree (Engineer of Mines)
Advanced Integrated Mining Systems Incorporating
in Mining Engineering includes all the requirements for the
Automation and Robotics
M.S. degree, with the sole exception that an “engineering
Underground Excavation (Tunneling) and Construction
report” is required rather than a Master’s Thesis.
Site Characterization and Geotechnical Investigations,
The Doctor of Philosophy degree in Mining and Earth
Modeling and Design in Geoengineering.
Systems Engineering requires a total of 90 credit hours,
Description of Courses
beyond the bachelor’s degree of which the Ph.D. Thesis
MNGN404. TUNNELING (I) Modern tunneling tech-
shall be no fewer than 30 credit hours. The usual depart-
niques. Emphasis on evaluation of ground conditions,
mental requirement is a minimum of 60 credit hours of
estimation of support requirements, methods of tunnel
course work and 30 credit hours for thesis work. The thesis
driving and boring, design systems and equipment, and
must be successfully defended before a doctoral committee.
safety. Prerequisite: MNGN210, 314. 3 hours lecture; 3
Prerequisites:
semester hours.
Students entering a graduate program for the master’s or
MNGN407. ROCK FRAGMENTATION (II) Theory and
doctor’s degree are expected to have had much the same
application of rock drilling, rock boring, explosives,
undergraduate training as that required at Colorado School
blasting, and mechanical rock breakage. Design of blasting
of Mines in mining, if they are interested in the traditional
rounds, applications to surface and underground excavation.
mining specialty. Students interested in the Earth Systems
Prerequisite: EGGN320 or concurrent enrollment. 3 hours
engineering specialty with different engineering sub-
lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in odd years.
disciplinary background may also require special mining
MNGN414. MINE PLANT DESIGN (I) Analysis of mine
engineering subjects depending upon their graduate
plant elements with emphasis on design. Materials handling
program. Deficiencies if any, will be determined by the
systems, dewatering, hoisting, compressed air, and other
Department of Mining Engineering on the basis of student’s
power systems. Prerequisite: EGGN351, DCGN381 or
education, experience, and graduate study.
EGGN384. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
For specific information on prerequisites, students are
encouraged to refer to a copy of the Mining Department’s
MNGN421. DESIGN OF UNDERGROUND EXCAVA-
Departmental Guidelines and Regulations for Graduate
TIONS (II) Design of underground openings in competent
Students, available from the Mining Department.
and broken ground using rock mechanics principles. Rock
bolting design and other ground support methods. Coal,
Required Curriculum:
evaporite, metallic and nonmetallic deposits included.
All graduate students are required to complete three core
Prerequisite: SYGN101, credit or concurrent enrollment in
courses during their first academic year of study at CSM,
EGGN320. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
depending upon their specialty and background.
MNGN423. SELECTED TOPICS (I, II) Special topics in
These courses are:
mining engineering. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. 1
MNGN505 - Rock Mechanics in Mining
to 3 semester hours.
MNGN512 - Surface Mine Design
MNGN424. MINE VENTILATION (II) Fundamentals of
MNGN516 - Underground Mining
mine ventilation, including control of gas, dust, temperature,
and humidity; stressing analysis and design of systems.
Advanced Soil Mechanics (new, to be advised)
Prerequisite: EGGN351, 371 and MNGN314. 2 hours
Underground Excavation (new, to be advised)
lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
Fundamentals of Engineering Geology (new, to be
MNGN427. MINE VALUATION (I) Course emphasis is on
advised)
the business aspects of mining. Topics include time
In addition, all full-time graduate students are required to
valuation of money and interest formulas, cash flow,
register for and attend MNGN625 - Graduate Mining
investment criteria, tax considerations, risk and sensitivity
Seminar each semester while in residence, except in the case
analysis, escalation and inflation and cost of capital.
of scheduling conflicts with other course(s) approved by the
Calculation procedures are illustrated by case studies.
thesis advisor.
Computer programs are used. Prerequisite: Senior in
Mining, graduate status or consent of instructor. 2 hours
Fields of Research:
lecture; 2 semester hours.
The Mining Engineering Department focuses on the
following fundamental areas:
MNGN428. MINING ENGINEERING EVALUATION
Geomechanics, Rock Mechanics and Stability of
AND DESIGN REPORT I (I) Preparation of phase I
Underground Openings
engineering report based on coordination of all previous
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Colorado School of Mines
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work. Includes mineral deposit selection, geologic descrip-
analysis, macrofab analysis, wedge intersections, monitoring
tion, mining method selection, ore reserve determination,
and maintenance of final pit slopes, classification of slides.
and permit process outline. Emphasis is on detailed mine
Prerequisite: MNGN321, GEOL308 or 309. 2 hours lecture;
design and cost analysis evaluation in preparation for
2 semester hours.
MNGN429. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
MNGN446. SLOPE DESIGN LABORATORY (II)
MNGN429. MINING ENGINEERING EVALUATION
Laboratory and field exercise in slope analysis and design.
AND DESIGN REPORT II (II) Preparation of formal
Collection of data and specimens in the field for laboratory
engineering report based on all course work in the mining
determination of physical properties for determination of
option. Emphasis is on mine design, equipment selection,
slope angle stability. Application of computer software to
production scheduling and evaluation. Prerequisite:
slope stability determination for hard and soft rock environ-
MNGN427, 428. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
ments. Prerequisite: MNGN321 and credit or concurrent
registration in MNGN445. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
MNGN433. MINE SYSTEMS ANALYSIS I (II) Applica-
tion of statistics, systems analysis, and operations research
MNGN482. MINE MANAGEMENT (II) Basic principles
techniques to mineral industry problems. Laboratory work
of successful mine management, supervision, administrative
using computer techniques to improve efficiency of mining
policies, industrial and human engineering. Prerequisite:
operations. Prerequisite: MACS323 or equivalent course in
Senior or graduate status or consent of instructor. 2 hours
statistics; senior or graduate status. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours
lecture; 2 semester hours. Offered in odd years.
lab; 3 semester hours.
MNGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MINING ENGINEER-
MNGN436. UNDERGROUND COAL MINE DESIGN (II)
ING (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics
Design of an underground coal mine based on an actual coal
chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s).
reserve. This course shall utilize all previous course material
Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite:
in the actual design of an underground coal mine. Ventila-
Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
tion, materials handling, electrical transmission and
MNGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
distribution, fluid mechanics, equipment selection and
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
application, mine plant design. Information from all basic
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
mining survey courses will be used. Prerequisite:
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
MNGN316, 321, 414, EGGN329 and DCGN381 or
‘Independent Study’ form must be completed and submitted
EGGN384. Concurrent enrollment with the consent of
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
instructor permitted. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester
hours.
Graduate Courses
500-level courses are open to qualified seniors with
MNGN438. INTRODUCTION TO GEOSTATISTICS (I)
permission of the department and Dean of the Graduate
Introduction to the application and theory of geostatistics in
School. 600-level courses are open only to students enrolled
the mining industry. Review of elementary statistics and
in the Graduate School.
traditional estimations techniques. Variograms, estimation
variance, block variance, kriging, and geostatistical concepts
MNGN501. REGULATORY MINING LAWS AND
are presented. Prerequisite: MACS323 or equivalent. 1 hour
CONTRACTS (I) Basic fundamentals of engineering law,
lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
regulations of federal and state laws pertaining to the
mineral industry and environment control. Basic concepts of
MNGN440. EQUIPMENT REPLACEMENT ANALYSIS
mining contracts. Offered in even numbered years. Prerequi-
(I) Introduction to the fundamentals of classical equipment
site: Senior or graduate status. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
replacement theory. Emphasis on new, practical approaches
hours. Offered in even years.
to equipment replacement decision making. Topics include:
operating and maintenance costs, obsolescence factors,
MNGN505. ROCK MECHANICS IN MINING (I) An
technological changes, salvage, capital investments, minimal
introduction to the mechanics of the deformation and failure
average annual costs, optimum economic life, infinite and
of rocks and rock masses when affected by mining.
finite planning horizons, replacement cycles, replacement
Displacements, strains stresses and their manipulations are
vs. expansion, maximization of returns from equipment
discussed and the equations of equilibrium are defined.
replacement expenditures. Prerequisite: MNGN427, senior
Linear and non-linear constitutive laws, with and without
or graduate status. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
time dependence are introduced. Concepts of stable and
unstable equilibria are summarized. Rock control problems,
MNGN445. OPEN PIT SLOPE DESIGN (II) Introduction
surface and underground mining of tabular and massive ore
to the analysis and design of optimal pit slopes. Topics
bodies are explained. Prerequisite: Introductory course in
include: economic aspects of slope angles, rock mass
rock mechanics (e.g., MN321). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
classification and strength determinations, geologic
hours
structural parameters, properties of fracture sets, data
collection techniques, hydrologic factors, methods of
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1999-2000
119

MNGN506. UNDERGROUND EXCAVATIONS (I) Study
MNGN514. MINING ROBOTICS (I) Fundamentals of
of problems in design and excavation of underground
robotics as applied to the mining industry. The focus is on
chambers for defense and industrial applications. Prerequi-
mobile robotic vehicles. Topics covered are mining
site: Senior or graduate status. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
applications, introduction and history of mobile robotics,
hours.
sensors, including vision, problems of sensing variations in
rock properties, problems of representing human knowledge
MNGN507. ADVANCED DRILLING AND BLASTING (I)
in control systems, machine condition diagnostics, kinemat-
An advanced study of the theories of rock penetration
ics, and path finding. Prerequisite: MACS404 or consent of
including percussion, rotary, and rotary percussion drilling.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in odd
Rock fragmentation including explosives and the theories of
years.
blasting rock. Application of theory to drilling and blasting
practice at mines, pits, and quarries. Prerequisite:
MNGN516. UNDERGROUND MINE DESIGN Selection,
MNGN407. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in
design, and development of most suitable underground
odd years.
mining methods based upon the physical and the geological
properties of mineral deposits (metallics and nonmetallics),
MNGN539/EGES539. MARINE MINING SYSTEMS (I)
conservation considerations, and associated environmental
Define interdisciplinary marine mining systems and
impacts. Reserve estimates, development and production
operational requirements for the exploration survey, sea
planning, engineering drawings for development and
floor mining, hoisting, and transport. Describe and design
extraction, underground haulage systems, and cost esti-
components of deep-ocean, manganese-nodule mining
mates. Prerequisite: MNGN210. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours
systems and other marine mineral extraction methods.
lab; 3 semester hours.
Analyze dynamics and remote control of the marine mining
systems interactions and system components. Describe the
MNGN517. ADVANCED UNDERGROUND MINING (II)
current state-of-the-art technology, operational practice,
Review and evaluation of new developments in advanced
trade-offs of the system design and risk. Prerequisite:
underground mining systems to achieve improved produc-
EGGN351, EGGN320, GEOC408 or consent of instructor. 3
tivity and reduced costs. The major topics covered include:
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate even
mechanical excavation techniques for mine development
years.
and production, new haulage and vertical conveyance
systems, advanced ground support and roof control
MNGN511. MINING INVESTIGATIONS (I, II) Investiga-
methods, mine automation and monitoring, new mining
tional problems associated with any important aspect of
systems and future trends in automated, high productivity
mining. Choice of problem is arranged between student and
mining schemes. Prerequisite: Underground Mine Design
instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Lecture,
(e.g., MNGN314). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
consultation, lab, and assigned reading; 2 to 4 semester
hours.
MNGN519. ADVANCED SURFACE COAL MINE
DESIGN (II) Review of current manual and computer
MNGN512. SURFACE MINE DESIGN Analysis of
methods of reserve estimation, mine design, equipment
elements of surface mine operation and design of surface
selection, and mine planning and scheduling. Course
mining system components with emphasis on minimization
includes design of a surface coal mine for a given case study
of adverse environmental impact and maximization of
and comparison of manual and computer results. Prerequi-
efficient use of mineral resources. Ore estimates, unit
site: MNGN312, 316, 427. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3
operations, equipment selection, final pit determinations,
semester hours. Offered in odd years.
short- and long-range planning, road layouts, dump
planning, and cost estimation.. Prerequisite: MNGN210. 3
MNGN520. ROCK MECHANICS IN UNDERGROUND
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
COAL MINING (I) Rock mechanics consideration in the
design of room-and-pillar, longwall, and shortwall coal
MNGN513 ADVANCED SURFACE MINE DESIGN
mining systems. Evaluation of bump and outburst condi-
(II) This course introduces students to alternative open pit
tions and remedial measures. Methane drainage systems.
planning and design concepts. Course emphasis is on
Surface subsidence evaluation. Prerequisite: MNGN321. 3
optimization aspects of open pit mine design. Topics include
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in odd years.
3-D ultimate pit limit algorithms and their applications;
computer aided haul road and dump designs; heuristic long-
MNGN523. SELECTED TOPICS (I, II) Special topics in
and short-term pit scheduling techniques; parametrization
mining engineering, incorporating lectures, laboratory work
concepts; mathematical optimization for sequencing and
or independent study, depending on needs. This course may
scheduling; ore control and truck dispatching. Design
be repeated for additional credit only if subject material is
procedures are illustrated by case studies using various
different. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 2 to 4 semester
computer programs. Prerequisite: MNGN308, MNGN312,
hours.
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
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MNGN525. INTRODUCTION TO NUMERICAL
instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
TECHNIQUES IN ROCK MECHANICS (I) Principles of
Offered in even years.
stress and infinitesimal strain analysis are summarized,
MNGN538. GEOSTATISTICAL ORE RESERVE ESTI-
linear constitutive laws and energy methods are reviewed.
MATION (I) Introduction to the application and theory of
Continuous and laminated models of stratified rock masses
geostatistics in the mining industry. Review of elementary
are introduced. The general concepts of the boundary
statistics and traditional ore reserve calculation techniques.
element and finite element methods are discussed. Emphasis
Presentation of fundamental geostatistical concepts,
is placed on the boundary element approach with displace-
including: variogram, estimation variance, block variance,
ment discontinuities, because of its relevance to the
kriging, geostatistical simulation. Emphasis on the practical
modeling of the extraction of tabular mineral bodies and to
aspects of geostatistical modeling in mining. Prerequisite:
the mobilization of faults, joints, etc. Several practical
MACS323 or equivalent course in statistics; graduate or
problems, selected from rock mechanics and subsidence
senior status. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
engineering practices, are treated to demonstrate applica-
tions of the techniques. Prerequisite: MNGN321,
MNGN539. ADVANCED MINING GEOSTATISTICS (II)
EGGN320, or equivalent courses, MACS455 or consent of
Advanced study of the theory and application of
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in even
geostatistics in mining engineering. Presentation of state-of-
years.
the-art geostatistical concepts, including: robust estimation,
nonlinear geostatistics, disjunctive kriging, geostatistical
MNGN526. MODELING AND MEASURING IN
simulation, computational aspects. This course includes
GEOMECHANICS (II) Introduction to instruments and
presentations by many guest lecturers from the mining
instrumentation systems used for making field measure-
industry. Emphasis on the development and application of
ments (stress, convergence, deformation, load, etc.) in
advanced geostatistical techniques to difficult problems in
geomechanics. Techniques for determining rock mass
the mining industry today. Prerequisite: MACS323 or
strength and deformability. Design of field measurement
equivalent and approval of department. 3 hours lecture; 3
programs. Interpretation of field data. Development of
semester hours. Offered in odd years.
predictive models using field data. Introduction to various
numerical techniques (boundary element, finite element,
MNGN550. NEW TECHNIQUES IN MINING (II) Review
FLAC, etc.) for modeling the behavior of rock structures.
of various experimental mining procedures, including a
Demonstration of concepts using various case studies.
critical evaluation of their potential applications. Mining
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. 2
methods covered include deep sea nodule mining, in situ
hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours. Offered in odd
gassification of coal, in situ retorting of oil shale, solution
years.
mining of soluble minerals, in situ leaching of metals,
geothermal power generation, oil mining, nuclear fragmen-
MNGN528. MINING GEOLOGY (I) Role of geology and
tation, slope caving, electro-thermal rock penetration and
the geologist in the development and production stages of a
fragmentation. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of
mining operation. Topics addressed: mining operation
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in even
sequence, mine mapping, drilling, sampling, reserve
years.
estimation, economic evaluation, permitting, support
functions. Field trips, mine mapping, data evaluation,
MNGN552. INTEGRATED MINING AND PROCESSING
exercises and term project. Prerequisite: GEGN401 or
SYSTEMS (I) Theory and application of advanced methods
GEGN405 or permission of instructors. 2 hours lecture/
of extracting and processing of minerals underground or in
seminar, 3 hours laboratory: 3 semester hours. Offered in
situ to recover concentrates of finished materials without the
even years.
traditional surface processing and disposal of tailings to
minimize environmental impacts. Prerequisites: Senior or
MNGN530. INTRODUCTION TO MICRO COMPUTERS
graduate status 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
IN MINING (I) General overview of the use of PC based
micro computers and software applications in the mining
MNGN585. MINING ECONOMICS (I) Advanced study in
industry. Topics include the use of: database, CAD,
mine valuation with emphasis on revenue and cost aspects.
spreadsheets, computer graphics, data acquisition, and
Topics include price and contract consideration in coal,
remote communications as applied in the mining industry.
metal and other commodities; mine capital and operating
Prerequisite: Any course in computer programming. 2 hours
cost estimation and indexing; and other topics of current
lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
interest. Prerequisite: MNGN427 or EBGN504 or equiva-
lent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in even
MNGN536. OPERATIONS RESEARCH TECHNIQUES
years.
IN THE MINERAL INDUSTRY Analysis of exploration,
mining, and metallurgy systems using statistical analysis.
MNGN590. MECHANICAL EXCAVATION IN MINING
Monte Carlo methods, simulation, linear programming, and
(II) This course provides a comprehensive review of the
computer methods. Prerequisite: MNGN433 or consent of
existing and emerging mechanical excavation technologies
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
121

for mine development and production in surface and
MNGN701. GRADUATE THESIS-MASTER OF SCI-
underground mining. The major topics covered in the course
ENCE (I, II) Laboratory, field , or library work on an
include: history and development of mechanical excavators,
original investigation for the master’s thesis under supervi-
theory and principles of mechanical rock fragmentation,
sion of the graduate student’s advisory committee. 6
design and performance of rock cutting tools, design and
semester hours upon completion of thesis.
operational characteristics of mechanical excavators (e.g.
MNGN703. GRADUATE THESIS-DOCTOR OF PHI-
continuous miners, roadheaders, tunnel boring machines,
LOSOPHY (I, II) Preparation of the doctoral thesis
raise drills, shaft borers, impact miners, slotters), applica-
conducted under supervision of the graduate student’s
tions to mine development and production, performance
advisory committee. 30 semester hours.
prediction and geotechnical investigations, costs versus
conventional methods, new mine designs for applying
GOGN501. SITE INVESTIGATION AND CHARACTER-
mechanical excavators, case histories, future trends and
IZATION An applications oriented course covering:
anticipated developments and novel rock fragmentation
geological data collection, geophysical methods for site
methods including water jets, lasers, microwaves, electron
investigation; hydrological data collection; materials
beams, penetrators, electrical discharge and sonic rock
properties determination; and various engineering classifica-
breakers. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate status. 3 hours
tion systems. Presentation of data in a format suitable for
lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in odd years.
subsequent engineering design will be emphasized.
Prerequisite: Introductory courses in geology, rock mechan-
MNGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MINING ENGINEER-
ics, and soil mechanics. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ING (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics
chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s).
GOGN502. SOLID MECHANICS APPLIED TO ROCKS
Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite:
An introduction to the deformation and failure of rocks and
Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
rock masses and to the flow of groundwater. Principles of
displacement, strain and stress, together with the equations
MNGN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
of equilibrium are discussed. Elastic and plastic constitutive
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
laws, with and without time dependence, are introduced.
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
Concepts of strain hardening and softening are summarized.
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
Energy principles, energy changes caused by underground
‘Independent Study’ form must be completed and submitted
excavations, stable and unstable equilibria are defined.
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Failure criteria for intact rock and rock masses are ex-
MNGN625. GRADUATE MINING SEMINAR (I, II)
plained. Principles of numerical techniques are discussed
Discussions presented by graduate students, staff, and
and illustrated. Basic laws and modeling of groundwater
visiting lecturers on research and development topics of
flows are introduced. Prerequisite: Introductory Rock
general interest. Required of all graduate students in mining
Mechanics. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
engineering every semester during residence. 1 semester
GOGN503. CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING
hour upon completion of thesis or residence.
LABORATORY An applications oriented course covering:
MNGN698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MINING ENGINEER-
Advanced rock testing procedures; dynamic rock properties
ING (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics
determination; on-site measurements; and various rock mass
chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s).
modeling approaches. Presentation of data in a format
Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite:
suitable for subsequent engineering design will be empha-
Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
sized. Prerequisite: Introductory courses in geology, rock
mechanics, and soil mechanics. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
MNGN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
hours.
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
GOGN504. SURFACE STRUCTURES IN EARTH
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
MATERIALS Principles involved in the design and
‘Independent Study’ form must be completed and submitted
construction of surface structures involving earth materials.
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Slopes and cuts. Retaining walls. Tailing dams. Leach
dumps. Foundations. Piles and piers. Extensive use of case
MNGN700. GRADUATE ENGINEERING REPORT-
examples. Prerequisites: GOGN501, GOGN502,
MASTER OF ENGINEERING (I, II) Laboratory, field, and
GOGN503. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
library work for the Master of Engineering report under
supervision of the student’s advisory committee. Required
GOGN505. UNDERGROUND EXCAVATION IN ROCK
of candidates for the degree of Master of Engineering. 6
Components of stress, stress distributions, underground
semester hours upon completion of report.
excavation failure mechanisms, optimum orientation and
shape of excavations, excavation stability, excavation
support design, ground treatment and rock pre-reinforce-
122
Colorado School of Mines
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ment, drill and blast excavations, mechanical excavation,
Petroleum Engineering
material haulage, ventilation and power supply, labor
CRAIG W. VAN KIRK, Professor and Department Head
requirements and training, scheduling and costing of
JOHN R. FANCHI, Professor
underground excavations, and case histories. Prerequisites:
RICHARD L. CHRISTIANSEN, Associate Professor
GOGN501, GOGN502, GOGN503. 3 hours lecture; 3
RAMONA M. GRAVES, Associate Professor
semester hours.
ROBERT S. THOMPSON, Associate Professor
GOGN506. EXCAVATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT
ERDAL OZKAN, Associate Professor
Normal project initiation, design procedures, project
ALFRED W. EUSTES III, Assistant Professor
financing, permitting and environmental impacts, prepara-
JON R. CARLSON, Research Professor
tion of plans and specifications, contract award, notice to
MARK G. MILLER, Research Assistant Professor
proceed and legal requirements. Construction alternatives,
BILLY J. MITCHELL, Professor Emeritus
contract types, standard contract language, bidding and
HOSSEIN KAZEMI, Adjunct Professor
estimating and contract awarding procedures. Construction
Degrees Offered:
inspection and control methods and completion procedures.
Master of Engineering (Petroleum Engineer)
Conflict resolution, administrative redress, arbitration and
Master of Science (Petroleum Engineering)
litigation. Time and tonnage based incentive programs. The
role of experts. Prerequisite: College-level in
Doctor of Philosophy (Petroleum Engineering)
Microeconomics or Engineering Economy. Degree in
Program Description:
Engineering. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
The Petroleum Engineering Department offers students a
GOGN625. GEO-ENGINEERING SEMINAR Discussions
choice of a Master of Science degree or a Master of
presented by graduate students, staff, and visiting lectures
Engineering degree. For the Master of Science degree, a
on research and development topics of general interest.
thesis is required in addition to course work. For the Master
Required of all graduate students in Geo-Engineering every
of Engineering degree, no thesis is required, but the course
semester, during residence. Prerequisite: Enrollment in Geo-
work requirement is greater than for the MS. The effort
Engineering Program. 1 semester hour upon completion of
required and subsequent value of the MS degree is consid-
thesis or residence.
ered equal to those of the ME degree. After admission to the
graduate program, students may change from ME to MS, or
vice versa, according to their needs and interests.
Applications from students having an ME or MS in
Petroleum Engineering, or in another engineering discipline,
will be considered for admission to the Ph.D. program. To
obtain the Doctor of Philosophy degree, a student must
demonstrate unusual competence, creativity, and dedication
in their field. In addition to extensive course work, a
dissertation is required.
Program Requirements:
Master of Engineering
36 hours of course credit
(no thesis)
Master of Science
24 hours of course credit,
plus 6 thesis hours
Doctor of Philosophy
60 hours of course credit, 30
thesis hours, and dissertation
Candidates for the non-thesis Master of Engineering
degree must complete 36 hours of graduate course credit. At
least 27 of the credit hours must be from the Petroleum
Engineering Department. Up to 9 credit hours of senior-
level courses may be applied to the degree. All courses must
be approved by a faculty advisor from the Petroleum
Engineering Department. No graduate committee is
required. A portion of the course credit requirement is a
special project directed by a member of the Petroleum
Engineering faculty. For the ME degree, the student must
demonstrate sound engineering thought and practice.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
123

