Colorado
School of Mines
1999-2000
Undergraduate Bulletin
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
1

To CSM Students
This Bulletin is for your use as a source of continuing reference. Please save it.
Published by Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401-1887
Colorado School of Mines Bulletin (USPS 391-690)
Correspondence
Address correspondence to: Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401-1887
Main Telephone: (303) 273-3000 Toll Free: 1-800-446-9488
Inquiries to Colorado School of Mines should be directed as follows:
Admissions: A. William Young, Director of Enrollment Management
Student Housing: Bob Francisco, Director of Student Life
Financial Aid: Roger Koester, Director of Student Financial Aid
2
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Contents
Academic Calendar .............................. 4
Grades ....................................................... 27
Academic Probation and Suspension .......... 29
Section 1–Welcome ............................. 5
Access to Student Records ........................ 30
Mission and Goals ........................................ 5
General Information .................................... 31
The Academic Environment .......................... 5
Curriculum Changes ................................... 31
History of CSM ............................................. 6
Undergraduate Degree Requirements ........ 31
Unique Programs ......................................... 6
Undergraduate Programs ........................... 32
Location ....................................................... 7
Institutional Goals ....................................... 32
Accreditation ................................................ 7
The Core Curriculum .................................. 33
Administration .............................................. 7
Chemical Engineering and
Section 2–Student Life ......................... 8
Petroleum Refining ................................. 35
Chemistry and Geochemistry ..................... 37
Facilities ....................................................... 8
Economics and Business ........................... 40
Services ....................................................... 8
Engineering ................................................ 42
Activities ..................................................... 11
Environmental Science and Engineering ..... 48
Student Honors .......................................... 13
Geology and Geological Engineering .......... 49
Section 3–Tuition, Fees, Financial Assis-
Geophysics ................................................ 52
tance, Housing ................................ 15
Liberal Arts and International Studies .......... 55
Tuition ........................................................ 15
Mathematical and Computer Sciences ........ 59
Fees .......................................................... 15
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering ...... 62
Descriptions of Fees and Other Charges .... 15
Military Science .......................................... 65
Housing ..................................................... 16
Mining Engineering ..................................... 67
Payments and Refunds .............................. 17
Petroleum Engineering ............................... 68
Residency Qualifications ............................ 18
Physical Education and Athletics ................ 71
Financial Aid and Scholarships ................... 19
Physics ...................................................... 72
Financial Aid Policies .................................. 22
Section 6–Description of Courses ...... 74
Section 4–Living Facilities .................. 23
Student Life ................................................ 74
Residence Halls ......................................... 23
Core Areas ................................................. 74
Dining Facilities .......................................... 23
Family Housing .......................................... 23
Section 7–Centers and Institutes ..... 128
Mines Park ................................................. 23
Section 8–Services ........................... 133
Fraternities, Sororities ................................ 23
Private Rooms, Apartments ........................ 23
Directory of the School ..................... 136
Section 5–Undergraduate Information 24
Appendix .......................................... 148
Admission Requirements ............................ 24
Index ................................................ 156
Admission Procedures ............................... 25
Academic Regulations ................................ 26
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
3

Academic Calendar
Fall Semester
1999
2000
Confirmation/Registration ................................................................................. Aug. 23, Monday ...................... Aug. 21, Monday
Classes start ........................................................................................................ Aug. 24, Tuesday ...................... Aug. 22, Tuesday
Labor Day - Classes in session ........................................................................... Sept. 6, Monday ......................... Sept. 4, Monday
Last day to register, add or drop courses without a “W’ ............................... Sept. 8, Wednesday ................. Sept. 6, Wednesday
Fall Break, Columbus Day ................................................................................. Oct. 11, Monday .......................... Oct. 9, Monday
Mid-term grades due in Registrar’s Office ........................................................ Oct. 18, Monday ....................... Oct. 16, Monday
Last day to withdraw from a course Continuing students/Grad students ........ Nov. 2, Tuesday ......................... Oct. 31, Tuesday
Early Registration Spring Semester ............................................................... Nov. 8-12, Mon.-Fri. .............. Nov. 6-10, Mon.-Fri.
Thanksgiving Recess .................................................................................... Nov. 25-28, Thurs.-Sun. ..... Nov. 23-26, Thurs.-Sun.
Last day to withdraw from a course New undergraduate students ..................... Dec. 3, Friday .............................. Dec. 1, Friday
Classes end ......................................................................................................... Dec. 9, Thursday ....................... Dec. 7, Thursday
Dead Day .............................................................................................................. Dec. 10, Friday ............................. Dec. 8, Friday
Seniors’ lowest possible grades due in Registrar’s Office .............................. Dec. 14, Tuesday ....................... Dec. 12, Tuesday
Final exams ................................................................................................... Dec. 13-16, Mon.-Thurs. ... Dec. 11-14, Mon.-Thurs.
Semester ends ....................................................................................................... Dec. 17, Friday ........................... Dec. 15, Friday
Midyear Degree Convocation .............................................................................. Dec. 17, Friday ........................... Dec. 15, Friday
Final grades due in Registrar’s Office .............................................................. Dec. 20, Monday ....................... Dec. 18, Monday
Winter Recess ........................................................................................................ Dec. 18-Jan. 3 ........... Dec. 16-Jan. 1, Sat.-Mon.
Spring Semester
2000
2001
Confirmation/Registration ................................................................................... Jan. 4, Tuesday ........................... Jan. 2, Tuesday
Classes start ....................................................................................................... Jan. 5, Wednesday .................... Jan. 3, Wednesday
Last day to register, add or drop courses without a “W’ ............................... Jan. 19, Wednesday ................. Jan. 17, Wednesday
Mid-terms grades due in Registrar’s Office ..................................................... Feb. 28, Monday ....................... Feb. 26, Monday
Spring Recess ................................................................................................ March 11-19, Sat.-Sun. ........ March 10-18, Sat.-Sun.
Last day to withdraw from a course ................................................................. March 21, Tuesday .................. March 20, Tuesday
All except new undergrads & 2nd sem freshmen
Registration Field & Summer Terms .............................................................. April 3-7, Mon.-Fri. ............... April 2-6, Mon.-Fri.
Early Registration Fall Semester ................................................................... April 10-14, Mon.-Fri. ........... April 9-13, Mon.-Fri.
Last day to withdraw from a course-new undergrads & 2nd sem freshmen ... April 21, Friday .......................... April 20, Friday
Classes end ........................................................................................................ April 27, Thursday .................. April 26, Thursday
Dead Day ............................................................................................................. April 28, Friday .......................... April 27, Friday
Seniors’ lower possible grades due in Registrar’s Office ................................. May 2, Tuesday .......................... May 1, Tuesday
Final exams ..................................................................................................... May 1-4, Mon.-Thurs. Apr. 30-May 3, Mon.-Thurs.
Semester ends ........................................................................................................ May 5, Friday ............................... May 4, Friday
Commencement ..................................................................................................... May 5, Friday ............................... May 4, Friday
Final grades due in Registrar’s Office ............................................................... May 8, Monday .......................... May 7, Monday
Summer Sessions
2000
2001
Registration, First Field & Summer Thesis ....................................................... May 8, Monday .......................... May 7, Monday
First Field Term starts ......................................................................................... May 8, Monday .......................... May 7, Monday
Last day to register, add or drop courses without a “W” - Field Term .......... May 10, Thursday .................... May 11, Thursday
Memorial Day (Holiday) .................................................................................... May 29, Monday ....................... May 28, Monday
Last day to withdraw from First Field Term ........................................................ June 2, Friday .............................. June 1, Friday
Registration - Summer School ..................................................................... June 15-16, Thurs.-Fri. ........ June 14-15, Thurs.-Fri.
First Field Term ends ........................................................................................... June 16, Friday ........................... June 15, Friday
Field Term grades due in Registrar’s Office ..................................................... June 19, Monday ....................... June 18, Monday
Summer School starts ........................................................................................ June 19, Monday ....................... June 18, Monday
Last day to register, add or drop courses without a W -Summer School ....... June 26, Monday ....................... June 25, Monday
Independence Day (Holiday) ............................................................................... July 4, Tuesday ...................... July 4, Wednesday
Second Field Term begins .................................................................................. July 10, Monday .......................... July 9, Monday
Last day to register, add or drop courses without a W -Second Field Term .. July 13, Thursday ..................... July 12, Thursday
Last day to withdraw from Summer School ....................................................... July 14, Friday ............................. July 13, Friday
Last day to withdraw from Second Field Term ................................................... Aug. 4, Friday .............................. Aug. 3, Friday
Summer School ends ............................................................................................ Aug. 11, Friday .......................... Aug. 10, Friday
Summer School grades due in Registrar’s Office ............................................ Aug. 14, Monday ...................... Aug. 13, Monday
Second Field Term ends ....................................................................................... Aug. 18, Friday .......................... Aug. 17, Friday
Second Field Term grades due in Registrar’s Office ..................................... August 21, Monday .................... Aug. 20, Monday
4
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Section 1 - Welcome
Mission and Goals
The Academic Environment
Colorado School of Mines is a public research university
We strive to fulfill this educational mission through our
devoted to engineering and applied science related to
undergraduate curriculum and in an environment of
resources. It is one of the leading institutions in the nation
commitment and partnership among students and faculty.
and the world in these areas. It has the highest admission
The commitment is directed at learning, academic success
standards of any university in Colorado and among the
and professional growth, it is achieved through persistent
highest of any public university in the U.S. CSM has
intellectual study and discourse, and it is enabled by
dedicated itself to responsible stewardship of the earth and
professional courtesy, responsibility and conduct. The
its resources. It is one of a very few institutions in the world
partnership invokes expectations for both students and
having broad expertise in resource exploration, extraction,
faculty. Students should expect access to high quality faculty
production and utilization which can be brought to bear on
and to appropriate academic guidance and counseling; they
the world’s pressing resource-related environmental
should expect access to a high quality curriculum and
problems. As such, it occupies a unique position among the
instructional programs; they should expect to graduate
world’s institutions of higher education.
within four years if they follow the prescribed programs
The school’s role and mission has remained constant and
successfully; and they should expect to be respected as
is written in the Colorado statutes as: The Colorado School
individuals in all facets of campus activity and should
of Mines shall be a specialized baccalaureate and graduate
expect responsive and tactful interaction in their learning
research institution with high admission standards. The
endeavors. Faculty should expect participation and
Colorado School of Mines shall have a unique mission in
dedication from students, including attendance, attentive-
energy, mineral, and materials science and engineering and
ness, punctuality and demonstrable contribution of effort in
associated engineering and science fields. The school shall
the learning process; and they should expect respectful
be the primary institution of higher education offering
interaction in a spirit of free inquiry and orderly discipline.
energy, mineral and materials science and mineral
We believe that these commitments and expectations
engineering degrees at both the graduate and undergradu-
establish the academic culture upon which all learning is
ate levels. (Colorado revised Statutes, Section 23-41-105)
founded.
Throughout the school’s 124 year history, the translation
CSM offers the bachelor of science degree in Chemical
of its mission into educational programs has been influenced
and Petroleum Refining Engineering, Chemistry, Econom-
by the needs of society. Those needs are now focused more
ics, Engineering, Engineering Physics, Geological Engineer-
clearly than ever before. We believe that the world faces a
ing, Geophysical Engineering, Mathematical and Computer
crisis in balancing resource availability with environmental
Sciences, Metallurgical and Material Engineering, Mining
protection and that CSM and its programs are central to the
Engineering, and Petroleum Engineering.
solution to that crisis. Therefore the school’s mission is
u All CSM graduates must have depth in an area of
reinterpreted below as a commitment for the decade of the
specialization, enhanced by hands-on experiential
1990’s and beyond:
learning, and breadth in allied fields.
Colorado School of Mines is dedicated to education and
u They must have the knowledge and skills to be able to
research in all areas of science and engineering and
recognize, define and solve problems by applying sound
associated fields related to the discovery, production, and
scientific and engineering principles. These attributes
utilization of resources needed to improve the quality of life
uniquely distinguish our graduates to better function in
of the world’
s inhabitants. CSM is committed to educating
increasingly competitive and diverse technical profes-
students to become good stewards of the Earth and its
sional environments.
resources. It is committed to the mitigation of environmental
u Graduates must have the skills to communicate informa-
damage caused by the production and utilization of
tion, concepts and ideas effectively orally, in writing, and
minerals, energy, and materials, and to the development of
graphically. They must be skilled in the retrieval,
processes that will minimize such damage in the future. It is
interpretation and development of technical information
further committed to the development of technologies that
by various means, including the use of computer-aided
can reduce the world’
s dependence on non-renewable
techniques.
resources.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
5

u Graduates should have the flexibility to adjust to the ever-
disciplines in the context of responsible stewardship of the
changing professional environment and appreciate diverse
earth and its resources.
approaches to understanding and solving society’s
CSM has always had an international reputation in
problems. They should have the creativity, resourceful-
resource fields. Graduates have come from nearly every
ness, receptivity and breadth of interests to think critically
nation in the world and alumni can be found in nearly every
about a wide range of cross-disciplinary issues. They
nation.
should be prepared to assume leadership roles and
possess the skills and attitudes which promote teamwork
The student body was predominantly white male for
and cooperation and to continue their own growth
many years, reflecting the demographics of the industries it
through life-long learning.
served. The School gave one of the early engineering
degrees for women to Florence Caldwell in 1897 but there
u Graduates should be capable of working effectively in an
were many subsequent years when there were no female
international environment, and be able to succeed in an
students. This has changed and today approximately 25% of
increasingly interdependent world where borders between
the overall student body are women and 15% of the
cultures and economies are becoming less distinct. They
undergraduates are underrepresented minorities, thanks to
should appreciate the traditions and languages of other
strong recruiting efforts and the opening up of traditionally
cultures, and value diversity in their own society.
white male industries.
u Graduates should exhibit ethical behavior and integrity.
Unique Programs
They should also demonstrate perseverance and have
pride in accomplishment. They should assume a responsi-
Colorado School of Mines is an institution of engineer-
bility to enhance their professions through service and
ing and applied science with a special focus in the resource
leadership and should be responsible citizens who serve
areas. As such, it has unique programs in many fields. This
society, particularly through stewardship of the environ-
is the only institution in the world, for example, that offers
ment.
doctoral programs in all five of the major earth science
disciplines: Geology and Geological Engineering, Geophys-
History of CSM
ics, Geochemistry, Mining Engineering and Petroleum
In 1865, only six years after gold and silver were
Engineering. It has one of the few Metallurgical and
discovered in the Colorado Territory, the fledgling mining
Materials Engineering programs in the country that still
industry was in trouble. The nuggets had been picked out of
focuses on the complete materials cycle from mineral
streams and the rich veins had been worked. New methods
processing to finished advanced materials.
of exploration, mining and recovery were needed. A number
In addition to these traditional programs which define
of men with names like Loveland, Berthoud, Arthur Lakes,
the institutional focus, the school is pioneering programs in
George West and the Episcopal Bishop Randall proposed a
interdisciplinary areas. One of the most successful of these
school of mines. In 1874 the Territorial Legislature passed
is the Engineering Division program, which currently claims
an appropriation of $5,000 and commissioned W.A.H.
more than one-third of the undergraduate majors. This
Loveland and a Board of Trustees to found the Territorial
program combines civil, electrical and mechanical engineer-
School of Mines in or near Golden. Governor Routt signed
ing in a nontraditional curriculum that is accredited by the
the Bill on February 9, 1874. With the achievement of
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. It
statehood in 1876, the Colorado School of Mines was
serves as a model for such programs here and elsewhere.
constitutionally established. The first diploma was awarded
in 1882.
While many of the programs at CSM are firmly
grounded in tradition, they are almost all undergoing
As CSM grew, its mission expanded. From a rather
continual evolution. Recent successes in integrating aspects
narrow initial focus on nonfuel minerals, it developed
of the curriculum have spurred similar activity in other areas
programs as well in petroleum production and refining.
such as the geosciences. There, through the medium of
More recently it has expanded into the fields of materials
computer visualization, geophysicists and geologists are in
science and engineering, energy and environmental
the process of creating a new emerging discipline. A similar
engineering, and economics as well as a broader range of
development is occurring in geo- engineering through the
engineering and applied science disciplines. CSM sees its
integration of aspects of civil engineering, geology and
mission as education and research in engineering and
mining. CSM has played a leadership role in this kind of
applied science with a special focus on the earth science
innovation over the last decade.
6
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Location
Technology accredits undergraduate degree programs in
Golden, Colorado has been the home for CSM since its
Chemical and Petroleum-Refining Engineering, Engineer-
inception. Located 20 minutes west of Denver, this
ing, Engineering Physics, Geological Engineering, Geo-
community of 15,000 is located in the foothills of the
physical Engineering, Metallurgical and Materials Engineer-
Rockies. Skiing is an hour away to the west. Golden is a
ing, Mining Engineering and Petroleum Engineering. The
unique community that serves as home to CSM, the Coors
American Chemical Society has approved the degree
Brewing Company, the National Renewable Energy
program in the Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry.
Laboratory, a major U.S. Geological Survey facility that also
Administration
contains the National Earthquake Center, and the seat of
General management of the School is vested by state
Jefferson County. Golden once served as the territorial
statute in a Board of Trustees, consisting of seven members
capital of Colorado.
appointed by the governor. A nonvoting student member is
Accreditation
elected annually by the student body. Financial support
Colorado School of Mines is accredited through the
comes from student tuition and fees and from the state
doctoral degree by the Commission on Institutions of
through annual appropriations. These funds are augmented
Higher Education of the North Central Association of
by government and privately sponsored research, private gift
Colleges and Schools. The Engineering Accreditation
support from alumni, corporations, foundations and other
Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and
friends.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
7

Section 2- Student Life
Facilities
Counseling: Experienced, professional counselors offer
Student Center
assistance in a variety of areas. Personal counseling for
stress management, relationship issues, wellness education
The Ben H. Parker Student Center has recently
and/or improved self image are a few of the areas often
undergone a four million dollar renovation and addition.
requested. Gender issues, personal security, and compatibil-
The building contains the offices for the Vice President of
ity with roommates are also popular interactive presenta-
Student Life and Dean of Students, the Director of Student
tions. SDAS works closely with other student life depart-
Life, Housing, Conferences Reservation Office, Student
ments to address other issues.
Activities and Greek Advisor, ASCSM Offices, and Student
Groups. The Student Center also contains the student dining
Academic Services: The staff often conducts workshops
hall, the I-Club, a food court, game room, bookstore,
in areas of interest to college students, such as time
student lounges and TV room, and the Outdoor Recreation
management, learning skills, test taking, preparing for finals
program office. There are also a number of meeting rooms
and college adjustment. Advising on individual learning
and banquet facilities in the Student Center.
skills is also available.
Services
Tutoring and Academic Excellence Workshops: Free
walk-in tutoring is available to all CSM students for most
Academic Advising
freshmen and sophomore courses. Tutoring in some upper
Freshmen are advised under the Freshman Mentor
division courses may also be available. Weekly academic
Program, designed
excellence workshops in introductory calculus, chemistry,
u to ease the transition from high school or work to
and physics are provided as well.
college,
u to provide quality academic advising,
International Student Affairs
u to provide a resource/contact person for critical periods
International student advising is the responsibility of
during the freshman year, and
International Student and Scholar Services and international
u to give students an opportunity to get to know a
student services are handled through this office. The
campus professional.
International Student and Scholar Services Office coordi-
nates the Host Family Program. Orientation programs for
Each mentor, who is a member of the faculty or
new international students are held at the beginning of each
professional staff, advises approximately 10 students.
semester. Visas and work permits are processed through the
Undecided transfer students are advised by the Admissions
International Student Advisor at the International Student
Office during their first year. Upperclass students and
and Scholar Services Office.
transfer students who have declared a major are advised by
an advisor in their option department.
Office of International Programs/Study Abroad
Questions concerning work in a particular course should
The Office of International Programs (OIP) located in
be discussed with the course instructor. General questions
Stratton Hall, room 109, develops international opportuni-
on scheduling and planning the academic program can be
ties for students and faculty at CSM, including study abroad
answered by the student’s advisor or mentor at any time.
programs. For information about the international activities
The advisor’s or mentor’s signature is required on the early
of OIP, see p. 111.
registration form filed by every student.
English as a Second Language Program
Office for Student Development and Academic
The INTERLINK program at Colorado School of Mines
Services
combines intensive English language instruction with
training in skills necessary for successful academic and
The Student Development and Academic Services
social life at an American engineering university. Designed
Office (SDAS), located at 1400 Maple Street, serves as the
to address the special linguistic needs of students in the
personal, academic and career counseling center. Through
fields of science and technology, its curriculum focuses on
its various services, the center acts as a comprehensive
reading, writing, grammar, listening, conversation, pronun-
resource for the personal growth and life skills development
ciation, and study skills. Instruction is offered in 9-week
of our students. SDAS houses a library of over 300 books
sessions at six levels of proficiency. At the successful
and other materials for checkout, and is home to CSM’s
completion of the fifth level, a qualified student can
Engineers Choosing Health Options (ECHO), promoting
understand, take notes on academic lectures, make oral
wise and healthy decision making regarding students’ use of
presentations, read scholarly books and journals, conduct
alcohol and other drugs.
library research, and write essays and research papers.
8
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Admission to the program is open to adults who have
Career Center (Placement and Cooperative
completed secondary school in good standing (grade point
Education)
average of C+ or above) and are able to meet their educa-
The Career Center assists and advises students in their
tional and living expenses. For further information contact
search for engineering-related employment. Each year
INTERLINK Language Center at Colorado School of
industry and government representatives visit the campus to
Mines, Golden, CO 80401; call (303) 273-3516 or FAX
interview students and explain employment opportunities.
(303) 273-3529.
Fall is the major recruiting season for both summer and full-
Identification Cards
time positions, but interviews take place in the spring as
All new students should have an identification card
well. Students must be registered with the Career Center in
made as early as possible their first semester. Identification
order to interview, which is accomplished by submitting
cards are made in the Student Activities Office in the
resumes and signing a card giving the Center permission to
Student Center. In subsequent semesters, validation stickers
disseminate student materials.
may also be obtained from the Student Activities Office.
A Career Manual is available to students to help in
Lost, stolen or damaged identification cards will be replaced
resume writing, interviewing and off-campus job search.
for a small fee. The identification card is required to check
Staff members offer individual critiques of resumes and
material out of the CSM Library and various other CSM
letters, and personal job search advice. A small library of
activities may require its presentation. All students are
directories and other job search materials is available for
required to carry their ID at all times while on campus.
check-out. Many workshops are offered throughout the year
Student Health Center
on job search topics, and video-taped practice interviewing
The Student Health Center, located in a free-standing
is available.
building at 17th and Elm, provides primary health care to
The Career Center sponsors a Career Day each fall to
CSM students and their spouses. Students pay a $45 fee
allow students to explore career options with exhibiting
each semester which entitles them to unlimited visits with a
employers. A Shadowing Programis available for students
physician or nurse as well as prescription and over the
who wish to visit a local professional in order to clarify
counter medications. The health center also provides
career goals. For students undecided about which engineer
wellness teaching, immunizations, allergy shots, flu shots,
or science career to pursue, career counseling is provided.
nutrition counseling and information regarding a wide range
The Cooperative Education Program is available to
of health concerns. Staff members are also available to
students who have completed three semesters at CSM (two
provide health-promotion events for students groups and
for transfer students). It is an academic program which
residence hall program. The Students Health Center is open
offers 3 hours of credit in the major for engineering work
Monday through Friday 8-12 and 1-4:45 P.M. It is staffed
experience, awarded on the basis of a term paper written
by RN’s throughout the day. Physicians coverage is
following the CO-OP term. The type of credit awarded
provided by family practice physicians who are on site for
depends on the decision of the department, but in most cases
two hours daily and on-call at all times.
is additive credit. CO-OP terms usually extend from May to
Starting with the Fall 1999 semester, dental services are
December, or from January to August, and usually take a
provided at the Student Health Center. These services are
student off-campus full time. Part-time CO-OP is also
provided by a dentist who has scheduled hours two days per
possible if a student is working 20 hours per week for
week four hours per day. Basic services such as x-rays,
several semesters. Students must register for CO-OP while
cleanings, fillings and extractions are available.
on the job (a no credit, no fee class), and must write learning
To be eligible for care, students must be enrolled in
objectives and sign informal contracts with their company’s
seven or more hours; have paid the Health Center fee if they
representative to ensure the educational component of the
are part time and have a completed Health History Form on
work experience.
file at the Health Center. Supervised by Vice President and
Full-time, part-time, summer and CO-OP jobs are
Dean of Student Life. Phone: (303) 273-3381; FAX: (303)
publicized in the Career Center as well as on bulletin boards
279-3155.
around the campus. Students are often contacted by the
Motor Vehicles Parking
Career Center regarding specific opportunities, and resumes
are sent by the Center directly to employers. CSM graduates
All students are permitted to bring motor vehicles on
are eligible for the services of the Career Center for 18
campus but they must be registered with CSM Public Safety.
months after graduation. Information on starting salaries,
Regulations for parking may be obtained from CSM Public
summer salaries, job search success rates, and other topics is
Safety. Some parking space is restricted, and this must be
collected and available through the Center.
observed.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
9

Standards, Codes of Conduct
Golden, CO 80401-1869, or call (303) 273-3097.
Every fall, each student is supplied with a Student
Minority Engineering Program
Handbook that lists all School regulations governing
conduct, including discrimination, alcoholic beverages,
The Minority Engineering Program is located at 1616
drugs, academic dishonesty, and distribution of literature, as
Maple Street. The MEP meets the needs of minority
well as the process for filing a complaint. Anyone having
students by providing various student services, summer
additional questions concerning these regulations should
programs, recruitment, academic/retention programs
contact the Dean of Students.
(academic advising, academic excellence workshops,
counseling, tutoring and peer study groups), professional/
Student Publications
career development (leadership workshops, career develop-
Three student publications are published at CSM by the
ment, time management, study skills and national confer-
Associated Students of CSM. Opportunities abound for
ences), community outreach and cultural and social
students wishing to participate on the staffs.
activities.
The Oredigger is the student newspaper, published
Working through student professional societies—
weekly during the school year. It contains news, features,
American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES),
sports, letters and editorials of interest to students, faculty,
Asian Student Association (ASA), National Society of
and the Golden community.
Black Engineers (NSBE), and Society of Hispanic Profes-
The Prospector is the student yearbook. Published
sional Engineers (SHPE)— the Office of Minority Engi-
annually in late spring, its staff strives to capture the essence
neering Program is a center for minority student activities,
of a school year in pictures and print.
and a place for students to become a community of scholars
with common goals and objectives in a comfortable learning
The literary magazine, High Grade, is published each
environment.
semester. Contributions of poetry, short stories, drawings,
and photographs are encouraged from students, faculty and
The American Indian Science and Engineering Society
staff. A Board of Student Publications acts in an advisory
(AISES) chapter was established at the Colorado School
capacity to the publications staffs and makes recommenda-
of Mines in 1992. It is a peer support group for Native
tions on matters of policy. The Public Affairs Department
American students pursuing science and engineering
staff members serve as daily advisors to the staffs of the
careers. Its main goal is to help the students get through
Oredigger and Prospector. The Liberal Arts and Interna-
college so they can then use those new skills to create a
tional Studies Department provides similiar service to the
better life for themselves and other Native Americans.
High Grade.
Asian Students Association (ASA) - This is a branch of the
Veterans Counseling
Minority Engineering Program which acknowledges the
The Registrar’s Office provides veterans counseling
Asian heritage by involvement in various school
services for students attending the School and using
activities, social activities, and activities with the other
educational benefits from the Veterans Administration.
Minority Engineering chapters. ASA allows students with
an Asian heritage or students interested in Asian heritage
Tutoring
to assemble and voice shared interests and associate in
Individual tutoring in most courses is available through
organized group activities which include attending
the Office for Student Development and Academic Services.
Nuggets games, bowling, ice skating and numerous other
This office also sponsors group tutoring sessions which are
activities.
open to all interested CSM students. For more information
about services and eligibiliy requirements, contact the
National Society of Black Engineers - NSBE is a non-
Student Development and Academic Services office.
profit organization managed by students. It was founded
to promote the recruitment, retention and successful
Office of Women in Science, Engineering and
graduation of Black and other under-represented groups
Mathematics (WISEM)
in the field of engineering. NSBE operates through a
The WISEM office is located in 300 Guggenheim Hall.
university-based structure coordinated through regional
The mission of WISEM is to enhance opportunities for
zones, and administered by the National Executive Board.
women in science and engineering careers, to increase
The local chapters, which are the center of NSBE activity,
retention of women at CSM, and to promote equity and
create and conduct projects in the areas of pre-college
diversity in higher education. The office sponsors programs
student interaction, university academic support mecha-
for women students and faculty and produces the Chevron
nisms and career guidance programs. “We instill pride
Lecture Series. For further information, contact: Debra K.
and add value to our members which causes them to want
Lasich, Interim Director of Women in Science, Engineering
to give back to NSBE in order to produce a continuum of
and Mathematics, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois,
success.”
Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE) -
10
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