Candidates for the Master of Science degree must
Jarring wave propagation
complete 24 graduate credit hours of course work, approved
Drillstring dynamics
by the candidate’s graduate committee, and six hours of
Fuzzy logic controllers
thesis credit. At least 15 of the course credit hours must be
Research projects generally involve professors and
from the Petroleum Engineering Department. Up to 9 credit
graduate students from other disciplines - Geology,
hours of senior-level courses may be applied to the degree.
Geophysics, Chemical Engineering, and others - in addition
All courses must be approved by the faculty advisor and the
to Petroleum Engineering. Projects often include off-campus
graduate committee. For the MS degree, the student must
laboratories, institutes, and other resources.
demonstrate ability to observe, analyze, and report original
scientific research. For other requirements, refer to the
Special Features:
general directions of the Graduate School in this bulletin.
In an exchange program with the Petroleum Engineering
Department of the University of Leoben, Austria (ULA), a
A candidate for the Ph.D. must complete 60 hours of
student can spend one semester in Austria during graduate
graduate course credit and 30 hours of thesis credit. Of the
studies and receive full transfer of credit back to CSM.
60 hours of course credit, a minimum of 12 credit hours of
graduate courses in a minor field is required. Part or all of
The Petroleum Engineering Department is located in a
the course work for a Master’s degree may be counted
recently renovated structure in the foothills west of Denver.
toward a Ph.D. upon approval of the Faculty Advisor and
The laboratory wing, completed in late 1993, has 20,000
the graduate committee. The candidate selects course work
square feet of space, with about $2 million of equipment
by consultation with the Faculty Advisor, and with the
acquired in recent years.
approval of the student’s doctoral committee. Candidates
The Petroleum Engineering Department enjoys strong
must demonstrate proficiency in a second language. A
association with the Geology and Geophysics Departments
passing score on the Graduate School Foreign Language
at CSM. Courses that integrate the faculty and interests of
Exam is accepted. For other requirements, refer to the
the three departments are taught at the undergraduate and
general directions of the Graduate School in this bulletin.
graduate levels.
Required Curriculum:
The department is close to oil and gas field operations,
A student in the graduate program selects course work by
oil companies and laboratories, and geologic outcrops of
consultation with the Faculty Advisor and with the approval
producing formations. There are many opportunities for
of the graduate committee. Course work is tailored to the
summer and part-time employment in the oil and gas
needs and interests of the student.
industry in the Denver metropolitan region.
All PE graduate students must take PE681 in the Fall
Each summer some graduate students assist with the
semester, PE682 in the Spring semester, and LICM515 for
field session for undergraduate students. In the past, the
credit for one semester during their graduate programs.
field session students have visited oil and gas operations in
Also, students who do not have a BS degree in PE must take
Europe, Alaska, Canada, Southern California, and the Gulf
PE514 as soon as possible in their graduate programs.
Coast.
Fields of Research:
The Petroleum Engineering Department encourages
Current research topics include
student involvement with the Society of Petroleum Engi-
Formation evaluation
neers. The department provides financial support for
Reservoir characterization and simulation
students attending the SPE Annual Technical Conference
and Exhibition.
Simulation of directional drilling
Remediation of contaminated soils and aquifers
Description of Courses
Oil recovery processes
PEGN408/EGES408. INTRODUCTION TO OFFSHORE
Rock and fluid properties
TECHNOLOGY (II) Introduction to practical offshore
Completion and stimulation of wells
engineering/design technology for the exploration, drilling,
production and transportation of petroleum in the ocean.
Economics and management
Practical analysis methods of environmental forces,
Natural gas engineering
hydrodynamics, structural responses, and pipe flows for the
Coalbed methane
design of platform, riser, subsea completion and pipeline
Geothermal energy
systems, including environment-hydrodynamic-structure
Phase behavior
interactions. System design parameters. Industry practice
Artificial lift
and the current state of the art technology for deep ocean
Rock mechanics
drilling. Prerequisite: MACS315 or consent of instructor 3
Directional drilling
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Drill bit vibration analysis
PEGN411. MECHANICS OF PETROLEUM PRODUC-
Tubular buckling
TION (II) Nodal analysis for pipe and formation
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deliverability including single and multiphase flow. Natural
flooding). Gas-liquid displacement processes (lean gas, rich
flow and design of artificial lift methods including gas lift,
gas, and CO2). Thermal recovery processes (steam and in
sucker rod pumps, electrical submersible pumps, and
situ combustion). Introduction to numerical reservoir
hydraulic pumps. Prerequisite: PEGN308, PEGN310,
simulation, history matching and forecasting. Prerequisite:
PEGN311, and EGGN351. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
PEGN423. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
hours.
PEGN426. WELL COMPLETION AND STIMULATION
PEGN413. GAS MEASUREMENT AND FORMATION
(I) Completion parameters; design for well conditions.
EVALUATION LAB (I) This lab investigates the properties
Perforating, sand control, skin damage associated with
of a gas such as vapor pressure, dew point pressure, and
completions and well productivity. Fluid types and proper-
field methods of measuring gas volumes. The application of
ties; characterization of compatibilities. Stimulation
well logging and formation evaluation concepts are also
techniques: acidizing and fracturing. Selection of proppants
investigated. Prerequisites: PEGN308, PEGN310, and
and fluids; types, placement and compatibilities. Estimation
PEGN419. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
of rates, volumes and fracture dimensions. Reservoir
considerations in fracture propagation and design. Prerequi-
PEGN414. WELL TEST ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (II)
site: PEGN311, PEGN361, PEGN411 and MACS315. 3
Solutions to the diffusivity equation. Transient well testing:
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
build-up, drawdown, multi-rate test analyses for oil and gas.
Flow tests and well deliverabilities. Type curve analysis.
PEGN428. ADVANCED DRILLING ENGINEERING (II)
Superposition, pulse and interference tests. Well test design.
Rotary drilling systems with emphasis on design of drilling
Prerequisites: PEGN426. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
programs, directional and horizontal well planning, bit
selection, bottom hole assembly and drillstring design. This
PEGN419. WELL LOG ANALYSIS AND FORMATION
elective course is recommended for petroleum engineering
EVALUATION (I) An introduction to well logging methods,
majors interested in drilling. Prerequisite: PEGN311,
including the relationship between measured properties and
PEGN361. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
reservoir properties. Analysis of log suites for reservoir size
and content. Graphical and analytical methods will be
PEGN439/GEGN439/GPGN439. MULTIDISCIPLINARY
developed to allow the student to better visualize the
PETROLEUM DESIGN (II) This is a multidisciplinary
reservoir, its contents, and its potential for production. Use
design course that integrates fundamentals and design
of the computer as a tool to handle data, create graphs and
concepts in geology, geophysics, and petroleum engineer-
log traces, and make computations of reservoir parameters is
ing. Students work in integrated teams consisting of students
required. Prerequisites: PEGN308, PEGN310, concurrent
from each of the disciplines. Multiple open-ended design
enrollment in GEOL308. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3
problems in oil and gas exploration and field development
semester hours.
are assigned. Several written and oral presentations are
made throughout the semester. Project economics including
PEGN422. ECONOMICS AND EVALUATION OF OIL
risk analysis are an integral part of the course. Prerequisites:
AND GAS PROJECTS (I) Project economics for oil and gas
PE majors: PEGN316, PEGN414, PEGN422, PEGN423,
projects under conditions of certainty and uncertainty.
PEGN424 (or concurrent) GEOL308; GE Majors:
Topics include time value of money concepts, discount rate
GEOL308 or GEOL309, GEGN316, GEGN438; GP
assumptions, measures of project profitability, costs, state
Majors: GPGN302 and GPGN303. 2 hours lecure; 3 hours
and local taxes, federal income taxes, expected value
lab; 3 semester hours.
concept, decision trees, bayesian analysis, the decision to
purchase imperfect information, gamblerÕs ruin, and monte
PEGN481. PETROLEUM SEMINAR (I) Written and oral
carlo simulation techniques. Prerequisite: MACS323. 3
presentations by each student on current petroleum topics,
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
presentations by each student. Prerequisite: Consent of
department. 2 hours; 1 semester hour.
PEGN423. PETROLEUM RESERVOIR ENGINEERING I
(I) Data requirements for reservoir engineering studies.
PEGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS (I, II) Group study of any
Material balance calculations for normal gas, retrograde gas
topic in the field of, or closely related to, petroleum
condensate, solution-gas and gas-cap reservoirs with or
engineering. By consent of instructor. Hours per week and
without water drive. Primary reservoir performance.
credit to be determined at time of registration.
Forecasting future recoveries by decline curve analysis and
Graduate Courses
incremental material balance. Prerequisites: PEGN316,
The 500-level courses are open to qualified seniors with
PEGN419 and MACS315 (MACS315 only for non PEGN
permission of the department and the Dean of Graduate
majors). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
School. The 600-level courses are open only to students
PEGN424. PETROLEUM RESERVOIR ENGINEERING II
enrolled in Graduate School. Certain courses may vary from
(II) Reservoir engineering aspects of supplemental recovery
year to year, depending upon the number of students and
processes. Introduction to liquid-liquid displacement
their particular needs.
processes (polymer, water, caustic, miscible, and surfactant
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
125

PEGN501. APPLICATIONS OF NUMERICAL METH-
Prerequisite: PEGN411 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
ODS TO PETROLEUM ENGINEERING (I) The course
lecture; 3 semester hours.
will solve problems of interest in Petroleum Engineering
PEGN508. ADVANCED ROCK PROPERTIES (I)
through the use of spreadsheets on personal computers and
Application of rock mechanics and rock properties to
structured FORTRAN programming on PCs or mainframes.
reservoir engineering, well logging, well completion and
Numerical techniques will include methods for numerical
well stimulation. Topics covered include: capillary pressure,
quadrature, differentiation, interpolation, solution of linear
relative permeability, velocity effects on Darcy’s Law,
and non-linear ordinary differential equations, curve fitting
elastic/mechanical rock properties, subsidence, reservoir
and direct or iterative methods for solving simultaneous
compaction, and sand control. Prerequisite: PEGN424 and
equations. Prerequisites: PEGN414 and PEGN424 or
PEGN426 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
semester hours.
PEGN502. ADVANCED DRILLING FLUIDS AND
PEGN511. PHASE BEHAVIOR IN THE OIL AND GAS
CEMENTING (I) The physical properties and purpose of
INDUSTRY Essentials of thermodynamics for understand-
drilling fluids and cement are investigated. Emphasis is
ing phase behavior. Modeling of phase behavior of single
placed on drilling fluid design, clay chemistry, cementing
and multi-component systems with equations of state and
operations, design, and testing; and solids control. Prerequi-
other appropriate solution models in spreadsheets and
site: PEGN428 or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3
commercial PVT software. Special focus on paraffins,
hours lab; 3 semester hours.
asphaltenes, natural gas hydrates, and mineral deposition.
PEGN503/GEGN503/GPGN503. INTEGRATED EXPLO-
Prerequisite: ChEN357 or equivalent, or consent of
RATION AND DEVELOPMENT (I) Students work alone
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and in teams to study reservoirs from fluvial-deltaic and
PEGN512. ADVANCED GAS ENGINEERING (I) The
valley fill depositional environments. This is a
physical properties and phase behavior of gas and gas
multidisciplinary course that shows students how to
condensates will be discussed. Flow through tubing and
characterize and model subsurface reservoir performance by
pipelines as well as through porous media is covered.
integrating data, methods and concepts from geology,
Reserve calculations for normally pressured, abnormally
geophysics and petroleum engineering. Activities and topics
pressured and water drive reservoirs is presented. Both
include field trips to surface outcrops, well logs, borehole
stabilized and isochronal deliverability testing of gas wells
cores, seismograms, reservoir modeling of field perfor-
will be illustrated. Finally, gas storage, to meet peak load
mance, written exercises and oral team presentations.
demand is also covered. Prerequisite: PEGN423 or consent
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
lab; 3 semester hours.
PEGN513. RESERVOIR SIMULATION I (I) Mathematics
PEGN504/GEGN504/GPGN504. INTEGRATED EXPLO-
for petroleum engineering calculations. Development of
RATION AND DEVELOPMENT (II) Students work in
fluid flow equations pertinent to petroleum production.
multidisciplinary teams to study practical problems and case
Solutions to diffusivity equations. Numerical reservoir
studies in integrated subsurface exploration and develop-
simulation by finite differences and finite element methods.
ment. The course addresses emerging technologies and
Prerequisite: PEGN424 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
timely topics with a general focus on carbonate reservoirs.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
Activities include field trips, 3D computer modeling, written
exercises and oral team presentations. Prerequisite: Consent
PEGN514. PETROLEUM TESTING TECHNIQUES (I)
of instructor. 3 hours lecture and seminar; 3 semester hours.
Investigation of basic physical properties of petroleum
reservoir rocks and fluids. Review of recommended
PEGN506. ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY METHODS (II)
practices for testing drilling fluids and oil well cements.
Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) methods are reviewed from
Emphasis is placed on the accuracy and calibration of test
both the qualitative and quantitative standpoint. Recovery
equipment. Quality report writing is stressed. Prerequisite:
mechanisms and design procedures for the various EOR
Graduate status. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour. Required for
processes are discussed. In addition to lectures, problems on
students who do not have a B.S. in PE.
actual field design procedures will be covered. Field case
histories will be reviewed. Prerequisite: PEGN424 or
PEGN519. ADVANCED FORMATION EVALUATION (I)
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
A detailed review of wireline well logging and evaluation
methods stressing the capability of the measurements to
PEGN507. INTEGRATED FIELD PROCESSING (II)
determine normal and special reservoir rock parameters
Integrated design of production facilities covering multi-
related to reservoir and production problems. Computers for
stage separation of oil, gas, and water, multiphase flow, oil
log processing of single and multiple wells. Utilization of
skimmers, natural gas dehydration, compression, crude
well logs and geology in evaluating well performance
stabilization, petroleum fluid storage, and vapor recovery.
before, during, and after production of hydrocarbons. The
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Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

sensitivity of formation evaluation parameters in the
sites: PEGN311, PEGN428 or equivalent, or consent of
volumetric determination of petroleum in reservoirs.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisite: PEGN419 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
PEGN595. ADVANCED DRILLING AND DEVELOP-
lecture; 3 semester hours.
MENT (I) Lectures, seminars, and technical problems with
PEGN522. ADVANCED WELL DESIGN (I) Basic
emphasis on well planning, rotary rig supervision, and field
applications of rock mechanics to petroleum engineering
practices for execution of the plan. Prerequisite: PEGN428
problems. Hydraulic fracturing; acid fracturing, fracturing
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
simulators; fracturing diagnostics; sandstone acidizing; sand
PEGN596. PRESSURE CONTROL WHILE DRILLING
control, and well bore stability. Different theories of
Principles and procedures of pressure control are taught
formation failure, measurement of mechanical properties.
with the aid of a full-scale drilling simulator. Specifications
Review of recent advances and research areas. Prerequisite:
and design of blowout control equipment for onshore and
PEGN426 or consent of instructor.
offshore drilling operations, gaining control of blowouts,
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
abnormal pressure detection, well planning for wells
PEGN523. ADVANCED ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF OIL
containing abnormal pressures, and kick circulation removal
AND GAS PROJECTS (I) Determination of present value
methods are taught. Students receive hands-on training with
of oil properties. Determination of severance, ad valorem,
the simulator and its peripheral equipment. Prerequisites:
windfall profit, and federal income taxes. Analysis of
PEGN311 and PEGN428 or consent of instructor. 2 hours
profitability indicators. Application of decision tree theory
lecture, 3 hours simulator; 3 semester hours.
and Monte Carlo methods to oil and gas properties.
PEGN597. WELL TUBULAR DESIGN Fundamentals of
Economic criteria for equipment selection. Prerequisite:
tubulars (casing, tubing, and drill pipe) design applied to
PEGN422 or EBGN504 or ChEN504 or MNGN427 or
drilling. Major topics covered include: Dogleg running
ChEN421 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
loads. Directional hole considerations. Writing of design
semester hours.
criteria equations. Effects of formation pressures. Stability
PEGN524. PETROLEUM ECONOMICS AND MANAGE-
loads after cementing. Effects of temperature, pressure, mud
MENT (II) Business applications in the petroleum industry
weights, and cement. Helical bending of tubing. Fishing
are the central focus. Topics covered are: fundamentals of
loads. Micro-annulus problem. Strengths of API tubulars.
accounting, oil and gas accounting, strategic planning, oil
Abrasive wear while rotating drill pipe. How to design for
and gas taxation, oil field deals, negotiations, and the
Hydrogen Sulfide and fatigue corrosion. Connections.
formation of secondary units. The concepts are covered by
Common rig operating procedures. Much more. Prerequi-
forming companies that prepare proforma financial
sites: PEGN311, PEGN428 or equivalent, or consent of
statements, make deals, drill for oil and gas, keep account-
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ing records, and negotiate the participation formula for a
PEGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PETROLEUM ENGI-
secondary unit. Prerequisite: PEGN422 or consent of
NEERING (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and
PEGN538/EGES538. INTRODUCTION TO OFFSHORE
student(s). Usually the course is offered only once.
TECHNOLOGY (II) Introduction to offshore engineering
Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit
technology for exploration drilling, production and
hours.
transportation of petroleum in the ocean. Practical analysis
PEGN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
methods for determining environmental forces, structural
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
response, and pipe flow for the design of platforms, risers,
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
subsea completion and pipeline systems, including environ-
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
ment-hydrodynamic-structure interactions. System design
‘Independent Study’ form must be completed and submitted
parameters. Industrial practice and state-of-the-art technol-
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
ogy for deep ocean drilling. Prerequisite MACS315 or
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PEGN603. DRILLING MODELS (II) Analytical models of
physical phenomena encountered in drilling. Casing and
PEGN594. DIRECTIONAL AND HORIZONTAL DRILL-
drilling failure from bending, fatigue, doglegs, temperature,
ING Application of directional control and planning to
stretch; mud filtration; corrosion; wellhead loads; and
drilling. Major topics covered include: Review of proce-
buoyancy of tubular goods. Bit weight and rotary speed
dures for the drilling of directional wells. Section and
optimization. Prerequisite: PEGN428 or consent of
horizontal view preparation. Spider diagrams. Two and three
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
dimensional directional planning. Optimal plug back depths.
Collison diagrams. Surveying and trajectory calculations.
PEGN605. WELL TESTING AND EVALUATION (II)
Surface and down hole equipment. Common rig operating
Various well testing procedures and interpretation tech-
procedures, and horizontal drilling techniques. Prerequi-
niques for individual wells or groups of wells. Application
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
127