SHPE is a non-profit organization that exists for the
committees are: Friday Afternoon Club (FAC), which
advancement of Hispanic engineering (sciences) students
provides comedians and other performing artists to the
to become professional engineers and scientists, to
campus on most Fridays throughout the academic year;
increase the number of Hispanics entering into the field of
Special Events which coordinates events such as the
engineering, and to develop and implement programs
annual Back to School Bashes, Discount Sport Nights at
benefiting Hispanics seeking to become engineers and
Rockies or Avalanche Games, and one time specialty
scientists. Anyone interested in joining may do so. SHPE
entertainment; and E-Days and Homecoming.
is a national organization with student and professional
Special Events
chapters in nearly 100 cities across the country. The
Engineers’ Days festivities are held each spring. The
organization is divided into five regions representing 76
three-day affair is organized entirely by students. Contests
student chapters. The SHPE organization is governed by a
are held in drilling, hand-spiking, mucking, oil-field
National Board of Directors which includes representa-
olympics, and softball, just to name a few. Additional events
tives from all regions including two student representa-
include a huge fireworks display, the awarding of scholar-
tives.
ships to outstanding Colorado high school seniors and an
Activities
Engineers’ Day concert.
The Office of Student Activities coordinates the various
Homecoming weekend is one of the high points of the
activities and student organizations on the Mines campus.
entire year’s activities. Events include a football rally and
Student government, professional societies, living groups,
game, campus decorations, election of Homecoming queen
honor societies, interest groups and special events add a
and beast, parade, burro race, and other contests.
balance to the academic side of the CSM community.
International Day is planned and conducted by the
Participants take part in management training, responsibility,
International Council. It includes exhibits and programs
and leadership development. To obtain an up to date listing
designed to further the cause of understanding among the
of the recognized campus organizations or more information
countries of the world. The international dinner and
about any of these organizations, contact the Student
entertainment have come to be one of the campus social
Activities office.
events of the year.
Student Government
The Military Ball, a dinner and dance sponsored by the
Associated Students of CSM (ASCSM), is sanctioned by
ROTC Battalion, is held each spring and is one of the most
the Board of Trustees of the School. The purpose of
colorful affairs of the year.
ASCSM is, in part, to advance the interest and promote
the welfare of CSM and all of the students and to foster
Winter Carnival, sponsored by Blue Key, is an all-
and maintain harmony among those connected with or
school ski day held each year at one of the nearby ski
interested in the School, including students, alumni,
slopes.
faculty, trustees and friends.
Student/Parent Day is an annual event held in the fall to
Through funds collected as student fees, ASCSM strives
acquaint high school students and their parents with the
to ensure a full social and academic life for all students
faculty, students, alumni, adminis trative personnel, and
with its organizations, publications, and special events.
facilities.
As the representative governing body of the students
Living Groups
ASCSM provides leadership and a strong voice for the
Residence Hall Association (RHA) is a student-run
student body, enforces policies enacted by the student
organization developed to coordinate and plan activities for
body, works to integrate the various campus organiza-
students living in the Residence Halls. Its membership is
tions, and promotes the ideals and traditions of the
represented by students from each hall floor. Officers are
School.
elected each fall for that academic year.
The Graduate Student Association was formed in 1991
Social Fraternities, Sororities
and is recognized by CSM through the student govern-
There are seven national fraternities and two national
ment as the representative voice of the graduate student
sororities active on the CSM campus, and a third sorority
body. GSA’s primary goal is to improve the quality of
has scheduled a colonization during the 1999-2000 school
graduate education and offer academic support for
year. Fraternities and Sororities offer the unique opportunity
graduate students.
of leadership, service to one’s community, and fellowship.
The Mines Activity Council serves ASCSM as the campus
Greeks are proud of the number of campus leaders, athletes
special events board. The majority of all student campus
and scholars that come from their ranks. Additionally, the
events are planned by the MAC committees. These
Greek social life provides a complement to the scholastic
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
11

programs at Mines. Colorado School of Mines chapters are
Chinese Student Association
Alpha Tau Omega
International Student Organization
Beta Theta Pi
Japanese Student Association
Kappa Sigma
Kuwaiti Student Association
Phi Gamma Delta
Middle Eastern Student Association
Pi Beta Phi.
Muslim Student Association
Sigma Alpha Epsilon
Omani Student Association
Sigma Kappa.
Taiwanese Student Association
Sigma Nu
Professional Societies
Sigma Phi Epsilon
Professional Societies are generally student chapters of
Honor Societies
the national professional societies. As a student chapter, the
Honor societies recognize the outstanding achievements
professional societies offer a chance for additional profes-
of their members in the areas of scholarship, leadership, and
sional development outside the classroom through guest
service. Each of the CSM honor societies recognize
speakers, trips, and interactive discussions about the current
different achievements in our students. The Colorado
activities in the profession. Additionally, many of the
School of Mines honor societies, and their representative
organizations offer internship, fellowship and scholarship
areas, are as follows:
opportunities. The Colorado School of Mines chapters are
as follows:
Alpha Phi Omega - Service
Alpha Sigma Mu - Metals
American Association of Drilling Engineers (AADE)
Blue Key - Service, Scholarship, Activities
American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Kappa Mu Epsilon. - Mathematics
American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE)
Order of Omega
American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical & Petroleum
Pi Epsilon Tau - Petroleum Engineering
Engineers (AIME)
Tau Beta Pi - Engineering
American Ceramic Society (A. Cer. Soc.)
Interest Organizations
American Chemical Society
American Indian Science & Engineering Society (AISES)
Interest organizations meet the special and unique needs
American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
of the CSM student body by providing co-curricular
American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
activities in specific areas. These organizations are:
American Society of Metals (ASM International)
Amnesty International
American Welding Society
Anime Club
Asian Student Association (ASA)
Association of Geoscience Students (AGS)
Association of Engineering Geologists (AEG)
Ballroom Dance Band
Association of General Contractors (AGC)
Campus Crusade for Christ
Institute of Electrical & Electronic Engineers (IEEE)
Capoeira Clubs
National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE)
Choir
Society of American Military Engineers (SAME)
CSM Ambassadors
Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE)
Earthworks
Society of Economics and Business
Fellowship of Christian Athletes
Society of Economic Geologists (SEG)
Fellowship of Christian Cowboys
Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE)
High Grade
Society of Mining Engineers (SME)
Math Club
Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE)
Mines Little Theatre
Society of Physics Students (SPS)
Non Traditional Students
Society of Student Geophysicists (SSG)
Oredigger
Society of Women Engineers (SWE)
Prospector
The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society of AIME
Students for Creative Anachronism
Recreational Organizations
International Student Organizations
The recreation organizations provide the opportunity, for
The International Student Organizations provide the
students with similar interests to participate as a group in
opportunity to experience a little piece of a different culture
these recreational activities. Most of the recreational
while here at Mines, in addition to assisting the students
organizations compete on both the local and regional levels
from that culture adjust to the Mines campus.
at tournaments throughout the year. These clubs are:
These organizations are:
12
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Bicycle Club
for by Mr. Brunton, is awarded for meritorious work in
Billiards Club
mining.
BMOC (Big Men On Campus)
The Leo Borasio Memorial Award. A plaque and cash
Bridge Club
award presented each year to the outstanding junior in the
Caving Club
McBride Honors Program. Mr. Borasio was a 1950
Cheerleading
graduate of the School of Mines.
Ice Hockey Club
Kayak Club
Clark B. Carpenter Award. A cash award given to the
Kendo Club
graduating senior in mining or metallurgy who, in the
Lacrosse Club
opinion of the seniors in mining and metallurgy and the
Men’s Volleyball
professors in charge of the respective departments, is the
Outdoor Club
most deserving of this award.
Racquetball Club
Clark B. Carpenter Research Award. A cash award
Rugby Club
presented in honor of Professor Clark B. Carpenter to a
Shooting Club
student or students, undergraduate or graduate, selected
Ski Club/Team
by the Department of Metallurgical Engineering on the
Tae Kwon Do Club
basis of scholastic ability and accomplishment. This
Willie Wonka Boarders
award derives from an endowment by Leslie E. Wilson,
Women’s Soccer
E.M., 1927.
Outdoor Recreation Program
Mary and Charles Cavanaugh Memorial Award. A cash
The Outdoor Recreation Program is housed in the Parker
award given in metallurgy based on scholarship,
Student Center. The Program teaches classes in outdoor
professional activity, and participation in school activities.
activities; rents mountain bikes, climbing gear, backpacking
Colorado Engineering Council Award. A silver medal
and other equipment; and sponsors day and weekend
presented for excellence in scholarship, high integrity,
activities such as camping, snowshoeing, rock climbing, and
and general engineering ability.
mountaineering.
Distinguished Military Graduate. Designated by the
Student Honors
ROTC professor of military science for graduating seniors
Awards are presented each year to members of the
who possess outstanding qualities of leadership and high
graduating class and others in recognition of students who
moral character, and who have exhibited a definite
have maintained a superior scholastic record, who have
aptitude for and interest in military service.
distinguished themselves in school activities, and who have
Dwight D. “Ike” Eisenhower Award. Provided for by Mr.
done exceptional work in a particular subject.
and Mrs. R. B. Ike Downing, $150 and a medal with
Robert F. Aldredge Memorial Award. A cash award,
plaque is awarded to the outstanding ROTC cadet
presented in geophysics for the highest scholastic average
commissioned each year, based on demonstrated
in geophysics courses.
exemplary leadership within the Corps of Cadets and
American Institute of Chemists Award. A one year
academic excellence in military science.
membership, presented in chemistry and chemical
Prof. Everett Award. A cash award presented to an
engineering for demonstrated scholastic achievement,
outstanding senior in mathematics through the generosity
leadership, ability, and character.
of Frank Ausanka, ’42.
Robert A. Baxter Award. A cash award, given for
Cecil H. Green Award. A gold medal given to the
meritorious work in chemistry.
graduating senior in geophysical engineering, who in the
Charles N. Bell, 1906, Award. A Brunton transit is
opinion of the Department of Geophysics, has the highest
awarded for completing the course in mining to the
attainment in the combination of scholastic achievement,
student demonstrating the most progress in school work
personality, and integrity.
during each year.
The Neal J. Harr Memorial Outstanding Student Award.
The Brunton Award in Geology. A Brunton transit is
Provided by the Rocky Mountain Association of
awarded in recognition of highest scholastic achievement
Geologists, the award and rock hammer suitably en-
and interest in and enthusiasm for the science of geology.
graved, presented in geology for scholastic excellence in
the study of geology with the aim of encouraging future
Hon. D. W. Brunton Award. A Brunton transit, provided
endeavors in the earth sciences.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
13

Harrison L. Hays, ’31, Award. A cash award presented in
Outstanding Graduating Senior Awards. A suitably
chemical and petroleum-refining for demonstrating by
engraved plaque is presented by each degree-granting
scholarship, personality, and integrity of character, the
department to its outstanding graduating senior.
general potentialities of a successful industrial career.
H. Fleet Parsons Award. A cash award presented for
John C. Hollister Award. A cash award is presented to the
outstanding service to the School through leadership in
most deserving student in Geophysics and is not based
student government.
solely on academic performance.
Maxwell C. Pellish, 1924, Academic Achievement Award.
Robert M. Hutchinson Award for Excellence in Geologi-
A suitably engraved plaque presented to the graduating
cal Mapping. An engraved Brunton Compass given in
senior with the highest cumulative grade point average
recognition of this phase of Geological Engineering.
who has had a minimum of 6 semesters at CSM.
Henry W. Kaanta Award. A cash award and plaque is
The Thomas Philipose Outstanding Senior Award. A
presented to a graduating senior majoring in extractive
plaque and cash award, presented to a senior in the
metallurgy or mineral processing for the outstanding
McBride Honors Program in Public Affairs for Engineers
paper written on a laboratory procedure or experimental
whose scholarship, character, and personality best
process.
exemplify the ideals of the program as determined by the
Maryanna Bell Kafadar Humanities Award. The award is
Committee of tutors.
for the graduating senior who has excelled in the
George R. Pickett Memorial Award. A cash award
Humanities.
presented to a graduating senior on the basis of demon-
Alan Kissock, 1912, Award. A cash award is presented in
strated interests and accomplishments in the study of
metallurgy for best demonstrating the capability for
borehole geophysics.
creativity and the ability to express it in writing.
President’s Senior Scholar Athlete Award. A plaque
George C. Marshall Award. A certificate, an official
presented to the graduating senior who has the highest
biography of General Marshall and an expense paid trip
academic average and who lettered in a sport in the senior
to the National Security Conference sponsored by the
year.
Marshall Foundation, is presented to the most outstanding
Max I. Silber Scholastic Achievement Award. A pewter
ROTC cadet who demonstrates those leadership and
bowl or other piece suitably engraved is presented
scholastic qualities which epitomized the career of
annually to the student in each class with the highest
General Marshall.
scholastic standing.
Metallurgical Engineering Faculty Award. An engraved
William D. Waltman, 1899, Award. Provided for by Mr.
desk set is presented from time to time by the faculty of
Waltman, a cash award and suitably engraved plaque is
the department to a graduating senior who, by participa-
presented to the graduating senior whose conduct and
tion in and contribution to campus life, and by academic
scholarship have been most nearly perfect and who has
achievement, has demonstrated those characteristics of a
most nearly approached the recognized characteristics of
well-rounded graduate to which CSM aspires.
an American gentleman or lady during the recipient’s
Evan Elliot Morse Memorial Award. A cash award is
entire collegiate career.
presented annually to a student in physics who, in the
H.G. Washburn Award. A copy of De Re Metallica by
opinion of the Physics Department faculty, has shown
Agricola is awarded in mining engineering for good
exceptional competence in a research project.
scholastic record and active participation in athletics.
Old Timers’ Club Award. A suitable gift is presented to a
Charles Parker Wedgeforth Memorial Award. Presented
graduating senior who, in the opinion of the Department
to the most deserving and popular graduating senior.
of Mining Engineering, has shown high academic
standing in coal mining engineering and potential in the
coal industry.
14
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Section 3 - Tuition, Fees,
Financial Assistance, Housing
Tuition and fees at CSM are kept at a minimum
Field Term Courses
consistent with the cost of instruction and the amount of
On-campus:
Health Center $17.00
state funds appropriated to the School. The following rates
Student Services $41.00
are in effect for 1999-2000. Increases can be expected in
Off-campus:
Arrangements and payment for
subsequent years.
transportation, food, lodging, and other expenses must be
Tuition
made with the department concerned. (Geology Department
camping fee is $135.)
Academic and Field Courses
Miscellaneous
Sem Hrs
Resident
Non-res
New Student Orientation ................. $25.00
Less than 10
$154/sem hr.
$491/sem hr.
Chem Lab Fee .................................. $15.00
10 or more
$2,308/sem
$7,358/sem
Engineering Field Session ............... $50.00
The above are applicable to all academic periods and to
Graduation (Bachelors) .................. $55.00
both graduate and undergraduate courses.
Student Health Insurance
Other Courses and Programs
Fall or Spring/Summer
Summer Only
Executive Master of Science in Environmental Science
Student only
$375.00
125.00
and Engineering - $16,500
Spouse only
1202.50
400.84
Child(ren) only
812.00
270.84
Fees
Spouse & Child(ren)
1985.50
661.84
Regular Semester (Fall/Spring)
The Spring Semester automatically includes Summer
During a regular semester, students taking less than 7
Session coverage through August.
credit hours are not required to pay student fees, except for
Military Science Lab Fees
the Technology Fee. Any such student wishing to take part
(Military Science students only)
in student activities and receive student privileges may do so
Scholarship Students
$140.00
by paying full semester fees. All students carrying 7 or more
credit hours must pay full student fees as follows:
Descriptions of Fees and Other
Health Center* ................................ $45.00
Charges
Associated Students ........................... 54.00
The following mandatory, non-waivable fees are charged
Athletics ............................................. 41.00
by the Colorado School of Mines to all students enrolled for
Student Services .............................. 110.00
7.0 semester hours or more:
Student Assistance ............................. 12.50
Technology Fee** .............................. 35.00
Health Center Fee - Revenues support physician/Medical services
Total ................................................ $297.50
to students. ................................................................. $45.00/term
*A health insurance program is also available. Health
Associated Students Fee - Revenues support student organizations/
insurance is a mandatory fee unless the student can prove
events/activities; e.g., newspaper, homecoming, E-days.
coverage through another plan. **All students with any
Expenditures must be approved by ASCSM. ......... $54.00/term
number of credit hours must pay a Technology Fee of
Athletics Fee - Revenues support intercollegiate athletics and
entitle student entrance to all scheduled events and use of the
$35.00 per term.
facilities. .................................................................... $41.00/term
Summer Session
Student Assistance Fee: funds safety awareness programs, training
Academic Courses
seminars for abuse issues, campus lighting, and parking facility
Health Center ................................... $22.50
maintenance. ............................................................. $12.50/term
Athletics ............................................. 20.50
Student Services Fee - Revenues support bond indebtedness and
Student Services ................................ 55.00
other student services; e.g., Placement/Co-Op, Student
Technology Fee .................................. 17.50
Development Center, Student Activities, Student Life, and
Total ................................................ $115.50
services provided in the Student Center. ............... $110.00/term
Technology Fee: funds technology infrastructure and equipment for
maximum student use. The School matches the student fee
revenues dollar for dollar. ......................................... $35.00/term
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
15

The following mandatory, waivable fee is charged by the
Computer Usage Fees - Revenues assist in providing research
Colorado School of Mines to all degree seeking students
computing services. .................... $500.00/term Paid by sponsor
enrolled for 7.0 semester hours or more:
Refunds or Advances - These charges are reimbursement requests
for funds advanced to or on behalf of the student. Funds
Student Health Insurance - Revenues contribute to a self-insurance
received replace those advances. .......................................... N/A
fund. At publication FY 98-99 rates had not been determined. .
Payments - CSM must repay to the bank any student funds for
............................................................. $375.00/term (97-98 rate)
which a student becomes ineligible. Funds collected from the
The following are established fees that are case
student replace those payments. ........................................... N/A
dependent.
Grants and Scholarships (Recalled) When students become
Late Insurance Waiver Fee - Revenues provide funds for the
ineligible for grant, loan or scholarship money which they have
administration of the health insurance program. ............ $40.00
received, the recall of those funds are reflected. ................. N/A
Chemistry Lab Fee - Revenues provide a contingency against
Return Check - The amount of a student’s check which has been
breakage of laboratory equipment; e.g., test tubes, beakers, etc.
returned for insufficient funds. ............................................. N/A
................................................................................. $15.00/course
Returned Check Charge - Revenues offset bank fees for returned
Field Camp Fee - Revenues support the instructional activities/
checks. ................................................................................ $20.00
services provided during Field session. .......................................
Voicemail Fee: Assessed to students living in campus housing who
........................................ $100.00 - $800.00 depending on Dept
request voice mail services. (Optional) .................... $45.00/year
Military Science Lab Fee - Revenues support the instructional
In all instances, the cost to collect these fees are not
activities of the Military Science Department. . $140.00 ROTC
reimbursed to the Student Receivables Office. The Colorado
New Student Orientation Fee - Revenues support the new student
School of Mines does not automatically assess any optional
orientation program provided to freshmen and transfer students
fees or charges.
at the start of the Fall and Spring semesters. This fee is exempt
from refund policy. ............................................................ $25.00
Housing
Summer Orientation Fee - Revenues support the Explore CSM
NOTE: Room and board charges are established by the
programs provided to freshmen students and their parents
Board of Trustees (BOT) and are subject to change.
during the summer. ............................................................ $35.00
Payment of room and board charges fall under the same
Transcript Fee - Revenues support the cost of providing transcripts.
guidelines as payment of tuition and fees. Rates below are in
...................................................................................... $2.00/copy
effect for the 1999-2000 Academic year. Included is a
Yearbook Fee - Revenues support the publication of the CSM
“flexible” meal plan which guarantees students a designated
yearbook, The Prospector. ........................................... $30.00/yr.
number of meals per week and gives them about $50.00 -
Add/Drop Charge - Revenues offset the cost of processing Add/
Drop registration. ........................................................ $4.00 each
$75.00 to spend as they wish on additional meals or in the
Late Registration Fee - Revenues offset the cost of processing late
deli at the Student Center. For more information, please
registration. Assessed after 5 days. ...... $100.00 (grad students)
contact the Student Life Office at (303) 273-3350.
Late Payment Penalty - Revenues offset billing costs for late
Rates for 1999-2000 (per year)
payments. 1.5% per month of outstanding balance
Residence Halls (Students must choose a meal plan)
Housing Application Fee ......................................................... $50.00
Morgan, Thomas, Bradford, Randall Halls
Damage Deposit, (Housing) - Revenues are used to repair or
Double Room .................................. $ 2,581
replace damaged items/rooms in CSM housing units. Mines Pk
& P.Village ........................................................................ $400.00
Single Room .................................... $ 3,046
Bike Locker Rental - Revenues go to provide and maintain locker
Double Room as Single .................. $ 3,396
facilities for residence hall student bicycles. .......... $35.00/term
WeaverTowers
Residence Hall Room Charge - Revenues support maintenance,
Double Room .................................. $ 2,968
improvements and residence hall administration. .......................
Single Room .................................... $ 3,434
.................................................. See Housing Rates on next page
Double Room as Single .................. $ 3,784
Meal Plan Charges - Revenues provide meals and maintain
“E” Room, Single ............................ $ 3,688
cafeteria equipment for the students on meal plans. ...................
Residence Hall Association Fee ...... $70 included above
........................................................ See Meal Plans on next page
Meal Plans (per year)
Residence Hall Association Fee - Revenues support social activities
Marble Plan (19-meal + plan) ........ $ 2,442
for the residence hall students. ................................. $35.00/year
............................................ plus $50 declining balance
Housing and Rental Fees - Rental fees for housing rentals go to
Diamond (19-meal plan) ................. $ 2,400
maintain the rental properties, pay utility charges, and maintain
and improve properties. .......... See Housing Rates on next page
Granite (15-meal plan) .................... $ 2,336
Tuition Paid-Out - CSM has advanced tuition to another school.
Quartz (160 block plan) .................. $ 2,232
Charges are reimbursement request for those advances. Only for
............................................ plus $75 declining balance
sponsored students .............................................. Paid by sponsor
Agate (112 block plan) .................. $ 1,864
Books/Supplies Fee - Advances made to or on behalf of the
............................................ plus $50 declining balance
student. Charges are reimbursement only. Only for sponsored
students ............................................................... Paid by sponsor
16
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Field Session (Six weeks)
If a student wishes to cancel a residence hall reservation,
Thomas Hall
$25 of the deposit will be refunded if notice of the cancella-
Double Room ..................................... $ 275
tion is received in writing by the Residence Life Office on
Single Room ....................................... $ 475
or before May 15 of the current year.
Meal Plans
Contracts are issued for the full academic year and no
Gold Card (declining balance) ...... $ 250.00 minimum
cancellation will be accepted after May 15, except for those
Summer Session (Eight weeks)
who decide not to attend CSM. Those contracts separately
Thomas Hall Double Room ............... $ 360
issued only for entering students second semester may be
Single Room ....................................... $ 565
cancelled no later than December 15. After that date no
Meal Plans ...................................................
cancellation will be accepted except for those who decide
Gold Card (declining balance) ........ $ 330 minimum
not to attend CSM.
Mines Park (per month)*
Payments and Refunds
Family Housing
1 Bedroom .......................................... $ 500.00
Payment Information
2 Bedroom ......................................... $ 575.00
A student is expected to complete the registration
Apartment Housing
process, including the payment of tuition and fees, room,
1 Bedroom .......................................... $ 500.00
and board, before attending class. Students should mail their
2 Bedroom .......................................... $ 675.00
payment to:
3 Bedroom .......................................... $ 900.00
Cashier
Prospector Village (per month)**
Colorado School of Mines
1 Bedroom Apartment ....................... $ 446.00
Golden, CO 80401-1887
2 Bedroom Apartment ....................... $ 490.00
Please note your social security number on payment.
3 Bedroom Apartment ....................... $ 541.00
Financial Responsibility
Additional Rentals
It is important for students to recognize their financial
1220 17th Street ................................. $ 470.00
responsibilities when registering for classes at the school. If
1224 17th Street ................................. $ 470.00
students do not fulfill their financial obligations by
1812 Illinois Street ............................. $ 635.00
published deadlines:
*Tenant pays gas and electricity only
** CSM pays all public utilities, gas, electricity, water.
4 Late payment penalties will accrue on any outstand-
Tenant pays $18.50 per phone line (optional). Tenant pays
ing balance.
$45.00 per voice mail (optional)
4 Transcripts will not be issued.
Residence Hall Application
4 Past due accounts will be turned over to Colorado
Information and application for residence hall space are
Central Collection Services in accordance with
included in the packet offering admission to the student.
Colorado law.
Students desiring accommodations are requested to forward
4 Collection costs will be added to a students account.
their inquiries at the earliest possible date.
4 The student’s delinquency may be reported to
The submission of a room application does not in itself
national credit bureaus.
constitute a residence hall reservation. A residence hall
Late Payment Penalties
contract will be mailed to the student to be signed by the
A penalty will be assessed against a student if payment is
student and his or her parents and returned to the Residence
not received in full by the official day of registration. The
Life Office . Only upon receipt and written
penalty is described in the schedule of courses for each
acknowledgement of the residence hall contract by the
semester. If payment is not completed by the sixth week of
Residence Life Office will the student be assured of a room
class, the student may be officially withdrawn from classes.
reservation.
Students will be responsible for all collection costs.
Rooms and roommates are assigned in accordance with
Encumbrances
student preference insofar as possible, with earlier applica-
A student will not be permitted to register for future
tions receiving priority.
classes, graduate, or secure an official transcript of his/her
Advance Deposits
academic record while indebted in any way to CSM.
Students will be responsible for payment of all reasonable
An advance deposit of $50 made payable to Colorado
costs of collection.
School of Mines must accompany each application received.
This deposit will be refunded in full (or in part if there are
Refunds
charges against the room) when the student leaves the
Refunds for tuition and fees are made according to the
residence hall.
following schedule:
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
17