of these techniques to field development, analysis of well
PEGN681. PETROLEUM ENGINEERING SEMINAR (I)
problems, secondary recovery, and reservoir studies.
Comprehensive reviews of current petroleum engineering
Productivity, gas well testing, pressure buildup and
literature, research, and selected related topics. 2 hours
drawdown, well interference, fractured wells, type curve
seminar; 1 semester hour. Required of all candidates for
matching, and short-term testing. Prerequisite: PEGN426 or
advanced degree in petroleum engineering.
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PEGN682. PETROLEUM ENGINEERING SEMINAR (II)
PEGN606. ADVANCED RESERVOIR ENGINEERING
Comprehensive reviews of current petroleum engineering
(II) A review of depletion type, gas-cap, and volatile oil
literature, research, and selected related topics. 2 hours
reservoirs. Lectures and supervised studies on gravity
seminar; 1 semester hour. Required of all candidates for
segregation, moving gas-oil front, individual well perfor-
advanced degree in petroleum engineering.
mance analysis, history matching, performance prediction,
PEGN698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PETROLEUM ENGI-
and development planning. Prerequisite: PEGN423 or
NEERING (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course.
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and
PEGN607. PARTIAL WATER DRIVE RESERVOIRS (I)
student(s). Usually the course is offered only once.
The hydrodynamic factors which influence underground
Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit
water movement, particularly with respect to petroleum
hours.
reservoirs. Evaluation of oil and gas reservoirs in major
PEGN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
water containing formations. Prerequisite: PEGN424 or
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
PEGN608. FLUID DISPLACEMENT IN POROUS
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
MEDIA (II) The factors involved in multiphase fluid flow in
‘Independent Study’ form must be completed and submitted
porous media. The micro- and macroscopic movement of
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
various fluid combinations. Performance of various
PEGN701. GRADUATE THESIS-MASTER OF SCIENCE
displacement tests on cores in the laboratory. Prerequisite:
(I, II) Laboratory, field, and library work for the master’s
PEGN423 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
thesis under supervision of the graduate student’s advisory
semester hours.
committee. 6 semester hours upon completion of report.
PEGN614. RESERVOIR SIMULATION II (II) Current
PEGN703. GRADUATE THESIS-DOCTOR OF PHI-
techniques for conducting reservoir simulation studies of
LOSOPHY (I, II) Investigations for Doctor of Philosophy
petroleum reservoirs. Methods for discretizing reservoirs,
thesis under direction of the student’s advisory committee.
fluid, and production data. Techniques involved in model
30 semester hours upon completion.
equilibration, history matching, and predictions. Black-oil
and compositional models. Single-well and field-wide
models including 3-dimensional and 3-phase flow. Prerequi-
site: PEGN513 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
semester hours.
128
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Physics
Science, Mathematics, Metallurgy, Mining, or Petroleum
DON L. WILLIAMSON, Professor and Department Head
Engineering. A written comprehensive and oral exam is
F. EDWARD CECIL, Professor
required.
REUBEN T. COLLINS, Professor
Prerequisites:
THOMAS E. FURTAK, Professor
The Graduate School of Colorado School of Mines is
FRANK V. KOWALSKI, Professor
open to graduates from four-year programs at recognized
JAMES A. McNEIL, Professor
colleges or universities. Admission to the Physics Depart-
FRANKLIN D. SCHOWENGERDT, Professor
ment M.S. and Ph.D. programs is competitive, based on an
JOHN U. TREFNY, Professor and
evaluation of undergraduate performance, standardized test
Vice President for Academic Affairs
scores, and references. The undergraduate course of study of
TIMOTHY R. OHNO, Associate Professor
each applicant is evaluated according to the requirements of
DAVID M. WOOD, Associate Professor
the Physics Department, and a student may not be a
CHARLES G. DURFEE, Assistant Professor
candidate for a graduate and an undergraduate degree at the
JON H. EGGERT, Assistant Professor
same time.
UWE GREIFE, Assistant Professor
Required Curriculum:
MARIET A. HOFSTEE, Assistant Professor
PETER W. SUTTER, Assistant Professor
Master of Science, Physics
NATHAN PALMER, Lecturer
PHGN505 Classical Mechanics I
BRUCE H. MEEVES, Instructor
PHGN507 Electromagnetic Theory I
JAMES T. BROWN, Professor Emeritus
PHGN520 Quantum Mechanics I
F. RICHARD YEATTS, Professor Emeritus
PHGN521 Quantum Mechanics II
WILLIAM B. LAW, Associate Professor Emeritus
PHGN530 Statistical Mechanics
ARTHUR Y. SAKAKURA, Associate Professor Emeritus
Electives and Graduate Seminars - 9 hours.
ROBERT F. HOLUB, Research Professor
Master’s Thesis
VICTOR KAYDANOV, Research Professor
Doctor of Philosophy, Applied Physics
JEROME G. MORSE, Research Professor
JAMES E. BERNARD, Research Associate Professor
PHGN505 Classical Mechanics I
PHGN507 Electromagnetic Theory I
Degrees Offered:
PHGN511 Mathematical Physics I
Master of Science (Physics)
PHGN520 Quantum Mechanics I
Doctor of Philosophy (Applied Physics)
PHGN521 Quantum Mechanics II
Program Description:
PHGN530 Statistical Mechanics
The Physics Department at CSM offers a full program of
PHGN608 Electromagnetic Theory II
instruction and research leading to the Ph.D. in applied
Electives - 9 hours.
physics and the M.S. in physics.
12 hour minor: as specified in the general requirements
Graduate students are given a solid background in the
of the graduate school
fundamentals of classical and modern physics at an
Graduate Seminar: Each full-time graduate student (M.S.
advanced level and are encouraged early in their studies to
and Ph.D.) will register for PHGN501 or PHGN502
learn about the research interests of the faculty so that a
Graduate Seminar each semester, for a total of 2 semester
thesis topic can be identified.
hours credit.
Program Requirements:
Doctoral Thesis.
Students entering graduate programs in Physics and
Fields of Research:
Applied Physics will select an initial program in consulta-
Theoretical
tion with the departmental Graduate Council until such time
Field Theory
as a research field has been chosen and a thesis committee
Nuclear Theory
appointed. The following are requirements for the M.S. and
Ph.D. degrees:
Condensed Matter Theory
Master’s: 24 semester hours in an approved program
Experimental
with a satisfactory thesis; no foreign language is required.
Applied Optics: lasers, spectroscopy, near-field micros-
Fourteen semester hours plus thesis must be taken in
copy, non-linear optics
residence.
Nuclear: Low energy reactions, nuclear astrophysics,
environmental physics
Doctorate: 44 semester hours in an approved program.
Minors are available in one of the following: Chemical
Electronic Materials: Photovoltaic materials, thin film
Engineering, Chemistry, Geology, Geophysics, Materials
semiconductors, transparent conductors,
nanocrystalline materials, ion beam processing
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
129

Solid State: Mössbauer spectroscopy, small-angle x-ray
PHGN422. NUCLEAR PHYSICS Introduction to sub-
scattering, x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy,
atomic (particle and nuclear) phenomena. Characterization
polymers, amorphous materials, magnetic materials,
and systematics of particle and nuclear states; symmetries;
granular materials, high pressure physics
introduction and systematics of the electromagnetic, weak,
Surface and Interface Physics: X-ray photoelectron
and strong interactions; systematics of radioactivity; liquid
spectroscopy, Auger spectroscopy, scanning probe
drop and shell models; nuclear technology. Prerequisite:
microscopies
PHGN325. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Description of Courses
PHGN423. DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION Review of
Senior Level
basic physical principles; types of power generation treated
PHGN402. GREAT PHYSICISTS (II) The lives, times, and
include fission, fusion, magnetohydrodynamic, thermoelec-
scientific contributions of key, historical physicists are
tric, thermionic, fuel cells, photovoltaic,
explored in an informal seminar format. Each week a
electrohydrodynamic, piezoelectrics. Prerequisite:
member of the faculty will lead discussions about one or
PHGN300/310. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
more different scientists who have figured significantly in
PHGN424. ASTROPHYSICS (I) A survey of fundamental
the development of the discipline. Prerequisite: None. 1
aspects of astrophysical phenomena, concentrating on
hour lecture; 1 semester hour.
measurements of basic stellar properties such as distance,
PHGN404 PHYSICS OF THE ENVIRONMENT An
luminosity, spectral classification, mass, and radii. Simple
examination of several environmental issues in terms of the
models of stellar structure evolution and the associated
fundamental underlying principles of physics including
nuclear processes as sources of energy and nucleosynthesis.
energy conservation, conversion and generation; solar
Introduction to cosmology and physics of standard big-bang
energy; nuclear power and weapons, radioactivity and
models. Prerequisite: PHGN325. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
radiation effects; aspects of air, noise, and thermal pollution.
hours.
Prerequisite: PHGN200/210 or consent of instructor. 3
PHGN435/CRGN435. INTERDISCIPLINARY MICRO-
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ELECTRONICS PROCESSING LABORATORY (I)
PHGN412. MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS Mathematical
Application of science and engineering principles to the
techniques applied to the equations of physics; complex
fabrication and testing of microelectronic devices. Emphasis
variables, partial differential equations, special functions,
on specific unit operations and the interrelation among
finite and infinite-dimensional vector spaces. Green’s
processing steps. Prerequisites: Senior standing in PHGN,
functions. Transforms; computer algebra. Prerequisite:
ChEN, MTGN, or EGGN. Consent of instructor. Due to lab
MACS347. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
space the enrollment is limited to 20 students. 1.5 hours
lecture, 4 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
PHGN419. PRINCIPLES OF SOLAR ENERGY
SYSTEMS(II) Theory and techniques of insolation
PHGN440/MLGN502. SOLID STATE PHYSICS (II) An
measurement. Absorptive and radiative properties of
elementary study of the properties of solids including
surfaces. Optical properties of materials and surfaces.
crystalline structure and its determination, lattice vibrations,
Principles of photovoltaic devices. Optics of collector
electrons in metals, and semiconductors. (Graduate students
systems. Solar energy conversion techniques: heating and
in physics may register only for PHGN440.) Prerequisite:
cooling of buildings, solar thermal (power and process
PHGN325. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
heat), wind energy, ocean thermal, and photovoltaic.
PHGN441/MLGN522. SOLID STATE PHYSICS APPLI-
Prerequisite: PHGN300/310 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
CATION AND PHENOMENA Continuation of PHGN440/
hours
MLGN502 with an emphasis on applications of the
PHGN420. QUANTUM MECHANICS (I) Schroedinger
principles of solid state physics to practical properties of
equation, uncertainty, change of representation, one-
materials including: optical properties, superconductivity,
dimensional problems, axioms for state vectors and
dielectric properties, magnetism, noncrystalline structure,
operators, matrix mechanics, uncertainty relations, time-
and interfaces. (Graduate students in physics may register
independent perturbation theory, time-dependent perturba-
only for PHGN441.) Prerequisite: PHGN440/MLGN501 or
tions, harmonic oscillator, angular momentum. Prerequisite:
equivalent by instructor’s permission. 3 hours lecture; 3
PHGN325, PHGN350, PHGN361. 3 hours lecture; 3
semester hours.
semester hours.
PHGN450 COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS (I) Introduction
PHGN421. ATOMIC PHYSICS (II) A study of the
to numerical methods for analyzing advanced physics
fundamental particles of matter, atomic structure, and
problems. Topics covered include finite element methods,
spectra. Application of the Schroedinger equation to
analysis of scaling, efficiency, errors, and stability, as well as
hydrogen-like atoms. Prerequisite: PHGN325. 3 hours
a survey of numerical algorithms and packages for analyzing
lecture; 3 semester hours.
algebraic, differential, and matrix systems. The numerical
methods are introduced and developed in the analysis of
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Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

advanced physics problems taken from classical physics,
PHGN501. GRADUATE SEMINAR (I) Oral presentations
astrophysics, electromagnetism, solid state and nuclear
on topics dealing with current research and technical
physics. Prerequisites: Introductory-level knowledge of C,
literature. Includes presentation of latest research results by
Fortran or Basic; MACS347. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
guest lecturers, staff, and advanced students. 1 hour
hours.
seminar; 1 semester hour.
PHGN460. PLASMA PHYSICS Review of Maxwell’s
PHGN502. GRADUATE SEMINAR (II) Oral presentations
equations; charged-particle orbit in given electromagnetic
on topics dealing with current research and technical
fields; macroscopic behavior of plasma, distribution
literature. Includes presentation of latest research results by
functions; diffusion theory; kinetic equations of plasma;
guest lecturers, staff, and advanced students. 1 hour
plasma oscillations and waves, conductivity, magnetohydro-
seminar; 1 semester hour.
dynamics, stability theory; Alven waves, plasma confine-
PHGN505. CLASSICAL MECHANICS I (I) Review of
ment. Prerequisite: PHGN300/310. 3 hours lecture; 3
Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations in the dynamics
semester hours. Offered on sufficient demand.
of particles and rigid bodies; kinetic theory; coupled
PHGN462. ADVANCED ELECTROMAGNETISM (I)
oscillations and continuum mechanics; fluid mechanics.
Continuation of PHGN361. The solution of boundary value
Prerequisite: PHGN350 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3
problems in curvilinear coordinates; solu tions to the wave
semester hours.
equation including plane waves, refraction, interference and
PHGN507. ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY I (II) To
polarization; waves in bounded regions, radiation from
provide a strong background in electromagnetic theory.
charges and simple antennas; relativistic electrodynamics.
Electrostatics, magnetostatics, dynamical Maxwell equa-
Prerequisite: PHGN361. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
tions, wave phenomena. Prerequisite: PHGN462 or
PHGN471. SENIOR DESIGN (I) A two semester program
equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
covering the full spectrum of experimental design, drawing
PHGN511. MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS I Review of
on all of the student’s previous course work. At the
complex variable and finite and infinite-dimensional linear
beginning of the first semester, the student selects a research
vector spaces. Sturm-Liouville problem, integral equations,
project in consultation with the course coordinator and the
computer algebra. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3
faculty supervisor. The objectives of the project are given to
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
the student in broad outline form. The student then designs
the entire project, including any or all of the following
PHGN520. QUANTUM MECHANICS I (I) Schroedinger
elements as appropriate: literature search, specialized
equation, uncertainty, change of representation, one-
apparatus, block-diagram electronics, computer data
dimensional problems, axioms for state vectors and
acquisition and/or analysis, sample materials, and measure-
operators, matrix mechanics, uncertainty relations, time-
ment and/or analysis sequences. The course culminates in a
independent perturbation theory, time-dependent perturba-
senior thesis. Supplementary lectures are given on tech-
tions, harmonic oscillator, angular momentum; semiclassical
niques of physics research and experimental design.
methods, variational methods, two-level system, sudden and
Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. 1 hour lecture, 6
adiabatic changes, applications. Prerequisite: PHGN420 or
hours lab; 3 semester hours.
equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PHGN472. SENIOR DESIGN (II) Continuation of
PHGN521. QUANTUM MECHANICS II (II) Review of
PHGN471. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. 1 hour
angular momentum, central potentials and applications.
lecture, 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
Spin; rotations in quantum mechanics. Formal scattering
theory, Born series, partial wave analysis. Additional of
PHGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS (I, II) Pilot course or special
angular momenta, Wigner-Eckart theorem, selection rules,
topics course. Prerequisites: Consent of department. Credit
identical particles. Prerequisite: PHGN520. 3 hours lecture;
to be determined by instructor, maximum of 6 credit hours.
3 semester hours.
PHGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
PHGN525/MLGN525. SURFACE PHYSICS (I) Solid state
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
physics focusing on the structural and electronic nature of
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
the outer few atomic layers and the gas-surface interactions.
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
Detailed explanations of many surface analysis techniques
‘Independent Study’ form must be completed and submitted
are provided, highlighting the application of these tech-
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
niques to current problems, particularly electronic materials.
Graduate Courses
Prerequisite: MLGN502 or equivalent, or consent of
500-level courses are open to qualified seniors with the
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
permission of the department and the Dean of Graduate
PHGN530. STATISTICAL MECHANICS (II) Review of
School.
thermodynamics; equilibrium and stability; statistical
operator and ensembles; ideal systems; phase transitions;
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
131

non- equilibrium systems. Prerequisite: PHGN341or
PHGN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
equivalent and PHGN520. Co-requisite: PHGN521. 3 hours
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
lecture; 3 semester hours.
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
PHGN540/MLGN507. CONDENSED MATTER I (I)
‘Independent Study’ form must be completed and submitted
Principles and applications of the quantum theory of
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
electrons and phonons in solids: structure, symmetry, and
bonding; electron states and excitations in metals and alloys;
PHGN606. CLASSICAL MECHANICS II Continuation of
transport properties; surfaces. Prerequisite: PHGN420 and
PHGN505. Selected topics from elasticity, plasticity, and
PHGN440 or their equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
fluid mechanics including the thermal and electromagnetic
hours.
interaction. Theories of interacting fields. Prerequisite:
PHGN505. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PHGN541/MLGN508. CONDENSED MATTER II (II)
Principles and applications of the quantum theory of
PHGN608. ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY II Spherical,
electrons and phonons in solids: phonon states in solids;
cylindrical, and guided waves; relativistic 4- dimensional
transport properties; electron states and excitations in
formulation of electromagnetic theory. Prerequisite:
semiconductors and insulators; defects and impurities;
PHGN507. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
amorphous materials; magnetism; superconductivity.
PHGN612. MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS II Continuation
Prerequisite: PHGN540/MLGN507. 3 hours lecture; 3
of PHGN511. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
semester hours.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
PHGN542. SOLID STATE DEVICES (I) An overview of
PHGN622. QUANTUM MECHANICS III Continuation of
the physical principles involved in the fabrication, character-
PHGN521. Introduction to the techniques of quantized
ization, and operation of solid state devices. Topics will
fields with applications to quantum electrodynamics and the
include: p-n junction devices (e.g., LEDs, solar cells, lasers,
non-relativistic many-body problem. Prerequisite:
particle detectors); junction transistor devices (e.g., FETs,
PHGN521. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
thyristors, switches); surface- and interface-controlled
devices (e.g., MOSFETs, CSDs, Schottky barrier devices);
PHGN631. TOPICS IN STATISTICAL MECHANICS
other devices such as infrared detectors, recording and
Continuation of PHGN530. Interacting systems; disordered
display devices, thermoelectric devices, Josephson junc-
systems; phase transitions; Green functions for many-body
tions, electroluminescent and electrochromic panels.
systems; scaling and renormalization in critical phenomena.
Prerequisite: PHGN440. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisite: PHGN530 and PHGN622. 3 hours lecture; 3
Offered every other year in alternation with PHGN544.
semester hours.
PHGN544. THEORY AND OPERATION OF PHOTO-
PHGN698. SPECIAL TOPICS (I, II) Pilot course or special
VOLTAIC DEVICES (I) A thorough treatment of photovol-
topics course. Prerequisites: Consent of department. Credit
taic device operation and theory. Material and device
to be determined by instructor, maximum of 6 credit hours.
parameters as related to the generation of photocurrents and
PHGN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
photovoltages in solar cells. Physics of various solar cell
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
types: homojunctions, heterojunctions, Schottky barriers,
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
MIS, SIS, electrochemical. Environmental effects and
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
device production. Important measurement techniques.
‘Independent Study’ form must be completed and submitted
Discussion of research topics from the current literature.
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Prerequisite: PHGN440 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered every other year in
PHGN701. GRADUATE THESIS-MASTER OF SCIENCE
alternation with PHGN542.
(I, II, S) Preparation of master’s thesis under supervision of
the graduate student’s advisory committee. Required of all
PHGN580. QUANTUM OPTICS Theory and application of
candidates for the degree of Master of Science. 6 semester
the following: Gaussian beams, optical cavities and wave
hours upon completion of thesis.
guides, atomic radiation, detection of radiation, laser
oscillation, nonlinear optics. Prerequisite: PHGN420 and
PHGN703. GRADUATE THESIS-DOCTOR OF PHI-
PHGN462. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
LOSOPHY (I, II, S) Conducted under the supervision of
student’s doctoral committee. Required of candidates for the
PHGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS (I, II) Pilot course or special
degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 30 semester hours credit
topics course. Prerequisites: Consent of department. Credit
to be determined by instructor, maximum of 6 credit hours.
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Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Centers and Institutes
Advanced Coatings and Surface
lurgy branch of materials science and engineering. Objec-
Engineering Laboratory
tives of ASPPRC are to perform research of direct benefit to
the users and producers of steels, to educate graduate
The Advanced Coating and Surface Engineering
students within the context of research programs of major
Laboratory (ACSEL) is a multi-disciplinary laboratory that
theoretical and practical interest to the steel-using and steel-
serves as a focal point for industry- driven research and
producing industries, and to develop a forum to stimulate
education in advanced thin films and coating systems,
advances in the processing, quality and application of steel.
surface engineering, tribology and electronic and semicon-
ductor materials. The laboratory is supported by an
Research programs consist of several projects, each of
industrial consortium that holds semi-annual meetings
which is a graduate student thesis. Small groups of students
designed to maximize interaction between participants,
and faculty are involved in each of the research programs.
evaluate the research conducted by graduate students and
Sponsor representatives are encouraged to participate on the
faculty, and provide direction and guidance for future
graduate student committees.
activities. ACSEL provides opportunities for CSM faculty
The Center was established with a five-year grant of
and graduate students to visit and work in sponsor facilities,
$575,000 from the National Science Foundation, and is now
participate in technical meetings with sponsors, and for
self-sufficient, primarily as a result of industry support.
CSM graduates to gain employment with sponsors.
Center for Combustion and
Advanced Control of Energy and
Environmental Research
Power Systems
The Center for Combustion and Environmental Research
The Advanced Control of Energy and Power Systems
(CCER) is an interdisciplinary research and educational unit
Center (ACEPS), based in the Engineering Division,
specializing in the chemistry and physics of exothermic
features a unique partnership consisting of industry, the
reacting flows. Specific research projects are varied, but
National Science Foundation (NSF), the Department of
they fall into five core areas: detailed combustion chemical
Energy (DOE), the Electric Power Research Institute
kinetic modeling and experiment; combustion flow-field
(EPRI), Colorado School of Mines (CSM) and Purdue
modeling and experiment; combustion spray and aerosol
University. The mission of ACEPS is to conduct fundamen-
modeling and experiment; optical sensing techniques in
tal research and applied research supporting the technical
combustion; and combustion emissions remediation.
advancement of the electric utility industry, their customers,
Collaborative projects involve CSM’s Engineering
and component suppliers in the field of electric power
Division and Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining
systems with special emphasis on the advanced/intelligent
Department, and often include faculty and students from
control and power quality in the generation, transmission,
other universities. Interaction with federal and industrial
distribution, and utilization stages; using such research as a
sponsors not only helps to guide the Center’s program, but
means of advancing graduate education.
offers students opportunities after graduation.
Center research projects focus on the development of an
Center for Commercial Applications of
intelligent energy system that will employ advanced power
electronics, enhanced computer and communications
Combustion in Space
systems, new smart sensor and actuators, and smart
The Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion
interactive utility/customer interface systems. Examples
in Space (CCACS) is a NASA/Industry/ University space
include: electric vehicles and their impact on power quality,
commercialization center based at the Colorado School of
localized and adaptive monitoring systems for transmission
Mines. The mission of the Center is to assist industry in
and distribution networks, and intelligent automatic
developing commercial products by conducting combustion
generation control for transient loads.
research which takes advantage of the unique properties of
Advanced Steel Processing and
space.
Products Research Center
The Center operates under the auspices of NASA’s
Office of Space Access and Technology (OSAT), whose
The Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research
mission is to provide access to space for commercial
Center (ASPPRC) at Colorado School of Mines was
research and development activities by private industry. The
established in 1984. The Center is a unique partnership
focus of CCACS is on products and processes in which
between industry, the National Science Foundation (NSF),
combustion plays a key role and which can benefit from
and Colorado School of Mines, and is devoted to building
knowledge to be gained through experiments conducted in
excellence in research and education in the ferrous metal-
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
133

space. Examples include combustors, fire suppression and
Involving over twenty students and faculty from five
safety, combustion synthesis of advanced materials and
departments, the center provides a unique combination of
sensors and controls. The Center involves faculty and
expertise that has enabled CSM to achieve international
students from the departments of Chemical Engineering,
prominence in the area of solids. CSM participants interact
Economics and Business, Engineering, Metallurgical and
on an on-going basis with sponsors, including frequent
Materials Engineering, and Physics. For further information,
visits to their facilities. For students, this interaction often
contact CCACS Director F.D. Schowengerdt, Physics
continues beyond graduation, with opportunities for
Department, CSM, (303) 384-2091.
employment at sponsoring industries.
Center for Environmental Risk
Center for Robotics and Intelligent
Assessment
Systems
The mission of the Center for Environmental Risk
The Center for Robotics and Intelligent Systems (CRIS)
Assessment (CERA) at CSM is to unify and enhance
focuses on the study and application of advanced engineer-
environmental risk assessment research and educational
ing and computer science research in neural networks,
activities at CSM. By bringing diverse, inter-disciplinary
robotics, sensor/actuator development and artificial
expertise to bear on problems in environmental risk
intelligence, to problems in environment, energy, natural
assessment, CERA facilitates the development of signifi-
resources, materials, transportation, information, communi-
cantly improved, scientifically-based approaches for
cations and medicine. CRIS concentrates on problems
estimating human and ecological risks and for using the
which are not amenable to traditional solutions within a
results of such assessments. Education and research
single discipline, but rather require a multi-disciplinary
programs within CERA integrate faculty and students from
systems approach to integrate technologies. The systems
the departments of Chemical Engineering and Petroleum
require closed loop controllers that incorporate artificial
Refining, Environmental Sciences and Engineering,
intelligence and machine learning techniques to reason
Chemistry and Geochemistry, Economics and Business, and
autonomously or in cooperation with a human supervisor.
Geology and Geological Engineering.
Established in 1994, CRIS includes faculty from the
Center for Intelligent Biomedical
departments of Engineering, Mathematical and Computer
Devices and Musculoskeletal
Science, Geophysics, Metallurgical and Materials Engineer-
ing, and Environmental Science and Engineering. Research
Systems
is sponsored by industry, federal agencies, state agencies,
The multi-institutional Center for Intelligent Biomedical
and joint government-industry initiatives. Interaction with
Devices and Musculoskeletal systems (IBDMS) integrates
industry enables CRIS to identify technical needs that
programs and expertise from CSM, Rose Musculoskeletal
require research, to cooperatively develop solutions, and to
Research Laboratory, University of Colorado Health
generate innovative mechanisms for the technology transfer.
Sciences Center and the Colorado VA Research Center,
Enthusiastic and motivated students are encouraged to join
Established CSM as a National Science Foundation
CRIS for education and research in the area of robotics and
Industry/University Cooperative Research Center, IBDMS is
intelligent systems.
also supported by industry and State organizations.
Center for Solar and Electronic
With its Industrial Advisory Board, IBDMS seeks to
Materials
establish educational programs and long-term basic and
applied research efforts that improve U.S. technology.
The Center for Solar and Electronic Materials (CSEM)
IBDMS focuses the work of diverse engineering, materials
was established in 1995 to focus, support, and extend
and medicine disciplines. Its graduates are a new generation
growing activity in the area of electronic materials for solar
of students with an integrated engineering and medicine
and related applications. CSEM facilitates interdisciplinary
systems view, with increasing opportunities available in the
collaborations across the CSM campus; fosters interactions
biotechnology industry.
with national laboratories, industries, public utilities, and
other universities; and serves to guide and strengthen the
Center for Research on Hydrates and
electronic materials curriculum.
Other Solids
CSEM draws from expertise in the departments of
The Center for Research on Hydrates and Other Solids is
Physics, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Chemical
sponsored by a consortium of fifteen industrial and
and Petroleum Engineering, Chemistry and Geochemistry,
government entities. The center focuses on research and
and from the Division of Engineering. The largest research
education involving solids in hydrocarbon and aqueous
activity is directed at the photovoltaic industry. CSEM also
fluids which affect exploration, production and processing
supports research in thin film materials, polymeric devices,
of gas and oil.
electrophotography, encapsulants, electronic materials
134
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

processing, and systems issues associated with electronic
Industrial collaborations which provide equipment,
materials and devices.
materials and services.
Graduate students in materials science and the above-
Research experience at industrial plants or national
mentioned departments can pursue research on center-
laboratories.
related projects. Undergraduates are involved through
Professional experience and exposure before nationally
engineering design courses and summer research. Close
recognized organizations through student presenta-
proximity to the National Renewable Energy Lab and
tions of university research.
several local photovoltaic companies provides a unique
Direct involvement in national welding and materials
opportunity for students to work with industry and govern-
professional societies.
ment labs as they attempt to solve real world problems.
Colorado Advanced Materials Institute
External contacts also provide guidance in targeting the
With its mission to coordinate and foster research in
educational curriculum toward the needs of the electronic
materials science and engineering leading to economic
materials industry.
development, CAMI was established in 1984 by the state of
Center for Wave Phenomena
Colorado at CSM. It functions as a consortium of the state’s
With sponsorship for its research by 36 companies in the
research universities (CSM, CU, CSU, DU and UCCS), and
worldwide oil exploration industry, this interdisciplinary
private industry.
program, including faculty and students from the Math-
CAMI is one of the four major technology areas funded
ematical and Computer Sciences and Geophysics Depart-
by the State’s science and technology agency, the Colorado
ments, is engaged in a coordinated and integrated program
Advanced Technology Institute (CATI), whose mission is to
of research in inverse problems and problems of seismic
establish Colorado as an acknowledged world leader in
data processing and interpretation. Its methods have
selected technologies. In concert with this goal, CAMI has
applications to seismic exploration, mapping of the seabed,
competitively awarded more than $400,000 in seed grants to
ocean sound-speed profiling, and nondestructive testing and
researchers in Colorado. These seed grants enable investiga-
evaluation, among other areas. Extensive use is made of
tors to develop subsequent proposals for full funding from
analytical techniques, especially asymptotic methods and
federal and industry sources, thus leveraging CAMI’s
computational techniques. Methodology is developed
investment.
through computer implementation, based on the philosophy
To stimulate effective technology transfer and promote
that the ultimate test of an inverse method is its application
strong industry/university partnership, CAMI sponsors a
to field or experimental data. Thus, the group starts from a
matching grant program directed at joint academic-industry
physical problem, develops a mathematical model that
research. Participation from the small business segment is
adequately represents the physics, derives an approximate
represented on the CAMI board by the director of the
solution technique, generates a computer code to implement
Jefferson County Business and Innovation Centers, the
the method, tests on synthetic data, and, finally, tests on
Colorado Center for Technology Transfer and by manage-
field data.
ment representatives from various small firms in the
Center for Welding, Joining and
materials community.
Coatings Research
Colorado Center for Advanced
The Center for Welding , Joining and Coatings Research
Ceramics
(CWJCR) is an integral part of the Department of Metallur-
The Colorado Center for Advanced Ceramics (CCAC) is
gical and Materials Engineering. The goal of CWJCR is to
laying the foundation for exciting technological develop-
promote education and research, and to advance understand-
ments in advanced ceramics. Established at CSM in April
ing of the metallurgical aspects of welding, joining and
1988, the Center is dedicated to excellence in research and
coating processes. The Center’s current activities include:
graduate education in high technology ceramic materials. A
education, research, conferences, short courses, seminars,
collaborative industry-university venture, the goal of the
information source and transfer, and industrial consortia.
Center is to translate scientific advancements in ceramics
The Center for Welding, Joining and Coatings Research
into new and improved ceramic fabrication processes and
assists the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
ceramic materials. The close coupling between the univer-
Department by providing numerous opportunities which
sity and industry within the Center, ensures the transfer of
directly contribute to the student’s professional growth.
concepts into the industrial sector. Participation of industrial
Some of these opportunities include:
members representing raw material produced ceramic
Direct involvement in the projects which constitute the
manufacturers, and users of ceramic materials promotes the
Center’s research program.
rapid transition of new ideas into industrial practice. Each
Interaction with internationally recognized visiting
project involves research leading to a graduate thesis of a
scholars.
student. Current research activities involve ceramic powder
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
135

processing, the electronic properties of bulk and thin film
research, development and testing of new methods and
ceramics, ceramic-metal composites, and high temperature
equipment, thus facilitating the rapid application of
synthesis of new ceramic materials and fibers.
economically feasible new technologies.
Colorado Institute for Fuels and High-
Current research projects are being conducted through-
Altitude Engine Research
out the world in the areas of tunnel, raise and shaft boring,
rock mechanics, micro-seismic detection, machine instru-
The Colorado Institute for Fuels and High Altitude
mentation and robotics, rock fragmentation and drilling,
Engine Research (CIFER) is an interdisciplinary research
materials handling systems, innovative mining methods, and
institute involving faculty and students from several
mine design and economics analysis relating to energy and
academic departments at the Colorado School of Mines.
non-fuel minerals development and production. EMI has
CIFER was formed to assist industry, State and Federal
been a pioneer in the development of special applications
governments in developing and implementing clean air
software and hardware systems and has amassed extensive
policy for the benefit of the U.S. and particularly for high
databases and specialized computer programs. Outreach
altitude communities through the development of newer,
activities for the Institute include the offering of short
cleaner burning fuels and the technology to properly use
courses to the industry, and sponsorship and participation in
fuels.
major international conferences in tunneling, shaft drilling,
The overall objective of CIFER is to enhance air quality
raise boring and mine mechanization.
through research, development and education in relation to
The full-time team at EMI consists of scientists,
heavy-duty mobile sources through its specific strengths in
engineers, and support staff. Graduate students pursue their
fuels science, catalysis, materials, combustion science and
thesis work on Institute projects, while undergraduate
analytical chemistry.
students are employed in research.
CIFER manages two laboratory facilities: The Heavy
Institute for Energy Resource Studies
Duty Laboratory, located at the Denver Regional Transpor-
tation District facility, performs complete emissions and
The mission of the Institute for Energy Resource Studies
performance analyses of transit buses and large trucks; and
is to conduct authoritative geologic and engineering
The CSM Fuels Laboratory, which operates on the CSM
evaluations of energy resources on a national and worldwide
campus. Additional laboratory capabilities are available to
basis. Current research emphasis is on applied studies of
CIFER through CSM member academic departments.
natural gas and oil from conventional and nonconventional
reservoirs.
Energy and Minerals Field Institute
One research arm of the Institute is the Potential Gas
The Energy and Minerals Field Institute is an educa-
Agency. Sponsored primarily by the American Gas
tional activity serving Colorado School of Mines students
Association, the Agency guides the work of the Potential
and external audiences. The goal of the Institute is to
Gas Committee, which consists of volunteers members from
provide better understanding of complex regional issues
industry, government, and academic institutions who
surrounding development of western energy and mineral
estimate the size and location of the nation’s natural gas
resources by providing firsthand experience that cannot be
resource base. Other research sponsors include the U.S.
duplicated in the classroom. The Institute conducts a six-day
Department of Energy, and the Gas Research Institute.
interdisciplinary program for educators, the media,
Cooperating entities include industry, government and
government officials, industry, and the financial community.
research organizations, and projects include faculty and
A six-day program is also conducted for Washington
students in various CSM departments.
congressional aides and agency personnel. The Institute also
hosts conferences and seminars throughout the year dealing
Institute for Resource and
with issues specific to western resources development.
Environmental Geosciences (IREG)
Students involved in Institute programs are afforded a
The Institute for Resource and Environmental Geo-
unique opportunity to learn about the technological,
sciences (IREG) was established to advance interdiscipli-
economic, environmental, and policy aspects of resource
nary earth science research. Its board of directors is
development.
comprised of the heads of the Departments of Engineering,
Excavation Engineering and Earth
Geology and Geological Engineering, Geophysics, Math
Mechanics Institute
and Computer Science, Mineral Economics and Petroleum
Engineering. IREG’s mission is to stimulate innovation and
The Excavation Engineering and Earth Mechanics
support initiatives in integrated, multidisciplinary research
Institute (EMI), established in 1974, combines education
and education of earth scientists and engineers for resource
and research for the development of improved excavation
exploration and production, geo-engineering and applied
technology. By emphasizing a joint effort among research,
environmental geo-sciences.
academic, and industrial concerns, EMI contributes to the
136
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

IREG conducts interdisciplinary energy and environmen-
organization specializing in applied studies of petroleum
tal restoration research projects for industry and govern-
reservoirs. The center integrates disciplines from within the
ment. Areas of expertise include: integrated geology,
Departments of Chemistry and Geochemistry, Geology and
geophysics, environmental science and petroleum engineer-
Geological Engineering, and Petroleum Engineering.
ing; geohydrologic modeling; subsurface characterization;
PEPC offers students and faculty the opportunity to
fate and transport; risk assessment; groundwater contamina-
participate in research areas including: improved techniques
tion and containment; remediation technologies testing;
for exploration, drilling, completion, stimulation and
geostatistics/modeling/neural networks. Current projects
reservoir evaluation techniques; characterization of
include site characterization, development of test beds to
stratigraphic architecture and flow behavior of petroleum
test proposed in situ remediation technologies, studying
reservoirs at multiple scales; evaluation of petroleum
foam diversion in fracturing, stratigraphic inversion at the
reserves and resources on a national and worldwide basis;
Brent/Mesa Verde field, and development of geoscience
and development and application of educational techniques
inversion methods.
to integrate the petroleum disciplines.
International Ground Water Modeling
Reservoir Characterization Project
Center
The Reservoir Characterization Project (RCP) works on
The International Ground Water Modeling Center
the forefront of new multicomponent 3-D seismic technol-
(IGWMC) is an information, education, and research center
ogy in the optimization of reservoir development. Multi-
for ground-water modeling established at Holcomb
component seismic data are recorded, processed and
Research Institute in 1978, and relocated to the Colorado
interpreted to increase the fidelity of seismic data to define
School of Mines in 1991. Its mission is to provide an
structural and stratigraphic variations in the subsurface.
international focal point for ground-water professionals,
Application of the new integrated reservoir technologies
managers, and educators in advancing the use of quality-
leads to enhanced recovery of hydrocarbons from reservoirs.
assured computer models in ground-water resource
The RCP consortium was established in 1985 and
protection and management. IGWMC operates a clearing-
includes 30 national and international companies. Faculty
house for ground-water modeling software; organizes
and students from the departments of Geophysics, Geology
conferences, short courses and seminars; provides technical
and Geological Engineering, and Petroleum Engineering are
advice and assistance related to ground-water. In support of
provided the opportunity to work closely with industrial
its information and training activities, IGWMC conducts a
contacts in areas both educational and research.
program of applied research and development in ground-
water modeling. Topics covered in this program include
W.J. Kroll Institute for Extractive
quality assurance in modeling, modeling screening and
Metallurgy
testing, evaluation of model use and model needs, software
A grant from the late W.J. Kroll enabled the establish-
development and improvement, and model review studies.
ment of an Institute for Extractive Metallurgy in the
CSM students are involved with IGWMC activities at the
Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering. The
graduate as well as undergraduate levels. Students from
Institute promotes studies and research in the production
various CSM departments are employed to assist with
and refining of metals, and processing of waste and
computer programming, model testing, program documenta-
hazardous materials, particularly mineral processing,
tion, user support, and multidisciplinary research activities.
pyrometallurgy, hydrometallurgy, electrometallurgy and the
application of these areas to the development and research
Petroleum Exploration and
of environmentally acceptable methods of extraction of
Production Center
metals. Scholarships, fellowships, conferences, visiting
The Petroleum Exploration and Production Center
lecturers, and research grants are available through this
(PEPC) is an interdisciplinary educational and research
organization.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
137

Directory of the School
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
ROBERT G. MOORE, 1995 -B.S., Northern Arizona
JOHN K. COORS 16000 Table Mountain Parkway, Golden,
University; M.P.A., University of Colorado; Vice President
CO 80403
for Business Affairs
FRANK ERISMAN Holme Roberts & Owen, 1700 Lincoln
STEPHEN P. POUGNET, 1995-B.A., Michigan State
St., Suite 4100 Denver, CO 80203
University; Vice President for Institutional Advancement
HUGH W. EVANS 768 Rockway Place Boulder, CO 80303
PHILLIP R. ROMIG, 1969-B.S., University of Notre Dame;
M.S., Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Dean of the Office
KAREN OSTRANDER-KRUG Krug & Sobel, 621
of Graduate Studies and Research, and Professor of
Seventeenth St., Suite 777, Denver, CO 80293
Geophysics
F. STEVEN MOONEY Thompson Creek Metals Co., 945
NIGEL T. MIDDLETON, 1990-B.Sc., Ph.D., University of
W. Kenyon Ave. Englewood, CO 80110
the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg; Associate Vice President
DAVID D. POWELL, JR. Holland & Hart, LLP 555
for Academic Affairs; Associate Professor of Engineering,
Seventeenth St., Suite 3200 Denver, CO 80202
P.E., S. Africa
DAVID. J. WAGNER David Wagner & Associates, P.C.,
JAMES P. ALLEN, 1986-B.A., University of Colorado;
8400 E. Prentice Ave., Englewood, CO 80111
Manager of Software Implementation
KIMBERLY KLOPPEL Student Representative
LINDA J. BALDWIN, 1994-B.S., Iowa State University;
Continuing Education Program Coordinator
EMERITUS VOTING MEMBERS OF BOT
GARY L. BAUGHMAN, 1984-B.S.Ch.E., Ohio University;
Ms. Sally Vance Allen
M.S., Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Director of Special
Mr. Leo N. Bradley
Programs and Continuing Education and Associate
Mr. Joseph Coors, Sr.
Research Professor
Mr. Joseph Coors, Jr.
Mr. William K. Coors
DAVID G. BEAUSANG, 1993-B.S., Colorado State
Mr. Kenneth R. Fenwick
University; Computing Support Specialist
Mr. Jack Grynberg
JUDI A. BONACQUISTI, 1997-B.S., Colorado State
Mr. Don K. Henderson
University; Assistant Director of the Minority Engineering
Mr. Anthony L. Joseph
Program
Mr. J. Robert Maytag
BARBARA A. BOSCHE, 1998-Director of Grants and
Mr. Terry P. McNulty
Research Development
Mr. Donald E. Miller
Mr. Randy L. Parcel
HEATHER A. BOYD, 1990-B.S., Montana State Univer-
Mr. D. Monte Pascoe
sity; Director of Residence Life
Mr. John A. Reeves, Sr.
STEVEN L. BRIDGEMAN, 1995-B.S., Colorado State
Mr. Fred R. Schwartzberg
University; Controller
Mr. Ted P. Stockmar
Mr. Charles E. Stott, Jr.
ERLING A. BROSTUEN, 1994-B.A., University of North
Dr. John W Vanderwilt*
Dakota; Continuing Education Program Coordinator and
Mr. J. N. Warren
Director of the Energy and Minerals Field Institute
Mr. James C. Wilson
RONALD L. BRUMMETT, 1993-B.A., Metropolitan State
Mr. Russell L. Wood
College; M.A., University of Northern Colorado; M.B.A.,
ADMINISTRATION
University of Colorado Denver; Director of CSM Career
Center and the Office for Student Development and
THEODORE A. BICKART, 1998-B.E.S., M.S.E., D.Engr.,
Academic Services
The Johns Hopkins University; President and Professor of
Engineering
TIMOTHY W. CAKE, 1994-B.S., Colorado State Univer-
sity; M.S., Regis University; Director of Plant Facilities
JOHN U. TREFNY, 1977-B.A., Fordham College; Ph.D.,
Rutgers University; Vice President for Academic Affairs and
G. MATTNEY COLE, 1982-B.S., Texas Christian Univer-
Dean of Faculty, Professor of Physics
sity; Ph.D., Florida State University; Continuing Education
Program Coordinator
HAROLD R. CHEUVRONT, 1976-84, 1985-B.S., M.A.,
West Virginia University; Ph.D., University of Northern
KATHLEEN CONNOR, 1996-Director of Outdoor
Colorado; Vice President for Student Life and Dean of
Recreation
Students
138
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