Withdrawal from School in Fall or Spring
12 consecutive months immediately prior to the first day of
Semester
classes for any given term.
First 11 days ................................................... 100%
These requirements must be met by one of the following:
Next 5 school days ........................................... 60%
(a) the father, mother, or guardian of the student if an
Next 5 school days ........................................... 40%
unemancipated minor, or (b) the student if married or over
Next 5 school days ........................................... 20%
22, or (c) the emancipated minor.
No refund after the first 26 school days.
The home of the unemancipated minor is assumed to be
Withdrawal from School in an 8 week Summer
that of the parents, or if there is a legal guardian of the
Session
student, that of such guardian. If the parents are separated
First 6 days ..................................................... 100%
or divorced and either separated or divorced parent meets
Next 3 school days ........................................... 60%
the Colorado residency requirements, the minor also will be
Next 3 school days ........................................... 40%
considered a resident. Statutes provide for continued
Next 3 school days ........................................... 20%
resident status, in certain cases, following parents’ moving
No refund after the first 15 school days.
from Colorado. Please check Colorado Revised Statutes
Withdrawal from School in a 6 week Summer
1973, 23-7-103(2)(m)(II) for exact provisions. In a case
Session
where a court has appointed a guardian or granted custody,
First 4 days ..................................................... 100%
it shall be required that the court certify that the primary
Next 2 school days ........................................... 60%
purpose of such appointment was not to qualify the minor
Next 2 school days ........................................... 40%
for resident tuition status.
Next 2 school days ........................................... 20%
Nonresident Students
No refund after the first 10 school days.
To become a resident of Colorado for tuition classifica-
Room and board refunds are pro-rated to the date of
tion under state statutes, a student must be domiciled in
checkout from the Residence Hall. Arrangements must be
Colorado for one year or more immediately preceding the
made with the Housing Office. Student health insurance
first day of class for the semester for which such classifica-
charges are not refundable. The insurance remains in effect
tion is sought. A person must be emancipated before
for the entire semester.
domicile can be established separate from the domicile of
PLEASE NOTE: Students receiving federal financial aid
the parents. Emancipation for tuition purposes takes place
under the Title IV programs may have a different refund
automatically when a person turns 22 years of age or
determined as required by federal law or regulations.
marries.
Residency Qualifications
The establishment of domicile for tuition purposes has
two inseparable elements: (1) a permanent place of
A student is classified as a resident or nonresident for
habitation in Colorado and (2) intent to remain in Colorado
tuition purposes at the time admission is granted. The
with not intent to be domiciled elsewhere. The twelve-
classification is based upon information furnished by the
month waiting period does not begin until both elements
student. The student who, due to subsequent events,
exist. Documentation of the following is part of the
becomes eligible for resident tuition must make formal
petitioning process to document physical presence: copies of
application to the Registrar for a change of status.
rental arrangements, rent receipts, copy of warranty deed if
A student who willfully gives wrong information to
petitioner owns the personal residence property and
evade payment of nonresident tuition shall be subject to
verification of dates of employment. Documentation of the
serious disciplinary action. The final decision regarding
following is part of the petitioning process to document
tuition status rests with the Tuition Appeals Committee of
intent: Colorado drivers license, motor vehicle registration
Colorado School of Mines.
(as governed by Colorado Statute), voter registration,
Resident Students
payment of Colorado state income taxes, ownership of
A person whose legal residence is permanently estab-
residential real estate property in the state (particularly if the
lished in Colorado may continue to be classified as a
petitioner resides in the home), any other factor peculiar to
resident student so long as such residence is maintained
the individual which tends to establish the necessary intent
even though circumstances may require extended absences
to make Colorado one’s permanent place of habitation.
from the state.
Nonresident students wishing to obtain further informa-
Qualification for resident tuition requires both (1) proof
tion on the establishment of residency or to apply for
of adoption of the state as a fixed and permanent home,
resident status should contact the Registrar’s Office. The
demonstrating physical presence within the state at the time
“Petition for In-State Tuition Classification” is due in the
of such adoption, together with the intention of making
Registrar’s Office by the first day of classes of the term the
Colorado the true home; and (2) living within the state for
student is requesting resident status.
18
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Financial Aid and Scholarships
Merit-based assistance is offered to recognize students
Undergraduate Student Financial Assistance
who have special talents or achievements. Academic awards
to new students are made on the basis of their high school
The role of the CSM Financial Assistance Program is to
records, SAT or ACT test scores, academic interests, and
enable students to enroll and complete their educations,
extracurricular activities. Continuing students receive
regardless of their financial circumstances. In fulfilling this
scholarships based on their academic performance at CSM,
role, the Office of Financial Aid administered over $20
particularly in their major field of study, and on financial
million in total assistance in 1997-98, including over $6.0
need.
million in grants and scholarships.
Alumni Association Grants are awarded to students
Applying for Assistance
who are children of alumni, who have been active in the
The CSM Application for Admission serves as the
CSM Alumni Association for the two years prior to the
application for CSM merit-based scholarships for new
student’s enrollment. The one-year grants carry a value of
students (the Athletic, Music and Military Science Depart-
$1,000. The students may also receive a senior award, based
ments have their own application procedures for their
on their academic scholarship, and the availability of funds.
scholarships). Continuing students may be recommended by
their major department for scholarships designated for
Board of Trustees’ Scholarships are awarded to
students from that department. To apply for need-based
incoming freshmen, and typically continue for four years (or
CSM, federal and Colorado assistance, students should
eight semesters) if the student continues to meet the
complete the CSM Application for Financial Aid and the
academic requirements for renewal.
Free Application for Federal Student Aid.
Engineers’ Day Scholarships are available to Colorado
After the student’s and family’s financial circumstances
residents. Based on high school records and other informa-
are reviewed, a financial aid award is sent to the student.
tion, a CSM Student Government committee selects students
New students are notified beginning in late March, and
for these four-year awards.
continuing students are sent an award letter in early June.
The CSM National Scholarship Program covers partial
Types of Financial Assistance
to full tuition for out-of-state students who are incoming
Need-based assistance will typically include grants,
freshmen. These scholarships vary from one year to four
part-time employment, and student loans. Grants are
years in duration, and are based on superior high school
provided by CSM, by the State of Colorado (Colorado State
achievement. The program was begun in 1978 with a major
Grants and Student Incentive Grants), and by the federal
leadership gift from the W.M. Keck Foundation, and now
government (Pell Grants and Supplemental Educational
includes scholarships sponsored by: Gulf Oil Foundation
Opportunity Grants).
W.M. Keck Foundation Phelps Dodge Corporation
Work Study funds also come from CSM, Colorado and
Specially named scholarships are provided by friends
the federal government. Students work between 8 and 12
of CSM who are interested in assisting qualified students to
hours a week, and typically earn between $500 to $1,000 to
prepare for careers in science and engineering related to the
help pay for books, travel, and other personal expenses.
energy industries and high technology. The generosity of the
following donors is recognized:
Student Loans may be offered from two federal
programs: the Perkins Student Loan, or the Stafford Student
Scholarship/Donor
Loan. In addition, students may receive loans from the
Adolph Coors Jr. Memorial
Various
following CSM loan funds which have been provided by
Adolph Coors Foundation Minority Program
alumni and private donors.
Adolph Coors Foundation
Ralph M. Parsons Student Loan
Alcoa Foundation
Alcoa Foundation
Lewis Loan Fund
Robert L. Allardyce Endowment
Robert L. Allardyce
Clara Newman Loan Fund
American Indian Fund
Jack Grynberg
William Welch Endowed Loan
Amoco CEPR
Amoco Foundation
CSM Foundation Combined Fund Loan
Amoco Foundation Fund
Amoco Foundation
Board of Trustees Loan
The S.E. Anderson ’32 Fund
S.E. Anderson
Supplemental student loans may also be offered through
private bank loan programs.
Frank & Peter Andrews Endowed
Estate of P.T. Andrews
The Alumni Association of CSM administers a loan
George & Marjorie Ansell Endowed
Dr & Mrs Ansell
program designed to assist juniors and seniors who have
ARA Fund
ARA
exhausted their other sources of funds. These are short term
loans which require repayment within three years after
ARCO Foundation
ARCO Foundation
graduation, and have been made available through the
ARCO Minority Scholarship
ARCO
contributions of CSM alumni.
ARCS Foundation
ARCS Foundation
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
19

Benjamin Arkin Memorial
Harry and Betty Arkin
Faculty/Geochemistry
Various
Timothy Ashe & Blair Burwell Endowed
Various
Faculty/Geology
Various
R.C. Baker Foundation
R.C. Baker Foundation
Robert L. Gibson Endowed
Estate of R.L. Gibson
Barlow & Haun Endowed
Barlow & Haun
Gulf Oil Foundation
Gulf Oil Foundation
Paul Bartunek Memorial
Estate of Paul Bartunek/Various
Margaret & Al Harding Fund
Mr & Mrs Harding
C.W. Barry Endowed
Various
Charles J. Hares Memorial
Various
Boettcher Foundation
Boettcher Foundation
George Robert & Robert Michael Harris
Robert Harris
David S. Bolin Endowed
Various
Scott W. Hazen Endowed Financial Aid
BP Exploration Inc.
BP Exploration
Scott & Dorothy Hazen
Quenton L. Brewer Memorial Endowed
Quenton Brewer
H.H. Harris Foundation
H.H. Harris Foundation
David C. Brown Fund
David C. and Yukiko Brown
Hill Foundation
Hill Foundation
Dean Burger Memorial Fund
Ben L. Fryrear
Robert E. Hochscheid Memorial
Various
Bruce Carlson Mining Fund
Various
Edward C. Horne
Mr. Horne
Michael E. Carr Endowed
Michael Carr
Charles Horvath Endowed
C. Horvath Estate
Celcius Scholarship
Celcius
Hui Oi Chow Endowed
Stephen Hui
Chevron Corp. USA
Chevron
David C. Johnston Memorial
Geo R. Brown
Faculty/CR
Various
Kaiser Aluminum Fund
Kaiser Aluminum
Norman J. Chrisite Canadian Endowed
Various
Wm. Keck Foundation
Wm. Keck Foundation
Ted Christiansen Fund
Ted Christiansen
John V. Kline Memorial
Estate of John Kline/Various
Cleveland Cliffs Foundation
Cleveland Cliffs Foundation
James A. Kohm Memorial
F. A. Kohm
Melvin F. Coolbaugh Award
Class ’33 Alumni
Richard & Marie Kuehl Scholarship
Class of 39 Endowed Athletic
Class of ’39/Various
Richard & Marie Kuehl
Class of 1942 Memorial
Various
Francis J. & Mary Labriola Endowed Mr. & Mrs. Labriola
Class of 1952 Endowed
Class of ’52/Various
Parker Liddell Memorial
Estate of Parker Liddell
Collester Endowed Fund
Stewart M. Collester
Linn Scholarship
Linn Family
Malcom E. Collier Endowed
Malcom Collier, Jr.
Frank Lindeman Jr. Memorial
Various
Combined
Various
George & Susan Lindsay
Susan Lindsay Trust
Coulter Foundation Undergraduate
John P. Lockridge Fund
John P. Lockridge
V.V. Coulter Foundation
Paul Cyrus Mann Memorial
Various
Cyprus Minerals Company
Cyprus
Marathon Oil Company
Marathon Oil
Chester Davis Chemistry
Chester Davis
B.E. Mares Trust Undergrad Scholarship in Petroleum
Lawrence S. DeMarco Memorial
Various
Engineering
B.E. Mares
Denver Gem & Mineral Guild
Denver Gem & Mineral
Barbara Jean Martinez Memorial
Denver Geophysical Society
Denver Geophysical Society
Martinez Family/Various
Kuno Doerr, Jr. Memorial
Q.M. Fitzgerald
Math Undergraduate
Various
Tenney Cook DeSollar
Estate of Edythe Desollar
Vernon L. Mattson Fund
Alience M. Mattson
Philip F. Dickson Memorial
Family of P F. Dickson
Maxwell L. McCormick Memorial
Maxwell McCormick
Brian & Elizabeth Downward Memorial
Various
Joseph McNeil Memorial
Harry L. McNeill
Edna Dumke Memorial
Various
Thomas Mead Endowed
William Mead
Faculty, Division of Engineering
Various
Donald & Barbara Miller
Donald & Barbara Miller
Exxon Coal & Mineral Co.
Exxon
Minerals Industry Education Foundation Endowed
Minerals Inc. Education Foundation
FMC Gold Student Support
FMC Foundation
Faculty Mining Fund
Various
Charles F. Fogarty Fund
Mrs. Charles F. Fogarty
Minorco (USA) Scholarship
Minorco
Foundry Educational Foundation
Foundry Educational Foundation
Mobil Oil Corp
Mobil Oil
Frank C. Frischknecht Geophysics Fund
Rex Monahan Scholarship in Geology
Rex Monahan
Dr. Jaqueline Frischknecht
John Moore Endowed Scholarship
Florence Moore
C.A Freuauff Foundation
Charles Freuauff
James D. & Lois H. Mulryan Endowed
Maxwell E. Gardner Memorial
Various
James & Lois Mulryan
Garg Endowed Fund
Arvind & Om Garg
Earl H. Murchison Memorial
Irene Murchison
20
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Newmont Mining Corporation
Newmont Mining
G.C. Weaver
G.C. Weaver
Norwest Endowed Undergrad Regional Minority English
Frederick L. (Fritz) and Virginia Weigand Scholarship
Scholarship
Norwest Bank
Fund
Frederick Weigand
Duane T. Nutter Estate
Bequest
Loren Weimer Memorial
Bob & Ruth Weimer
Oryx Energy Company
Oryx
Frank & Mary Weiszmann
F. & M. Weiszmann
John W. Page Foundation
J.W. Page Foundation
Anna Lee White Endowed
Mrs Anna Lee White
Ben Parker & James Boyd Student Development
Charles H. Wickman Memorial
Charles Wickman
Dr. & Mrs James Boyd
John H. & Harriette Wilson Student Aid-Endowed
Russell Barnett Paul Memorial
Lee Paul
Mr & Mrs John Wilson
Darlene Regina Pauli Memorial
Various
Jerome Yopps Memorial
Various
Pennzoil Student Financial Aid
Pennzoil
McBride Honors Program scholarships are awarded to
Franklin H. Persse Scholarship
Franklin H. Persse
outstanding students in the Honors Program. Recipients
Phelps Dodge NASP
Phelps Dodge
are selected in the spring of the freshman year. Scholar-
John S. Phillips Memorial Fund/Geology
D.R. Phillips
ships begin in the sophomore year and are renewable for
Phillips Petroleum Co.
Phillips Petroleum
two years.
Robert G. Piper/Wisconsin Centrifugal Endowed Fund
Athletic scholarships for up to full tuition may be awarded
Wisconsin Centrifugal
to promising student-athletes in seventeen men’s and
Paula S. Pustmueller
Various
women’s sports. The scholarships are renewable for up to
Ben M. Rastall
Ben Rastall
three years, based on the recommendation of the Athletics
Department.
Runners of the Rockies
Runners of the Rockies
Rocky Mtn. Coal Mining Institute
Music scholarships for participation in Band and Chorus
Rocky Mtn Coal Institute
are based on academic record, quality of musical
performance on an audition tape, and financial need.
Rocky Mountain Chapter ASM
ASM
Amounts of the awards vary from approximately one-
Robert Sayre Endowed
Robert Sayre
fourth to one-half of a resident tuition. The scholarships
Schlechten Fund
Daniel Delaney
are renewable for three years, but students who are
Schlumberger Collegiate Award
selected to receive these scholarships must remain in
Schlumberger Foundation.
good standing in Band or Chorus and in their academic
Viola Seaver Memorial
V. Seaver Estate
work at CSM.
Shell Foundation Incentive Fund
Shell
Army ROTC scholarships are available from CSM and the
Robert Shipley Memorial
Ulsinternl Inc
U.S. Army for outstanding young men and women who
SME-AIME Coal Division Fund
SME-AIME
are interested in a military career. The one, two, three, and
Sonnenfeld PHD
Amoco
four-year scholarships can provide up to full tuition and
Eugene M. Staritzky Fund
Anna S. Stern
fees, a book allowance, and a monthly stipend for
Ted P. Stockmar Fund
Holme Roberts Owen
personal expenses. The CSM Military Science Depart-
ment assists students in applying for these scholarships.
Stoddard Endowed Memorial
Edna L. Stoddard
Jeanne Storrer & R. Charles Earlougher Endowed
U.S. Navy Scholarships through the Civil Engineering
Charles Earlougher
Program, Nuclear Power Officer Program, and Baccalau-
reate Degree Completion Program are also available to
Ruth and Vernon Taylor Foundation
R & V Taylor
CSM students. The local Navy Recruiting District Office
J. & M. Thompson Endowed Undergraduate - Mining
provides information about these scholarships.
J. & M. Thompson
U.S. Air Force ROTC Scholarships are available from
Robert E. Thurmond
Robert Thurmond
CSM and the U.S. Air Force. The three and four year
H. Trueblood Foundation Geology
scholarships can provide up to full tuition, fees, a book
Harry Trueblood Foundation
allowance, and a stipend. Further information is available
Union Pacific Corporation
Union Pacific Corporation
through the Department of Aerospace Studies at the
Union Pacific Foundation
Union Pacific
University of Colorado Boulder (the official home base
United States Fund
Jack Grynberg
for the CSM detachment).
University Science & Art
University of Science & Art
In addition to scholarships through CSM, many students
Unocal Corp. Academic
Union Oil
receive scholarships from their hometown civic, religious or
C. Richard Wagner Memorial Endowed
Evelyn Wagner
other organizations. All students are urged to contact
Bill and Grace Waldschmidt
Various
organizations with which they or their parents are affiliated
Michael Colin Watts Fund
Kiwanis /Monta Vista
to investigate such scholarships.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
21

Financial Aid Policies
all of the credits for which they register with a minimum
General
2.000 grade average. If students are deficient in either the
credit hour or grade average measure, they will receive a
CSM students requesting or receiving financial assis-
one semester warning period during which they must return
tance sponsored by the U.S. Government, the State of
to satisfactory standing by completing at least 12 credits
Colorado, or the Colorado School of Mines are required to
with a minimum 2.000 grade average. If this is not done,
report to the CSM Financial Aid Office all financial
their eligibility will be terminated until such time as they
assistance offered or received from all sources including
return to satisfactory standing. Financial aid eligibility
CSM immediately upon receipt or notification of such
termination may be appealed to the Director of Financial
assistance. For the purpose of this paragraph, “financial
Aid on the basis of extenuating or special circumstances
assistance” shall include, but not be limited to, grants,
having negatively affected the student’s academic perfor-
scholarships, fellowships, or loans funded by public or
mance.
private sources, as well as all income not considered taxable
income by the Internal Revenue Service. Upon receipt of
Study Abroad
this information, CSM shall evaluate, and may adjust any
Students who will be studying abroad through a program
financial assistance provided to the student from CSM,
sponsored by or pre-approved for credit by CSM may apply
Colorado, or federal funds. No student shall receive
for all forms of financial assistance as if they were registered
financial assistance from CSM if such student’s total
for and attending classes at CSM. Financial assistance will
assistance from all sources exceeds the total cost of the
be based on the student’s actual expenses for the program of
student’s education at CSM. For the purpose of this
study abroad.
paragraph, the “total cost of education” shall be defined to
For additional information about Study Abroad opportu-
include the cost of tuition, fees, books, room and board,
nities, contact the Office of International Studies, Stratton
necessary travel, and reasonable personal expenses.
109; (303) 384-2121.
Funds for the Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental
Refunds
Educational Opportunity Grant, Federal College Work-
If students completely withdraw from all of their classes
Study Program, Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Stafford
during a semester, they may be eligible for a refund (a
Loan, and Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students
reduction in tuition and fees, and room or board if they live
are provided in whole or part by appropriations of the
on campus, and a return of funds to the financial aid
United States Congress. Funds for the Colorado Student
programs from which the student is receiving assistance).
Incentive Grant are provided jointly by appropriations of the
Students withdrawing from CSM in their first semester of
United States Congress and the Colorado General Assembly.
attendance will have their refund calculated on a pro-rated
The Colorado General Assembly also provides funds for the
basis, according to the percentage of the semester that
Colorado Grant, Colorado Scholarship, Colorado Athletic
remains to be completed at the time of their withdrawal.
Scholarship, Colorado Diversity Grant, Colorado Part-Time
There will be no refund given after the date on which
Student Grant, and Colorado Work-Study programs. These
students have completed at least 60% of the semester. For
programs are all subject to renewed funding each year..
students not in their first semester of enrollment, the refund
Satisfactory Academic Progress
will be calculated as required by Federal law or regulation,
CSM students receiving scholarships must make
or by the method described in the section on “Payments and
satisfactory academic progress as specified in the rules and
Refunds,” using the method that will provide the largest
regulations for each individual scholarship.
reduction in charges for the student. For the purposes of this
Students receiving assistance from federal, Colorado or
policy, the official withdrawal date is the date as specified
need-based CSM funds must make satisfactory academic
on the withdrawal form by the student. If the student
progress toward their degree. Satisfactory progress is
withdraws unofficially by leaving campus without complet-
defined as successfully completing a minimum of 12 credits
ing the check-out procedure, the official withdrawal date
each semester with a minimum 2.000 grade average.
will be the last date on which the student’s class attendance
Students who register part-time must successfully complete
can be verified.
22
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Section 4 - Living Facilities
Residence Halls
Mines Park
Colorado School of Mines has five residence halls for
The Mines Park apartment complex is located west of the
men and women. The traditional style includes Bradford,
6th Avenue and 19th Street intersection on 55 acres owned
Randall, Morgan, and Thomas Halls with primarily double
by CSM. Construction completed in 1998 offers 1 & 2
bedrooms and a bathroom on each floor. There are a limited
bedroom units in family housing and 1, 2, & 3 bedroom
number of single rooms available. Weaver Towers houses in
units in other areas.
seven or eight person suites with each suite containing both
Units are complete with refrigerators, stoves, dishwash-
single and double bedrooms, a living/study room and two
ers, cable television and campus phone hook-ups and T-1
bathrooms. Each Residence Hall complex houses mailboxes,
connections to the campus network system. There is a
Lounge areas, TV room, and coin operated washers and
community center which contains the laundry facility and
dryers. Each occupant has a wardrobe or closet, storage
recreational/study space.
drawers, mirror, a study desk and chair, and a wall book-
Rates are as follows:
shelf. All rooms are equipped with data connections, cable
TV (basic) service, a phone (campus, with optional voice
Family Housing
mail), and upgraded electrical systems. The student is
1 bedroom
500/mo
responsible for damage to the room or furnishings. Colorado
2 bedroom
575/mo
School of Mines assumes no responsibility for loss or theft
Apartment Housing
of personal belongings. Living in the CSM Residence Halls
1 bedroom
500/mo
is convenient, comfortable, and provides the best opportu-
2 bedroom
675/mo
nity for students to take advantage of the student activities
3.bedroom
900/mo
offered on campus.
For an application to any of the campus housing options,
Dining Facilities
please contact the Housing Office at (303) 273-3350 or visit
Colorado School of Mines operates a dining hall in the
them in the Ben Parker Student Center.
Ben H. Parker Student Center. Under the provisions for the
Fraternities, Sororities
operation of the residence halls, students who live in the
A student who is a member of one of the national Greek
residence halls are required to board in the School dining
organizations on campus is eligible to live in Fraternity or
hall. Breakfast, lunch and dinner are served Monday
Sorority housing. Most of the organizations have their own
through Friday, lunch and dinner on Saturday and brunch
houses, and provide room and board to members living in
and dinner on Sunday. Students not living in a residence hall
the house. All full time, undergraduate students are eligible
may purchase any one of several meal plans which best
to join these organizations. For information, contact the
meets their individual needs. No meals are served during
Student Activities office or the individual organization.
breaks (Thanksgiving, Christmas and Spring Break).
Family Housing
Private Rooms, Apartments
Many single students live in private homes in Golden.
Prospector Village is a complex of 69 apartments located
Colorado School of Mines participates in no contractual
on the west edge of the campus. These units are typically
obligations between students and Golden citizens who rent
two-bedroom apartments. Each apartment is approximately
rooms to them. Rents in rooming houses generally range
800 square feet in size and is heated from steam, as is the
from $250 to $300 a month. Housing is also available in the
rest of campus. Apartments are equipped with stove,
community of Golden, where apartment rental ranges from
refrigerator, and draperies.
$400 to $600 a month. For more information regarding local
rentals call the Off Campus Housing Information Line at
(303) 273-3827.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
23

Section 5 - Undergraduate Information
Admission Requirements
Aptitude Test (SAT) of the College Entrance Examination
Colorado School of Mines admits students who have
Board or the American College Test (ACT) battery.
demonstrated they can do the classroom and laboratory
Applications for either the SAT or ACT may be obtained
work and profit from our programs. The decision to admit a
from the high school counselors, or by writing to
student is based on his or her ability to earn a degree at
Educational Testing Service, P.O. Box 592, Princeton, NJ
CSM. Criteria considered in evaluating students include (1)
08541 for the SAT; or to the American College Testing
pattern of course work in high school or college, (2) grades
Program, P.O. Box 168, Iowa City, IA 52243 for the
earned in those courses, (3) rank in class, (4) ACT or SAT
ACT.
scores, and (5) other available test scores. No single
Transfer Students
criterion for admission is used; however, the most important
The minimum admission requirements for all students
factor is the academic record in high school or college.
who have attended another college or university are as
The admission requirements below are minimum
follows:
requirements which may change after a catalog has been
1. Students transferring from another college or university
printed. The Board of Trustees, CSM’s governing board,
must have completed the same high school course work
reserves the right to deviate from published admission
requirements as entering freshmen. A transcript of the
requirements. In such cases, changes in admission policy
applicant’s high school record is required. Transfer
would be widely publicized.
students are not required to take the SAT or the ACT.
Freshmen
2. Applicants should present college transcripts showing an
The minimum admission requirements for all high school
overall 2.50 (C+) grade point average or better. Students
graduates who have not attended a college or university are
presenting a lower GPA will be given careful consider-
as follows:
ation and acted on individually.
1. An applicant must be a graduate of an accredited high
3. An applicant who has attended another college may not
school.
disregard any other collegiate record. If the applicant has
attended more than one college, records must include all
2. An applicant should rank in the upper third of the
transcripts of record from each college.
graduating class. Consideration will be given to appli-
cants below this level on evidence of strong motivation,
4. An applicant who cannot re-enroll at the institution from
superior test scores, and recommendation from principal
which he or she wishes to transfer because of his or her
or counselor.
scholastic record or for other reasons is ineligible to enter
Colorado School of Mines.
3. The following 13 units of secondary school work must be
completed in grades 9-12:
5. Previously completed college courses which correspond
to those at CSM to meet graduation requirements may be
Algebra .............................................................................. 2
transferred for credit if the grade earned was not lower
Geometry .......................................................................... 1
than a C or its equivalent.
Advanced Mathematics (including Trigonometry) ........ 1
English .............................................................................. 4
Former Students
History or Social Studies ................................................. 2
The minimum admission requirements for those students
Laboratory Science .......................................................... 3
who have previously attended CSM are as follows:
One unit, including laboratory, must be either chemistry
1. Any student who has attended another college or
or physics. Second and third units may be chemistry,
university since last enrolling at CSM must apply for
physics, zoology, botany, geology, etc. with laboratory.
admission as a transfer student.
Both physics and chemistry are recommended for two of
2. Any student who did not complete the semester immedi-
the three required units. General Science is not accept-
ately preceding the beginning of the period for which he
able as a science unit, however it is acceptable as an
or she wishes to enroll must be re-admitted to CSM by
academic elective unit.
the Admissions Office.
4. Three additional academic units (social studies, math-
3. A former student, returning after a period of suspension,
ematics, English, science, or foreign language) are
must apply for admission to the Admissions Office and
required. These units must be acceptable to the
must furnish an approval for such re-enrollment from the
applicant’s high school to meet graduation requirements.
Readmissions Committee of Colorado School of Mines.
For applicants submitting GED Equivalency Diplomas,
Appropriate forms for admission application may be
these units may be completed by the GED test.
secured from the Admissions Office.
5. Applicants from the United States and Canada are
required to submit the scores of either the Scholastic
24
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