JEFFRY D. CUSTARD, 1993-B.S., Colorado State
DEBBY PAGE LANE, 1993-A.A.S. Front Range Commu-
University; M.L.I.S., University of Texas Austin; Comput-
nity College; B.S., Metropolitan State College; M.P.A.,
ing Support Specialist
University of Colorado Denver; Director of Human
Resources
HILLE L. DAIS, 1999-B.A., M.A., University of Minne-
sota; B.S., Metropolitan State College of Denver; Associate
DAVID LARUE, 1998-Computer Support Specialist
Vice President for Business Affairs
DEBRA K. LASICH, 1999-B.S., Kearney State College;
MARY C. DALE, 1984-B.A., Southwestern College; M.A.,
M.A., University of Nebraska; Interim Director of the
University of Denver; Assistant for Collaborative Informa-
Women in Science, Engineering, and Mathematics
tion Development and Support
(WISEM) Program
MARY DAVIS, 1998-B.S., Metropolitan State College;
LINDA LAU, 1998-Advising Coordinator
M.Ed., University of Colorado; Associate Director of
EDWARD R. LIBERATORE, 1991-B.A., Georgetown
Financial Aid
University; J.D., Washington College of Law; Director of
THERESE DEEGAN-YOUNG, 1987-B.A., St. Louis
Legal Services
University; M.A., University of Colorado; Student Develop-
CAIRN A. LINDLOFF, 1994-B.S., University of Nevada at
ment Center Counselor
Reno; M.Ed., University of South Carolina; Director of
JACK M. DeLONG, 1998-Museum Collections Manager
Student Activities and Greek Advisor
TRICIA DOUTHIT, 1998-B.S., Colorado School of Mines;
ROBERT A. MacPHERSON, 1988-B.S., United States
Assistant Director of Admissions
Naval Academy; Director of Environmental Health and
Safety
RHONDA L. DVORNAK, 1994-B.S., Colorado School of
Mines; Continuing Education Program Coordinator
A. EDWARD MANTZ, 1994-B.S., Colorado School of
Mines; Director of Green Center
MELODY A. FRANCISCO, 1988-89, 1991-B.S., Montana
State University; Continuing Education Program Coordina-
JULIAN MARTINEZ, 1993-B.S.E.E., University of Texas
tor
El Paso; Minority Engineering Program Director
ROBERT A. FRANCISCO, 1988-B.S., Montana State
VIRGINIA A. MAST, 1977-B.A., Middlebury College;
University; Director of Student Life
Curator of the Geology Museum
GEORGE FUNKEY, 1991-M.S., Michigan Technological
LEAH K. McNEILL, 1997-B.A., University of Mississippi;
University; Director of Information Services
M.A. University of South Carolina; Director of Public
Relations
LISA GOBERIS, 1998-B.S., University of Northern
Colorado; Assistant Director of the Student Center
MARY MITTAG-MILLER, 1998-Director of ORS
BRUCE P. GOETZ, 1980-84, 1987- B.A., Norwich
STEPHANIE K. POMPONIO, 1999-B.A., University of
University; M.S., M.B.A., Florida Institute of Technology;
Northern Colorado; Internship Development Coordinator
Associate Director of Admissions
JAMES L. PROUD, 1994-B.S., University of Wisconsin,
R. MICHAEL HAVILAND, 1995-B.A., Athenaeum of
Whitewater; M.A., California State Polytechnic University;
Ohio; M.P.A., University of Pittsburgh; Ed.D., University of
Continuing Education Program Coordinator
Massachusetts; Executive Director, Office of International
SUSAN K. PURCELL, 1994-B.S., St. Bonaventure
Programs
University; M.A., University of Colorado; Continuing
JOHN P. JORDAN, 1996-B.S., University of Idaho; M.S.,
Education Program Coordinator
Montana College of Mineral Science and Technology;
CAROLYN L. REED, 1980-Assistant to the President
Instructor and Experimental Mine Manager
MARIAN E. ROHRER, R,N, 1998-Director, Student Health
MELVIN L. KIRK, 1995-B.S., M.A., University of
Center
Northern Colorado; Student Development Center Counselor
SYDNEY SANDROCK, 1995-Assistant to the Vice
ROGER A. KOESTER, 1989-B.A., Grinnell College;
President for Business Affairs
M.B.A., Drake University; Director of Financial Aid
SANDRA M. SCHMITZER, 1995-B.A., Michigan State
KATHLEEN LAMB, 1986-94, 1995 B.A., Harvard
University; Director of Materials Management
University; B.A., Metropolitan State College; Computer
Support Specialist
WILLIAM R. SHARP, 1979-E.M., M.S., Colorado School
of Mines; Research Development Officer
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
139

SUSAN A. SMITH, 1995-B.S., Oklahoma State University;
AUSTIN R. BROWN, B.A., Grinnell College; M.A., Ph.D.,
M.A., University of Tulsa; Registrar
Yale University; Emeritus Professor of Mathematical and
Computer Sciences
RUTH A. STREVELER, 1994-B.A., Indiana University;
M.S., Ohio State University; Ph.D., University of Hawaii
JAMES T. BROWN, B.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado;
Manoa; Academic Achievement Coordinator for Student
Emeritus Professor of Physics
Support Services
W. REX BULL, B.Sc., App. Diploma in Mineral Dressing,
JANE R. TAYLOR, 1997-B.A., Augusta College; Director
Leeds University; Ph.D., University of Queensland;
of Marketing Communications
Emeritus Professor of Metallurgical and Materials Engineer-
ing
CAROL L. WARD, 1993-B.S., Ohio State University;
M.A., Denver University; Computer Support Engineer
JERROLD J. BURNETT, A.S. in E.E., Arlington State
College; B.A., Texas A&M University; M.S., Texas A&I
LOUISE WILDEMAN, 1998-B.A., Smith College; M.A.,
College; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma; Emeritus Professor
University of Wisconsin; Assistant Director of Career
of Physics, P.E.
Planning and Placement
BETTY J. CANNON, B.A., M.A., University of Alabama;
DEREK J. WILSON, 1982-B.S., University of Montana;
Ph.D., University of Colorado; Emeritus Associate
Director of the Computing Center
Professor of Liberal Arts and International Studies
A. WILLIAM YOUNG, 1974-B.S., North Carolina State
W. JOHN CIESLEWICZ, B.A., St. Francis College; M.A.,
University; M.S., University of Denver; Director of
M.S., University of Colorado; Emeritus Associate Professor
Enrollment Management and Assistant Vice President for
of Slavic Studies and Foreign Languages
Student Life
RICHARD H. DeVOTO, A.B., Dartmouth College; M.Sc.,
EDWARD A. ZITT, 1991-Manager of Financial Computing
Thayer School of Engineering Dartmouth College; D.Sc.,
EMERITI
Colorado School of Mines; Emeritus Professor of Geology,
P.E.
GEORGE S. ANSELL, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Rensselaer
Polytechnic Institute; Emeritus President and Professor of
DONALD I. DICKINSON, B.A., Colorado State Univer-
Metallurgical Engineering, P.E.
sity; M.A., University of New Mexico; Emeritus Professor
of Liberal Arts and International Studies
GUY T. McBRIDE, JR. B.S., University of Texas; D.Sc.,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Emeritus President,
J. PATRICK DYER, B.P.E., Purdue University; Emeritus
P.E.
Associate Professor of Physical Education and Athletics
JOHN F. ABEL, JR. E.M., M.Sc., E.Sc., Colorado School
WILTON E. ECKLEY, A.B., Mount Union College; M.A.,
of Mines; Emeritus Professor of Mining Engineering
The Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., Case Western
Reserve University; Emeritus Professor of Liberal Arts and
R. BRUCE ALLISON, B.S., State University of New York
International Studies
at Cortland; M.S., State University of New York at Albany;
Emeritus Professor of Physical Education and Athletics
KENNETH W. EDWARDS, B.S., University of Michigan;
M.A., Dartmouth College; Ph.D., University of Colorado;
WILLIAM R. ASTLE, B.A., State University of New York
Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
at New Paltz; M.A., Columbia University; M.A., University
of Illinois; Emeritus Professor of Mathematical and
JOSEPH J. FINNEY, B.S., United States Merchant Marine
Computer Sciences
Academy; M.S., University of New Mexico; Ph.D.,
University of Wisconsin; Emeritus Professor of Geology
HENRY A. BABCOCK, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of
Colorado; Emeritus Professor of Civil Engineering, P.E.
EDWARD G. FISHER, B.S., M.A., University of Illinois;
Emeritus Professor of English
RAMON E. BISQUE, B.S., St. Norbert’s College; M.S.
Chemistry, M.S. Geology, Ph.D., Iowa State College;
DAVID E. FLETCHER, B.S., M.A., Colorado College;
Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
M.S.B.A., Ph.D., University of Denver; Emeritus Professor
of Economics and Business
NORMAN BLEISTEIN, B.S., Brooklyn College; M.S.,
Ph.D., New York University; Professor of Mathematical and
S. DALE FOREMAN, B.S., Texas Technological College;
Computer Sciences
M.S., Ph.D., University of Colorado; Emeritus Professor of
Civil Engineering, P.E.
ARDEL J. BOES, B.A., St. Ambrose College; M.S., Ph.D.,
Purdue University; Professor of Mathematical and
JAMES H. GARY B.S., M.S., Virginia Polytechnic
Computer Sciences
Institute; Ph.D., University of Florida; Emeritus Professor of
Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining, P.E.
140
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

DONALD W. GENTRY, B.S., University of Illinois; M.S.,
THOMAS A. KELLY, B.S., C.E., University of Colorado;
University of Nevada; Ph.D., University of Arizona;
Emeritus Professor of Basic Engineering, P.E.
Professor of Mining Engineering, P.E.
GEORGE H. KENNEDY, B.S., University of Oregon; M.S.,
JOHN O. GOLDEN, B.E., M.S., Vanderbilt University;
Ph.D., Oregon State University; Emeritus Professor of
Ph.D., Iowa State University; Emeriti Professor of Chemical
Chemistry and Geochemistry
Engineering and Petroleum Refining, P.E.
ARTHUR J. KIDNAY, P.R.E., D.Sc., Colorado School of
THOMAS L. T. GROSE, B.S., M.S., University of
Mines; M.S., University of Colorado; Emeritus Professor of
Washington; Ph.D., Stanford University; Emeritus Professor
Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining, P.E.
of Geology
R. EDWARD KNIGHT. B.S., University of Tulsa; M.A.,
C. RICHARD GROVES, B.S., M.S., Purdue University;
University of Denver; Emeritus Professor of Engineering
Emeritus Professor of Engineering
GEORGE KRAUSS, B.S., Lehigh University; M.S., Sc.D.,
RAYMOND R. GUTZMAN, A.B., Fort Hays State College;
Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Professor of
M.S., State University of Iowa; Emeritus Professor of
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, P.E.
Mathematical and Computer Sciences
DONALD LANGMUIR, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Harvard
FRANK A. HADSELL, B.S., M.S., University of Wyoming;
University; Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and Geochem-
D.Sc., Colorado School of Mines; Emeritus Professor of
istry and Emeritus Professor of Environmental Science &
Geophysics
Engineering
FRANK G. HAGIN, B.A., Bethany Nazarene College;
WILLIAM B. LAW, B.Sc., University of Nevada; Ph.D.,
M.A., Southern Methodist University; Ph.D., University of
Ohio State University; Emeritus Associate Professor of
Colorado; Emeritus Professor of Mathematical and
Physics
Computer Sciences
FRED R. LEFFLER, B.S.E.E., University of Denver; M.S.,
JOHN W. HANCOCK, A.B., Colorado State College;
Ph.D., Oregon State University; Emeritus Professor of
Emeritus Professor of Physical Education and Athletics
Engineering, P.E.
ROBERT C. HANSEN, E.M., Colorado School of Mines;
V. ALLEN LONG, A.B., McPherson College; A.M.,
M.S.M.E., Bradley University; Ph.D., University of Illinois;
University of Nebraska; Ph.D., University of Colorado;
Emeritus Professor of Engineering, P.E.
Emeritus Professor of Physics
JOHN D. HAUN, A.B., Berea College; M.A., Ph.D.,
GEORGE B. LUCAS, B.S., Tulane University; Ph.D., Iowa
University of Wyoming; Emeritus Professor of Geology,
State University; Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and
P.E.
Geochemistry
T. GRAHAM HEREFORD, 1980-B.A., Ph.D. University of
MAURICE W. MAJOR, B.A., Denison University; Ph.D.,
Virginia; Emeritus Professor of Liberal Arts and Interna-
Columbia University; Emeritus Professor of Geophysics
tional Studies
DONALD C.B. MARSH, B.S., M.S., University of
JOHN A. HOGAN, B.S., University of Cincinnati; M.A.,
Arizona; Ph.D., University of Colorado; Emeritus Professor
Lehigh University; Professor of Liberal Arts and Interna-
of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
tional Studies
SCOTT J. MARSHALL, B.S., University of Denver;
WILLIAM A. HUSTRULID, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University
Emeritus Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, P.E.
of Minnesota; Emeritus Professor of Mining Engineering
JAMES W. MARTIN, B.S., Michigan College of Mining
RICHARD W. HUTCHINSON, B.Sc., University of
and Technology; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Emeritus
Western Ontario; M.Sc., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin;
Professor of Engineering, P.E.
Charles Franklin Fogarty Professor in Economic Geology;
JEAN P. MATHER, B.S.C., M.B.A., University of Denver;
Emeritus Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
M.A., Princeton University; Emeritus Professor of Mineral
ABDELWAHID IBRAHIM, B.S., University of Cairo;
Economics
M.S., University of Kansas; Ph.D., Michigan State
FRANK S. MATHEWS, B.A., M.A., University of British
University; Emeritus Associate Professor of Geophysics
Columbia; Ph.D., Oregon State University; Emeritus
GEORGE W. JOHNSON, B.A., University of Illinois;
Professor of Physics
M.A., University of Chicago; Emeritus Professor of English
RUTH A. MAURER, B.S., M.S., Colorado State Univer-
JAMES G. JOHNSTONE, Geol.E., Colorado School of
sity; Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Emeritus Associate
Mines; M.S., Purdue University; (Professional Engineer);
Professor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Emeritus Professor of Civil Engineering
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
141

ROBERT S. McCANDLESS, B.A., Colorado State College;
FRANKLIN J. STERMOLE, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State
Emeritus Professor of Physical Education and Athletics
University; Emeritus Professor of Chemical Engineering
MICHAEL B. McGRATH, B.S.M.E., M.S., University of
and Petroleum Refining/Mineral Economics, P.E.
Notre Dame; Ph.D., University of Colorado; Emeritus
ROBERT J. TAYLOR, BAE School of the Art Institute;
Professor of Engineering
M.A., University of Denver; Emeritus Associate Professor
BILL J. MITCHELL, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of
of Engineering
Oklahoma; Emeritus Professor of Petroleum Engineering
GUY H. TOWLE, Geol.E., Ph.D., Colorado School of
WILLIAM M. MUELLER, Met. E., M.S., D.Sc., Colorado
Mines; Emeritus Associate Professor of Geophysics
School of Mines; Emeritus Vice President for Academic
FUN-DEN WANG, B.S., Taiwan Provincial Cheng-Kung
Affairs and Dean of Faculty and Emeritus Professor of
University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana;
Metallurgical Engineering, P.E.
Emeritus Professor of Mining Engineering
KARL R. NEWMAN, B.S., M.S., University of Michigan;
ROBERT J. WEIMER, B.A., M.A., University of Wyoming;
Ph.D., University of Colorado; Emeritus Professor of
Ph.D., Stanford University; Emeritus Professor of Geologi-
Geology
cal Engineering, P.E.
GABRIEL M. NEUNZERT, B.S., M.Sc., Colorado School
J. EDWARD WHITE, B.A., M.A., University of Texas;
of Mines; (Professional Land Surveyor); Emeritus Associate
Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Emeritus
Professor of Engineering
Professor of Geophysics, P.E.
ROBERT W. PEARSON, P.E., Colorado School of Mines;
WALTER W. WHITMAN, B.E., Ph.D., Cornell University;
Emeritus Associate Professor of Physical Education and
Emeritus Professor of Geophysics
Athletics and Head Soccer Coach
JOHN T. WILLIAMS, B.S., Hamline University; M.S.,
ANTON G. PEGIS, B.A., Western State College; M.A.,
University of Minnesota; Ph.D., Iowa State College;
Ph.D., University of Denver; Emeritus Professor of English
Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
HARRY C. PETERSON, B.S.M.E., Colorado State
ROBERT D. WITTERS, B.A., University of Colorado;
University; M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University; Emeritus
Ph.D., Montana State College; Emeritus Professor of
Professor of Engineering
Chemistry and Geochemistry
ALFRED PETRICK, JR., A.B., B.S., M.S., Columbia
F. RICHARD YEATTS, B.S., The Pennsylvania State
University; M.B.A., University of Denver; Ph.D., University
University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Arizona; Emeritus
of Colorado; Emeritus Professor of Mineral Economics, P.E.
Professor of Physics
THOMAS PHILIPOSE, B.A., M.A., Presidency College-
PROFESSORS
University of Madras; Ph.D., University of Denver;
University Emeritus Professor of Liberal Arts and Interna-
ROBERT M. BALDWIN, 1975-B.S., M.S., Iowa State
tional Studies
University; Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Professor of
Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining and Head of
STEVEN A. PRUESS, B.S., Iowa State University; M.S.,
Department
Ph.D., Purdue University; Professor of Mathematical and
Computer Sciences
THEODORE A. BICKART, 1998-B.E.S., M.S.E., D.Engr.,
The Johns Hopkins University; President and Professor of
ODED RUDAWSKY, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania
Engineering
State University; Emeritus Professor of Mineral Economics
ANNETTE L. BUNGE, 1981-B.S., State University of New
ARTHUR Y. SAKAKURA, B.S., M.S., Massachusetts
York at Buffalo; Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley;
Institute of Technology; Ph.D., University of Colorado;
Professor of Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining
Emeritus Associate Professor of Physics
F. EDWARD CECIL, 1976-B.S., University of Maryland;
MIKLOS D. G. SALAMON, Dipl.Eng., Polytechnical
M.A., Ph.D., Princeton University; Professor of Physics
University, Hungary; Ph.D., University of Durham,
England; Emeritus Professor of Mining Engineering
JIN S. CHUNG, 1980-B.S.E., Seoul National University;
M.S., University of California at Berkeley; Ph.D., Univer-
MAYNARD SLAUGHTER, B.S., Ohio University; M.A.,
sity of Michigan at Ann Arbor; Professor of Engineering
University of Missouri; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh;
Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
REUBEN T. COLLINS, 1994-B.A., University of Northern
Iowa; M.S., Ph.D., California Institute of Technology;
CHARLES W. STARKS, Met.E., M.Met.E, Colorado
Professor of Physics
School of Mines; Emeritus Associate Professor of Chemis-
try, P.E.
142
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