International Students
the Admissions Office, Colorado School of Mines, Twin
The minimum admission requirements for those students
Towers, 1811 Elm St., Golden, CO 80401-9951, for
who are not citizens of the United States or Canada are as
application forms.
follows:
A student may apply for admission any time after
1. Students from outside the United States and Canada must
completing the 11th grade. The application will be evaluated
meet the specified unit requirements in secondary
upon receipt of the completed application form, a high
education for entering freshmen, or for students entering
school transcript showing courses completed, courses
after having completed some college education. Students
remaining to be completed, ranking in class, other pertinent
from countries using the English system of examinations
data, and SAT or ACT scores. In some cases, the grades or
must have earned First Class or First Division rank on
marks received in courses taken during the first half of the
their most recent examination to be eligible for admis-
senior year may be required. Applicants who meet freshman
sion.
admission requirements are admitted subject to completion
of all entrance requirements and high school graduation.
2. The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is
required of all international students whose native
Transfer Students
language is not English. Information and application
Undergraduate students at another college or university
forms for this test, which is given four times each year all
who wish to transfer to CSM should request an application
over the world, may be obtained from the College
for admission from the Admissions Office.
Entrance Examination Board, P.O. Box 592, Princeton,
A transfer student should apply for admission at the
NJ 08541, U.S.A.
beginning of the final quarter or semester of attendance at
Nondegree Students
his or her present college. The application will be evaluated
A nondegree student is one who has not applied to
upon receipt of the completed application form, high school
pursue a degree program at CSM but wishes to take courses
transcript, transcripts covering all work taken from each
regularly offered on campus. Such students may take any
university or college attended, and a list of courses in
course for which they have the prerequisites as listed in the
progress. The Director of Enrollment Management will then
CSM Bulletin or have the permission of the instructor.
notify the student about his or her admission status.
Transcripts or evidence of the prerequisites are required. An
Admission is subject to satisfactory completion of current
applicant for admission to the undergraduate school who
courses in progress and submission of a final, complete
does not meet admission requirements may not fulfill
transcript.
deficiencies through this means. Exception to this rule can
Advanced Placement
be made only by the Director of Enrollment Management. A
Course work completed under the Advanced Placement
maximum of 12 hours of nondegree credit from Colorado
Program in a high school will be accepted for college credit
School of Mines may be transferred to an undergraduate
provided that the Advanced Placement Program Test grade
degree program.
is either 5 (highest honors) or 4 (honors). For a score of
Admission Procedures
three (creditable) on the test, credit may or may not be given
All Applicants
subject to a study of the A.P. test and related materials,
placement test data, high school record, and other test scores
Documents received by CSM in connection with
available. No credit will be given if the test grade is 2 (pass)
applications for admission or transfer of credit will not be
or 1 (fail).
duplicated, returned to the applicant, or forwarded to any
agency or any other institution.
In special cases, advanced placement may be granted for
course work not completed under the College Entrance
A $25.00 non-refundable application fee is required from
Examination Board Program. Students wishing such credit
all applicants. This includes applicants from Colorado,
may demonstrate competence by writing the Advanced
applicants from out of state, and applicants who are not
Placement Examination in the subject. Information can be
citizens and who live outside of the United States.
secured from the College Entrance Examination Board, P.O.
Applications for undergraduate study cannot be accepted
Box 592, Princeton, NJ 08541.
later than 21 days prior to the date of registration for any
Credit for a CSM course may also be awarded after
academic semester or summer session. Admission for any
academic department review for College Level Equivalency
semester or term may close whenever CSM’s budgeted
Program (CLEP) credit. Interested students should contact
number of students has been met.
the appropriate department/division. The opportunity to
High School Graduates
challenge the content of a course is open to students. This
Colorado high school applicants should obtain applica-
option is at the discretion of the individual department, and
tions from their high school counselor or principal or write
credit for a particular course which is challenged is granted
the Admissions Office. Out-of-state applicants should write
upon recommendation of the head of the appropriate
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
25

department.
Prerequisites
Declaration of Option
It is the responsibility of each student to make certain
Since the curriculum during the first two semesters at
that the proper prerequisites for all courses have been met.
CSM is the same for everyone, students are not required to
Registration in a course without the necessary prerequisite
choose a major until the end of the freshman year. By the
may result in dismissal from the class or a grade of F
beginning of the junior year, all students must have declared
(Failed) in the course.
a major.
Transfer Credit
Medical Record
New Transfer Students.
A health history prepared by the student, a medical
Upon matriculation, a transfer student will receive the
examination performed by the student’s physician and an
prescribed academic credit for courses taken at another
updated immunization record completed by the student and
institution if these courses are listed in a current articulation
the physician, nurse or health authority comprise the
agreement and transfer guide between CSM and that
medical record. A medical record is required for full time
institution. When an articulation agreement does not exist
students entering CSM for the first time, or following an
with another institution, the transfer student may receive
absence of more than 12 calendar months.
credit for a course taken at another institution, subject to
review by the appropriate CSM department head or
The medical record will be sent to the student after
designate to ensure course equivalency.
acceptance for admission. The medical record must be
updated and completed and then returned to the Student
Continuing Students.
Health Center before permission to enroll is granted. Proof
Students who are currently enrolled at CSM may transfer
of immunity consists of an official Certificate of Immuniza-
credit in required courses only in extenuating circumstances,
tion signed by a physician, nurse, or public health official
upon the advance approval of the Registrar, the department
which documents measles, mumps and rubella immunity.
head of the appropriate course, the department head of the
The Certificate must specify the type of vaccine and the
student’s option, and the Vice President for Academic
dates (month, day, year) of administration or written
Affairs. Upon return, credit will be received subject to
evidence of laboratory tests showing immunity to measles,
review by the appropriate department head. Forms for this
mumps and rubella.
purpose are available in the Registrar’s Office.
The completed medical record is confidential and will be
Returning Students.
kept in the Student Health Center. The record will not be
Students who have matriculated at CSM, withdrawn,
released unless the student signs a written release.
applied for readmission and wish to transfer in credit taken
Veterans
at an institution while they were absent from CSM, must
obtain approval, upon return, of the department head of the
Colorado School of Mines is approved by the Colorado
appropriate course, the department head of the student’s
State Approving Agency for Veteran Benefits under chapters
option, the Registrar, and the Vice President for Academic
30, 31, 32, 35, and 1606. Undergraduates must register for
Affairs.
and maintain 12 hours, and graduate students must register
for and maintain 8 hours of graduate work in any semester
In all cases, requests for transfer credit are initiated in the
to be certified as a full- time student for full-time benefits.
Admissions Office and processed by the Registrar.
Any hours taken under the full-time category will decrease
Course Withdrawals, Additions and Drops
the benefits to 3/4 time, 1/2 time, or tuition payment only.
Courses may be added or dropped without fee or penalty
All changes in hours, addresses, marital status, or
during the first 11 school days of a regular academic term
dependents are to be reported to the Veterans Counseling
(first 4 school days of a 6-week field course or the first 6
Office as soon as possible so that overpayment or underpay-
school days of the 8-week summer term).
ment may be avoided. Veterans must see the Veteran’s
Continuing students may withdraw from any course after
Counselor each semester to be certified for any benefits for
the eleventh day of classes through the tenth week for any
which they may be eligible. In order for veterans to continue
reason with a grade of W. After the tenth week, no with-
to receive benefits, they must make satisfactory progress as
drawals are permitted except in cases of withdrawal from
defined by Colorado School of Mines.
school or for extenuating circumstances upon approval by
Academic Regulations
the Registrar. A grade of F will be given in courses which
Deficiencies
are withdrawn from after the deadline without approval.
The curricula at Colorado School of Mines have been
Freshmen in their first and second semesters and transfer
especially designed so that the course work flows naturally
students in their first semester are permitted to withdraw
from course to course and year to year. Thus, it is important
from courses with no grade penalty through the Friday prior
that deficiencies in lower numbered courses be scheduled in
to the last week of classes.
preference to more advanced work.
All add/drop and withdrawal procedures are initiated in
26
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

the Registrar’s Office. To withdraw from a course (with a
enrollment at CSM or another college more difficult.
“W”) a student must obtain the appropriate form from the
Leave of Absence
Registrar’s office, have it initialed by the instructor and
Students planning to be absent from Mines for one or
signed by the student’s advisor/mentor to indicate acknowl-
more academic semesters should request approval of a leave
edgment of the student’s action, and return it to the
of absence by completing the appropriate form available in
Registrar’s Office by close of business on the last day that a
the Registrar’s Office. Approval of the request will facilitate
withdrawal is authorized. Acknowledgment (by initials) by
re-enrollment upon return and permit, if desired, continu-
the division/department is required in only 2 cases: 1. when
ance of insurance eligibility.
a course is added after the 11th day of the semester and 2.
when the Registrar has approved, for extenuating circum-
Grades
stances, a withdrawal after the last date specified (a”late
When a student registers in a course, one of the
withdrawal”). Approval of a late withdrawal can only be
following grades will appear on his academic record, except
given by the Registrar.
that if a student registered as NC fails to satisfy all condi-
A $4.00 fee will be charged for any change in class
tions, no record of this registration in the course will be
schedule after the first 11 days of class, except in cases
made. The assignment of the grade symbol is based on the
beyond the student’s control or withdrawal from school. All
level of performance, and represents the extent of the
add/drop and withdrawal procedures are initiated in the
student’s demonstrated mastery of the material listed in the
Registrar’s Office.
course outline and achievement of the stated course
objectives.
Independent Study
For each semester credit hour awarded for independent
A
Excellent
study a student is expected to invest approximately 25 hours
B
Good
of effort in the educational activity involved. To register for
C
Satisfactory
independent study or for a “special topics” course, a student
D
Poor (lowest passing)
should get from the Registrar’s Office the form provided for
F
Failed
that purpose, have it completed by the instructor involved
S
Satisfactory,
and the appropriate department/division head, and return it
C or better, used at mid-term
to the Registrar’s Office.
U
Unsatisfactory, below C, used at mid-term
Absenteeism
WI
Involuntarily Withdrawn
Class attendance is required of all undergraduates unless
W
Withdrew, No Penalty
the student is representing the School in an authorized
T
Transfer Credit
activity, in which case the student will be allowed to make
PRG In Progress
up any work missed. Students who miss academic work
PRU In Progress Unsatisfactory
(including but not limited to exams, homework, labs) while
participating in school sponsored activities must either be
INC
Incomplete
given the opportunity to make up this work in a reasonable
NC
Not for Credit
period of time or be excused from such work. It is the
Z
Grade not yet submitted
responsibility of the student to initiate arrangements for
M
Thesis Completed
such work. Proof of illness may be required before makeup
Incomplete Grade.
of missed work is permitted. Excessive absence may result
If a student, because of illness or other reasonable
in a failing grade in the course. Determination of excessive
excuse, fails to complete a course, a grade of INC (Incom-
absence is a departmental prerogative.
plete) is given. The grade INC indicates deficiency in
The Office of the Dean of Students, if properly informed,
quantity of work and is temporary.
will send notice to faculty members of absences of three
A GRADE OF INC MUST BE REMOVED NOT
days or more due to illness or in case of death in the family.
LATER THAN THE FIRST FOUR WEEKS OF THE
Withdrawal from School
FIRST SEMESTER OF ATTENDANCE FOLLOWING
A student may officially withdraw from CSM by
THAT IN WHICH IT WAS RECEIVED. Upon failure to
processing a Withdrawal from School form available in the
remove an INC within the time specified, it shall be changed
Financial Aid Office. Completion of the form through the
to an F (failed) by the Registrar.
Student Development Office prior to the last day of
Progress Grade.
scheduled classes for that term will result in W’s being
The progress grade (PRG), carrying no point value, is
assigned to courses in progress. Failure to officially
used primarily for multi-semester courses, such as thesis or
withdraw will result in the grades of courses in progress
certain special project courses which are spread over two
being recorded as F’s. Leaving school without having paid
terms. The progress grade will be awarded in MACS111,
tuition and fees will result in a hold being placed against the
MACS112, and PHGN100 to students completing the
transcript. Either of these actions would make future
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
27

course for the FIRST time who would otherwise have
appeal to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The
received a grade of “D” (an enrollment with a grade of “W”
VPAA will obtain written statements from the faculty
is not considered a completion). A student may appeal the
member who gave the grade, from the faculty member
assignment of the “PRG” grade to the Dean of Students.
appointed in Step 2, and from the faculty committee
It is required that a student receiving a progress grade be
appointed in Step 3. The VPAA then will submit all
re-registered in the same course in the next semester of
statements to the Faculty Affairs Committee for investiga-
attendance. It is further required, in undergraduate courses,
tion and decision. The decision of the Faculty Affairs
that a letter grade be given by the department at the end of
Committee is final.
that semester.
Quality Hours and Quality Points.
A student may not drop a course in which re-registered
For graduation a student must successfully complete a
for the purpose of completing a course in which a progress
certain number of required semester hours and must
grade was received the previous semester. If a progress
maintain grades at a satisfactory level. The system for
grade is received for a course taken in the spring semester,
expressing the quality of a student’s work is based on
the student may, with the permission of the department head
quality points and quality hours. The grade A represents
of the course, re-register in that course in the summer
four quality points, B three, C two, D one, F none. The
session, in which case the letter grade must be given at the
number of quality points earned in any course is the number
end of the summer session.
of semester hours assigned to that course multiplied by the
numerical value of the grade received. The quality hours
Forgiveness of “F” Grade.
earned are the number of semester hours in which grades of
When a student completing MACS111 or MACS112 or
A, B, C, D, or F are awarded. To compute a grade-point
PHGN100 for the FIRST time receives an “F” in the course
average, the number of cumulative quality hours is divided
but subsequently receives a grade of “D” or higher in that
into the cumulative quality points earned. Grades of W, WI,
course, the “F” received for the first completion will be
INC, PRG, PRU, or NC are not counted in quality hours.
changed to a “W”. (If an “F” is received the next time a
Transfer Credit. Transfer credit earned at another institution
course is taken after getting a grade of “W”, it will be
will have a T grade assigned but no grade points will be
forgiven. However, for the purpose of this rule a prior
recorded on the student’s permanent record. Calculation of
enrollment with a grade of “PRG” will be considered a
the grade-point average will be made from the courses
completion and a subsequent “F” will not be forgiven.)
completed at Colorado School of Mines by the transfer
NC Grade.
student.
A student may for special reasons, with the instructor’s
Semester Hours.
permission, register in a course on the basis of NC (Not for
The number of times a class meets during a week (for
Credit). To have the grade NC appear on his/her transcript,
lecture, recitation, or laboratory) determines the number of
the student must enroll at registration time as a NC student
semester hours assigned to that course. Class sessions are
in the course and comply with all conditions stipulated by
normally 50 minutes long and represent one hour of credit
the course instructor, except that if a student registered as
for each hour meeting. Two to four hours of laboratory work
NC fails to satisfy all conditions, no record of this registra-
per week are equivalent to 1-semester hour of credit. For the
tion in the course will be made.
average student, each hour of lecture and recitation requires
Grade Appeal Process
at least two hours of preparation. No full-time undergradu-
Student appeals on grades are to be heard by the Faculty
ate student may enroll for less than 10 nor more than 19
Affairs Committee of the CSM Faculty Senate. The appeal
credit hours in one semester. Physical education, advanced
process has the following steps:
ROTC and Honors Program in Public Affairs courses are
excepted. However, upon written recommendation of the
1. The student should attempt to work out the dispute with
faculty advisor, the better students may be given permission
the faculty member responsible for the course.
by the Dean of Students or Registrar to take additional
2. If the student is not satisfied with the results of Step 1,
hours.
she or he must appeal in writing to the Department Head/
Division Director, who will appoint a faculty member
Grade-Point Averages
who is familiar with the course material to serve as
Grade-Point Averages shall be specified, recorded,
adjudicator.
reported, and used to three figures following the decimal
3. If the student is not satisfied with the results of Step 2,
point for any and all purposes to which said averages may
she or he must notify the Department Head/Division
apply.
Director in writing, and the Department Head/Division
Honor Roll and Dean’s List
Director will appoint an ad hoc committee from within
To be placed on the academic honor roll, a student must
the Department to serve as adjudicator.
complete at least 14 semester hours with a 3.0-3.499 grade
4. If the student is not satisfied with the results of Step 3, he
point for the semester, have no grade below C, and no
or she must submit a written statement of the case for the
incomplete grade. Those students satisfying the above
28
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

criteria with a semester grade-point average of 3.5 or above
91-110.5
2.0
2.2
are placed on the Dean’s List.
111-130.5
2.0
2.2
Graduation Awards
131-150.5
2.0
2.3
Graduation awards are determined by the student’s
A freshman or transfer student who fails to make a
cumulative academic record at the end of the preceding
grade-point average of 1.5 during the first grade period will
semester. Students achieving a final cumulative grade point
be placed on suspension.
average of 3.5 or higher, however, will have “with High
Suspension becomes effective immediately when it is
Scholastic Honors” shown on their diplomas and on their
imposed. Readmission after suspension requires written
transcripts.
approval from the Readmissions Committee. While a one
Good Standing
semester suspension period is normally the case, exceptions
A student is in good standing at CSM when he or she is
may be granted, particularly in the case of first-semester
enrolled in class(es) and is not on either academic or
freshmen and new transfer students.
disciplinary probation. Provisional probation does not
No student who is on suspension may enroll in any
affect a student’s being in good standing.
regular academic semester without the written approval of
Academic Probation and Suspension
the Readmissions Committee. However, a student on
suspension may enroll in a summer session (field camp,
Probation
academic session, or both) with the permission of the Dean
A student whose cumulative grade-point average falls
of Students. Students on suspension who have been given
below the minimum requirements specified (see table
permission to enroll in a summer session by the Dean may
below) will be placed on probation for the following
not enroll in any subsequent term at CSM without the
semester. A student on probation is subject to the following
written permission of the Readmissions Committee.
restrictions:
Readmissions Committee meetings are held prior to the
1. may not register for more than 15 credit hours
beginning of each regular semester and at the end of the
2. may be required to withdraw from intercollegiate
spring term.
athletics
A student who intends to appear in person before the
3. may not run for, or accept appointment to, any campus
Readmissions Committee must register in the Dean of
office or committee chairmanship. A student who is placed
Students Office in person or by letter. Between regular
on probation while holding a position involving significant
meetings of the Committee, in cases where extensive travel
responsibility and commitment may be required to resign
would be required to appear in person, a student may
after consultation with the Dean of Students or the President
petition in writing to the Committee, through the Dean of
of Associated Students. A student will be removed from
Students.
probation when the cumulative grade-point average is
Appearing before the Readmissions Committee by letter
brought up to the minimum, as specified in the table below.
rather than in person will be permitted only in cases of
When a part-time degree undergraduate has attempted a
extreme hardship. Such cases will include travel from a
total of 12 quality hours of credit with a cumulative grade-
great distance, e.g. overseas, or travel from a distance which
point average of less than 2.0, the student will be placed on
requires leaving a permanent job. Appearing by letter will
academic probation by the Dean of Students. Should
not be permitted for continuing students in January.
students not earn a 2.0 grade-point average for the next
semester of attendance, they will be subject to suspension.
The Readmissions Committee meets immediately before
classes start and the first day of classes. Students applying
Suspension.
for readmission must appear at those times except under
A student on probation who fails to meet both the last
conditions beyond the control of the student. Such condi-
semester grade period requirements and the cumulative
tions include a committee appointment load extending
grade-point average given in the table below will be placed
beyond the first day of classes, delay in producing notice of
on suspension. A student who meets the last semester grade
suspension or weather conditions closing highways and
period requirement but fails to achieve the required
airports.
cumulative grade-point average will remain on probation.
All applications for readmission after a minimum period
Total
Required
away from school, and all appeals of suspension or
Quality
Cumulative
Last Semester
dismissal, must include a written statement of the case to be
Hours
G.P. Average
G.P. Average
made for readmission.
0-18.5
1.7
— —
19-36.5
1.8
2.0
A student who, after being suspended and readmitted
twice, again fails to meet the required academic standards
37-54.5
1.8
2.0
shall be automatically dismissed. The Readmissions
55-72.5
1.9
2.1
Committee will hear a single appeal of automatic dismissal.
73-90.5
1.9
2.1
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
29

The appeal will only be heard after demonstration of
2. Transcript of Grades: Registrar
substantial and significant changes. A period of time
3. Computer Grade Lists: Registrar
sufficient to demonstrate such a charge usually elapses prior
4. Encumbrance List: Controller and Registrar
to the student attempting to schedule this hearing. The
5. Academic Probation/Suspension List: Undergraduate-
decision of the Committee on that single appeal will be final
Dean of Students; Graduate-Graduate Dean
and no further appeal will be permitted.
6. Advisor File: Academic Advisor
Readmission by the Committee does not guarantee that
7. Option/Advisor/Enrolled/ Minority/Foreign List:
there is space available to enroll. A student must process the
Registrar, Dean of Students, and Graduate Dean
necessary papers with the Admissions Office prior to seeing
8. Externally Generated SAT/GRE Score Lists: Undergradu-
the Committee.
ate-Registrar; Graduate-Graduate Dean
Notification.
9 Financial Aid File: Financial Aid (closed records)
Notice of probation, suspension, or dismissal will be
10. Medical History File: School Physician (closed records)
mailed to each student who fails to meet catalog require-
Student Access to Records. The undergraduate student
ments.
wishing access to a record will make written request to the
Repeated Failure
Dean of Students. The graduate student will make a similar
A student who twice fails a required course at Colorado
request to the Dean of the Graduate School. This request
School of Mines and is not subject to academic suspension
will include the student’s name, date of request and type of
will automatically be placed on “Special Hold” status with
record to be reviewed. It will be the responsibility of the
the Registrar, regardless of the student’s cumulative or
student’s dean to arrange a mutually satisfactory time for
semester GPA. The student must meet with the Readmis-
review. This time will be as soon as practical but is not to be
sions Committee and receive written permission before
later than 45 days from receipt of the request. The record
being allowed to register. Transfer credit from another
will be reviewed in the presence of the dean or designated
school will not be accepted for a twice-failed course.
representative. If the record involves a list including other
students, steps will be taken to preclude the viewing of the
other student name and information.
Access to Student Records
Challenge of the Record. If the student wishes to
Students at the Colorado School of Mines are protected
challenge any part of the record, the appropriate dean will
by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974,
be so notified in writing. The dean may then(l) remove and
as amended. This Act was designed to protect the privacy of
destroy the disputed document, or (2) inform the student
education records, to establish the right of students to
that it is his decision that the document represents a
inspect and review their education records, and to provide
necessary part of the record; and if the student wishes to
guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading
appeal, (3) convene a meeting of the student and the
data through informal and formal hearings. Student also
document originator (if reasonably available) in the
have the right to file complaints with The Family Educa-
presence of the Vice President for Academic Affairs as
tional Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA) concerning
mediator, whose decision will be final. Destruction of
alleged failures by the institution to comply with the Act.
Records. Records may be destroyed at any time by the
Copies of local policy can be found in the Registrar’s
responsible official if not otherwise precluded by law except
Office.
that no record may be destroyed between the dates of access
Directory Information. The school maintains lists of
request and the viewing of the record. If during the viewing
information which may be considered directory information
of the record any item is in dispute, it may not be destroyed.
as defined by the regulations. This information includes
Access to Records by Other Parties. Colorado School of
name, current and permanent addresses and phone numbers,
Mines will not permit access to student records by persons
date of birth, major field of study, dates of attendance,
outside the School except as follows:
degrees awarded, last school attended, participation in
1. In the case of open record information as specified in the
officially recognized activities and sports, class, and
section under Directory Information.
academic honors. Students who desire that this information
2. To those people specifically designated by the student.
not be printed must so inform the Registrar before the end
Examples would include request for transcript to be sent
of the first two weeks of the fall semester the student is
to graduate school or prospective employer.
registered for. The following student records are maintained
by Colorado School of Mines at the various offices listed
3. Information required by a state or federal agency for the
below:
purpose of establishing eligibility for financial aid.
4. Accreditation agencies during their on-camp review.
1. General Records: Undergraduate-Registrar; Graduate-
5. In compliance with a judicial order or lawfully issued
Graduate Dean
subpoena after the student has been notified of the
intended compliance.
30
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

6. Any institutional information for statistical purposes
catalog, a student must receive the approval of the Registrar,
which is not identifiable with a particular student.
the heads of departments of the two courses, the head of the
7. In compliance with any applicable statue now in effect or
student’s option department, and the Vice President for
later enacted. Each individual record (general, transcript,
Academic Affairs. Forms for this purpose are available in
advisor, and medical) will include a log of those persons
the Registrar’s Office.
not employed by Colorado School of Mines who have
Change of Catalog
requested or obtained access to the student record and the
It is assumed that each student will graduate under the
legitimate interest that the person has in making the
requirements of the catalog in effect at the time of first
request.
enrollment. However, it is possible to change to any
General Information
subsequent catalog in effect while the student is enrolled in
Academic Calendar
a regular semester.
The academic year is based on the early semester system.
To change catalogs, a form obtained from the Registrar’s
The first semester begins in late August and closes in mid-
Office is presented for approval to the head of the student’s
December; the second semester begins in early January and
option department. Upon receipt of approval, the form must
closes in early May.
be returned to the Registrar’s Office.
Part-Time Degree Students
Students’ Use of English
A part-time degree student is defined as a matriculated
All Mines students are expected to show professional
degree student enrolled for less than 10 hours during the
facility in the use of the English language.
regular academic year or less than 5 hours in summer
English skills are emphasized, but not taught exclusively,
session.
in most of the humanities and social sciences courses and
A part-time degree student may enroll in any course for
EPICS. Students are required to write reports, make oral
which he or she has the prerequisites or the permission of
presentations, and generally demonstrate their facility in the
the department. Part-time degree students will be subject to
English language while enrolled in their courses.
all rules and regulations of Colorado School of Mines, but
The LAIS Writing Center is available to assist students
they may not:
with their writing. For additional information, contact the
1. Live in student housing;
LAIS Division, Stratton 301; 273-3750.
2. Receive financial help in the form of School-
Summer Session
sponsored scholarships or grants;
The summer session is divided into two independent
3. Participate in any School-recognized activity unless
units: a period not to exceed 6 weeks for required field and
fees are paid;
laboratory courses in engineering, geology, geophysics,
4. Take advantage of activities provided by student fees
metallurgical and materials engineering, mining, petroleum,
unless such fees are paid.
chemical engineering and petroleum-refining, chemistry and
Course work completed by a part-time degree student
geochemistry, mathematics, physics, and environmental
who subsequently changes to full-time status will be
sciences and engineering ecology; and an 8-week on-
accepted as meeting degree requirements.
campus summer school during which some regular school
Seniors in Graduate Courses
year courses are offered.
With the consent of the student’s department and the
Curriculum Changes
Dean of Graduate Studies, a qualified senior may enroll in
The Board of Trustees of the Colorado School of Mines
500-level courses without being a registered graduate
reserves the right to change any course of study or any part
student. At least a 2.5 GPA is required. The necessary forms
of the curriculum in keeping with educational and scientific
for attending these courses are available in the Registrar’s
developments. Nothing in this catalog or the registration of
Office. Seniors may not enroll in 600-level courses. Credits
any student shall be considered as a contract between
in 500-level courses earned by seniors may be applied
Colorado School of Mines and the student.
toward an advanced degree at CSM only if:
1. The student gains admission to the Graduate School.
2. The student’s graduate committee agrees that these
Undergraduate Degree Requirements
credits are a reasonable part of his graduate program.
Bachelor of Science Degree
3. The student provides proof that the courses in
Upon completion of the requirements and upon being
question were not counted toward those required for the
recommended for graduation by the faculty, and approved
Bachelor’s Degree.
by the Board of Trustees, the undergraduate receives one of
Course Substitution
the following degrees:
To substitute credit for one course in place of another
course required as part of the approved curricula in the
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
31

Bachelor of Science
appropriate departments to become a multiple degree
(Chemical and Petroleum-Refining Engineering)
candidate. The following requirements must be met by the
Bachelor of Science (Chemistry)
candidate in order to obtain multiple degrees:
Bachelor of Science (Economics)
1. All requirements of each degree program must be met.
Bachelor of Science (Engineering)
2. Any course which is required in more than one degree
Bachelor of Science (Engineering Physics)
need be taken only once.
Bachelor of Science (Geological Engineering)
3. A course required in one degree program may be used as
Bachelor of Science (Geophysical Engineering)
a technical elective in another, if it satisfies the restric-
Bachelor of Science (Mathematical and Computer Sciences)
tions of the elective.
Bachelor of Science (Metallurgical & Materials Engineering)
4. Different catalogs may be used, one for each degree
Bachelor of Science (Mining Engineering)
program.
Bachelor of Science (Petroleum Engineering)
5. No course substitutions are permitted in order to
Graduation Requirements
circumvent courses required in one of the degree
To qualify for a Bachelor of Science degree from
programs, or reduce the number of courses taken.
Colorado School of Mines, all candidates must satisfy the
However, in the case of overlap of course content
following requirements:
between required courses in the degree programs, a more
1. A minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.000 for
advanced course may be substituted for one of the
all academic work completed in residence.
required courses upon approval of the head of each
2. A minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.000 for
department concerned, the Registrar and the Vice
courses comprising the department course sequence in the
President for Academic Affairs. The course substitution
candidate’s major.
form can be obtained in the Registrar’s Office.
3. A minimum of 30 hours credit in 300 and 400 series
A student may not be a candidate for a graduate and an
technical courses in residence, at least 15 of which are to
undergraduate degree at the same time. To be a candidate
be taken in the senior year.
the student must first gain admission to one school and
4. A minimum of 19 hours in humanities and social sciences
make satisfactory progress toward a degree offered by that
courses.
school.
5. The recommendation of their degree-granting department
to the faculty.
Undergraduate Programs
6. The certification by the Registrar that all required
academic work is satisfactorily completed.
Institutional Goals
7. The recommendation of the faculty and approval of the
All degree programs at the Colorado School of Mines are
Board of Trustees.
designed to fulfill the Profile of the Colorado School of
Seniors must submit an Application to Graduate two
Mines Graduate:
semesters prior to the anticipated date of graduation.
The Colorado School of Mines is dedicated to serving
Applications are available in the Registrar’s Office.
the people of Colorado, the nation and the global commu-
The Registrar’s Office provides the service of doing
nity by providing the highest quality education, research and
preliminary degree audits. It is the ultimate responsibility of
outreach in all areas of science and engineering and
students to monitor the progress of their degrees. It is also
associated fields related to the discovery, production and
the student’s responsibility to contact the Registrar’s Office
utilization of resources needed to improve the quality of life
when there appears to be a discrepancy between the degree
of the world’s inhabitants. CSM is committed to educating
audit and the student’s records.
students to become good stewards of the Earth and its
All graduating students must officially check out of
resources. To do this, CSM must provide students with
School. Checkout cards, available in the Dean’s Office,
perspectives informed by the humanities and social sciences,
must be completed and returned one week prior to the
perspectives which also enhance students’ understanding of
expected date of completion of degree requirements.
themselves and contemporary society. CSM is committed to
No students, graduate or undergraduate, will receive
the development of processes and approaches to mitigate
diplomas until they have complied with all the rules and
environmental damage caused in the past by the production
regulations of Colorado School of Mines and settled all
and utilization of minerals, energy and materials. It is also
accounts with the School. Transcript of grades and other
committed to minimizing such damage in the future, thus
records will not be provided for any student or graduate who
helping to sustain the earth system upon which all life and
has an unsettled obligation of any kind to the School.
development depend.
Multiple Degrees. A student wishing to complete
u
All CSM graduates must have depth in an area of
Bachelor of Science degrees in more than one degree
specialization, enhanced by hands-on experiential
program must receive permission from the heads of the
32
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

learning, and breadth in allied fields. They must have
accreditation by the Accreditation Board for Engineering
the knowledge and skills to be able to recognize, define
and Technology, and science programs are positioned for
and solve problems by applying sound scientific and
approval by their relevant societies, in particular the
engineering principles. These attributes uniquely
American Chemical Society for the Chemistry program.
distinguish our graduates to better function in increas-
The Core Curriculum
ingly competitive and diverse technical professional
Core requirements for graduation include the following:
environments.
In Mathematics and the Basic Sciences, 12 semester hours
u
Graduates must have the skills to communicate
in Calculus for Scientists and Engineers and 3 semester
information, concepts and ideas effectively orally, in
hours in Differential Equations (2 semester hours in
writing, and graphically. They must be skilled in the
Differential Equations for Geological Engineering
retrieval, interpretation and development of technical
majors); 8 semester hours in the Principles of Chemistry;
information by various means, including the use of
and 9 semester hours in Physics.
computer-aided techniques.
In Design, 6 semester hours in Design Engineering
u
Graduates should have the flexibility to adjust to the
Practices Introductory Course Sequence.
ever-changing professional environment and appreciate
In Systems, 9 semester hours in Earth and Environmental
diverse approaches to understanding and solving
Systems, Engineering Systems and Human Systems.
society’s problems. They should have the creativity,
In Humanities and the Social Sciences, 10 semester hours
resourcefulness, receptivity and breadth of interests to
in Nature and Human Values, Principles of Economics,
think critically about a wide range of cross-disciplinary
Human Systems, and a restricted cluster of 9 semester
issues. They should be prepared to assume leadership
hours in H&SS electives. Note that the Human Systems
roles and possess the skills and attitudes which promote
course is inclusive in both the Humanities and Social
teamwork and cooperation and to continue their own
Sciences and the Systems core segments.
growth through life-long learning.
In Physical Education, 2 semester hours.
u
Graduates should be capable of working effectively in
In Freshman Orientation and Success, 0.5 semester hours.
an international environment, and be able to succeed in
Free electives, minimum 9 hours, are included within each
an increasingly interdependent world where borders
degree granting program.
between cultures and economies are becoming less
The Freshman Year Freshmen in all programs take the
distinct. They should appreciate the traditions and
same subjects, as listed below:
languages of other cultures, and value diversity in their
own society.
Fall Semester
u
Graduates should exhibit ethical behavior and integrity.
subject code** and
They should also demonstrate perseverance and have
course number
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
CHGN121 Principles of Chemistry I
3
3
4
pride in accomplishment. They should assume a
MACS111 Calculus for Scientists & Engn’rs I
4
4
responsibility to enhance their professions through
SYGN101* Earth and Environmental Systems
3
3
4
service and leadership and should be responsible
LIHU100* Nature and Human Values
4
4
citizens who serve society, particularly through
CSM101 Freshman Success Seminar
0.5
0.5
stewardship of the environment.
PAGN101 Physical Education I
0.5
0.5
To enable the fulfillment of these goals by all gradu-
Total
17
ates, the curriculum is made up of a common core and
Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
eleven undergraduate degree granting programs. Each
degree granting program has an additional set of goals
CHGN124 Principles of Chemistry II
3
3
which focus on the technical and professional expectations
CHGN126 Quantitative Chemical Measurements 3
1
of that program. The common core and the degree granting
MACS112 Calculus for Scientists & Engn’rs II
programs are coupled through course sequences in math-
4
4
ematics and the basic sciences, in specialty topics in science
EPIC151* Design I
2
3
3
and/or engineering, in humanities and the social sciences,
PHGN100 Physics I
3.5
3
4.5
and in design. Further linkage is achieved through a core
PAGN102 Physical Education II
2
0.5
course sequence which addresses system interactions among
Total
16
phenomena in the natural world, the engineered world, and
* Students will be registered in alternate combinations of
the human world.
SYGN101, LIHU100 and EPIC151 between the fall and
spring semesters.
Through the alignment of the curriculum to these
institutional goals and to the additional degree-granting
** Key to Subject Codes (next page)
program goals, all engineering programs are positioned for
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
33

CHGC Geochemistry
An award-winning program, EPICS replaces the
LAIS Liberal Arts & International Studies
traditional core courses in introductory computing skills,
CHGN Chemistry
graphics, and technical communication. Whenever possible,
LICM Communication
instruction in these subjects is “hands-on” and experiential,
ChEN Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining
with the instructor serving primarily as mentor rather than
LIFL Foreign Languages
lecturer.
DCGN Core Science and Engineering Fundamentals
Problem-solving skills are developed through “projects,”
LIHN Honors Program
open-ended problems which the students solve in teams.
EBGN Economics and Business
Starting with simple case studies, the projects grow in
LIHU Humanities
length and complexity to a final, full-semester project
EGES Engineering Systems (Engineering)
submitted by an external client. The projects require
LIMU Band; Choir
extensive library research and self-education in appropriate
EGGN Engineering
technical areas; they also require students to consider non-
LISS Social Sciences
technical constraints (economic, ethical, political, societal)
EPIC EPICS
in arriving at their solutions.
MACS Mathematical & Computer Sciences
ESGN Environmental Science and Engineering
Written and oral communications are studied and
MNGN Mining Engineering
practiced as an integral part of the project work. Graphics
GEGN Geological Engineering
and computing skills are integrated with projects wherever
MSGN Military Science
possible.
GEGX Geochemical Exploration (Geology)
Among the topics studied by students in EPICS are: use
MTGN Metallurgical & Materials Engr’ng
of the computer as a problem-solving tool, and the use of
GEOC Oceanography (Geology)
word-processing, graphics, spreadsheet and CAD packages;
PAGN Physical Education and Athletics
3-D visualization; audience analysis and the preparation of a
GEOL Geology
variety of technical documents; oral communication in the
PEGN Petroleum Engineering
staff format; interpersonal skills in group work; project
GOGN Geo-Engineering (Mining)
management.
PHGN Physics GPGN Geophysics
The EPICS program is required of all undergraduates.
SYGN Core sequence in Systems
Division of Liberal Arts and International Studies
The Sophomore Year
(LAIS) Writing Center
Requirements for the sophomore year are listed within
The LAIS Writing Center located in room 263 of the
each degree granting program. Continuing requirements for
Green Center (phone: 303-273-3085) is a teaching facility
satisfying the core are met in the sophomore, junior and
providing all CSM students with an opportunity to enhance
senior years. It is advantageous, but not essential, that
their writing proficiency. The LAIS Writing Center faculty
students select one of the eleven undergraduate degree
are experienced technical writers and professional writing
programs early in the sophomore year.
instructors. The Center assists students with all their writing
Curriculum Changes
needs, from course assignments, to scholarship applications,
In accordance with the statement on Curriculum Change
proposals, letters and resumes. This service is free to CSM
on page 24, the Colorado School of Mines is entering a
students and includes one-to-one tutoring and online
phased period of curriculum revision. To confirm that they
resources provided in a computerized, electronic classroom
are progressing according to the requirements of the new
which is used extensively by students in the required
curriculum, students should consult their academic advisors
freshman course, LIHU100 Nature and Human Values.
on a regular basis and should carefully consult any Bulletin
Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC)
Addenda that may be published during this period.
To support the institutional goal in developing profes-
Special Programs
sional communication skills, required writing and communi-
EPICS (Engineering Practices Introductory Course
cation intensive courses are designated in both the core and
Sequence)
in the degree-granting programs. The LAIS Writing Center
EPICS is a two-semester sequence of courses for
supports the WAC program.
freshman and sophomores, designed to prepare students for
The Guy T. McBride, Jr. Honors Program in Public
their upper-division courses and to develop some of the key
Affairs for Engineers
skills of the professional engineer: the ability to solve
The McBride Honors Program, administered through the
complex, open-ended problems; the ability to self-educate;
Division of Liberal Arts and International Studies, was
and the ability to communicate effectively.
instituted in 1978 through a grant from the National
Endowment for the Humanities. Honors offers a 27-
34
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

semester-hour program of seminars and off-campus
Chemical Engineering
activities that has the primary goal of providing a select
number of students the opportunity to cross the boundaries
and Petroleum Refining
of their technical expertise and to gain the sensitivity to
prove, project, and test the moral and social implications of
ROBERT M. BALDWIN, Professor and Head of Department
their future professional judgements and activities, not only
ANNETTE L. BUNGE, Professor
for the particular organizations with which they will be
JAMES F. ELY, Professor
involved, but also for the nation and the world. To achieve
RONALD L. MILLER, Professor
this goal, the program seeks to bring themes from the
M. SAMI SELIM, Professor
humanities and the social sciences into the engineering
E. DENDY SLOAN, Weaver Distinguished Professor
curriculum that will encourage in students habits of thought
VICTOR F. YESAVAGE, Professor
necessary for effective management and enlightened
JOHN R. DORGAN, Associate Professor
leadership.
J. THOMAS MCKINNON, Associate Professor
J. DOUGLAS WAY, Associate Professor
This program, which leads to a certificate and a Minor in
DAVID W.M. MARR, Assistant Professor
Public Affairs for Engineers, is described more fully under
COLIN A. WOLDEN, Assistant Professor
the Division of Liberal Arts and International Studies.
DAVID T. WU, Assistant Professor
Minor Program/Area of Special Interest
JAMES H. GARY, Professor Emeritus
Established Minor Programs/Areas of Special Interest
JOHN O. GOLDEN, Professor Emeritus
are offered by all of the undergraduate degree-granting
ARTHUR J. KIDNAY, Professor Emeritus
departments as well as the Division of Environmental
MICHAEL S. GRABOSKI, Research Professor
Science and Engineering, the Division of Liberal Arts and
ROBERT D. KNECHT, Research Professor
International Studies, and the Military Science Department.
ROBERT L. MCCORMICK, Research Assistant Professor
A MINOR PROGRAM of study must consist of a minimum
Program Description
of 18 credit hours of a logical sequence of courses, only
The field of chemical engineering is extremely broad,
three hours of which may be taken in the student’s degree-
and encompasses all technologies and industries where
granting department. An AREA OF SPECIAL INTEREST
chemical processing is utilized in any form. Students with
must consist of a minimum of twelve credit hours of a
baccalaureate (B.S.) chemical engineering degrees from
logical sequence of courses, only three hours of which may
CSM can find employment in many and diverse fields,
be at the 100- or 200-level. No more than three credit hours
including: advanced materials synthesis and processing,
of the sequence may be specifically required by the degree
product and process research and development, food and
program in which the student is graduating. A Minor
pharmaceutical processing and synthesis, biochemical and
Program/Area of Special Interest declaration (which can be
biomedical materials and products, microelectronics
found in the Registrar’s Office) should be submitted for
manufacture, petroleum and petrochemical processing, and
approval prior to the student’s completion of half of the
process and product design.
hours proposed to constitute the program. Please see the
Department for specific course requirements.
The practice of chemical engineering draws from the
fundamentals of chemistry, mathematics, and physics.
Study Abroad
Accordingly, undergraduate students must initially complete
Students wishing to pursue study abroad opportunities
a program of study that stresses these three basic fields of
should contact the Office of International Programs (109
science. Chemical engineering coursework blends these
Stratton Hall), listed under the Services section of this
three disciplines into a series of engineering fundamentals
Bulletin, p.125. Colorado School of Mines encourages
relating to how materials are produced and processed both
students to include an international study/work experience
in the laboratory and in large industrial-scale facilities.
in their undergraduate education. CSM maintains student
Courses such as fluid mechanics, heat and mass transport,
exchange programs with universities in Mexico, Western
thermodynamics and reaction kinetics, and chemical process
Europe, Australia, Japan, and China. In addition, study
control are at the heart of the chemical engineering
abroad can be arranged on an individual basis at universities
curriculum at CSM. In addition, it is becoming increasingly
throughout the world. Financial aid and selected scholar-
important for chemical engineers to understand how
ships and grants can be used to finance approved study
microscopic, molecular-level properties can influence the
abroad programs. The Office of International Programs has
macroscopic behavior of materials and chemical systems.
developed a resource center for study abroad information in
This somewhat unique focus is first introduced at CSM
its office, 109 Stratton Hall, phone 303-384-2121. Students
through the physical and organic chemistry sequences, and
are invited to use the resource materials and meet with the
the theme is continued and developed within the chemical
Director of the Office of International Programs, Dr. R.
engineering curriculum via a senior-level capstone course in
Michael Haviland, to discuss overseas study opportunities.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
35

molecular perspectives. Our undergraduate program at
junior year which allows students to structure free electives
CSM is exemplified by intensive integration of computer-
into one of several specialty applications areas. Courses in
aided molecular simulation and computer-aided process
the chemical engineering portion of the curriculum may be
modeling in the curriculum, and by our unique approach to
categorized according to the following general system.
teaching of the unit operations laboratory sequence. The
A. Chemical Engineering Fundamentals
unit operations lab course is offered only in the summer as a
The following courses represent the basic knowledge
six-week intensive “field session”. Here, the fundamentals
component of the chemical engineering curriculum at CSM.
of heat, mass, and momentum transport and applied
1. Mass and Energy Balances (ChEN201) 2. Computational
thermodynamics are reviewed in a practical, applications-
Methods (ChEN200) 3. Fluid Mechanics (ChEN307) 4.
oriented setting. The important subjects of teamwork,
Heat Transfer (ChEN308) 5. Chemical Engineering
critical thinking, and oral and written technical communica-
Thermodynamics (ChEN357) 6. Mass Transfer (ChEN375)
tions skills are also stressed in this course.
7. Transport Phenomena (ChEN430)
Facilities for the study of chemical engineering at the
B. Chemical Engineering Applications
Colorado School of Mines are among the best in the nation.
The following courses are applications-oriented courses
Our modern in-house Unix computer network supports over
that build on the student’s basic knowledge of science and
50 workstations, and is anchored by an IBM SP-2 parallel
engineering fundamentals. 1. Unit Operations Laboratory
supercomputer. Specialized undergraduate laboratory
(ChEN312 and 313) 2. Reaction Engineering (ChEN418) 3.
facilities exist for the study of polymer properties, and for
Process Dynamics and Control (ChEN403) 4. Chemical
reaction engineering and unit operations. In 1992, the
Engineering Design I & II (ChEN401 and 402) 5. Molecular
department moved into a new $11 million facility which
Perspectives in Chemical Engineering (ChEN440)
included both new classroom and office space, as well as
high quality laboratories for undergraduate and graduate
C. Chemical Engineering Elective Tracks
research. Our honors undergraduate research program is
Students in chemical engineering may elect to structure
open to highly qualified students, and provides our
free electives into a formal Minor program of study (18
undergraduates with the opportunity to carry out indepen-
hours of coursework), an Area of Special Interest (12 hours)
dent research, or to join a graduate research team. This
or a Specialty Track in Chemical Engineering (9 hours).
program has been highly successful and Mines undergradu-
Minors and ASIs can be developed by the student in a
ate chemical engineering students have won several national
variety of different areas and programs as approved by the
competitions and awards based on research conducted while
student’s advisor and the Heads of the relevant sponsoring
pursuing their baccalaureate degree.
academic programs. Specialty tracks in chemical engineer-
Program Goals (Bachelor of Science in Chemical
ing are available in the following areas:
and Petroleum-Refining Engineering)
Microelectronics
The goals of the Chemical Engineering and Petroleum
Bio Engineering
Refining program at CSM are to:
Polymer and materials
u Instill in our students a high-quality basic education in
Environmental
chemical engineering fundamentals;
Petroleum and petrochemicals
u Develop the skills required to apply these fundamentals
Business and Economics
to the synthesis, analysis, and evaluation of chemical
Details on recommended courses for each of these tracks
engineering processes and systems; and
can be obtained from the student’s academic advisor.
u Foster personal development to ensure a lifetime of
professional success and an appreciation of the ethical
Degree Requirements (Chemical and Petroleum-
and societal responsibilities of a chemical engineer.
Refining Engineering)
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
Curriculum
MACS213 Calculus for Scientists & Engn’rs III
4
4
The chemical engineering curriculum is structured
PHGN200 Physics II
3.5 3
4.5
according to the goals outlined above. Accordingly, the
DCGN209 Introduction to Thermodynamics
3
3
program of study is organized to include 3 semesters of
Programming Elective*
2
2
science and general engineering fundamentals followed by 5
CHGN221 Organic Chemistry I
3
1
4
semesters of chemical engineering fundamentals and
PAGN201 Physical Education III
2
0.5
applications. An optional ‘track’ system is introduced at the
Total
18
*ChEN200, MACS260, or MACS261
36
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
Chemistry and
EBGN211 Principles of Economics
3
3
ChEN201 Mass and Energy Balances
3
3
Geochemistry
CHGN222 Organic Chemistry II
3
3
4
STEPHEN R. DANIEL, Professor and Department Head
EPIC251 Design II
2
3
3
DEAN W. DICKERHOOF, Professor
PAGN202 Physical Education IV
2
0.5
RONALD W. KLUSMAN, Professor
Total
16.5
DONALD L. MACALADY, Professor
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
PATRICK MACCARTHY, Professor
SYGN201/2 Engineering Systems
3
3
MICHAEL J. PAVELICH, Professor
CHGN351 Physical Chemistry I
3
1
4
KENT J. VOORHEES, Professor
ChEN307 Fluid Mechanics
3
3
THOMAS R. WILDEMAN, Professor
ChEN357 Chemical. Eng. Thermodynamics
3
1
4
SCOTT W. COWLEY, Associate Professor
SYGN200 Human Systems
3
3
MARK E. EBERHART, Associate Professor
Total
17
E. CRAIG SIMMONS, Associate Professor
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
DANIEL M. KNAUSS, Assistant Professor
CHGN353 Physical Chemistry II
3
1
4
KEVIN W. MANDERNACK, Assistant Professor
ChEN375 Chemical Eng. Mass Transfer
3
3
KIM R. WILLIAMS, Assistant Professor
ChEN308 Chemical Eng. Heat Transfer
3
3
DAVID T. WU, Assistant Professor
ChEN421 Engineering Economics
3
3
DAVID M. UPDEGRAFF, Research Professor
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Elective I
3
3
FRANCO BASILE, Research Assistant Professor
Total
16
STEVEN F. DEC, Research Assistant Professor
Summer Field Session
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
JAMES F. RANVILLE, Research Assistant Professor
ChEN312/313 Unit Operations Laboratory
6
6
RAMON E. BISQUE, Professor Emeritus
Total
6
KENNETH W. EDWARDS, Professor Emeritus
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
GEORGE H. KENNEDY, Professor Emeritus
ChEN418 Reaction Engineering
3
3
DONALD LANGMUIR, Professor Emeritus
ChEN430 Transport Phenomena
3
3
GEORGE B. LUCAS, Professor Emeritus
ChEN440 Molecular Perspectives/ Chem. Eng.
3
3
MAYNARD SLAUGHTER, Professor Emeritus
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Elective II
3
3
JOHN T. WILLIAMS, Professor Emeritus
Free Elective
3
3
ROBERT D. WITTERS, Professor Emeritus
Total
15
CHARLES W. STARKS, Associate Professor Emeritus
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
Program Description
ChEN402 Chemical Engineering Design
3
3
Chemistry provides fundamental knowledge critical to
ChEN403 Process Dynamics and Control
3
3
satisfying many of society’s needs: feeding and clothing and
Free Electives
6
6
housing the world’s people, finding and using sources of
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Elective III
3
3
energy, improving health care, ensuring national security,
Total
15
and protecting the environment. The programs of the
Degree total
136.5
Chemistry and Geochemistry Department are designed to
educate professionals for the varied career opportunities this
central scientific discipline affords. The curricula are
therefore founded in rigorous fundamental science comple-
mented by application of these principles to the mineral,
energy, materials, or environmental fields. For example, a
specific B.S. curricular track emphasizing environmental
chemistry is offered along with a more flexible track which
can be tailored to optimize preparation consistent with
students’ career goals. Those aspiring to enter Ph.D.
programs in chemistry are encouraged to include under-
graduate research beyond the minimum required among
their elective hours. Others interested in industrial chemis-
try choose area of special interest courses in chemical
engineering or metallurgy, for example. A significant
number of students complete degrees in both chemistry and
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
37

chemical engineering as an excellent preparation for
u Inorganic chemistry - atomic structure and periodicity,
industrial careers.
crystal lattice structure, molecular geometry and
The instructional and research laboratories located in
bonding (VSEPR, Lewis structures, VB and MO
Coolbaugh Hall contain extensive instrumentation for: gas
theory, bond energies and lengths), metals structure and
chromatography (GC), high-performance liquid chromatog-
properties, acid-base theories, main-group element
raphy (HPLC), ion chromatography (IC), supercritical-fluid
chemistry, coordination chemistry, term symbols,
chromatography (SFC), inductively-coupled-plasma-atomic
ligand field theory, spectra and magnetism of com-
emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) field-flow fractionation
plexes, organometallic chemistry.
(fff), mass spectrometry (MS, GC/MS, GC/MS/MS, PY/
u Organic chemistry - bonding and structure, structure-
MS, PY/GC/MS, SFC/MS), nuclear magnetic resonance
physical property relationships, reactivity-structure
spectrometry (solids and liquids), infrared spectrophotom-
relationships, reaction mechanisms (nucleophilic and
etry (FTIR), visible-ultraviolet spectrophotometry, micros-
electrophilic substitution, addition, elimination, radical
copy, X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), and
reactions, rearrangements, redox reactions, photo-
thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).
chemical reactions, and metal-mediated reactions),
Program Goals (Bachelor of Science in
chemical kinetics, catalysis, major classes of com-
pounds and their reactions, design of synthetic
Chemistry)
pathways.
The B.S. curricula in chemistry are designed to:
u Physical chemistry - thermodynamics (energy, enthalpy,
u Impart mastery of chemistry fundamentals;
entropy, equilibrium constants, free energy, chemical
u Develop ability to apply chemistry fundamentals in
potential, non-ideal systems, standard states, activity,
solving open-ended problems;
phase rule, phase equilibria, phase diagrams), electro-
u Impart knowledge of and ability to use moderns tools
chemistry, kinetic theory (Maxwell-Boltzmann
of chemical analysis and synthesis;
distribution, collision frequency, effusion, heat
u Develop ability to locate and use pertinent informa-
capacity, equipartition of energy), kinetics (microscopic
tion from the chemical literature;
reversibility, relaxation processes, mechanisms and rate
u Develop ability to interpret and use experimental data
laws, collision and absolute rate theories), quantum
for chemical systems;
mechanics (Schroedinger equations, operators and
u Develop ability to effectively communicate in both
matrix elements, particle-in-a-box, simple harmonic
written and oral formats;
oscillator, rigid rotor, angular momentum, hydrogen
u Prepare students for entry to and success in profes-
atom, hydrogen wave functions, spin, Pauli principle,
sional careers;
LCAO method), spectroscopy (dipole selection rules,
rotational spectra, term symbols, atomic and molecular
u Prepare students for entry to and success in graduate
programs; and
electronic spectra, magnetic spectroscopy, Raman
spectroscopy, multiphoton selection rules, lasers),
u Prepare students for responsible contribution to
statistical thermodynamics (ensembles, partition
society.
functions, Einstein crystals, Debye crystals), group
Curriculum
theory, surface chemistry, X-ray crystallography,
The B.S. chemistry curricula, in addition to the strong
electron diffraction, dielectric constants, dipole
basis provided by the common core, contain three compo-
moments.
nents: chemistry fundamentals, laboratory and communica-
tion skills, and applications courses.
Laboratory and communication skills
u Analytical methods - gravimetry, titrimetry, sample
Chemistry fundamentals
dissolution, fusion, quantitative spectrophotometry,
u Analytical chemistry - sampling, method selection,
GC, HPLC, GC/MS, potentiometry, AA, ICP-AES
statistical data analysis, error sources, interferences,
theory of operation of analytical instruments (atomic
u Synthesis techniques - batch reactor assembly, inert-
and molecular spectroscopy, mass spectrometry,
atmosphere manipulations, vacuum line methods, high-
magnetic resonance spectrometry, chromatography and
temperature methods, high-pressure methods, distilla-
other separation methods, electroanalytical methods,
tion, recrystallization, extraction, sublimation,
and thermal methods), calibration, standardization,
chromatographic purification, product identification
stoichiometry of analysis, equilibrium and kinetics
u Physical measurements - refractometry, viscometry,
principles in analysis.
colligative properties, FTIR, NMR,
38
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

u Information retrieval - Chemical Abstracts, CA on-line,
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
CA registry numbers, Beilstein, Gmelin, handbooks,
CHGN353 Physical Chemistry II
3
3
4
organic syntheses, organic reactions, inorganic
CHGN341 Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry
3
3
syntheses, primary sources, ACS Style Guide
CHGN323 Qualitative Organic Analysis
1
3
2
EBGN211 Principles of Economics
3
3
u Reporting - lab notebook, experiment and research
Area of Special Interest Elective (chm**)
3
3
reports, technical oral reports
CHGN302 Environmental Chemistry (env**)
3
3
u Communication - scientific reviews, seminar presenta-
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Elective I
3
3
tions
Total
18
Applications
**specialty restrictions
u Area of special interest courses-application of
Junior-Senior Year Summer Field Session
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
chemistry fundamentals in another discipline; e.g.
CHGN490 Synthesis & Characterization
18
6
chemical engineering, environmental science, materials
Total
6
science
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
CHGN495 Research
9
3
u Internship-summer or semester experience in an
CHGN401 Theoretical Inorganic Chem. (chm**) 3
3
industrial or governmental organization working on
Area of Special Interest Elective (chm**)
3
3
real-world problems
ESGN— Environmental Chemistry (env**)
6
6
u Undergraduate research-open-ended problem solving
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective II
3
3
in the context of a research problem
Free elective
3
3
Degree Requirements (Chemistry)
Total
15
The B.S. curricula in chemistry are outlined below. The
**specialty restrictions
restrictions specific to the environmental chemistry track are
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
labeled (env) while those specific to the other track are
CHGN495 Undergraduate Research
9
3
labeled (chm); those common to both tracks bear no label.
CHGN410 Surface Chemistry (env**)
3
3
In the environmental track the area of special interest must
Area of Special Interest Elective (chm**)
3
3
be in Environmental Science and Engineering (ESGN).
ESGN— Environmental Chemistry (env**)
3
3
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective III
3
3
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
Free elective (chm**)
3
3
MACS213 Calculus for Scientists & Engn’rs III
4
4
Free elective
3
3
PHGN200 Physics II
3.5 3
4.5
Total
15
DCGN209 Introduction to Thermodynamics
3
3
CHGN221 Organic Chemistry I
3
3
4
Degree Total
137.5
PAGN201 Physical Education III
2
0.5
Chemistry Minor and ASI Programs
Total
16
No specific course sequences are suggested for
Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
students wishing to include chemistry minors or areas of
CHGN222 Organic Chemistry II
3
3
4
special interest in their programs. Rather, those students
SYGN201/2 Engineering Systems
3
3
should consult with the CHGC department head (or
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
designated faculty member) to design appropriate se-
CHGN335 Instrumental Analysis
3
3
quences.
CHGN201 Thermodynamics Laboratory
3
1
EPIC152 Design II
2
3
3
PAGN202 Physical Education IV
2
0.5
Total
17.5
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
SYGN200 Human Systems
3
3
CHGN428 Biochemistry
3
3
CHGN336 Analytical Chemistry
3
3
CHGN337 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory
3
1
CHGN351 Physical Chemistry I
3
3
4
Area of Special Interest Elective (chm**)
3
3
ESGN - Environmental Elective (env**)
3
3
Total
17
**specialty restrictions
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
39