CAROL DAHL, 1991-B.A., University of Wisconsin;
WENDY J. HARRISON, 1988-B.S., Ph.D., University of
Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Professor of Economics
Manchester; Professor of Geology and Geological Engineer-
and Business
ing
STEPHEN R. DANIEL, 1966-Min. Eng.- Chem., M.S.,
WILLY A. M. HEREMAN, 1989-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., State
Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Professor of Chemistry
University of Ghent, Belgium; Professor of Mathematical
and Geochemistry and Head of Department
and Computer Sciences
THOMAS L. DAVIS, 1980-B.E., University of
MURRAY W. HITZMAN, 1996-A.B., Dartmouth College;
Saskatchewan; M.Sc., University of Calgary; Ph.D.,
M.S., University of Washington; Ph.D., Stanford University;
Colorado School of Mines; Professor of Geophysics
Charles Franklin Fogarty Distinguished Chair in Economic
Geology; Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
JOHN A. DeSANTO, 1983-B.S., M.A., Villanova Univer-
sity; M.S., Ph.D., University of Michigan; Professor of
NEIL F. HURLEY, 1996-B.S., University of Southern
Mathematical and Computer Sciences
California; M.S., University of Wisconsin at Madison;
Ph.D., University of Michigan; Charles Boettcher Distin-
DEAN W. DICKERHOOF, 1961-B.S., University of Akron;
guished Chair in Petroleum Geology; Professor of Geology
M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois; Professor of Chemistry
and Geological Engineering
and Geochemistry
TISSA ILLANGASEKARE, 1998-B.Sc., University of
GLEN R. EDWARDS, 1976-Met. Engr., Colorado School
Ceylon, Peradeniya; M. Eng., Asian Instititue of Technol-
of Mines; M.S., University of New Mexico; Ph.D., Stanford
ogy; Ph.D., Colorado State University; Professor and
University; Professor of Metallurgical and Materials
AMAX Distinguished Chair in Environmental Science and
Engineering
Engineering, P.E.
RODERICK G. EGGERT, 1986-A.B., Dartmouth College;
ALEXANDER A. KAUFMAN, 1977-Ph.D., Institute of
M.S., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University; Professor
Physics of the Earth, Moscow; D.T.Sc., Siberian Branch
of Economics and Business and Division Director
Academy; Professor of Geophysics
JAMES F. ELY, 1991-B.S., Butler University; Ph.D.,
MARVIN L. KAY, 1966-E.M., Colorado School of Mines;
Indiana University; Professor of Chemical Engineering and
Professor of Physical Education and Athletics; Head of
Petroleum Refining
Department and Director of Athletics
GRAEME FAIRWEATHER, 1994-B.Sc., Ph.D., University
ROBERT J. KEE, 1996-B.S., University of Idaho; M.S.
of St. Andrews Scotland; Professor of Mathematical and
Stanford University; Ph.D., University of California at
Computer Sciences and Head of Department
Davis; George R. Brown Distinguished Professor of
JOHN R. FANCHI, 1998-B.S. University of Denver; M.S.,
Engineering; Professor of Engineering
University of Mississippi; Ph.D., University of Houston;
ROBERT H. KING, 1981-B.S., University of Utah; M.S.,
Professor of Petroleum Engineering
Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University; Professor of
THOMAS E. FURTAK, 1986-B.S., University of Nebraska;
Engineering
Ph.D., Iowa State University; Professor of Physics
RONALD W. KLUSMAN, 1972-B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Indiana
JOAN P. GOSINK, 1991-B.S., Massachusetts Institute of
University; Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
Technology; M.S., Old Dominion University; Ph.D.,
FRANK V. KOWALSKI, 1980-B.S., University of Puget
University of California - Berkeley; Professor of Engineer-
Sound; Ph.D., Stanford University; Professor of Physics
ing and Division Director
RAGHU KRISHNAPURAM, 1997-B. Tech. Indian
D. VAUGHAN GRIFFITHS, 1994-B.Sc., Ph.D., D.Sc.,
Institute of Technology; M.S., Louisiana State University;
University of Manchester; M.S., University of California
Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon; Professor of Mathematical and
Berkeley; Professor of Engineering, P.E.
Computer Sciences
THOMAS L. T. GROSE, 1964-B.S., M.S., University of
KENNETH L. LARNER, 1988-B.S., Colorado School of
Washington; Ph.D., Stanford University; Emeritus Professor
Mines; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology;
of Geology and Geological Engineering
Charles Henry Green Professor of Exploration Geophysics;
JOHN P. HAGER, 1965-B.S., Montana School of Mines;
Professor of Geophysics
M.S., Missouri School of Mines; Sc.D., Massachusetts
KEENAN LEE, 1970-B.S., M.S., Louisiana State Univer-
Institute of Technology; Hazen Research Professor of
sity; Ph.D., Stanford University; Professor of Geology and
Extractive Metallurgy; Professor of Metallurgical and
Geological Engineering
Materials Engineering
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
143

MARK A. LINNE, 1989-B.S., University of Minnesota;
EUL-SOO PANG, 1986-B.A., Marshall University; M.A.,
M.S., Ph.D., Stanford University; Professor of Engineering
Ohio University; Ph.D., University of California at
Berkeley; Professor of Liberal Arts and International
STEPHEN LIU, 1987-B.S., M.S., Universitdade Federal de
Studies
MG, Brazil; Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Professor of
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, CEng, U.K.
MICHAEL J. PAVELICH, 1977-B.S., University of Notre
Dame; Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo;
DONALD L. MACALADY, 1982-B.S., The Pennsylvania
Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
State University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin at
Madison; Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
MAX PEETERS - 1998-M. Sc. Delft University; Western
Atlas Int’l Distinguished Chair in Borehole Geophysics/
PATRICK MacCARTHY, 1976-B.Sc., M.Sc., University
Petrophysics; Professor of Geophysics
College, Galway, Ireland; M.S., Northwestern University;
Ph.D., University of Cincinnati; Professor of Chemistry and
EILEEN P. POETER, 1987-B.S., Lehigh University; M.S.,
Geochemistry
Ph.D., Washington State University; Professor of Geology
and Geological Engineering, P.E.
GERARD P. MARTINS, 1969-B.Sc., University of London;
Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo; Professor
DENNIS W. READEY, 1989-B.S., University of Notre
of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
Dame; Sc.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology;
Herman F. Coors Distinguished Professor of Ceramic
DAVID K. MATLOCK, 1972-B.S., University of Texas at
Engineering; Professor of Metallurgical and Materials
Austin; M.S., Ph.D., Stanford University; Charles F. Fogarty
Engineering
Professor of Metallurgical Engineering sponsored by the
ARMCO Foundation; Professor of Metallurgical and
SAMUEL B. ROMBERGER, 1974-B.S., Ph.D., The
Materials Engineering, P.E.
Pennsylvania State University; Professor of Geology and
Geological Engineering
JAMES A. McNEIL, 1986-B.S., Lafayette College; M.S.,
Ph.D., University of Maryland; Professor of Physics
PHILLIP R. ROMIG, 1969-B.S., University of Notre Dame;
M.S., Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Dean of the Office
RONALD L. MILLER, 1986-B.S., M.S., University of
of Graduate Studies and Research, and Professor of
Wyoming; Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Professor of
Geophysics
Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining
PHILIPPE ROSS, 1998-B.Sc., McGill University; M.Sc.,
CARL MITCHAM, 1999-B.A., M.A., University of
McGill University; Ph.D., University of Waterloo; Professor
Colorado; Ph.D., Fordham University; Professor of Liberal
of Environmental Science and Engineering and Division
Arts and International Studies
Director
JOHN J. MOORE, 1989-B.Sc., University of Surrey,
TIBOR G. ROZGONYI, 1995-B.S., Eger Teachers College,
England; Ph.D., University of Birmingham, England;
Hungary; M.S., Ph.D., Technical University of Miskolc,
Professor of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering and
Hungary; Professor of Mining Engineering and Head of
Head of Department
Department
BARBARA M. OLDS, 1984-B.A., Stanford University;
ARTHUR B. SACKS, 1993-B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A.,
M.A., Ph.D., University of Denver; Professor of Liberal
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Professor of
Arts and International Studies
Liberal Arts and International Studies and Division Director
GARY R. OLHOEFT, 1994-B.S.E.E., M.S.E.E, Massachu-
JOHN A. SCALES, 1992-B.S., University of Delaware;
setts Institute of Technology; Ph.D., University of Toronto;
Ph.D., University of Colorado; Professor of Geophysics
Professor of Geophysics
FRANKLIN D. SCHOWENGERDT, 1973-B.S., M.S.,
DAVID L. OLSON, 1972-B.S., Washington State Univer-
Ph.D., University of Missouri at Rolla; Professor of Physics
sity; Ph.D., Cornell University; John H. Moore Distin-
guished Professor of Physical Metallurgy; Professor of
M. SAMI SELIM, 1982-B.S., Alexandria University, Egypt;
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, P.E.
M.S., Carnegie-Mellon University; M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State
University; Professor of Chemical Engineering and
UGUR OZBAY, 1998-B.S., Middle East Technical
Petroleum Refining
University of Ankara; M.S., Ph.D., University of the
Witwatersrand; Professor of Mining Engineering
RAHMAT A. SHOURESHI, 1994-B.S., Sharif University
of Technology; M.S., Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of
LEVENT OZDEMIR, 1977-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Colorado
Technology; Gerard August Dobelman Distinguished
School of Mines; Director of Excavation Engineering and
Professor of Engineering; Professor of Engineering
Earth Mechanics Institute and Professor of Mining
Engineering, P.E.
144
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

ROGER M. SLATT, 1992-B.A., San Jose State College;
THOMAS R. WILDEMAN, 1967-B.S., College of St.
M.S., Ph.D., University of Alaska; Professor of Geology
Thomas; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Professor of
and Geological Engineering and Head of Department
Chemistry and Geochemistry
E. DENDY SLOAN, JR., 1976-B.S.Ch.E., M.S., Ph.D.,
DON L. WILLIAMSON, 1975-B.S., Lamar University;
Clemson University; Weaver Distinguished Professor in
M.S., Ph.D., University of Washington; Professor of Physics
Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining and
and Head of Department
Professor of Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining,
ROBERT E. D. WOOLSEY, 1969-B.S., M.S., Ph.D.,
P.E.
University of Texas at Austin; Professor of Economics and
JOSEPH D. SNEED, 1980-B.A., Rice University; M.S.,
Business
University of Illinois; Ph.D., Stanford University; Professor
BAKI YARAR, 1980-B.Sc., M.Sc., Middle East Technical
of Liberal Arts and International Studies
University, Ankara; Ph.D., University of London; Professor
JOHN G. SPEER, 1997-B.S., Lehigh University; Ph.D.,
of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
Oxford University; Professor of Metallurgical and Materials
VICTOR F. YESAVAGE, 1973-B.Ch.E., The Cooper
Engineering
Union; M.S.E., Ph.D., University of Michigan; Professor of
JOHN E. TILTON, 1985-B.A., Princeton University; M.A.,
Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining
Ph.D., Yale University; Coulter Professor of Mineral
Economics; Professor of Economics and Business
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS
BARBARA B. BATH, 1989-B.A., M.A., University of
JOHN U. TREFNY, 1977-B.A., Fordham College; Ph.D.,
Kansas; Ph.D., American University; Associate Professor of
Rutgers University; Vice President for Academic Affairs and
Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Dean of Faculty, Professor of Physics
JEAN L. BELL, 1983-B.A., Swarthmore College; M.S.,
ILYA D. TSVANKIN, 1992-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Moscow
Ph.D., University of Colorado; Associate Professor of
State University; Professor of Geophysics
Mathematical and Computer Sciences
A. KEITH TURNER, 1972-B.Sc., Queen’s University,
JOHN R. BERGER, 1994-B.S., M. S., Ph.D., University of
Kingston, Ontario; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D.,
Maryland; Associate Professor of Engineering
Purdue University; Professor of Geology and Geological
Engineering, P.E.
BERNARD BIALECKI, 1995-M.S., University of Warsaw,
Poland; Ph.D., University of Utah; Associate Professor of
CHESTER J. VAN TYNE, 1988-B.A., B.S., M.S., Ph.D.,
Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Lehigh University; FIERF Professor and Professor of
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, P.E., PA
THOMAS M. BOYD, 1993-B.S., M.S., Virginia Polytech-
nic Institute and State University; Ph.D., Columbia
CRAIG W. VAN KIRK, 1978-B.S., M.S., University of
University; Associate Professor of Geophysics
Southern California; Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines;
Professor of Petroleum Engineering and Head of Depart-
RICHARD L. CHRISTIANSEN, 1990-B.S.Ch.E., Univer-
ment, P.E.
sity of Utah; Ph.D.Ch.E., University of Wisconsin;
Associate Professor of Petroleum Engineering
KENT J. VOORHEES, 1978-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Utah State
University; Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
L. GRAHAM CLOSS, 1978-A.B., Colgate University;
M.S., University of Vermont; Ph.D., Queen’s University,
JUNPING WANG, 1999-B.S., Hebei Teacher’s University,
Kingston, Ontario; Associate Professor of Geology and
Shijiazhuang, China; M.S., Institute of Systems Science,
Geological Engineering, P.E.
Academia Sinica, Beijing; M.S., Ph.D., University of
Chicago; Professor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
RONALD R. H. COHEN, 1985-B.A., Temple University;
Ph.D., University of Virginia; Associate Professor of
JOHN E. WARME, 1979-B.A., Augustana College; Ph.D.,
Environmental Science and Engineering
University of California at Los Angeles; Professor of
Geology and Geological Engineering
JOHN A. CORDES, 1977-B.A., J.D., M.A., University of
Iowa; Ph.D., Colorado State University; Associate Professor
RICHARD F. WENDLANDT, 1987-B.A., Dartmouth
of Economics and Business, Director, Institute for Global
College; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University;
Resources Policy and Management
Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
SCOTT W. COWLEY, 1979-B.S., M.S., Utah State
RONALD V. WIEDENHOEFT, 1979-B.C.E., Cornell
University; Ph.D., Southern Illinois University; Associate
University; M.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., Colum-
Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
bia University; Professor of Liberal Arts and International
Studies
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
145

TIMOTHY A. CROSS, 1984-B.A., Oberlin College; M.S.,
BRUCE D. HONEYMAN, 1992-B.S., M.S., Ph.D, Stanford
University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of Southern
University; Associate Professor of Environmental Science
California; Associate Professor of Geology and Geological
and Engineering
Engineering
MATTHEW J. HREBAR, III, 1976-B.S., The Pennsylvania
JOHN B. CURTIS, 1990-B.A., M.S., Miami University;
State University; M.S., University of Arizona; Ph.D.,
Ph.D., The Ohio State University; Associate Professor of
Colorado School of Mines; Associate Professor of Mining
Geology and Geological Engineering
Engineering
KADRI DAGDELEN, 1992-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Colorado
JOHN D. HUMPHREY, 1991-B.S., University of Vermont;
School of Mines; Associate Professor of Mining Engineer-
M.S., Ph.D., Brown University; Associate Professor of
ing
Geology and Geological Engineering
GRAHAM A. DAVIS, 1993-B.S., Queens University;
KENNETH E. KOLM, 1984-B.S., Lehigh University; M.S.,
M.B.A., University of Cape Town; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania
Ph.D., University of Wyoming; Associate Professor of
State University; Associate Professor of Economics and
Environmental Science and Engineering
Business
YAOGUO LI, 1999-B.S., Wuhan College of Geology,
MAARTEN V. DeHOOP, 1997-B.Sc., M.Sc., State
China; Ph.D., University of British Columbia; Associate
University of Utrecht; Ph.D., Delft University of Technol-
Professor of Geophysics
ogy; Associate Professor of Mathematical and Computer
MARK T. LUSK, 1994-B.S., United States Naval Academy;
Science
M.S., Colorado State University; Ph.D., California Institute
JOHN R. DORGAN, 1992-B.S., University of Massachu-
of Technology; Associate Professor of Engineering
setts Amherst; Ph.D., University of California Berkeley;
WADE E. MARTIN, 1989-B.S., Southern Oregon State
Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering and Petroleum
College; Ph.D., University of New Mexico; Associate
Refining
Professor of Economics and Business
MARK EBERHART, 1998 - B.S., M.S. University of
J. THOMAS McKINNON, 1991-B.S., Cornell University;
Colorado; Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology;
Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Associate
Associate Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
Professor of Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining
JOHN C. EMERICK, 1980-B.S., University of Washington;
NIGEL T. MIDDLETON, 1990-B.Sc., Ph.D., University of
M.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado; Associate Professor of
the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg; Associate Vice President
Environmental Science and Engineering
for Academic Affairs; Associate Professor of Engineering,
LINDA A. FIGUEROA, 1990-B.S., University of Southern
P.E., S. Africa
California; M.S., Ph.D., University of Colorado; Associate
BRAJENDRA MISHRA, 1997-B. Tech. Indian Institute of
Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering, P.E.,
Technology; M.S., Ph.D., University of Minnesota;
CA
Associate Professor of Metallurgical and Materials
ROBERT H. FROST, 1977-Met.E. Ph.D., Colorado School
Engineering
of Mines; S.M.,M.E., Massachusetts Institute of Technol-
DAVID R. MUNOZ, 1986-B.S.M.E., University of New
ogy; Associate Professor of Metallurgical and Materials
Mexico; M.S.M.E., Ph.D., Purdue University; Associate
Engineering
Professor of Engineering
RAMONA M. GRAVES, 1982-B.S., Kearney State College;
GRAHAM G. W. MUSTOE, 1987-B.S., M.Sc., University
Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Associate Professor of
of Aston; Ph.D., University College Swansea; Associate
Petroleum Engineering
Professor of Engineering
PETER HARTLEY, 1974-B.A., M.A., University of
WILLIAM C. NAVIDI, 1996-B.A., New College; M.A.,
Colorado; Ph.D., University of New Mexico; Associate
Michigan State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of
Professor of Liberal Arts and International Studies
California at Berkeley; Associate Professor of Mathematical
JERRY D. HIGGINS, 1986-B.S., Southwest Missouri State
and Computer Sciences
University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Missouri at Rolla;
ERIC P. NELSON, 1981-B.S., California State University at
Associate Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
Northridge; M.A., Rice University; M.Phil., Ph.D.,
GREGORY S. HOLDEN, 1978-B.S., University of
Columbia University; Associate Professor of Geology and
Redlands; M.S., Washington State University; Ph.D.,
Geological Engineering
University of Wyoming; Associate Professor of Geology
and Geological Engineering
146
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

KARL R. NELSON, 1974-Geol.E., M.S., Colorado School
J. DOUGLAS WAY, 1994-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of
of Mines; Ph.D., University of Colorado; (Professional
Colorado; Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering and
Engineer); Associate Professor of Engineering, P.E.
Petroleum Refining
KATHLEEN H. OCHS, 1980-B.A., University of Oregon;
KAREN B. WILEY, 1981-B.A., Mills College; M.A.,
M.A.T., Wesleyan University; M.A., Ph.D., University of
Ph.D., University of Colorado; Associate Professor of
Toronto; Associate Professor of Liberal Arts and Interna-
Liberal Arts and International Studies
tional Studies
DAVID M. WOOD, 1989-B.A., Princeton University; M.S.,
TIMOTHY R. OHNO, 1992-B.S., University of Alberta;
Ph.D., Cornell University; Associate Professor of Physics
Ph.D., University of Maryland; Associate Professor of
XINDONG WU, 1998-B.Eng., M.Eng. Hefei University of
Physics
Technology; Ph.D. Edinburgh University; Associate
ERDAL OZKAN, 1998-B.S., M.Sc. Istanbul Technical
Professor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
University; Ph.D. University of Tulsa; Associate Professor
of Petroleum Engineering
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS
DIANNE AHMANN, 1999-B.A., Harvard College; Ph.D.,
LAURA J. PANG, 1985-B.A., University of Colorado;
Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Assistant Professor
M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University; Associate Professor of
of Environmental Science and Engineering
Liberal Arts and International Studies
HUSSEIN AMERY, 1997-B.A., University of Calgary;
TERENCE E. PARKER, 1994-B.S., M.S., Stanford
M.A., Wilfrid Laurier University; Ph.D., McMaster
University; Ph.D., University of California Berkeley;
University; Assistant Professor of Liberal Arts and Interna-
Associate Professor of Engineering
tional Studies
IVAR E. REIMANIS, 1994-B.S., Cornell University; M.S.,
TRACY KAY CAMP, 1998-B.A. Kalamazoo College; M.S.
University of California Berkeley; Ph.D., University of
Michigan State University; Ph.D. College of William and
California Santa Barbara; Associate Professor of Metallurgi-
Mary; Assistant Professor of Mathematical and Computer
cal and Materials Engineering
Sciences
ROBERT SIEGRIST, 1997-B.S., M.S., Ph.D. University of
JANIS M. CAREY, 1998-B.A., Princeton University; M.S.,
Wisconsin; Associate Professor of Environmental Science
University of California, Davis; Ph.D., University of
and Engineering, P.E., WI
California, Berkeley; Assistant Professor of Economics and
E. CRAIG SIMMONS, 1977-B.S., University of Kansas;
Business
M.S., Ph.D., State University of New York at Stony Brook;
NEVIS E. COOK, JR., 1992-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University
Associate Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
of Colorado Boulder; Assistant Professor of Environmental
CATHERINE A. SKOKAN, 1982-B.S., M.S., Ph.D.,
Science and Engineering, P.E.
Colorado School of Mines; Associate Professor of Engi-
CHRISTIAN DEBRUNNER, 1996-B.S., M.S., and Ph.D.,
neering
University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign; Assistant
ROBERT S. THOMPSON, 1982-P.E., Colorado School of
Professor of Engineering
Mines; M.B.A., University of Houston; Associate Professor
JEAN-PIERRE DELPLANQUE, 1998-Diploma,
of Petroleum Engineering, P.E.
ENSEEIHT France; M.Sc., National Polytechnic Institute of
STEVEN W. THOMPSON, 1989-B.S., Ph.D., The
Toulouse France; M.Sc., University of California Irvine;
Pennsylvania State University; Associate Professor of
Ph.D., University of California Irvine; Assistant Professor
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
of Engineering
ROBERT G. UNDERWOOD, 1978-B.S., University of
CHARLES G. DURFEE, III, 1999-B.S., Yale University;
North Carolina; Ph.D., University of Virginia; Associate
Ph.D., University of Maryland; Assistant Professor of
Professor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Physics
ERIK S. VAN VLECK, 1993-B.S. University of Kansas;
JON H. EGGERT, 1996-B.S. Montana State University;
M.S., University of Colorado Boulder; Ph.D., Georgia
M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University; Assistant Professor of
Institute of Technology; Associate Professor of Mathemati-
Physics
cal and Computer Sciences
ALFRED W. EUSTES III, 1996-B.S., Louisiana Tech
MICHAEL R. WALLS, 1992-B.S., Western Kentucky
University; M.S., University of Colorado at Boulder; Ph.D.,
University; M.B.A., Ph.D., The University of Texas at
Colorado School of Mines; Assistant Professor of Petroleum
Austin; Associate Professor of Economics and Business
Engineering, P.E.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
147

DAVID R. FROSSARD, 1995-B.A., Virginia Common-
JOHN A. PALMER, 1996-B.S., Brigham Young University;
wealth University; M.A., Ph.D., University of California,
M.E., Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Assistant
Irvine; Assistant Professor of Liberal Arts and International
Professor of Engineering
Studies
LAXMINARAYAN L. RAJA, 1999-B.A., Indian Institute of
UWE GREIFE, 1999-M.S., University of Munster; Ph.D.,
Technology; M.S., Texas A&M University; Ph.D., Univer-
University of Bochum; Assistant Professor of Physics
sity of Texas at Austin; Assistant Professor of Engineering
WILLIAM A. HOFF, 1994-B.S., Illinois Institute of
DOUGLAS E. SMITH, 1999-B.S., Illinois College; B.S.,
Technology; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois-Champaign/
Washington University; M.S., State University of New
Urbana; Assistant Professor of Engineering
York; Ph.D., University of Illinois; Assistant Professor of
Engineering
MARIET A. HOFSTEE, 1995-Drs., Ph.D., University of
Groningen, the Netherlands; Assistant Professor of Physics
JOHN P. H. STEELE, 1988-B.S., New Mexico State
University; M.S., Ph.D., University of New Mexico;
ELENA KATOK, 1997-B.S., University of California,
Assistant Professor of Engineering, P.E.
Berkeley; M.B.S., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University;
Assistant Professor of Economics and Business
PETER W. SUTTER, 1998-M.S., Ph.D., Swiss Federal
Institute of Technology; Assistant Professor of Physics
SHEKHAR JAYNANTHI, 1999-B.T., Institute of Technol-
ogy - Banaras Hindu University; M.S., Southern Illinois
LUIS TENORIO, 1997-B.A., University of California,
University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Assistant
Santa Cruz; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley;
Professor of Economics and Business
Assistant Professor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
PANOS. D. KIOUSIS, 1999-Ph.D., Louisiana State
TYRONE VINCENT, 1998-B.S. University of Arizona;
University; Assistant Professor of Engineering
M.S., Ph.D. University of Michigan; Assistant Professor of
Engineering
DANIEL M. KNAUSS, 1996-B.S., The Pennsylvania State
University; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State
KIM R. WILLIAMS, 1997-B.Sc., McGill University; Ph.D.,
University; Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Geochem-
Michigan State University; Assistant Professor of Chemistry
istry
and Geochemistry
MARK E. KUCHTA, 1999-B.S., M.A., Colorado School of
COLIN WOLDEN, 1997-B.S., University of Minnesota;
Mines; Ph.D., Lulea University of Technology, Sweden;
M.S., Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
Assistant Professor of Mining Engineering
Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering and Petroleum
Refining
NING LU, 1997-B.S. Wuhan University of Technology;
M.S., Ph.D. John Hopkins University; Assistant Professor
DAVID TAI-WEI WU, 1996-A.B., Harvard University;
of Engineering
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Assistant
Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry/Chemical
KEVIN W. MANDERNACK, 1996-B.S., University of
Engineering and Petroleum Refining
Wisconsin Madison; Ph.D., University of California San
Diego; Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
RAY RUICHONG ZHANG, 1997-B.S., M.S., Tongji
University; Ph.D., Florida Atlantic University; Assistant
DAVID W.M. MARR, 1995-B.S., University of California,
Professor of Engineering
Berkeley; M.S., Ph.D., Stanford University; Assistant
Professor of Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining
SENIOR LECTURERS
JOHN E. McCRAY, 1998-B.S., West Virginia University;
HUGH KING, 1993-B.S., Iowa State University; M.S., New
M.S., Clemson University; Ph.D., University of Arizona;
York University; M.D., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D.,
Assistant Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
University of Colorado; Senior Lecturer of Mathematical
KELLY T. MILLER, 1996-B.S., Massachusetts Institute of
and Computer Sciences
Technology; Ph.D., University of California Santa Barbara;
LECTURERS
Assistant Professor of Metallurgical and Materials Engineer-
ing
CATHERINE FLYNN, 1997-B.A., M.A., Western State
College; Lecturerer of Liberal arts and International Studies
MANAVENDRA MISRA, 1993-B.Tech., Indian Institute of
Technology; Ph.D., University of Southern California;
JON LEYDENS, 1997-B.A., M.A., Colorado State
Assistant Professor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
University; Director of Writing Center, and Lecturer of
Liberal Arts and International Studies
BARBARA MOSKAL, 1999-B.S., Duquesne University;
M.S., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Assistant Professor of
SUZANNE NORTHCOTE, 1994-B.A., M.A., Hunter
Mathematical and Computer Sciences
College; Lecturer of Liberal Arts and International Studies
148
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

NATHAN PALMER, 1996-B.S., Colorado School of Mines,
BENITO A. TELESCA, 1998-B.S., Hunter College; M.E.,
M.S., Northwestern University; Lecturer of Physics
Hardin-Simmons University; Adjunct Instructor and
Intramural Club Sports Director
TERRI E. WOODINGTON, 1999-B.S., James Madison
University; M.S., Texas A&M University; Lecturer of
VERSIE L. WALLACE, JR., 1988-B.S., M.S., Northwest-
Mathematical and Computer Sciences
ern Oklahoma State University; Head Football Coach
INSTRUCTORS
LIBRARY FACULTY
CANDACE S. AMMERMAN, 1983-B.S., Colorado School
ROBERT K. SORGENFREI, 1991-B.A., University of
of Mines; Instructor of Engineering
California; M.L.S., University of Arizona; Librarian
BRUCE MEEVES, 1999-B.S., Montana State University;
JOANNE V. LERUD, 1989-B.S.G.E., M.S., University of
M.S., Washington State University; Instructor of Physics
North Dakota; M.A., University of Denver; Librarian and
Director of Library
VICTOR L. DOPERALSKI, 1998-B.S. Kansas State
University; M.S. Kansas State University; Instructor and
JANICE K. CHRISTOPHER, 1994-B.A., University of
Head Women’s Basketball Coach
Wyoming; M..A., State University of New York Buffalo;
M.L.I.S., University of Texas Austin; Assistant Librarian
COACHES
LISA DUNN, 1991-B.S., University of Wisconsin-Superior;
MICHELE L. HARRIS, 1995-B.S., M.A., Adams State
M.A., Washington University; M.L.S., Indiana University;
College; Head Volleyball Coach
Associate Librarian
TIMOTHY J. HARRISON, 1998-B.A., University of
GITA PASSFIELD, 1996-B.A., University of Colorado,
California at Santa Barbara; M.A., Saint Mary’s College;
Boulder; M.L.I.S., University of Denver; Assistant Librarian
Head Men’s Basketball Coach
LISA B. STOMBERG, 1994-B.A., University of New
JAMES S. JULIANA, 1998-B.A., M.A., University of
Mexico; M.S., University of North Carolina; Assistant
Northern Colorado; Adjunct Instructor and Assistant
Librarian
Football Coach
CHRISTOPHER J. J. THIRY, 1995-B.A., M.I.L.S.,
FRANK KOHLENSTEIN, 1998-B.S., Florida State
University of Michigan; Assistant Librarian
University; M.S., Montana State University; Head Soccer
Coach
CHRISTOPHER HOOPER-LANE B.S., M.A., University
of Wisconsin, Madison
DAN R. LEWIS, 1992-B.S., California State University;
Head Wrestling Coach
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
149

Appendix
Affirmative Action
participating in any manner in an investigation, proceeding,
Colorado School of Mines has instituted an affirmative
hearing, or lawsuit involving unlawful discrimination; or
action plan, which is available for perusal in numerous CSM
C. The Human Resources Director or the Director of
offices including the Library, the Dean of Students’ Office,
Legal Services, if either of them deem it to be in the best
and the Office of Human Resources.
interest of CSM to do so.
Any person feeling that a violation of the following
IV. Informal Complaint Resolution Process
policies has occurred should promptly refer the matter to the
At the written request of an individual who has come
Office of Personnel and Affirmative Action, located in
forward with a complaint alleging unlawful discrimination,
Guggenheim Hall (2nd floor), for investigation.
hereinafter the “Complainant,” the Human Resources
Colorado School of Mines
Director shall assist in an attempt to resolve the complaint in
an informal manner. The informal unlawful discrimination
Unlawful Discrimination Policy and
complaint resolution process shall consist of an informal
Complaint Procedure
discussion between the Complainant and the individual or a
I. Statement of Authority and Purpose
representative of the entity accused of unlawful discrimina-
This policy is promulgated by the Board of Trustees
tion, hereinafter the “Respondent.” The Human Resources
pursuant to the authority conferred upon it by §23-41-
Director shall act as a mediator during this process, which
104(1), C.R.S. (1998) in order to set forth a policy concern-
shall be calculated to bring the complaint to the attention of
ing unlawful discrimination at CSM. This policy shall
the Respondent and elicit the voluntary cooperation of the
supersede any previously promulgated CSM policy which is
Respondent in settling the matter. By attempting to resolve
in conflict herewith.
the unlawful discrimination complaint in an informal
manner pursuant to the terms of this section, the Complain-
II. Unlawful Discrimination Policy
ant shall not waive any rights to subsequently pursue the
Attendance and employment at CSM are based solely on
complaint through the formal complaint procedure set forth
merit and fairness. Discrimination on the basis of age,
below.
gender, race, ethnicity, religion, national origin, disability,
V. Formal Complaint Procedure
and Vietnam-era or disabled veteran status is prohibited. No
discrimination in admission, application of academic
A. Purpose
standards, financial aid, scholastic awards, promotion,
The purpose of the formal unlawful discrimination
salary, benefits, transfers, reductions in force, terminations,
complaint procedure is to provide a formal mechanism for
re-employment, professional development, or conditions of
the prompt and fair internal resolution of complaints
employment shall be permitted. The remainder of this
alleging unlawful discrimination. The procedure outlined
policy shall contain a complaint procedure outlining a
below shall be the exclusive forum for the internal resolu-
method for reporting alleged violations of this policy and a
tion of such complaints at CSM.
review mechanism for the impartial determination of the
B. Where to file a Complaint
merits of complaints alleging unlawful discrimination.
All complaints by non-students alleging unlawful
III. Persons Who May File an Unlawful
discrimination or retaliation shall be filed in writing at the
Discrimination Complaint
Office of Human Resources located on the second floor of
An unlawful discrimination complaint may be filed by
Guggenheim Hall. Complaints by students alleging
any individual described in one of the categories below:
unlawful discrimination or retaliation may be submitted to
the Human Resources Office, the Student Development
A. Any member of the CSM community, including
Center, the Dean of Students, any faculty member, or any
classified staff, exempt employees, and students as well as
Resident Assistant. Any recipient of such a student
any applicant for employment or admission, who believes
complaint shall promptly forward the complaint to the
that he or she has been discriminated against by CSM, a
Director of Human Resources for handling in accordance
branch of CSM, or another member of the CSM community
with the provisions set forth below.
on account of age, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, national
origin, disability, or Vietnam-era or disabled veteran status;
C. Time Limits
All complaints alleging unlawful discrimination or
B. Any person who believes that he or she has been
retaliation must be filed within ninety days from the date
threatened with or subjected to duress or retaliation by
upon which the incident, occurrence, or other action alleged
CSM, a branch of CSM, or a member of the CSM commu-
to constitute unlawful discrimination or retaliation occurred.
nity as a result of (1) opposing any unlawful discriminatory
However, if the alleged discrimination or retaliation is of a
practice; (2) filing a complaint hereunder; (3) representing a
continuing nature, a complaint may be filed at any time.
Complainant hereunder; or (4) testifying, assisting, or
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Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

D. Contents of Complaint
Director shall provide the Complainant with a copy of the
A complaint alleging unlawful discrimination or
response as soon as practicable. If the response contains a
retaliation must be signed by the Complainant and set forth
denial of one or more of the allegations contained in the
specific factual matters believed to constitute unlawful
complaint, the process shall proceed with the selection of a
discrimination or retaliation. The complaint shall name as
hearing panel as set forth in subsection D below. If no
Respondent the individual or entity whom the Complainant
timely response is received, or if the response admits the
believes to have committed, participated in, or encouraged
allegations in their entirety, the matter shall be submitted to
the discrimination or retaliation. The complaint shall also
the President, who shall then issue a decision in accordance
include a brief statement describing the relief requested by
with subsection IX.D below.
the Complainant.
D. Selection of Hearing Panel
E. Fulfillment of Complaint Prerequisites
An initial hearing panel of ten individuals shall be
As soon as practicable after receipt of a complaint, the
selected at random in the following manner. Five initial
Human Resources Director shall submit the complaint to the
panel members shall be selected from the CSM group of
Director of Legal Services, who shall examine it and
which the Complainant is a member, i.e., classified staff,
determine if the prerequisites outlined above have been
exempt employees, undergraduate students, or graduate
fulfilled. If the prerequisites have not been fulfilled, the
students, and the five remaining initial panel members shall
Director of Legal Services shall inform the Complainant of
be selected from the CSM group of which the Respondent is
the specifics of such determination in writing. Unless the
a member. The Complainant and the Respondent shall each
time limitations set forth above have lapsed prior to the
disqualify two of the initial panel members. The disqualifi-
initial filing of the complaint, the Complainant shall have
cations exercised by the parties shall proceed in an alternate
the opportunity to correct any deficiencies and re-file the
fashion beginning with the Complainant. Of the remaining
complaint. If the prerequisites have been fulfilled, the
initial panel members, the one chosen last shall serve as an
complaint will be handled as set forth below.
alternate hearing panel member. The other five initial panel
members shall constitute the hearing panel for the appeal.
F. Choice of Remedies
Prospective panel members may be excused on account of
No Complainant shall be permitted to simultaneously file
conflict of interest, health, or unavoidable absence from
an unlawful discrimination claim under the CSM Unlawful
campus. An excused initial panel member shall be replaced
Discrimination Policy and Complaint Procedure and a
by another initial panel member chosen in a random
sexual harassment claim under the CSM Sexual Harassment
drawing prior to the exercise of any disqualifications by
Policy and Complaint Procedure against the same individual
either party.
arising out of an identical set of facts. In such a situation, a
Complainant shall be entitled to file his or her claim under
E. Selection of Chief Panel Member
either, but not both, of the above-mentioned policies.
After a hearing panel has been chosen, the panel
members shall elect a chief panel member from their number
VI. Pre-Hearing Procedures
who shall preside throughout the remainder of the case.
A. Notification to Proceed
As soon as practicable after a determination has been
1. Authority of Chief Panel Member
made that the complaint is sufficient pursuant to subsection
The chief panel member shall have the authority to (a)
V.E above, the Director of Legal Services shall inform the
issue orders to compel discovery; (b) make rulings on
Director of Human Resources of that fact and the Director
evidentiary objections; and (c) issue any other orders
of Human Resources shall proceed with the notifications
necessary to control the conduct of the hearing and prohibit
specified in subsection B below.
abusive treatment of witnesses, including removal of
B. Acknowledgment of Complaint and Notification of
disruptive individuals from the hearing room.
Respondent
2. Role of Alternate Hearing Panel Member
As soon as practicable, the Director of Human Resources
The alternate hearing panel member shall observe, but
shall send a letter to the Complainant acknowledging receipt
not actively participate in, all of the proceedings in the case
of the complaint. At the same time, the Director shall
and be prepared to substitute for a panel member who
provide the Respondent with a copy of the complaint and
becomes unavailable during any stage of the case due to
notify the Respondent in writing of the requirements set
death, illness, or emergency.
forth in subsection C below.
F. Setting of Hearing Date
C. Response to Complaint
After a chief panel member has been chosen, a hearing
Within ten days from the date of receipt of a copy of the
date shall be set with reasonable consideration given to the
complaint, the Respondent shall file with the Director of
schedules of the participants. The chief panel member shall
Human Resources a response in which the allegations
set a date for the hearing, which shall occur no more than
contained in the complaint are admitted or denied. The
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
151

ninety days after the date upon which the formal complaint
hearing panel and provide a copy to the opposing party no
was filed with the Director of Human Resources. Once set,
later than five days prior to the hearing date. If the hearing
the hearing date may be rescheduled only with the concur-
date is rescheduled, these time limits shall apply to the
rence of the Complainant, the Respondent, and the hearing
rescheduled hearing date.
panel.
C. Limitations Imposed by Pre-Hearing Statements
G. Participation of Attorneys
Neither party shall make an argument during the hearing
Either party may engage the services of an attorney to
which is inconsistent with the arguments set forth in the
assist in document preparation or case preparation.
summary of the argument section of his or her pre-hearing
However, an attorney may not enter an appearance or
statement. Neither party shall introduce any witnesses or
formally participate in the case on behalf of either party.
exhibits at the hearing which are not listed in his or her pre-
H. Legal Advice for Hearing Panel
hearing statement. All exhibits listed in the pre-hearing
statements shall be deemed genuine and admissible unless
If the hearing panel desires legal advice at any time
successfully challenged prior to the hearing.
during the case, the chief panel member shall request such
advice from the Director of Legal Services. The Director
D. List of Hearing Issues
shall provide the requested advice unless he or she is
After examining the pre-hearing statements of both
actively involved in the case on behalf of one of the parties.
parties, the hearing panel shall prepare a list of issues to be
In such event, the chief panel member shall request the
resolved through the hearing and distribute such list to the
desired legal advice from the Assistant Attorney General
parties no later than two days prior to the hearing date. The
assigned to CSM, whose name and telephone number shall
panel may list issues contained in the pre-hearing statement
be provided to the chief panel member by the Director.
of either party or relevant issues not contained in the pre-
I. Pre-Hearing Discovery
hearing statement of either party. However, since the
jurisdiction of the hearing panel is limited to hearing claims
Informal discovery, or the exchange between the parties
of unlawful discrimination, only issues directly related to
of information relevant to the case, is encouraged. If the
the Complainant’s claim of unlawful discrimination may be
parties cannot resolve such issues informally, either party
placed on the list of issues. The list of issues generated
may request the chief panel member up to ten days prior to
pursuant to this subparagraph shall be binding upon the
the hearing date to enter an order compelling discovery
subsequent hearing and shall form the standard against
upon a showing of the relevance of the requested informa-
which all relevancy arguments shall be weighed.
tion and the necessity of such information to case prepara-
tion. The other party may oppose such request by showing
E. Amendments to Pre-Hearing Statements
that the requested information is irrelevant, unnecessary to
Up to two days prior to the hearing date, either party may
the requesting party’s case preparation, or privileged
request the chief panel member to permit amendments to his
according to law.
or her pre-hearing statement upon a showing of good cause
VII. Pre-Hearing Statements
and lack of prejudice to the opposing party. Any party filing
an amended pre-hearing statement shall provide a copy
A. Contents of Pre-Hearing Statements
thereof to the opposing party no later than the filing
Each party shall file a pre-hearing statement containing
deadline imposed by the order granting leave to amend.
the following components:
VIII. Hearing Procedures
1. Summary of the Argument: A concise statement
A. Burden and Standard of Proof
summarizing the case from the position of the submitting
party;
The Complainant shall bear the burden of proof
throughout the case. The standard of proof which the
2. List of Issues: A list of the issues which the submit-
Complainant must meet to sustain the burden of proof shall
ting party wishes the hearing panel to resolve;
be the preponderance of the evidence standard. The
3. List of Witnesses: A list of witnesses to be presented
preponderance of the evidence standard shall be deemed met
at the hearing along with a summary of the anticipated
if the panel believes that it is more likely than not that the
testimony of each witness; and
facts at issue occurred. The facts at issue shall include all
4. Photocopies of Exhibits: Photocopies of each exhibit
facts which are required to be proven by the party bearing
to be presented at the hearing.
the burden of proof in order for such party to prevail.
B. Deadlines for Pre-Hearing Statements
B. Order of Presentation
The Complainant shall file a pre-hearing statement with
Since the Complainant bears the burden of proof, that
the hearing panel and provide a copy to the opposing party
party shall present his or her case first. After the Complain-
no later than ten days prior to the hearing date. The
ant has finished, the Respondent shall present his or her
Respondent shall file a pre-hearing statement with the
case.
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C. Outline of Hearing
2. Findings of Fact: A list of the relevant facts found by
The hearing shall proceed according to the following
the hearing panel upon which the recommendation is based;
general outline:
3. Legal Conclusions: A list of the legal conclusions of
1. Complainant’s Opening Statement
the hearing panel upon which the determination of the issue
of unlawful discrimination is based; and
2. Respondent’s Opening Statement (unless reserved) 3.
Complainant’s Case
4. Recommended Action: A statement regarding the
relief for the Complainant, if any, that is being recom-
4. Respondent’s Opening Statement (if reserved)
mended by the hearing panel.
5. Respondent’s Case
C. Issuance of Recommendation
6. Complaint’s Rebuttal Case (unless waived)
The recommendation of the hearing panel shall be issued
7. Respondent’s Rebuttal Case (only if Complainant
to the parties and delivered to the President along with the
presents a rebuttal case and unless waived)
case file within fifteen days after the conclusion of the
8. Complainant’s Closing Argument
hearing.
9. Respondent’s Closing Argument
D. Decision of President
The President shall examine the case file, consider the
10. Complainant’s Rebuttal Argument (unless waived)
recommendation of the hearing panel, and issue a final
D. Inapplicability of Strict Evidentiary Rules
written decision in the matter. The President shall possess
Strict legal evidentiary rules shall not apply during the
the authority to affirm, reverse, or modify the recommenda-
hearing. The chief panel member shall rule on the admissi-
tion of the hearing panel or to remand the matter to the
bility of disputed evidence with primary consideration given
panel for further proceedings or consideration. In the
to the relevance, reliability, and probative value of proffered
decision, the President may provide appropriate relief to the
evidence.
Complainant and may impose appropriate disciplinary
E. Witness Examination Procedure
action upon the Respondent. The decision of the President
shall be delivered to the parties and the hearing panel within
Each witness shall be directly examined by the party on
fifteen days from the date of the President’s receipt of the
whose behalf the witness has appeared to testify. Upon the
recommendation and case file from the hearing panel, unless
conclusion of the direct examination of each witness, the
the President is unavailable for a significant amount of time
opposing party shall be permitted the right of cross-
during this period.
examination. The chief panel member may permit re-direct
and re-cross examination. However, an identical examina-
E. Presidential Unavailability
tion procedure shall be utilized for all witnesses testifying in
The term “unavailable,” as utilized in this subsection and
a given hearing. Hearing panel members may interject
subsection X.D above, shall be defined to mean out of town,
questions at any time during the direct, cross, re-direct, or
medically incapacitated, or engaged in important CSM
re-cross examinations.
business to the extent that sufficient time cannot be devoted
IX. Post-Hearing Procedure
to decision making hereunder. If the President is unavail-
able for a significant period of time during the decision
A. Recommendation of the Hearing Panel
making period, a letter shall be sent to the parties advising
Within a reasonable time after the conclusion of the
them of that fact as well as the anticipated date of presiden-
hearing, the hearing panel shall confer among themselves
tial availability. In such event, the decision shall be due
and vote upon a recommended course of action. The panel
fifteen days from the date upon which the President
members holding a majority point of view shall designate
becomes available. The President shall be the sole judge of
one of their number to write a recommendation reflecting
presidential unavailability hereunder.
their opinion. The panel members holding a minority point
of view, if any, may issue a dissenting recommendation in a
F. Appeal of Presidential Decision
similar fashion.
There shall be no internal appeal from the final decision
of the President. A party aggrieved by the decision of the
B. Contents of Recommendation
President may file a complaint with the appropriate equal
The recommendation of the hearing panel shall include
opportunity enforcement agency or pursue other available
the following components:
legal remedies.
1. Statement Regarding Burden of Proof: A statement
Promulgated by the CSM Board of Trustees on March
regarding whether or not the hearing panel believes that the
13, 1992. Amended by the CSM Board of Trustees on June
burden of proof borne by the Complainant has been
10, 1999.
sustained;
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
153