Economics and Business
state-of-the-art quantitative techniques to analyze economic
and business issues. The remaining twenty percent of the
RODERICK G. EGGERT, Professor and Division Director
course work can come from any field. Many students
CAROL DAHL, Professor and Director, CSM/IFP Joint Interna-
complete minor programs in a technical field, such as
tional Graduate Degree Program in Petroleum Economics and
computer science, engineering, geology, or environmental
Management
science. A number of students pursue double majors.
JOHN E. TILTON, Coulter Professor
R. E. D. WOOLSEY, Professor and Director, Operations Research
Economics students have a range of career options
Program
following their undergraduate studies. Some pursue
JOHN A. CORDES, Associate Professor and Director, Institute for
graduate degrees in economics, business, or law. Others
Global Resources Policy and Management
begin careers as managers, economic advisors, and financial
GRAHAM A. DAVIS, Associate Professor
officers in business or government, often in organizations
WADE E. MARTIN, Associate Professor and Director of Graduate
that deal with engineering, applied science, and advanced
Programs
technology.
MICHAEL R. WALLS, Associate Professor
Program Goals (Bachelor of Science in
JANIS M. CAREY, Assistant Professor
Economics)
SHEKHAR JAYANTHI, Assistant Professor
The goals of undergraduate programs in economics and
JAMES M. OTTO, Research Professor and Deputy Director,
Institute for Global Resources Policy and Management
business are:
JOHN STERMOLE, Instructor
To introduce all CSM undergraduate students to economic
DAVID E. FLETCHER, Professor Emeritus
and business principles so that they understand the
ALFRED PETRICK, Jr., Professor Emeritus
economic and business environments, both national and
ODED RUDAWSKY, Professor Emeritus
global, in which they will work and live;
FRANKLIN J. STERMOLE, Professor Emeritus
To provide those students majoring in economics with a
Program Description
strong foundation in economic theory and analytical
The economy is becoming increasingly global and
techniques, taking advantage of the strong mathematical
dependent on advanced technology. In such a world, private
and quantitative abilities of CSM undergraduate students;
companies and public organizations need leaders and
and
managers who understand economics and business, as well
To prepare students majoring in economics for the work
as science and technology.
force, especially in organizations in CSM’s areas of
Programs in the Division of Economics and Business are
traditional strength (engineering, applied science,
designed to bridge the gap that often exists between
mathematics and computer science); and for graduate
economists and managers, on the one hand, and engineers
school, especially in economics, business, and law.
and scientists, on the other. All undergraduate students are
Curriculum
introduced to economic principles in a required course, and
Students pursuing a B.S. degree in economics complete
many pursue additional course work in minor programs or
the 24 semester hours of core courses listed below:
elective courses.
EBGN 311 Principles of Microeconomics
The B.S. degree in economics educates technologically
EBGN 312 Principles of Macroeconomics
literate economists. Within the major, students can (but are
EBGN 402 Field Session
not required to) choose special concentrations in Business,
EBGN 411 Intermediate Microeconomics
Global Business, or Resource Economics. All majors take
EBGN 412 Intermediate Macroeconomics
some forty percent of their courses in math, science, and
EBGN 421 Engineering Economics
engineering, including the same core required of all CSM
EBGN 425 Operations Research/Operations Management
undergraduates. This strong technical background distin-
EBGN 490 Econometrics
guishes our economics graduates from those at most other
Students also take 12 semester hours of electives within
universities. Students take another forty percent of their
the Division. In addition, students can— but are not required
courses in economics, business, and the humanities and
to— choose from the following three options:
social sciences more generally. They learn about the
(1) Business Option.
economy as a whole (macroeconomics), including long-run
Students take the 24 hours of required courses listed
economic growth and short-run business fluctuations,
above and 12 hours from the following list:
international trade, and the role of government in a market
EBGN 305 Financial Accounting
economy. They study decision making by consumers,
EBGN 306 Managerial Accounting
businesses, and government in specific sectors of the
EBGN 314 Principles of Management
economy (microeconomics). Students learn how to use
EBGN 345 Principles of Finance
40
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

EBGN 426 Manufacturing Management
EPICS 151 Design I (3)
EBGN 445 International Business Finance
EPICS 251 Design II (3)
EBGN 455 Linear Programming
SYGN 101 Earth and Environmental Systems (4)
(2) Global Business Option.
MACS 111 Calculus for Scientists and Engineers I (4)
MACS 112 Calculus for Scientists and Engineers II (4)
Students take the 24 hours of required courses listed
MACS 213 Calculus for Scientists and Engineers III (4)
previously, as well as:
MACS 315 Differential Equations (3)
EBGN 305 Financial Accounting
MACS 323 Probability and Statistics (3)
EBGN 345 Principles of Finance
MACS — Elective in Mathematics/Computer Science (3)
EBGN 441 International Trade OR
MACS — Elective in Mathematics/Computer Science (3)
EBGN 442 Economic Development
PHGN 100 Physics I (4.5) PHGN 200 Physics II (4.5)
EBGN 445 International Business Finance
SYGN 201/2 Engineered Systems (3)
Students also take 12 semester hours of courses from the
Economics and Business Core (24 hours)
Division of Liberal Arts and International Studies (LAIS),
Listed above
of which 6 hours have a regional focus, chosen from:
Economics and Business Electives (12 hours)
LISS 340 Political Economy of Latin America
LISS 342 Political Economy of Asia
Chosen from approved EBGN courses
LISS 440 Latin American Development
Free Electives (27 hours) Chosen from any field
The remaining 6 semester hours from LAIS present
Degree Requirements (Economics)
global perspectives, chosen from:
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec. lab.sem. hrs.
LISS 330 Managing Cultural Differences
PHGN200 Physics II
3.5
3
4.5
LISS 431 Global Environmental Issues
SYGN200 Human Systems
3
3
LISS 432 Cultural Dynamics of Global Development
MACS213 Calc. for Scientists & Engn’rs III
4
4
LISS 435 Political Risk Assessment
EBGN311 Principles of Microeconomics*
3
3
Finally, students are responsible for demonstrating
Free Elective
3
3
competency in a foreign language equivalent to two
PAGN201 Physical Education III
2
0.5
semesters of study at the college level.
Total
18
(3) Resource Economics Option.
Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec.lab.sem. hrs.
Students take the 24 hours of required courses listed
EBGN312 Principles of Macroeconomics*
3
3
above and 9 hours chosen from the following courses
EPICS251 Design II
2
3
3
(leaving 3 hours of EB electives):
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
EBGN 410 Natural Resource Economics
Free Elective
3
3
EBGN 430 Energy Economics
SYGN201/2 Engineered Systems
3
3
EBGN 470 Environmental Economics
PAGN202 Physical Education IV
2
0.5
EBGN 442 Economic Development
Total
15.5
To put the degree program in a broader perspective, a
* Students who complete the EBGN311/312 sequence are not
B.S. degree in economics involves 138.5 semester hours of
required to take EBGN211. For students pursuing a major in
economics, EBGN211 is not a substitute for either EBGN311 or
courses including:
EBGN312.
General Requirements (2.5 semester hours)
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
CSM 101 Freshman Success Seminar (0.5)
EBGN411 Intermediate Microeconomics
3
3
PAGN 101 Physical Education I (0.5)
EBGN— Econ / Business Elective
3
3
PAGN 102 Physical Education II (0.5)
MACS323 Probability and Statistics
3
3
PAGN 201 Physical Education III (0.5)
MACS— Elective in MCS
3
3
PAGN 202 Physical Education IV (0.5)
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective I
3
3
Humanities and Social Sciences (19 semester hours)
Free Electives
3
3
LIHU 100 Nature and Human Values (4)
Total
18
SYGN 200 Human Systems (3)
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
EBGN 211 Principles of Economics (3)
EBGN421 Engineering Economics
3
3
LAIS/EBGN Cluster Electives in Humanities and Social Sciences
MACS— Elective in MCS
3
3
(9)
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Electives II, III
6
6
Engineering, Mathematics, and Science (54 semester
Free Electives
6
6
hours)
Total
18
CHGN 121 Principles of Chemistry I (4)
CHGN 124/6 Principles of Chemistry II/Quant lab (4)
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
41

Summer Field Session
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
Engineering
EBGN402 Field Session 1
6
3
Total
3
JOAN P. GOSINK, Professor and Division Director
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
THEODORE A. BICKART, Professor and President
EBGN412 Intermediate Macroeconomics
3
3
JIN S. CHUNG, Professor
EBGN425 Operations Res/Operations Mgmt 3
3
D. VAUGHAN GRIFFITHS, Professor
EBGN490 Econometrics
3
3
ROBERT J. KEE, George R. Brown Distinguished Professor of
Free Electives
9
9
Engineering
Total
18
ROBERT H. KING, Professor and Associate Division Director
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
MARK A. LINNE, Professor
EBGN— Econ / Business Electives
9
9
RAHMAT A. SHOURESHI, Gerard August Dobelman Distin-
Free Electives
6
6
guished Professor of Engineering
Total
15
JOHN R. BERGER, Associate Professor
Degree Total
138.5
MARK T. LUSK, Associate Professor
NIGEL T. MIDDLETON, Associate Professor and Associate Vice-
Minor Programs
President for Academic Affairs
A minor in economics and business involves 18 hours of
DAVID R. MUÑOZ, Associate Professor
courses and can be completed according to one of the
GRAHAM G. W. MUSTOE, Associate Professor
following two options:
KARL R. NELSON, Associate Professor
Option 1:
TERENCE E. PARKER, Associate Professor
EBGN 211 Principles of Economics
CATHERINE K. SKOKAN, Associate Professor
Either EBGN 311 (Principles of Microeconomics) or EBGN 312
CHRISTIAN DEBRUNNER, Assistant Professor
(Principles of Macroeconomics)
JEAN-PIERRE DELPLANQUE, Assistant Professor
12 hours of approved electives from the Division of Economics
WILLIAM A. HOFF, Assistant Professor
and Business, chosen from the list below.
NING LU, Assistant Professor
Option 2:
JOHN A. PALMER, Assistant Professor
EBGN 311 (Principles of Microeconomics) and EBGN 312
LAXMINARAYAN L. RAJA, Assistant Professor
(Principles of Macroeconomics)
DOUGLAS E. SMITH, Assistant Professor
12 hours of approved electives from the Division of Economics
JOHN P. H. STEELE, Assistant Professor
and Business, chosen from the list below.
TYRONE VINCENT, Assistant Professor
Economics
RAY RUICHONG ZHANG, Assistant Professor
EBGN 409 Mathematical Economics
SANAA ABDEL-AZIM, Lecturer
EBGN 410 Natural Resource Economics
CANDACE S. AMMERMAN, Lecturer
EBGN 411 Intermediate Microeconomics
RON KNOSHAUG, Lecturer
EBGN 412 Intermediate Macroeconomics
THOMAS GROVER, Research Professor
EBGN 430 Energy Economics
HAROLD W. OLSEN, Research Professor
EBGN 441 International Economics
MASAMI NAKAGAWA, Research Professor
EBGN 442 Economic Development
MICHAEL B. McGRATH, Emeritus Professor
EBGN 470 Environmental Economics
GABRIEL M. NEUNZERT, Emeritus Associate Professor
EBGN 490 Econometrics
Note: Faculty for the environmental engineering specialty are
Business
listed in the Environmental Science and Engineering section of this
Bulletin.
EBGN 305 Financial Accounting
EBGN 306 Managerial Accounting
Program Description
EBGN 314 Principles of Management
The Division of Engineering offers a design-oriented,
EBGN 345 Principles of Finance
interdisciplinary, accredited non-traditional undergraduate
EBGN 421 Engineering Economics
program in engineering with specialization in a branch of
EBGN 425 Operations Research/Operations Management
civil, electrical, environmental or mechanical engineering.
EBGN 426 Manufacturing Management
The program emphasizes fundamental engineering prin-
EBGN 445 International Business Finance
ciples to provide a viable basis for lifelong learning.
EBGN 455 Linear Programming
Graduates are in a position to take advantage of a broad
Students are encouraged to use their electives to develop
variety of professional opportunities, and are well-prepared
depth in an area of interest; please see the undergraduate
for an engineering career in a world of rapid technological
advisor in the Division of Economics and Business.
change.
42
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Program Goals (Bachelor of Science in
The projects are generated by customer demand, and include
experiential verification to ensure a realistic design
Engineering)
experience. Throughout their academic careers, students
u Graduates will understand the design and analysis of
will benefit from interaction with well-qualified faculty who
engineering systems and the interdisciplinary nature of
maintain research and professional leadership.
engineering.
u Graduates will have an appreciation for engineering
Prospective students should note that this is an inte-
practice as it relates to the earth, energy, materials and
grated, broad-based and interdisciplinary engineering
environment.
program. Specifically, the curriculum incorporates topics
u Graduates will have the engineering expertise and
related to the minerals, energy and materials industries such
lifelong learning skills to meet the present and future
as “Earth and Environmental Systems”, “Earth Systems
needs of society.
Engineering”, and “Materials Engineering Systems”, while
excluding some of the subjects that might be taught in more
u Graduates will be able to incorporate non-technical
traditional majors in civil, electrical, environmental or
constraints and opportunities (i.e. aesthetic, social,
mechanical engineering. We emphasize the analysis and
ethical, etc.) in their engineering practice.
design of engineering systems with interdisciplinary
u Graduates will be well-prepared to assume entry level
application for industrial projects, structures and processes.
positions in industry or to enter appropriate graduate
For example, our unique Multidisciplinary Engineering
programs.
Laboratory sequence promotes life-long learning skills using
Curriculum
state-of-the-art instrumentation funded through grants from
During their first two years at CSM, students complete a
the Department of Education/ Fund for the Improvement of
set of core courses that include basic sciences, to provide
Post-Secondary Education, the National Science Founda-
knowledge about nature and its phenomena, and engineering
tion, the Parsons Foundation, Chevron, Kennecott Mining,
sciences, to extend the basic sciences through creative use of
and Fluor Daniel.
laws of nature. Course work in mathematics is an essential
The Civil Engineering Specialty builds on the applied
part of the curriculum, giving engineering students essential
mechanics principles of the core curriculum to focus in
tools for modeling, analyzing and predicting physical
geotechnics and structures. Students are required to take
phenomena. A total of forty-six credit hours address the
courses in soil mechanics, foundations, structural theory,
important areas of mathematics and the basic sciences. The
structural design and surveying. In addition, students must
core also includes liberal arts and international studies
choose two electives from a list of civil oriented courses
which enrich the educational experience and instill a greater
which includes opportunities for individual study projects.
understanding of how engineering decisions impact human
and social affairs.
The Electrical Engineering Specialty has focused depth
in the areas of electromechanical energy conversion, power
Engineering design course work begins in the freshmen
distribution, signal and system analysis, and instrumenta-
year in Design I, and continues through the four-year
tion. The program includes microprocessor-based systems
curriculum. This experience teaches design methodology
design, electronic devices and systems, communications,
and stresses the creative and synthesis aspects of the
signal processing, and control systems.
engineering profession. Three systems-oriented core
courses demonstrate the linkages among earth and environ-
The Environmental Engineering Specialty introduces
mental systems, human systems, and engineered systems.
students to the fundamentals of environmental engineering
including the scientific and regulatory basis of public health
Students complete an advanced core that includes
and environmental protection. Topics covered include
electronics and circuit theory, engineering mechanics,
environmental science and regulatory processes, water and
advanced mathematics, thermodynamics, economics,
wastewater engineering, solid and hazardous waste
engineering design, and additional studies in liberal arts and
management, and contaminated site remediation.
international topics. In their last two years of study,
students must choose a specialty, consisting of at least 18
The Mechanical Engineering Specialty complements
credit hours in civil, electrical, environmental or mechanical
the core curriculum with courses that provide depth in
engineering, plus at least 9 credit hours of free electives.
applied mechanics and thermosciences with an emphasis on
These electives, at the student’s discretion, can be used to
analytical methods and engineering design of machinery.
obtain an “area of special interest” of at least 12 semester
Topics such as heat transfer, advanced thermodynamics and
hours or a minor of at least 18 semester hours in another
advanced stress analysis are an important part of the
department or division.
mechanical engineering program, which also includes
control theory, and vibrations.
All students must complete a capstone design course,
stressing the interdisciplinary nature of engineering systems.
Students in each of the four specialties will spend
considerable time in laboratories. The division is well
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
43

equipped with basic laboratory equipment, as well as PC-
EGGN461 Soil Mechanics
3
3
based instrumentation systems, and the program makes
EGGN463 Soil Mechanics Lab
3
1
extensive use of computer-based analysis techniques.
EGGN— Civil Specialty Elective
3
3
Total
16
The Division of Engineering is housed in George R.
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec.lab.
sem. hrs.
Brown Hall. Emphasis on hands-on education is reflected
LAIS/EBGN H&SS cluster elective II
3
3
in the division’s extensive teaching and research laborato-
EGGN350 Multi-disc. Eng. Lab. II
4.5
1.5
ries. Interdisciplinary laboratories include the IBM
EGGN491 Senior Design I
3 3
4
Automated Systems Laboratory, the Multidisciplinary
Free elective
3
3
Engineering Laboratories, the USGS Soil Mechanics
EGGN413 Computer Aided Engineering
3
3
Laboratory, and environmental engineering laboratories in
EGGN464 Foundations
3
3
Coolbaugh Hall.
Total
17.5
All students are encouraged to take the Fundamental of
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec.lab.
sem. hrs.
Engineering examination before graduation.
Free electives
6
6
Degree Requirements in Engineering
LAIS/EBGN H&SS cluster elective III
3
3
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec.lab.
sem. hrs.
EGGN492 Senior Design II
1
6
3
DCGN241 Statics
3
3
EGGN— Civil Specialty Elective
3
3
MACS213 Calculus for Scientists & Engn’rs III
4
4
Total
15
PHGN200 Physics II
3
3
4.5
Degree Total
138.5
EBGN211 Principles of Economics
3
3
Electrical Specialty
MACS260/261* Programming
2/3
2/3
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec.lab.
sem. hrs.
PAGN201 Physical Education III
2
0.5
SYGN202 Engineered Materials Systems
3
3
Total
17/18
MACS348 Engineering Mathematics
3
3
*CE and Env. Specialty students take Fortran Programming,
PHGN300 Modern Physics
3
3
MACS260 ME and EE Specialty students take Computer
EGGN382 Linear Circuits
1
3
2
Programming Concepts (C++), MACS261
EGGN388 Information Systems Science
3
3
Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec.lab.
sem. hrs.
EGGN481 Adv. Electronics and Digital Systems 3
3
4
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
Total
18
PAGN202 Physical Education IV
2
0.5
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec.lab.
sem. hrs.
SYGN200 Human Systems
3
3
LAIS/EBGN H&SS cluster elective I
3
3
EGGN320 Mechanics of Materials
3
3
EGGN351 Fluid Mechanics
3
3
DCGN381 Elect. Circuits, Elect. & Pwr.
3
3
EGGN350 Multi-disc. Eng. Lab. II
4.5
1.5
EGGN250 Multi-disc. Eng. Lab. I
4.5
1.5
EGGN371 Engineering Thermodynamics
3
3
EPIC251 Design II
3
1
3
EGGN385 Electronic Devices and Circuits
3
3
4
MACS321 Data Analysis for Engineers
2
2
EGGN389 Fund. of Electric Machinery
3
3
4
Total
19
Total
18.5
Sophomore-Junior Year
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec.lab.
sem. hrs.
Summer Field Session
lec.lab.
sem. hrs.
LAIS/EBGN H&SS cluster elective II
3
3
EGGN 233 Field session
3
EGGN315 Dynamics
3
3
Total
3
EGGN450 Multi-disc. Eng. Lab. III
4.5
1.5
Civil Specialty
EGGN491 Senior Design I
3
3
4
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec.lab.
sem. hrs.
Free elective
3
3
SYGN201 Engineered Earth Systems
3
3
EGGN407 Feedback Control Systems
3
3
MACS348 Engineering Mathematics
3
3
Total
17.5
EGGN315 Dynamics
3
3
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec.lab.
sem. hrs.
EGGN351 Fluid Mechanics
3
3
Free electives
6
6
EGGN333 Surveying
3
3
LAIS/EBGN H&SS cluster elective III
3
3
EGGN342 Structural Theory
3
3
EGGN492 Senior Design II
1
6
3
Total
18
EGGN— Electrical Specialty Elective*
3
3
4
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
Total
16
LAIS/EBGN H&SS cluster elective I
3
3
Degree Total
143
EGGN371 Engineering Thermodynamics
3
3
*can be taken either fall or spring semester
EGGN444/445 Design of
Steel or Concrete Structures
3
3
44
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Environmental Specialty
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec.lab.
sem. hrs.
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec.lab.
sem. hrs.
Free elective
3
3
SYGN201/2 Engineered Earth Systems
3
3
LAIS/EBGN H&SS cluster elective III
3
3
MACS348 Engineering Mathematics
3
3
EGGN492 Senior Design II
1
6
3
EGGN351 Fluid Mechanics
3
3
EGGN— Mechanical Specialty Elective
6
6
EGGN371 Engineering Thermodynamics
3
3
Total
15
EGGN315 Dynamics
3
3
Degree Total
141
EGGN353 Environmental Sci. & Eng. I
3
3
Engineering Specialty Electives
Total
18
Civil Specialty
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec.lab.
sem. hrs.
All Civil Specialty students will take two from the
LAIS/EBGN H&SS cluster elective I
3
3
following list of civil technical elective courses. At least
EGGN350 Multi-disc. Eng. Lab. II
4.5
1.5
one of these must be a course annotated with an asterisk (*):
EGGN413/407 CAE / Feedback Control Systems 3
3
*EGGN444/5 Steel Design or Concrete (one these two courses is
EGGN354 Environmental Sci. & Eng. II
3
3
required see Junior Spring Semester)
Free elective
3
3
*EGGN451 Hydraulic Problems
EGGN— Environmental Specialty Elective
3
3
*EGGN488 Reliability of Engineering Systems
Total
16.5
*EBGN421 Engineering Economics
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec.lab.
sem. hrs.
EGGN388 Information Systems Science
LAIS/EBGN H&SS cluster elective II
3
3
EGGN422 Advanced Mechanics of Materials
EGGN450 Multi-disc. Eng. Lab. III
4.5
1.5
EGGN430 Global Positioning
EGGN491 Senior Design I
3
3
4
EGGN473 Fluid Mechanics II
Free elective
3
3
EGGN478 Engineering Dynamics
EGGN— Environmental Specialty Electives
6
6
EGGN442 Finite Element Methods for Engineers
Total
17.5
EGGN498 Special Topics in Engineering (Civil)
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec.lab.
sem. hrs.
EGES534 Soil Behavior
Free elective
3
3
EGES548 Advanced Soil Mechanics
LAIS/EBGN H&SS cluster elective III
3
3
MNGN321 Introduction to Rock Mechanics
EGGN492 Senior Design II
1
6
3
MNGN404 Tunneling
EGGN— Environmental Specialty Electives
9
9
GEGN309 Structural Geology
Total
18
GEGN467 Groundwater Engineering
Degree Total
142
GEGN468 Engineering Geology and Geotechnics
Mechanical Specialty
ESGN303 Fundamentals of Water and Wastewater Treatment
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec.lab.
sem. hrs.
ESGN440 Environmental Quality Modeling
SYGN202 Engineered Materials Systems
3
3
GPGN473 Fundamentals of Engineering Geophysics
MACS348 Engineering Mathematics
3
3
Electrical Specialty
LAIS/EBGN H&SS cluster elective I
3
3
Electrical specialty students are required to take one
EGGN315 Dynamics
3
3
from the following list of electrical technical elective
EGGN371 Engineering Thermodynamics
3
3
courses:
EGGN388 Information Systems Science
3
3
Total
18
EGGN482 Microcomputer Architecture and Interfacing
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec.lab.
sem. hrs.
EGGN483 Introduction to Communication and Signal Processing
LAIS/EBGN H&SS cluster elective II
3
3
EGGN484 Power Systems Analysis
Free elective
3
3
EGGN485 Power Electronics
EGGN351 Fluid Mechanics
3
3
Environmental Specialty
EGGN350 Multi-disc. Eng. Lab. II
4.5
1.5
In addition to EGGN353 and 354, environmental
EGGN407 Feedback Control Systems
3
3
specialty students are required to take a total of six elective
EGGN— Mechanical Specialty Elective
3
3
courses consisting of any four of the first five courses listed
Total
16.5
below, plus an additional two courses from any of those
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec.lab.
sem. hrs.
listed below.
EGGN450 Multi-disc. Eng. Lab. III
4.5
1.5
EGGN453 Wastewater Engineering
EGGN491 Senior Design I
3
3
4
EGGN454 Water Supply Engineering
Free elective
3
3
EGGN455 Solid and Hazardous Waste Engineering
EGGN413 Computer-Aided Engineering
3
3
EGGN456 Scientific Basis of Environmental Regulations
EGGN471 Heat Transfer
3
3
EGGN457 Site Remediation Engineering
EGGN411 Machine Design
3
3
4
EGGN451 Hydraulic Problems
Total
18.5
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
45

EGGN473 Fluid Mechanics II
Engineering examination. The second is a program in
GEGN467 Groundwater Engineering
Engineering Specialties which is suited to students pursuing
ESGN399 Independent Study
an engineering degree, and who have therefore completed
Mechanical Specialty
much of the coursework represented in the General
Mechanical specialty students are required to take three
Engineering program. Students may opt to pursue minors or
from the following list of mechanical elective courses:
ASIs in civil, electrical, environmental or mechanical
engineering within the Engineering Specialties program.
EGGN400 Intro. to Robotics for the Minerals and Construction
Industries
Students wishing to enroll in either program must satisfy
EGGN403 Thermodynamics II
all prerequisite requirements for each course in a chosen
EGGN408 Intro. to Offshore Technology
sequence. Students in the sciences or mathematics will
EGGN422 Advanced Mechanics of Materials
therefore be better positioned to prerequisite requirements in
EGGN442 Finite Element Methods for Engineers
the General Engineering program, while students in
EGGN473 Fluid Mechanics II
engineering disciplines will be better positioned to meet the
EGGN478 Engineering Dynamics
prerequisite requirements for courses in the Engineering
CR/EBGN421 Engineering Economics
Specialties.
PHGN350 Intermediate Mechanics
The courses listed below, constituting each program and
MTGN/EGGN390 Materials and Manufacturing Processes
the specialty variations, are offered as guidelines for
MTGN445 Mechanical Properties of Materials
selecting a logical sequence. In cases where students have
MTGN450 Statistical Control of Materials Processes
unique backgrounds or interests, these sequences may be
MTGN464 Forging and Forming
adapted accordingly through consultation with faculty in the
MNGN321 Intro. to Rock Mechanics
Engineering Division.
EBGN421 Engineering Economics
General Engineering Program
Division of Engineering Areas of Special Interest
A twelve (ASI) or eighteen hour (minor) sequence must
and Minor Programs
be selected from:
General Requirements
DCGN241 Statics
3 sem hrs.
A Minor Program of study must consist of a minimum
EGGN320 Mechanics of Materials
3 sem hrs.
of 18 credit hours of a logical sequence of courses, only
EGGN351 Fluid Mechanics
3 sem hrs.
three hours of which may be taken at the 100- or 200- level.
EGGN371 Thermodynamics
3 sem hrs.
No more than six credit hours of the sequence may be taken
DCGN381 Electrical Circuits, Electronics and Power
3 sem hrs.
in the student’s degree granting department.
EGGN315 Dynamics
3 sem hrs.
An Area of Special Interest (ASI) must consist of a
EBGN421 Engineering Economics
3 sem hrs.
minimum of 12 credit hours of a logical sequence of
Note: Multidisciplinary Engineering Laboratories I, II
courses, only three hours of which may be taken at the 100-
and III (EGGN 250, 350 and 450, respectively) may be
or 200-level. No more than three credit hours of the
taken as laboratory supplements to DCGN 381, EGGN351
sequence may be specifically required by the degree
and EGGN320.
program in which the student is graduating.
Engineering Specialties Program
A Minor Program / Area of Special Interest declara-
Civil
tion (available in the Registrar’s Office) should be submitted
A twelve (ASI) or eighteen hour (minor) sequence must
for approval prior to the student’s completion of half of the
be selected from:
hours proposed to constitute the program. Approvals are
required from the Director of the Engineering Division, the
EGGN331 Photogrammetry
3 sem hrs.
student’s advisor, and the Department Head or Division
EGGN342 Structural Theory
3 sem hrs.
Director in the department or division in which the student
EGGN408 Intro. to Offshore Technology
3 sem hrs.
is enrolled.
EGGN430 Global Positioning Systems
3 sem hrs.
EGGN444 Design of Steel Structures
3 sem hrs.
Programs in the Engineering Division
EGGN445 Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures
3 sem hrs.
The Engineering Division offers minor and ASI
EGGN451 Hydraulic Problems
3 sem hrs.
programs to meet two sets of audiences. The first is a
EGGN461 Soil Mechanics
3 sem hrs.
program in General Engineering which is suited to students
EGGN463 Soil Mechanics Laboratory
1 sem hr.
who are not pursuing an engineering degree. This program
EGGN464 Foundations
3 sem hrs.
offers foundation coursework in engineering which is
EGGN466 Construction Site Engineering
3 sem hrs.
compatible with many of the topics in the Fundamentals of
46
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Electrical
Five-Year Combined Engineering Physics
A twelve (ASI) or eighteen hour (minor) sequence must
Baccalaureate and Engineering Masters Degree
be selected from a basic electrical program comprising:
The Division of Engineering in collaboration with the
Department of Physics offers five year programs in which
DCGN381 Electrical Circuits, Electronics and Power
3 sem hrs.
students have the opportunity to obtain specific engineering
EGGN250 Multidisciplinary Engineering Lab I
1.5 sem hrs.
skills to compliment their physics background. Physics
EGGN382 Linear Circuit Analysis
2 sem hrs.
students in this program fill in their technical and free
EGGN388 Information Systems Science
3 sem hrs.
electives over their standard four year Engineering Physics
EGGN385 Electronic Devices and Circuits
4 sem hrs.
BS program with a reduced set of engineering classes. These
and may be augmented with courses in a specific area:
classes come in one of two tracks: Electrical engineering,
Controls, Signal-Processing and Communication
and Mechanical engineering. At the end of the fourth year,
EGGN407 Feedback Control Systems
3 sem hrs.
the student is awarded an Engineering Physics BS. Students
EGGN487 Engineering Control Laboratory
3 sem hrs.
in this program are automatically entered into the Engineer-
EGGN483 Intro. to Comm. & Signal Processing
4 sem hrs.
ing Systems Masters degree program. Just as any graduate
Power
student, it is possible for them to graduate in one year (non-
EGGN389 Fundamentals of Electric Machinery
4 sem hrs.
thesis option) with a Masters of Engineering in Engineering
EGGN484 Power System Analysis
3 sem hrs.
Systems degree.
EGGN485 Power Electronics
3 sem hrs.
Students must apply to enter this program in their mid-
Digital Systems
Sophomore or beginning Junior year. To complete the
EGGN481 Advanced Electronics and Digital Systems
4 sem hrs.
undergraduate portion of the program, students must take
EGGN482 Microcomputer Architec. And Interfacing
4 sem hrs.
the classes indicated by the “typical” class sequence for the
and electrical engineering electives which are offered
appropriate track, maintain a B average, find an appropriate
from time to time and are announced through the Division
Senior Design project that can lead into a Masters report or
of Engineering and the Schedule of Courses.
a Masters thesis by the start of the Senior year, and find a
Environmental
Division of Engineering advisor by the start of the Senior
A twelve credit ASI or eighteen credit minor sequence
year and make sure that he/she agrees with the subject and
must be selected from:
scope of the Senior Design project. At the beginning of the
Senior year, a pro forma graduate school application is
EGGN353 Fund. of Environ. Science & Engineering I
3 sem hrs.
submitted and as long as the undergraduate portion of the
EGGN354 Fund. of Environ. Science & Engineering II 3 sem hrs.
program is successfully completed, the student is admitted
EGGN453 Wastewater Engineering
3 sem hrs.
to the Engineering Systems graduate program.
EGGN454 Water Supply Engineering
3 sem hrs.
EGGN455 Solid and Hazardous Waste Engineering
3 sem hrs.
Interested students can obtain additional information and
EGGN456 Scientific Basis of Environ. Regulations
3 sem hrs.
detailed curricula from the Division of Engineering or the
EGGN457 Site Remediation Engineering
3 sem hrs.
Physics Department.
Mechanical
A twelve (ASI) or eighteen hour (minor) sequence must
be selected from:
Thermal / Fluid Systems
EGGN351 Fluid Mechanics
3 sem hrs.
EGGN403 Thermodynamics II
3 sem hrs.
EGGN408 Intro. to Offshore Technology
3 sem hrs.
EGGN451 Hydraulic Problems
3 sem hrs.
EGGN471 Heat Transfer
3 sem hrs.
EGGN473 Fluid Mechanics II
3 sem hrs.
Design
EGGN411 Machine Design
3 sem hrs.
EGGN413 Computer-Aided Engineering
3 sem hrs.
EGGN400 Introduction to Robotics
3 sem hrs.
EGGN407 Feedback Control Systems
3 sem hrs.
EGGN422 Advanced Mechanics of Materials
3 sem hrs.
For a minor in Design, 3 additional semester hours are to
be selected from the Thermal / Fluid Systems area.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
47

Environmental Science
GEGN467 Groundwater Engineering
GEGN470 Ground-Water Engineering Design
and Engineering
GEOC407 Atmosphere, Weather and Climate
GEOC408 Introduction to Oceanography
PHILIPPE ROSS, Professor and Division Director
GPGN392 Physics of the Earth
TISSA ILLANGASEKARE, Professor and
GPGN466 Geophysics and Geothermal Energy
AMAX Distinguished Chair
MTGN429 Metallurgical Environment
RONALD R.H. COHEN, Associate Professor
PHGN303 Physics of the Environment
JOHN C. EMERICK, Associate Professor
PHGN404 Physics of the Environment
LINDA A. FIGUEROA, Associate Professor
Students should review the restrictions currently placed
BRUCE D. HONEYMAN, Associate Professor
on all Minor and ASI programs at CSM by consulting the
KENNETH E. KOLM, Associate Professor
Description of Undergraduate Programs; Minor Programs/
ROBERT SEIGRIST, Associate Professor
Area of Special Interest section of this bulletin. Note
DIANNE AHMANN, Assistant Professor
particularly the limitations on the number of hours, which
NEVIS E. COOK, JR., Assistant Professor
may be taken at the 100 or 200 level or in the students
JUNKO MUNAKATA MARR, Assistant Professor
degree-granting department when planning a Minor
ROBERT F. HOLUB, Research Professor
Program. In addition to ESGN courses and courses listed
MATTHIAS KOHLER, Research Associate Professor
above one course from the list below may be applied to the
HELEN E. DAWSON, Research Assistant Professor
ESE Minor program (the list below is not applicable to the
Program Description
ESE ASI Program):
The Environmental Science and Engineering (ESE)
EBGN470 Environmental Economics
Division offers specialty and minor programs in Environ-
LISS364 Engineering, Science and Technology
mental Science and Engineering. ESE provides an under-
LISS431 Global Environmental Issues
graduate curriculum leading to a Minor (18 hours) or an
LISS460 Technology and Wilderness
Area of Special Interest (ASI) (12 hours).
LISS480 Environmental Politics and Policy
LISS482 Water Politics and Policy
Environmental Engineering Specialty in the
Undergraduates considering the ESE Minor or ASI
Engineering Division
Programs should note that hours applied to these ESE
See entries in this Bulletin under Engineering and the
Programs may also satisfy general science, engineering,
degree program leading to the BS in Engineering with a
humanities or Senior Seminar requirements specific to your
Specialty in Environmental Engineering. This Specialty is
degree-granting department. Undergraduates who choose to
supported by the Environmental Science and Engineering
pursue an ESE Minor or ASI should complete a Minor
Division.
Declaration form (available from the Registrar’s office).
Environmental Science and Engineering Minor
The Minor Declaration Form serves as a Curriculum Plan
and ASI
for the ESE Minor and ASI Programs (this plan can be
Any course offered by the ESE Division (all ESGN
changed at any time with the approval of the students
numbered courses) may be applied to the ESE Minor or
degree-granting department and the ESE Division). Further
ASI. In addition, courses offered by other academic
details concerning the ESE Minor and ASI Programs can be
departments may be applied, with approval, to the ESE
obtained from the ESE Division.
Minor or ASI. Examples of such courses are listed below:
CHGN302 Introduction to Environmental Chemistry
CHGN480 Sampling and Analysis in Environmental Chemistry
48
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

year) and ending with the capstone design courses in the
Geology and Geological
senior year. The program is accredited by the Accreditation
Board for Engineering and Technology, and students have
Engineering
the background to take the Fundamentals of Engineering
ROGER M. SLATT, Professor and Department Head
Exam, the first step in becoming a registered Professional
WENDY J. HARRISON, Professor
Engineer.
MURRAY W. HITZMAN, Professor, Charles Franklin Fogarty
Graduates follow five general career paths:
Professor of Economic Geology
Engineering Geology and Geotechnics. Careers in site
NEIL F. HURLEY, Professor, Charles Boettcher Distinguished
Chair in Petroleum Geology
investigation, design and stabilization of foundations or
KEENAN LEE, Professor
slopes; site characterization, design, construction and
EILEEN POETER, Professor
remediation of waste disposal sites or contaminated sites;
SAMUEL B. ROMBERGER, Professor
and assessment of geologic hazards for civil, mining or
A. KEITH TURNER, Professor
environmental engineering projects.
JOHN E. WARME, Professor
Ground-Water Engineering. Careers in assessment and
RICHARD F. WENDLANDT, Professor
remediation of ground-water contamination, design of
L. GRAHAM CLOSS, Associate Professor
ground-water control facilities for geotechnical projects and
TIMOTHY A. CROSS, Associate Professor
exploration for and development of ground-water supplies.
JOHN B. CURTIS, Associate Professor
Petroleum Exploration and Development Engineer-
JERRY D. HIGGINS, Associate Professor
ing. Careers in search for and development of oil, gas and
GREGORY S. HOLDEN, Associate Professor
coal and their efficient extraction.
JOHN D. HUMPHREY, Associate Professor
ERIC P. NELSON, Associate Professor
Mineral Exploration and Development Engineering.
JOHN E. McCRAY, Assistant Professor
Careers in search for and development of natural deposits of
RICHARD H. DEVOTO, Professor Emeritus
metals, industrial materials and rock aggregate.
JOSEPH J. FINNEY, Professor Emeritus
Geological Science. Students are also well prepared to
THOMAS L.T. GROSE, Professor Emeritus
pursue careers in basic geoscience. Graduates have become
JOHN D. HAUN, Professor Emeritus
experts in fields as divergent as global climate change, the
RICHARD W. HUTCHINSON, Professor Emeritus
early history of the Earth, planetary science, fractal
KARL R. NEWMAN, Professor Emeritus
representation of ground-water flow and simulation of
ROBERT J. WEIMER, Professor Emeritus
sedimentary rock sequences, to name a few. Careers are
available in research and education.
Program Description
A Bachelor of Science degree in Geological Engineering
The curriculum may be followed along two concentra-
is the basis for careers concentrating on the interaction of
tion paths with slightly different upper division require-
humans and the earth. Geological Engineers deal with a
ments. Both concentrations are identical in the first two
wide variety of the resource and environmental problems
years as students study basic science, mathematics,
that come with accommodating more and more people on a
engineering science, and geological science. In the junior
finite planet. Geologic hazards and conditions must be
year those students pursuing careers in ground-water
recognized and considered in the location and design of
engineering, engineering geology and geotechnics, or
foundations for buildings, roads and other structures; waste
geoenvironmental engineering applications follow the
disposal facilities must be properly located, designed and
Environmental, Engineering Geology and Geotechnics, and
constructed; contaminated sites and ground water must be
Ground-Water Engineering Concentration. Students
accurately characterized before cleanup can be accom-
anticipating careers in resource exploration and develop-
plished; water supplies must be located, developed and
ment or who expect to pursue graduate studies in geological
protected; and new mineral and energy resources must be
sciences follow the Mineral and Fuels Exploration Engi-
located and developed in an environmentally sound manner.
neering Concentration.
Geological Engineers are the professionals trained to meet
At all levels the Geological Engineering Program
these challenges.
emphasizes laboratory and field experience. All courses
The Geological Engineering curriculum provides a
have a laboratory session, and after the junior year students
strong foundation in the basic sciences, mathematics,
participate in a field course, which is six weeks of geologic
geological science and basic engineering along with
and engineering mapping and direct observation. The course
specialized upper level instruction in integrated applications
involves considerable time outdoors in the mountains and
to real problems. Engineering design is integrated through-
canyons of Utah and southwestern Colorado.
out the four year program, beginning in Design I (Freshman
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
49

At the senior level, students begin to focus on a career
a technical capacity and communicating with others in an
path by taking course sequences in at least two areas of
international geoscience and geoengineering arena.
geological engineering specialization. The course se-
Graduates should practice ethical behavior and
quences begin with a 4 unit course in the fundamentals of a
integrity, and they should function such that their society
field of geological engineering which is followed by a 3 unit
benefits from their work in the geosciences and
design-oriented course that emphasizes experience in direct
geoengineering disciplines.
application of principles through design projects.
Program Requirements
Students interested in careers in Geological Engineer-
In order to achieve the program goals listed above, every
ing are encouraged to enroll in a one unit Spring course
student working towards the Bachelor of Science Degree in
(GEOL 102) entitled “Careers in Geological Engineering”.
Geological Engineering must complete the following
The course, a series of presentations by faculty and outside
requirements:
professionals on all aspects of these careers, is designed to
provide students with the background necessary to make
1. CSM Freshman Common Core - 33 sem hrs.
informed career decisions. All students are invited to
2. Mathematics, Physics and Computer Science (beyond
participate.
Freshman year) - 16.5 sem hrs.
Program Goals (Bachelor of Science in
3. Earth Systems Engr & Design II (GE Option) - 6 sem hrs.
Geological Engineering)
4. Basic Geoscience - 19 to 23 sem hrs.
In addition to achieving the goals described in the CSM
5. Basic Engineering Sciences - 12 sem hrs.
Graduate Profile and the ABET Accreditation Criteria, the
6. Geological Engineering Field Methods - 8 sem hrs.
Geological Engineering Program at CSM has established the
7. Geological Engineering and related engineering topics -
following goals:
24 to 28 sem hrs.
Graduates of the Department should have depth and
8. Humanities & Social Sciences (beyond Freshman yr) - 15
breadth in one or more of the following fields: ground-water
sem hrs.
engineering, engineering geology and geotechnics, environ-
9. Free Electives - 9 sem hrs.
mental geology, and natural resource exploration and
Degree Requirements (Geological Engineering)
development. They should have the knowledge and
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
experience to recognize problems and design solutions
SYGN201 Engineered Earth Systems
2
3
3
through application of scientific and engineering principles
MACS213 Calc. for Scientists & Engn’rs III
4
4
and methods.
PHGN200 Physics II
3.5 3
4.5
DCGN241 Statics
3
3
Graduates must have the communication skills which
SYGN200 Human Systems
3
3
permit them to convey technical information, geoscience
PAGN201 Physical Education III
2
0.5
and geoengineering concepts, and results of technical
Total
18
studies to peers and the lay public. Communication skills
Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
include oral, written and graphic presentations, computer-
EPICS251 Design II
2
3
3
based retrieval, manipulation and analysis of technical
GEOL212 Mineralogy
2
3
3
information, and general computer literacy.
GEOL201 Hist. Geology and Paleontology
3
3
4
Graduates should appreciate and respect the characteris-
MACS312 Differential Equations
2
2
tics and worth of leadership and teamwork, and should
MACS261 Computer Programming Concepts
3
3
possess the attitude that teamwork and cooperation are
EGGN320 Mechanics of Materials
3
3
equally important values as leadership.
PAGN202 Physical Education IV
2
0.5
Graduates should have the skills and desire, as well as
Total
18.5
technical breadth and depth, to continue their personal and
Following the sophomore year, Geological Engineering students
professional growth through life-long learning. Graduates
choose from one of two concentrations: 1. Minerals and Fuels
should have the understanding that personal and profes-
Exploration Engineering 2. Environmental, Engineering Geology
and Geotechnics, and Ground-water Engineering
sional flexibility, creativity, resourcefulness, receptivity and
openness are crucial attributes to continued growth and
Minerals and Fuels Exploration Engineering Concentra-
success in increasingly diverse, multi-disciplinary technical
tion
environments.
Recommended for students intending careers in explora-
tion and development of mineral and fuels resources, or in-
Graduates should appreciate and respect diversity of
tending careers in geoscience research and education.
culture, language, religion, social-political-economic
systems, approaches toward thinking and analysis, and
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
personal preference. They should feel capable of working in
GEOL221 Optical Mineralogy
2
4
3
GEOL309 Structural Geology
3
3
4
50
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

DCGN209 Introduction to Thermodynamics
3
3
mental engineering careers.
EBGN211 Principles of Economics
3
3
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
Tech Elective I *
3
3
GEGN342 Geomorphology
2
3
3
Total
16
GEOL309 Structural Geology
3
3
4
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
DCGN209 Introduction to Thermodynamics *
3
3
GEOL307 Igneous & Metamorphic Petrology
3
6
5
EBGN211 Principles of Economics
3
3
GEGN317 Geologic Field Methods
6
2
EGGN461 Soil Mechanics
3
3
GEOL314 Stratigraphy
3
3
4
EGGN463 Soil Mechanics Lab
3
1
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective I
3
3
Total
17
Tech Elective II *
3
3
*Students in this concentration may substitute EGGN
EGGN351 Fluid Mechanics
3
3
371 for DCGN 209 with permission.
Total
20
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
Summer Field Term
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
GEOL306 Petrology
3
3
4
GEGN316 Field Geology
6
6
GEGN317 Geological Field Methods
6
2
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
GEOL314 Stratigraphy
3
3
4
GEGN4— Option Elective
3
3
4
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective I
3
3
GEGN4— Option Elective
3
3
4
MNGN321 Rock Mechanics
2
3
3
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective II
3
3
EGGN351 Fluid Mechanics
3
3
GPGN311 Geophysical Exploration**
3
3
4
Total
19
Free Elective
3
Summer Field Term
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
Total
18
GEGN316 Field Geology
6
6
**Other appropriate Applied Geophysics courses may be
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
substituted for GPGN311 with approval of GE Department.
GEGN468 Engineering Geology
3
3
4
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
GEGN467 Ground-Water Engineering
3
3
4
GEGN4— Design Elective
3
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective II
3
3
GEGN4— Design Elective
3
Free Elective
3
3
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective III
3
3
Total
18
MACS323 Probability & Statistics
3
3
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
Free Elective
3
GEGN469 Engineering Geology Design
3
3
Free Elective
3
GEGN470 Ground-Water Engineering Design
3
3
Total
18
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective III
3
3
Degree Total
147.5
MACS323 Probability & Statistics
3
3
Option Electives:
Free Elective
3
3
Students must take TWO of the following four courses.
Free Elective
3
3
GEGN401 Mineral Deposits
4 credits
Total
18
GEGN438 Petroleum Geology
4 credits
Degree Total
147.5
GEGN467 Ground-Water Engineering
4 credits
Students in the Environmental, Engineering Geology
GEGN468 Engineering Geology & Geotechnics
4 credits
and Geotechnics, and Ground-Water Engineering Concen-
Design Electives:
tration may further specialize by utilizing their free elective
Students must take TWO design courses, corresponding
courses to emphasize a specific specialty. Suggested
in subject area to the Option Elective.
courses are presented below and should be selected in
consultation with the student’s advisor. The emphasis area
GEGN403 Mineral Exploration Design
3 credits
is an informal designation only and it will not appear on the
GEGN439 Multi-Disciplinary Petroleum Design
3 credits
transcript.
GEGN469 Engineering Geology Design
3 credits
Engineering Geology and Geotechnics Emphasis:
GEGN470 Ground-Water Engineering Design
3 credits
*Technical Electives I & II: Either MNGN 321 or EGGN 461 is
EGGN464 Foundations
required as ONE of the technical electives. An additional technical
EGGN466 Construction Site Engineering
elective must be selected from an approved list available in the
MNGN404 Tunneling
Department so that the total technical elective credit hours are
MNGN445/446 Open Pit Slope Design
composed of a balance of engineering science and engineering
EBGN421 Engineering Economics
design.
EGGN454 Water Supply Engineering
Environmental, Engineering Geology and Geotechnics,
GEGN442 Advanced Engineering Geomorphology
and Ground-Water Engineering Concentration
GEGN475 Applications of Geographic Information Systems
Recommended for students intending careers in
GEGN499 Independent Study in Engineering Geology
geotechnical engineering, hydrogeology, or other environ-
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
51

Ground-Water Engineering Emphasis:
Geophysics
GEGN481 Advanced Hydrology
GEGN483 Math Modeling of Ground-Water Systems
THOMAS L. DAVIS, Professor & Interim Department Head
EBGN421 Engineering Economics
ALEXANDER A. KAUFMAN, Professor
GEGN475 Applications of Geographic Information Systems
KENNETH L. LARNER, Charles Henry Green Professor
GEGN499 Independent Study in Hydrogeology
of Exploration Geophysics
Geological Engineering Minor
GARY R. OLHOEFT, Professor
MAX PEETERS, Western Atlas Professor of Petrophysics
Students, other than Geological Engineering majors,
and Borehole Geophysics
desiring to receive a minor in Geological Engineering must
PHILLIP R. ROMIG, Professor and Dean of the Graduate School
complete 18 hours of Geology and Geological Engineering
JOHN A. SCALES, Professor
courses as follows:
ILYA TSVANKIN, Professor
1. SYGN101 Earth and Environmental Systems
THOMAS M. BOYD, Associate Professor
2. At least one course from each of the following groups:
YAUGUO LI, Associate Professor
Petrology/Mineralogy
MICHAEL L. BATZLE, Research Associate Professor
GEOL210 Materials of the Earth or
ROBERT D. BENSON, Research Associate Professor
GEOL212 Mineralogy and
VLADIMIR GRECHKA, Research Assistant Professor
GEOL307 Petrology or
HENGREN XIA, Research Assistant Professor
TIMOTHY M. NIEBAUER, Adjunct Associate Professor
GEGN306 Petrology
WARREN B. HAMILTON, Distinguished Senior Scientist
Structural Geology
PIETER HOEKSTRA, Distinguished Senior Scientist
GEOL308 Applied Structural Geology or
THOMAS R. LAFEHR, Distinguished Senior Scientist
GEOL309 Structural Geology and
MISAC N. NABIGHIAN, Distinguished Senior Scientist
Tectonics
ADEL ZOHDY, Distinguished Senior Scientist
Stratigraphy
FRANK A. HADSELL, Professor Emeritus
GEOL314 Stratigraphy or
JAMES E. WHITE, Professor Emeritus
GEOL315 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
ALFRED H. BALCH, Research Professor, Retired
3. One senior area elective course can be chosen from the
Program Description
following:
Geophysics entails the study and exploration of the
GEGN401 Mineral Deposits
Earth’s interior through physical measurements collected at
GEGN438 Petroleum Geology
the earth’s surface, in boreholes, from aircraft, and from
GEGN467 Ground-Water Engineering
satellites. Using a combination of mathematics, physics,
GEGN468 Engineering Geology & Geotechnics
geology, chemistry, hydrology, and computer science, a
4. Elective Geology & Geological Engineering courses to
geophysicist analyzes these measurements to infer properties
total 18 credits. (Design electives listed below are
and processes within the Earth’s complex interior a part of
strongly recommended.)
the world that cannot be visited directly.
GEGN403 Mineral Exploration Design
Because the Earth supplies society’s material needs and
GEGN439 Multi-Disciplinary Petroleum Design
is the repository of its used products and home to all its
GEGN469 Engineering Geology Design
inhabitants, the breadth and importance of this field are
GEGN470 Ground-Water Engineering Design
apparent. Oil companies and mining firms use the explor-
atory skills of geophysicists to locate deeply hidden
Area of Special Interest
resources throughout the world. Geophysicists assess the
An Area of Special Interest (ASI) consists of 12 or more
material properties near the Earth’s surface when sites are
hours of course work. To receive an ASI, a student must
chosen for large engineering and waste-management
take at least 12 hours of a logical sequence of courses, only
operations. Geophysical technology is used in environmen-
three credit hours of which may be at the 100- or 200- level.
tal applications such as tracking the flow of contaminants
Additionally a total of not more than three credit hours of
and in searches for groundwater. On the global scale,
the sequence may be specifically required by the degree
geophysicists try to understand such Earth processes as heat
program in which the student is graduating. For Geological
distribution and flow; gravitational, magnetic, electric,
Engineering, ASI students must satisfy item 2 of the
thermal, and stress force fields; and vibrations and other
Geological Engineering minor requirements above, or gain
disturbances within the Earth’s interior down to its central
written approval of an alternative program.
core.
Founded in 1926, the Department of Geophysics at the
Colorado School of Mines is the largest department in the
52
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