Colorado School Of Mines
sion of the concept of sexual harassment is a factor in the
Sexual Harassment Policy and
offense, the Perpetrator can also be required to attend a
sexual harassment seminar or workshop.
Complaint Procedure
III. Persons Who May File a Complaint
I. Statement of Authority and Purpose
A sexual harassment complaint may be filed by an
This policy is promulgated by the Board of Trustees
individual described in one of the categories below:
pursuant to the authority conferred upon it by §23-41-
104(1), C.R.S. (1988 Repl. Vol.) in order to set forth a
A. Any person who believes that he or she has been
policy concerning sexual harassment at CSM. This policy
sexually harassed by a member of the CSM community,
shall supersede any previously promulgated CSM policy
including classified staff, exempt employees, and students;
which is in conflict herewith.
B. Any person who believes that he or she has been
II. Sexual Harassment Policy
threatened with or subjected to duress or retaliation by a
member of the CSM community as a result of (1) opposing
A. Definition of Sexual Harassment
any perceived sexual harassment; (2) filing a complaint
Sexual harassment consists of unwelcome sexual
hereunder; (3) representing a Complainant hereunder; or (4)
advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or
testifying, assisting, or participating in any manner in an
physical conduct of a sexual nature when (1) submission to
investigation, proceeding, hearing, or lawsuit involving
such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or
sexual harassment; or
condition of an individual’s employment or scholastic
endeavors; (2) submission to or rejection of such conduct by
C.The Human Resources Director or the Director of
an individual is used as the basis for employment or
Legal Services, if either of them deem it to be in the best
academic decisions affecting the individual; or (3) such
interest of CSM to do so.
conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfer-
IV. Informal Complaint Resolution Process
ing with an individual’s work or school performance, or
At the request of an individual who has come forward
creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working or
with a sexual harassment complaint, hereinafter the
studying environment.
“Complainant,” the Director of Human Resources shall
B. Policy Statement
assist in an attempt to resolve the complaint in an informal
CSM wishes to foster an environment for its students
manner. Although verbal requests to proceed with the
and employees which is free from all forms of sexual
informal complaint resolution process will be honored,
harassment, sexual intimidation, and sexual exploitation.
complainants are strongly encouraged to put such requests
Accordingly, CSM will not tolerate sexual harassment and
in writing. The informal sexual harassment complaint
will take all necessary measures to deter such misconduct
resolution process shall consist of an informal discussion
and discipline violators of this policy with appropriate
between the Complainant and the individual accused of
sanctions. Furthermore, retaliation in any form against an
sexual harassment, hereinafter the “Respondent.” The
individual for reporting sexual harassment or cooperating in
Director of Human Resources shall act as a mediator during
a sexual harassment investigation is strictly prohibited. Such
this process, which shall be calculated to bring the com-
retaliation shall be dealt with as a separate instance of sexual
plaint to the attention of the Respondent and elicit the
harassment. The remainder of this policy shall contain a
voluntary cooperation of the Respondent in settling the
complaint procedure outlining a method for reporting
matter. By attempting to resolve the sexual harassment
alleged violations of this policy and a review mechanism for
complaint in an informal manner pursuant to the terms of
the impartial determination of the merits of complaints
this section, the Complainant shall not waive any rights to
alleging sexual harassment.
subsequently pursue the complaint through the formal
sexual harassment complaint procedure set forth below.
C. Sanctions for Sexual Harassment
Appropriate sanctions may be imposed upon an
V. Formal Complaint Procedure
employee or student who has sexually harassed another. The
A. Purpose
term Perpetrator shall be utilized herein to refer to such a
The purpose of the formal sexual harassment complaint
person. The sanctions may include one or more of the
procedure is to provide a formal mechanism for the prompt
following: verbal reprimand and warning, written reprimand
and fair internal resolution of complaints alleging sexual
and warning, student probation, suspension from registra-
harassment. The procedure outlined below shall be the
tion, monetary fine, suspension without pay, expulsion, or
exclusive forum for the internal resolution of sexual
termination. In determining appropriate sanctions for the
harassment complaints at CSM.
offense, the decision maker shall consider the severity of the
B. Where to file a Complaint
offense, aggravating and mitigating factors, and the
All complaints by non-students alleging sexual harass-
Perpetrator’s previous history of sexual harassment offenses.
ment or retaliation shall be lodged with the Human
If the decision maker concludes that a lack of comprehen-
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Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Resources Office located on the second floor of
vice president in whose area the Respondent is employed or
Guggenheim Hall. Complaints by students alleging sexual
enrolled, and, if applicable, the Respondent’s immediate
harassment or retaliation may be submitted to the Human
supervisor. However, if the President is the Respondent, the
Resources Office, the Student Development Center, the
term CSM Management Personnel shall refer to the Board
Dean of Students, any faculty member, or any Resident
of Trustees, and if the Respondent is a vice president, the
Assistant. Any recipient of a student sexual harassment or
term “CSM Management Personnel” shall refer to the
retaliation complaint shall promptly forward such complaint
President.
to the Director of Human Resources for handling in
H. Acknowledgment of Complaint and Notification of
accordance with the provisions set forth below.
Respondent
C. Time Limits
As soon as practicable after being informed of the
A complaint may be lodged at any time, but CSM
complaint pursuant to subsection V.G above, the vice
strongly encourages individuals who feel they have been
president shall send a letter to the Complainant acknowledg-
victims of sexual harassment to come forward as soon as
ing receipt of the complaint. At the same time, the vice
possible after the occurrence of the incident, event, or other
president shall notify the Respondent of the complaint in
action alleged to constitute sexual harassment or retaliation.
writing, and if the complaint has been reduced to writing,
D. Contents of Complaint
the vice president shall provide the Respondent with a copy
thereof. If the President is the Respondent, the President of
Although a verbal sexual harassment complaint will be
the Board of Trustees shall perform the above duties. If the
investigated, complainants are strongly encouraged to
Respondent is a vice president, the President shall perform
submit sexual harassment complaints in writing. Written
these duties.
complaints must be signed and must set forth specific
factual matters believed to constitute sexual harassment or
I. Investigation Authorization Form
retaliation. The Complaint shall name as Respondent each
Unless the complaint is initiated by the Director of Legal
individual whom the Complainant believes to have
Services or the Director of Human Resources pursuant to
committed, participated in, or encouraged the sexual
subsection III.C above, the Complainant shall be required to
harassment or retaliation. The complaint shall also include
execute a Sexual Harassment Complaint Investigation
a brief statement describing the relief requested by the
Authorization Form prior to any investigation of the
Complainant.
complaint.
E. Fulfillment of Complaint Prerequisites
J. Investigation of Complaint
As soon as practicable after receipt of the complaint, the
The Director of Legal Services and the Director of
Director of Human Resources shall submit the complaint to
Human Resources shall jointly investigate the complaint by
the Director of Legal Services, who shall determine if the
examining relevant documents, if any, and interviewing
prerequisites outlined above have been fulfilled. If the
witnesses and other individuals designated by either party.
prerequisites have not been fulfilled, the Director of Legal
The investigators will strive to conduct the investigation in a
Services shall inform the Complainant of the specifics of
discrete and expeditious manner with due regard to
such determination in writing. The Complainant shall have
thoroughness and fairness to both parties.
the opportunity to correct any deficiencies and re-file the
K. Confidentiality of Investigative Materials
complaint. If the prerequisites have been fulfilled, the
All materials and documents prepared or compiled by the
complaint will be handled as set forth below.
investigators during the course of investigating a sexual
F. Choice of Remedies
harassment complaint hereunder shall be kept confidential
No Complainant shall be permitted to simultaneously file
to the fullest extent of the law in order to protect
an unlawful discrimination claim under the CSM Unlawful
interviewees and promote candor.
Discrimination Policy and a sexual harassment claim under
L. Alternate Investigators
the CSM Sexual Harassment Policy against the same
If either the Director of Legal Services or the Director of
individual arising out of an identical set of facts. In such a
Human Resources is the Complainant or the Respondent
situation, a Complainant shall be entitled to file his or her
hereunder, or is otherwise unavailable, the President shall
claim under either of these policies.
appoint an alternate investigator.
G. Notification of CSM Management Personnel
M. Report of Findings and Confidential Recommenda-
As soon as practicable after a determination has been
tion
made that the complaint is sufficient pursuant to subsection
As soon as practicable after the conclusion of the
V.E above, the Director of Legal Services shall notify CSM
investigation, the Director of Legal Services shall prepare
Management Personnel of the complaint and provide them
and submit a report of findings and a confidential recom-
with a copy thereof. For the purpose this policy, the term
mendation to CSM Management Personnel and the Director
CSM Management Personnel shall refer to the President, the
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
155

of Human Resources. The report of findings shall be
serious concern to CSM. Personal relationships which might
provided to the Complainant and Respondent within a
be appropriate in other circumstances always pose inherent
reasonable time following the issuance of a decision
dangers when they occur between an Instructor and a
pursuant to subsection V.N below. The confidential
Student, between a Person in a Position of Trust and a
recommendation shall not be released to the Complainant or
Student, and between a Supervisor and a Subordinate
the Respondent without written authorization from the
Employee. Although both parties to the relationship may
President. The Director of Human Resources shall submit a
have consented at the outset, such relationships are
separate recommendation to CSM Management Personnel
fundamentally asymmetric in nature. It is incumbent upon
which contains a statement of agreement or disagreement
those with authority not to abuse, nor appear to abuse, the
with the findings and recommendation of the Director of
power with which they are entrusted. Accordingly, codes of
Legal Services.
ethics promulgated by most professional regulatory
N. Resolution of the Complaint
associations forbid professional-client amorous, romantic, or
sexual relationships. The relationships prohibited by this
Following consultations with the President, the Director
policy shall be viewed in this context, and Instructors,
of Legal Services, and the Director of Human Resources,
Persons in Positions of Trust, and Supervisors should be
the vice president shall issue a final written decision
aware that any violation of this policy shall result in formal
regarding the complaint. The decision shall be addressed to
disciplinary action against them.
the Complainant and shall contain a statement of whether or
not sexual harassment was found to have occurred, the
III. Definitions
remedies to be provided to the Complainant, if any, and the
For the purposes of this policy, the following definitions
sanctions to be imposed upon the Respondent, if any. At
shall apply:
approximately the same time, the decision shall be commu-
A. Person in a Position of Trust: Any person occupy-
nicated to the Respondent in writing. If sanctions are to be
ing a position of trust with respect to one or more students
imposed upon the Respondent, the vice president shall also
at CSM such that engaging in an amorous, romantic, or
notify the Respondent of that aspect of the decision in
sexual relationship with any student would compromise the
writing. If the President is the Respondent, the President of
ability of the employee to perform his or her duties.
the Board of Trustees shall perform the above duties. If the
Examples of Persons in Positions of Trust at CSM are those
Respondent is a vice president, the President shall perform
employed in the Office of the Registrar, those employed in
these duties.
the Student Life Office, those employed in the Student
O. Appeal of Final Decision
Development Office, those employed in Public Safety,
There shall be no internal appeal from the final decision
resident assistants, and paper graders. The above examples
rendered pursuant to subsection V.N above. A party
are provided for illustrative purposes only and are not
aggrieved by the decision may file a complaint with the
intended to be exhaustive listings or to limit the illustrated
appropriate administrative agency or pursue other available
category in any manner.
legal remedies.
B. Instructor: Any person who teaches at CSM,
Promulgated by the CSM Board of Trustees on March
including academic faculty members, instructional staff, and
13, 1992. Amended by the CSM Board of Trustees on March
graduate students with teaching or tutorial responsibilities.
26, 1998. Amended by the CSM Board of Trustees on June
C. Student: Any person who is pursuing a course of
10, 1999.
study at CSM.
D. Subordinate Employee: Any person employed by
Colorado School of Mines Personal
CSM who is supervised by another employee.
Relationships Policy
E. Supervisor: Any person employed by CSM who
occupies a position of authority over another employee with
I. Statement of Authority and Purpose
regard to hiring, administering discipline, conducting
This policy is promulgated by the Board of Trustees
evaluations, granting salary adjustments, or overseeing task
pursuant to the authority conferred upon it by §23-41-
performance.
104(1), C.R.S. (1988 Repl. Vol.) in order to set forth a
policy concerning certain personal relationships at CSM as
IV. Policy
addressed herein. This policy shall supersede any previously
A. Personal Relations Between Instructors and Students
promulgated CSM policy which is in conflict herewith.
in the Instructional Context
II. Preface
No Instructor shall engage in an amorous, romantic, or
Certain amorous, romantic, or sexual relationships in
sexual relationship, consensual or otherwise, with a Student
which the parties appear to have consented, but where a
who is enrolled in a course being taught by the Instructor, or
definite power differential exists between them, are of
whose academic work is being supervised by the Instructor.
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Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

B. Personal Relationships Between Instructors and
C. Personal Relationships Between Supervisors and
Students Outside the Instructional Context
Subordinate Employees
In a personal relationship between an Instructor and a
No Supervisor shall engage in an amorous, romantic, or
Student for whom the Instructor has no current professional
sexual relationship, consensual or otherwise, with a
responsibility, the Instructor should be sensitive to the
Subordinate Employee who reports, either directly or
constant possibility that he or she may unexpectedly be
indirectly, to the Supervisor or is under the Supervisor’s
placed in a position of responsibility for the instruction or
direct or indirect authority.
evaluation of the Student. This could entail a request to
D. Personal Relationships Between Persons in Positions
write a letter of recommendation for the Student or to serve
of Trust and Students
on an admissions or selection committee involving the
Student. In addition, an awareness should be maintained
No Person in a Position of Trust shall engage in an
that others may speculate that a specific power relationship
amorous, romantic, or sexual relationship, consensual or
exists even when none is present, giving rise to assumptions
otherwise, with a Student.
of inequitable academic or professional advantage of the
(Promulgated by the CSM Board of Trustees on
Student. Even if potential conflict of interest issues can be
February 14, 1992)
resolved, charges of sexual harassment may arise. In such
situations, it is the Instructor who, by virtue of his or her
special responsibility, shall be held accountable for
unprofessional behavior.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
157

Index
A
G
Academic Calendar ........................................................... 4
Geochemistry ..................................................................... 65
Academic Dishonesty ........................................................ 20
Geology and Geological Engineering ....................... 5, 69
Access to Student Records ............................................. 24
Geophysics ................................................................... 5, 80
Accreditation ..................................................................... 7
Grade-Point Averages ..................................................... 24
Admission Procedure ......................................................... 8
Grading System ............................................................... 23
Admission Requirements ................................................... 8
Graduate Degree Programs ............................................. 34
Admission to Candidacy ................................................. 29
Graduate Degrees and Requirements ............................. 29
Affirmative Action ........................................................ 150
Graduate Degrees Offered ................................................ 7
Alcohol Use ..................................................................... 19
Graduate Student Association ................................... 5, 12
Alumni Association ......................................................... 15
Graduate Student Loans .................................................. 28
Apartments ....................................................................... 10
Graduation ....................................................................... 22
Arthur Lakes Library ...................................................... 14
Green Center .................................................................... 16
Auditing Courses ............................................................. 18
H
C
Health Center ................................................................... 11
Campus Residence Requirement: .................................. 31
Health Insurance ............................................................. 11
Campus Security ............................................................. 19
Health Record ..................................................................... 9
Career Center ................................................................... 11
History of CSM ................................................................. 6
Categories of Admission ................................................... 8
Homecoming ................................................................... 12
Centers and Institutes .................................................... 133
Honor Societies ............................................................... 12
Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining ....... 5, 34
Housing ....................................................................... 5, 10
Chemistry and Geochemistry ....................................... 5, 39
I
Code of Conduct ............................................................... 19
Identification Cards ........................................................... 11
Colorado Graduate Fellowships ....................................... 28
Incomplete Grade. ............................................................. 23
Comprehensive Examination ............................................ 32
Independent Study ............................................................. 21
Computing and Networking ............................................. 14
Industrial Fellowships ....................................................... 27
Copy Center ....................................................................... 16
Interest Organizations ....................................................... 13
Course Grades ................................................................... 21
INTERLINK Language Center ........................................ 11
D
International & Minority Organizations .......................... 13
Defense of Thesis .............................................................. 18
International Day ............................................................... 12
Degree Students ................................................................... 8
International Programs ...................................................... 14
Description of Courses ...................................................... 34
International Student Services ..................................... 5, 10
Directory of the School ................................................... 138
International Students ......................................................... 9
Doctor of Philosophy ........................................................ 31
L
Drug Free Schools & Communities ................................. 19
LAIS Writing Center ....................................................... 15
Drug Use ............................................................................ 19
Late Payment ..................................................................... 26
E
Late Registration Fee ........................................................ 18
Economics and Business .............................................. 5, 44
Liberal Arts and International Studies ........................ 5, 89
Employment Restrictions and Agreements ...................... 27
M
Encumbrances .................................................................... 26
Master of Engineering ...................................................... 30
Engineer Days ................................................................... 12
Master of Science - Thesis ................................................ 30
Engineering ................................................................... 5, 49
Master of Science— Non-Thesis ...................................... 31
English as a Second Language ........................................... 5
Master’s Degree Programs ............................................... 29
Environmental Science and Engineering .................... 5, 60
Materials Science ......................................................... 5, 95
Explosives .......................................................................... 19
Mathematical and Computer Sciences ...................... 5, 102
F
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering ................ 5, 108
Fall Blowout ...................................................................... 12
Mines Park ......................................................................... 10
Fees .................................................................................... 25
Mining Engineering ................................................... 5, 117
Fellowships, Colorado Graduate ...................................... 28
Minor Programs ................................................................ 29
Financial Aid (Assistance) ........................................... 5, 27
Minority Organizations ..................................................... 13
Financial Responsibility ................................................... 26
Mission and Goals ............................................................... 6
Firearms ............................................................................. 19
Motor Vehicles .................................................................. 11
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Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000

N
S
Nondegree Students ................................................... 8, 22
Semester Hours ............................................................... 23
O
Sexual Harassment Policy ............................................ 154
Special Programs and Continuing Education (SPACE) 15
Office of Graduate Studies and Research ........................ 5
Spring Blowout ............................................................... 12
Office of Women in Science, Engineering and Mathematics
Student Center ................................................................. 10
................................................................................... 15
Student Conduct .............................................................. 19
Oredigger Student Newspaper .......................................... 12
Student Development and Academic Services .............. 10
P
Student Fees .................................................................... 25
Parking ............................................................................. 11
Student Housing ................................................................ 5
Part-time Status ................................................................ 17
Summer Registration ....................................................... 18
Payments and Refunds .................................................... 26
T
Personal Relationships Policy ...................................... 156
Telecommunications Center ........................................... 16
Petroleum Engineering ............................................ 5, 123
Thesis Committee ..................................................... 30, 32
Physics ...................................................................... 5, 129
Thesis Defense ......................................................... 30, 32
Probation .......................................................................... 21
Thesis Grades .................................................................. 21
Professional Degree ........................................................ 29
Thesis Refunds ................................................................ 27
Professional Societies ..................................................... 13
Thesis Registration .......................................................... 18
Program Requirements ................................................... 29
Transfer Credit ................................................................. 21
Prospector Village ........................................................... 10
Tuition .............................................................................. 25
Public Affairs .................................................................. 14
Public Nature of Research .............................................. 21
U
Q
Undergraduate Deficiencies ........................................... 21
Unlawful Discrimination Policy ................................... 150
Qualifying Examination .................................................. 31
Unsatisfactory Academic Performance .......................... 19
Quality Hours and Quality Points .................................. 23
R
V
Veterans’ Benefits .................................................... 12, 23
Reciprocal Registration .................................................. 17
Voicemail ......................................................................... 16
Recreational Organizations ............................................ 13
Refunds ............................................................................ 27
W
Registrar ............................................................................. 5
Weapons ........................................................................... 19
Registration ...................................................................... 17
Winter Carnival ............................................................... 12
Research Development and Services ............................. 16
Withdrawing from School .............................................. 22
Research Fair ................................................................... 12
Residence Halls ............................................................... 10
Residency ......................................................................... 17
Residency Qualifications ................................................ 17
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Graduate Bulletin
1999-2000
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