U.S. specializing in applied geophysical research and
large vibrator trucks for shaking the Earth) and networks of
education. Even so, with 12 active faculty and class sizes
PCs and workstations. Students also have access to the
ranging from 12 to 20, students receive individualized
Department’s petrophysics laboratory, one of the most
attention in a close-knit environment. Given the interdisci-
modern and complete for measuring properties of rocks and
plinary nature of geophysics, the undergraduate curriculum
their contained fluids. Undergraduate students also have
requires students to become thoroughly familiar with
two large rooms dedicated solely to their student needs.
geological, mathematical, and physical theory, in addition
These student rooms, equipped with networked PCs,
to exploring the theoretical and practical aspects of the
provide a friendly environment for work, study, relaxation,
various geophysical methodologies.
and student activities.
Traditionally, the resource industry has been, and
Program Goals (Bachelor of Science in
continues to be, the largest employer of CSM geophysics
Geophysical Engineering)
graduates. Within this industry, graduates find employment
Because geophysical engineers and geophysicists must
with the major oil companies, independent contracting
apply highly quantitative techniques and analysis to the
companies, and mineral exploration companies doing field
understanding of something as complex as the Earth and its
data acquisition, processing, and interpretation. Graduates
processes (which can never be observed directly), graduates
can also find employment in the emerging engineering and
require a special combination of traits and abilities to thrive
geotechnical industries with positions offered by govern-
in this discipline. Therefore, in addition to achieving the
ment agencies and the myriad of small contracting firms
goals described in the CSM Graduate Profile and the ABET
specializing in shallow subsurface characterization. For the
Accreditation Criteria, the Geophysics Program at CSM also
past decade, 100% of CSM’s geophysics graduates have
strives to graduate students who:
found employment in their chosen field by graduation, with
1. Think for themselves Geophysics graduates must have
about 20% choosing to pursue graduate study.
demonstrated the willingness to question and challenge
Geophysics Field Camp. Each summer, a base of
conventional formulations of problems, hypotheses,
operations is set up for four weeks in the mountains of
methods and solutions and are capable of solving
Colorado for geophysics students who have completed their
problems for themselves.
junior year. Students conduct geological studies, and
2. Are creative Geophysics graduates must have demon-
prepare maps and cross sections as the basis for designing
strated the ability to conceive and validate new hypoth-
geophysical surveys. They design and conduct seismic,
eses, new problem descriptions, and new methods for
gravimetric, magnetic, and electrical surveys in areas of
analyzing data and reaching conclusions and new
structural interest. They then process and interpret the
solutions to problems.
geophysical data that they have acquired. Following
3. Are good experimentalists and observationists Geophys-
completion of the four-week core program, students are
ics graduates must have demonstrated the ability to
given their choice of several diverse field experiences. In
design and carry out a geophysical field survey or
recent years these choices have included cruises on seismic
laboratory experiment the ability, while acquiring data in
ships in the Gulf of Mexico, studies at an archeological site,
the lab or in the field, to observe and record related
investigations at an environmental site, a well-logging
information, and to evaluate and act on those observa-
school offered by a leading well-logging company (Western
tions as needed to ensure that the data are of the highest-
Atlas International Logging Services), and geophysical
possible quality.
surveys in an urban setting.
4. Can deal rationally with uncertainty Geophysics graduates
Summer Jobs in Geophysics. In addition to the
must have demonstrated that they understand that
summer field camp experience, students are given opportu-
geophysical data always are incomplete and uncertain
nities every summer throughout their undergraduate career
can quantify the uncertainty and recognize when it is or is
at CSM to work as summer interns in various aspects of
not acceptable are able to make good judgments and
geophysics within industry, at CSM, or for government
decisions based on incomplete and uncertain data.
agencies. As examples, students have worked outdoors on
5. Have the potential to lead Geophysics graduates must
geophysics crews in various parts of the U.S., in South
have demonstrated the following qualities that are the
America, and offshore in the Gulf of Mexico.
foundation of leadership: know the importance of taking
Green Center. The extensive laboratories of the
risks, and can quantify the amount of risk and make good
Department of Geophysics in the Green Center provide
judgments about the level of risk to take have enough
facilities for the study of equipment and techniques used in
confidence in their skills and knowledge to be willing to
conducting geophysical field measurements. Included are
take risks when their judgment indicates that the benefits
magnetometers, gravity meters, electromagnetic ground-
exceed the risk understand that risk sometimes results in
penetrating radar equipment, as well as a wide array of
failure, and can treat failure as an opportunity to learn and
instruments for recording seismic waves (including three
grow recognize and take advantage of opportunities in a
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
53

field that is rapidly changing make observations that
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
change in time and are often transient
GEOL309 Structural Geol. and Tectonics
3
3
4
MACS349 Topics in Eng. Mathematics
3
3
Curriculum
GPGN321 Theory of Fields I: Static Fields
3
3
Being the applied and interdisciplinary science and
GPGN303 Intro. to Gravity & Magnetic Methods 3
3
4
engineering field that geophysics is, students educated in
GPGN315 Field Methods for Geophysicists I
1
3
2
geophysics must have a strong foundation in physics and
** Elective
3
3
mathematics, as well as in geology and computer sciences.
Total
19
Superimposed on this foundation is a comprehensive body
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
of courses in the theory and practice surrounding all the
GEOL314 Stratigraphy
3
3
4
methodologies used in geophysical investigations of the
GPGN306 Linear Systems Analysis
3
3
Earth’s subsurface. Also, as geophysics and geophysical
GPGN322 Theory of Fields II: TimeVarying
3
3
engineering involve study and exploration of the Earth,
GPGN302 Introduction to Seismic Methods
3
3
4
opportunities are great for graduates in these fields to work
GPGN308 Intro to Elec. &
anywhere and everywhere on the planet. Therefore,
Electromagnetic Methods
3 3
4
emphasis in the humanities electives is placed in giving
GPGN316 Field Methods for Geophysicists II
3
1
students a strong understanding of international issues and
Total
19
cultures. To satisfy this combination of needs, every student
Summer Field Term
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
working toward a Bachelor’s Degree in Geophysical
GPGN386 GP Field Camp: Field Proc. and Practices 6
6
Engineering at CSM must complete the following require-
Total
6
ments.
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
CSM Common Core (including mathematics, physics,
GPGN404 Digital Systems Analysis
3
3
chemistry, humanities and social sciences, design and earth
GPGN— Adv. Geophysical Methods Elective *** 3
3
4
systems, physical activities and freshman success courses)
DCGN381 Electrical Circuits, Electronics & Pwr 3
3
54.5 sem hrs.
GPGN438/439 Senior Design/Thesis
3
3
Advanced Requirements:
** Electives
6
6
Total
19
1. electives (including humanities and social sciences
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
(HSS) cluster)
18 sem hrs.
GPGN432 Borehole Geophysics
3
3
4
2. mathematics, physics, and computer science
GPGN494 Physics of the Earth
3
3
24 sem hrs.
** Electives
9
9
3. geologic emphasis
14 sem hrs.
Total
16
4. applied geophysics
20 sem hrs.
Degree total
149.5
5. field methods and instrumentation
12 sem hrs.
*The preferred semester for MACS261 is in the Fall.
6. other (Physics of the Earth, Senior Design/Thesis)
Students who do not choose the Geophysics major until the
7 sem hrs.
Spring, however, can take MACS261 in the Spring, in
Degree Requirements (Geophysical Engineering)
exchange with SYGN200 Human Systems.
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
** Electives must include at least 9 hours in an approved
MACS213 Calculus for Scientists & Engn’rs III
4
4
HSS Cluster.
PHGN200 Physics II
3.5 3
4.5
***Students must take at least one of the three allowed
SYGN201 Engineered Earth Systems
2
4
3
Advanced Geophysical Methods electives: GPGN414,
EBGN211 Principles of Economics
3
3
GPGN422, and GPGN 452; GPGN414 is offered in the
MACS261*Computer Programming Concepts
3
3
Spring semester.
PAGN201 Physical Education III
2
0.5
Minor in Geophysics/Geophysical Engineering
Total
18
Geophysics plays in important role in many aspects of
Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
civil engineering, mechanical engineering, and electrical
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
engineering, as well as mathematics, physics, geology,
GPGN220 Continuum Mechanics
3
3
chemistry, hydrology, and computer science. Given the
EPIC251 Design II (Earth Engineering)
2
3
3
natural connections between these various fields and
SYGN200 Human Systems
3
3
geophysics, coupled with intense recruiting by industry for
GEOL201 Historical Geology & Paleontology
3
3
geophysicists, it may be of interest for students in other
GPGN210 Materials of the Earth
3
3
4
majors to consider choosing to minor in geophysics or
PAGN202 Physical Education IV
2
0.5
choose geophysics as an area of specialization. The core of
Total
19.5
54
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

courses taken to satisfy the minor requirement must include
Liberal Arts and
some or all of the following geophysics methods courses.
GPGN210 Materials of the Earth
International Studies
GPGN302 Seismic Methods
ARTHUR B. SACKS, Professor and Division Director
GPGN303 Gravity and Magnetic Methods
DANIEL CEREZUELLE, 1999-2000 Hennebach Visiting Professor
GPGN308 Electrical and Electromagnetic Methods
CARL MITCHAM, Professor
GPGN432 Borehole Geophysics
BARBARA M. OLDS, Professor
The remaining hours can be satisfied by a combination
EUL-SOO PANG, Professor
of other geophysics courses, as well as courses in geology,
JOSEPH D. SNEED, Professor
mathematics, and computer science depending on the
RONALD V. WIEDENHOEFT, Professor
student’s major.
PETER HARTLEY, Associate Professor
Students should consult with the Department of
KATHLEEN H. OCHS, Associate Professor
Geophysics to get their sequence of courses approved before
LAURA J. PANG, Associate Professor
embarking on a minor program.
KAREN B. WILEY, Associate Professor
Geophysics 5-Year Program
HUSSEIN A. AMERY, Assistant Professor
DAVID R. FROSSARD, Assistant Professor
The Department of Geophysics’ 5-year program allows
CATHERINE FLYNN, Lecturer
undergraduates in any CSM option to work on a Master of
JON LEYDENS, Lecturer and Writing Program Administrator
Engineering degree in Geophysics while completing the
HEIDI G. LOSHBAUGH, Lecturer
requirements for the Bachelor of Science. Students can
SUZANNE M. NORTHCOTE, Lecturer
apply for provisional admission as early as the Fall semester
BETTY J. CANNON, Emeritus Associate Professor
of their Sophomore year and full admission as early as the
W. JOHN CIESLEWICZ, Emeritus Professor
Spring semester of their Junior year. Upon provisional
DONALD I. DICKINSON, Emeritus Professor
admission, they are assigned academic advisors who work
WILTON ECKLEY, Emeritus Professor
with them to discuss career options, define areas of interest,
EDWARD G. FISHER, Emeritus Professor
and plan course schedules. For students pursuing an
T. GRAHAM HEREFORD, Emeritus Professor
undergraduate degree in Geophysics, the academic advisors
JOHN A. HOGAN, Emeritus Professor
also will be their undergraduate advisors. Upon full
GEORGE W. JOHNSON, Emeritus Professor
admission, students are assigned graduate advisors and
ANTON G. PEGIS, Emeritus Professor
Master’s committees. The graduate advisors work with
THOMAS PHILIPOSE, University Emeritus Professor
students to select graduate courses and plan for internships,
both of which then are reviewed and approved by the
Program Description
Master’s committees. Graduate courses can be taken during
The Division of Liberal Arts and International Studies
both the senior and the fifth years.
(LAIS) does not offer an undergraduate degree, but instead
In addition to course work, 5-year students carry out
offers a curriculum comprising a coherent sequence in the
Master’s-level engineering projects in fields related to their
humanities and social sciences appropriate to a CSM
career goals. The projects normally are begun during the
education. The LAIS curriculum includes two core courses
summer following the fourth year. Following completion of
(LIHU100, Nature and Human Values, and SYGN200
course work, students continue the projects while working
Human Systems) and additional coure work in one of four
as graduate interns for leading companies or government
thematic clusters (See Cluster Requirements). To complete
agencies in fields such as resources (oil, minerals, ground-
the humanities and social science requirements of the core,
water), pollution and hazardous waste, geologic hazards,
students also take EBGN211, Principles of Economics,
civil engineering, archaeology, etc. In some cases employ-
offered by the Division of Economics and Business. The
ers also provide financial support for the student during the
focus of the entire core is human-environment interactions,
fifth year of course work. Upon completion of the projects,
and acknowledges that human systems are embedded in and
candidates submit engineering reports summarizing the
dependent on environmental systems. This theme is
results. The Master of Engineering degree is awarded after
consistent with the mission of CSM, with the mission of
each candidate completes all course work and an oral
LAIS, and with the goals of the CSM Graduate Profile. The
defense of the engineering report.
three electives are organized in clusters designed to increase
depth of learning.
The Liberal Arts and International Studies Division
provides students with an understanding of the cultural,
philosophical, social, political, and economic contexts in
which science and engineering function. LAIS offerings
enable students to learn how their responsibilities extend
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
55

beyond the technical mastery of science and technology to
Curriculum
the consequences for human society and the rest of life on
Key to courses offered by the LAIS Division:
Earth. Because of those larger responsibilities, the LAIS
LICM Communication
mission includes preparing students for effective political
LIFL Foreign Language
and social thought and action.
LIHU Humanities
Liberal arts exist for their intrinsic value. They are the
LIMU Music
arts of the free mind developing its powers for their own
LIHN McBride Honors
sake; they are the basis for the free, liberal, unhindered
LISS Social Sciences
development of intellect and imagination addressing
SYGN Systems
intrinsically worthy concerns. They are essential for
CSM students in all majors must take 19 credit-hours
preserving an open, creative and responsible society. The
in humanities and social science courses. These courses are
liberal arts include philosophy, literature, language, history,
housed in the Division of Liberal Arts and International
political science, the creative arts and the social sciences
Studies (LAIS) and the Division of Economics and Business
generally.
(EB). The student’s program in humanities and social
International Studies applies the liberal arts to the study
sciences must demonstrate both breadth and depth and
of international political economy, which is the interplay
cannot be limited to a selection of unrelated introductory
between economic, political, cultural, and environmental
courses.
forces that shape the relations among the world’s developed
Ten of the 19 hours are specified: LIHU100, Nature
and developing areas. International Studies focus especially
and Human Values (4 credit-hours); SYGN200, Human
on the role of the state and the market.
Systems (3 credit-hours); and EBGN211, Principles of
The LAIS mission is crucial to defining the implications
Economics (3 credit-hours). The remaining 9 credit-hours
of CSM’s commitment to stewardship of the Earth and to
must be chosen from a cluster area (see below.)
the permanent sustainability of both social organization and
Students in the McBride Honors Program must take
environmental resources that such a commitment requires.
LIHU100 and EBGN211, but they are exempt from
A good foundation in the subjects provided by the LAIS
SYGN200 and the clusters requirement (see Minor
Division is essential for graduating men and women who
Programs below.)
can provide the technical means for society’s material needs
NOTE: Any LAIS course, including Communication
in a manner that leaves posterity at an undiminished level of
and Music courses, may be taken as a free elective. NOTE:
both social and environmental quality.
See the Foreign Languages (LIFL) entry in Section VI
As a service to the CSM community, the LAIS Division
description of courses of this Bulletin for the CSM foreign
operates the LAIS Writing Center, which provides students
language policy.
with instruction tailored to their individual writing prob-
Required Courses
lems, and faculty with support for Writing Across the
LIHU100
Nature and Human Values
4 sem hrs.
Curriculum.
EBGN211
Principles of Economics
3 sem hrs.
Program Goals
SYGN200
Human Systems
3 sem hrs.
The course work in the Division of Liberal Arts and
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Cluster Electives
9 sem hrs.
International Studies is designed to help CSM develop in
Total
19 sem hrs.
students the ability to:
Cluster Requirements
engage in life-long learning and
1. Undergraduate students are required to take a minimum
recognize the value of doing so by providing:
of 9 credit-hours from one of the following clusters:
the broad education necessary to:
Humankind and Values; Society and Decisions;
Environment, Resources, Science, and Technology, and
a) understand the impact of engineering solutions
International Studies.
in contemporary, global, international, societal, and
2. Three of the 9 credit-hours must be a 400-level LIHU or
ethical contexts;
LISS course, or a 400-level EBGN course with a policy
b) understand the role of Humanities and Social
focus. (Please check with the Division of Economics
Sciences in identifying, formulating, and solving
and Business for a list of 400-level EBGN courses that
engineering problems;
satisfy this criterion.)
c) prepare people to live and work in a complex
3. Single majors in Economics must take all 9 credit-hours
world;
from LAIS.
an understanding of the meaning and implications of
4. Students other than single majors in Economics may
“stewardship of the Earth”;
take up to 6 credit-hours in EBGN.
an ability to communicate effectively in written and oral
forms.
56
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Humankind and Values
LISS482 Water Politics and Policy
LIHU300 Journey Motif in Modern Literature
LISS484 Population, Environment, and Resources
LIHU301 Writing Fiction
Environment, Resources, Science, and Technology
LIHU310 Engineering as a Human Pursuit
EBGN311 Principles of Microeconomics
LIHU330 Western Civilization since the Renaissance
EBGN410 Natural Resource Economics
LIHU334 Literary Heritage of the Western World
EBGN430 Energy Economics
LIHU339 Musical Traditions of the Western World
EBGN470 Environmental Economics
LIHU375 Patterns of American Culture
LIHU310 Engineering as a Human Pursuit
LIHU398 Comic Hero in Literature
LIHU360 History of Science and Technology: Beginning to
LIHU398 Great Books in the Western Scientific Tradition
1500
LIHU398 Modern Short Fiction
LIHU361 History of Science and Technology: 1500 to the
LIHU398 Sporting Hero in Literature
Present
LIHU398 Art History of the Western World
LIHU398 Great Books in the Western Scientific Tradition
LIHU401 The American Dream: Illusion or Reality?
LIHU404 Transcendent Vision
LIHU402 Heroes and Anti-Heroes
LIHU480 Urban Quality of Life
LIHU403 Mythology
LISS380 Environment and Human Adaptation of Early
LIHU404 Transcendent Vision
Peoples in America
LIHU470 Becoming American: Literary Perspectives
LISS381 Environment and Human Adaptation in Pre-
European Meso-America
LIHU480 Urban Quality of Life
LISS382 Environment and Human Adaptation in the Pre-
LISS300 Cultural Anthropology
European Southwest
LISS312 Introduction to Religions
LISS383 Environment and Human Adaptation in Post-
LISS330 Managing Cultural Differences
Contact Southwest
LISS410 Utopias/Dystopias
LISS398 Human Geography of the Middle East
LISS432 Cultural Dynamics of Global Development
LISS398 Technology and Human Adaptation in the Greater
LISS436 Ethics of Global Development
Southwest
LISS461 Technology and Gender: Issues
LISS410 Utopias/Dystopias
Society and Decisions
LISS431 Global Environmental Issues
EBGN311 Principles of Microeconomics
LISS450 American Mining History
EBGN312 Principles of Macroeconomics
LISS461 Technology and Gender: Issues
EBGN4xx Upper-level elective with a policy focus
LISS480 Environmental Politics and Policy
LIHU330 Western Civilization since the Renaissance
LISS482 Water Politics and Policy
LIHU350 History of War
LISS484 Population, Environment, and Resources
LIHU360 History of Science and Technology: Beginning to
International Studies
1500
EBGN311 Principles of Microeconomics
LIHU361 History of Science and Technology: 1500 to the
EBGN312 Principles of Macroeconomics
Present
EBGN441 International Economics
LIHU479 The American Military Experience
EBGN442 Economic Development
LISS335 International Political Economy
LIFLxxx All LIFL (foreign language) courses
LISS340 Political Economy of Latin America
LISS330 Managing Cultural Differences
LISS342 Political Economy of Asia
LISS335 International Political Economy
LISS344 Political Economy of the Middle East
LISS340 Political Economy of Latin America
LISS351 The History of Eastern Europe and Russia since
LISS342 Political Economy of Asia
1914
LISS344 Political Economy of the Middle East
LISS362 Science and Technology Policy
LISS398 Global Corporations
LISS372 American Political Experience
LISS398 Human Geography of the Middle East
LISS375 Introduction to Law and Legal Systems
LISS430 Critical World Issues
LISS435 Political Risk Assessment
LISS431 Global Environmental Issues
LISS450 American Mining History
LISS432 Cultural Dynamics of Global Development
LISS455 Japanese History and Culture
LISS434 International Field Practicum
LISS480 Environmental Politics and Policy
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
57

LISS435 Political Risk Assessment
evaluations and feasibilities now involve the application of
LISS436 Ethics of Global Development
such IPE methods as political risk assessment and mitiga-
LISS440 Latin American Development
tion.
LISS498 Asian Development
The IPE Program at CSM includes courses focusing on
LISS498 Hemispheric Integration in the Americas
Latin America, Asia, and the Islamic World; courses with a
global focus; and foreign language study. Students may opt
Minor Programs
for the 19-hour minor or a 22-hour certificate. The
The Division of Liberal Arts and International Studies
certificate is identical to the minor, with the addition of an
offers four minor programs. Students who elect to pursue a
international field practicum in which the student works
minor will usually automatically satisfy their cluster
abroad in a setting appropriate to his or her major field of
requirements. They will also need to use their free elective
study. Students may also pursue an ASI in International
hours to complete a minor. Students may choose to pursue
Political Economy.
an Area of Special Interest (ASI) in any of the minor
programs except the McBride Honors Program. Minors are
A graduate certificate in International Political Economy
a minimum of 18 credit-hours; ASIs are a minimum of 12
or in Interrnational Political Economy of Resources is also
credit-hours.
available; consult the CSM Graduate Bulletin for details.
Prior to the completion of the sophomore year, a student
Undergraduate Individual Minor
wishing to declare an LAIS Minor must fill out an LAIS
Program Advisor: Dr. Karen Wiley. Students declaring
Minor form (available in the LAIS Office) and obtain
an Undergraduate Individual Minor in LAIS must choose 19
approval signatures from the appropriate minor advisor in
restricted elective hours in LAIS in accordance with a
LAIS and from the LAIS Director. The student must also
coherent rationale reflecting some explicit focus that the
fill out a Minor/Area of Special Interest Declaration
student wishes to pursue. A student desiring this minor
(available in the Registrar’s Office) and obtain approval
must design it in consultation with a member of the LAIS
signatures from the student’s CSM advisor, from the Head
faculty who approves the rationale and the choice of
or Director of the student’s major department or division,
courses.
and from the LAIS Director.
The Guy T. McBride, Jr. Honors Program in Public
The other minors or ASIs available and their advisors
Affairs for Engineers
are:
Program Advisor: Dr. Barbara M. Olds. The McBride
Environmental Policy Minor. Dr. Karen Wiley.
Honors Program (Honors), administered through the
Division of Liberal Arts and International Studies, was
International Political Economy Minor. Dr. Laura Pang.
instituted in 1978 through a grant from the National
Undergraduate Individual Minor. Advisor depends on
Endowment for the Humanities. Honors offers a 27-
field of study.
semester-hour program of seminars and off-campus
Students should consult these advisors for the specific
activities that has the primary goal of providing a select
requirements for these minors.
number of engineering students the opportunity to cross the
Environmental Policy Minor
boundaries of their technical expertise and to gain the
Program Advisor: Dr. Karen Wiley. The primary
sensitivity to prove, project, and test the moral and social
objective of the Environmental Policy (EP) Minor is to give
implications of their future professional judgements and
students some basic background in the primary skill and
activities, not only for the particular organizations with
knowledge areas relevant to careers in environmental policy:
which they will be involved, but also for the nation and the
economics, politics, policy analysis, law, and ethics.
world. To achieve this goal, the program seeks to bring
themes from the humanities and the social sciences into the
International Political Economy Minor
engineering curriculum that will encourage in students the
Program Advisor: Dr. Laura Pang. The International
habits of thought necessary for effective management and
Political Economy (IPE ) Program at CSM was the first
enlightened leadership.
such program in the U.S. designed with the engineering and
applied science student in mind, and remains one of the very
Designed by teams of faculty members from the
few international engineering programs with this focus.
humanities, social sciences, sciences, and engineering, the
International Political Economy is the study of the interplay
curriculum of the McBride Honors Program features the
among politics, the economy, and culture. In today’s global
following educational experiences:
economy, international engineering and applied science
Small seminars guided by moderator from various
decisions are fundamentally political decisions made by
disciplines.
sovereign nations. Therefore, International Political
An interdisciplinary approach that integrates domestic and
Economy theories and models are often used in evaluating
global perspectives.
and implementing engineering and science projects. Project
58
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Opportunity for one-to-one relationships between faculty
Mathematical and
and students.
Opportunity to develop and practice oral and written
Computer Sciences
skills.
Opportunity to meet and hear visiting scholars.
GRAEME FAIRWEATHER, Professor and Department Head
Opportunity to attend the Washington Public Policy
JOHN DeSANTO, Professor
Seminar (one week in Washington, DC)
WILLY A.M. HEREMAN, Professor
Internship or overseas study.
RAGHU KRISHNAPURAM, Professor
Social relationships and camaraderie.
PAUL A. MARTIN, Professor
JUNPING WANG, Professor
A central experience in the program is the Practicum (an
BARBARA B. BATH, Associate Professor
internship, overseas study, or public service), which comes
BERNARD BIALECKI, Associate Professor
during the summer following the junior year. Because
MAARTEN V. de HOOP, Associate Professor
engineers and scientists will no doubt continue to assume
WILLIAM C. NAVIDI, Associate Professor
significant responsibilities as leaders in public and private
ROBERT G. UNDERWOOD, Associate Professor
sectors, it is essential that CSM students be prepared for
ERIK S. VAN VLECK, Associate Professor
more than the traditional first jobs in industry. Leadership
XINDONG WU, Associate Professor
and management demand an understanding of the accelerat-
TRACY KAY CAMP, Assistant Professor
ing pace of change that marks the social, political, and
MANAVENDRA MISRA, Assistant Professor
economic currents of society. While the seminars in the
BARBARA M. MOSKAL, Assistant Professor
program are designed to nourish such an understanding, the
LUIS TENORIO, Assistant Professor
goal of the internship is to put students into situations where
HUGH KING, Senior Lecturer
they may see firsthand the kinds of challenges they will face
G.GUSTAVE GREIVEL, Lecturer
in their professional lives.
TERI WOODINGTON Lecturer
Foreign study is also possible during the summer of the
WILLIAM R. ASTLE, Professor Emeritus
junior year, either through CSM-sponsored trips if interest
NORMAN BLEISTEIN, Professor Emeritus
warrants, or through individual plans arranged in consulta-
ARDEL J. BOES, Professor Emeritus
tion with the Principal Tutor. The cost for any foreign study
STEVEN PRUESS, Professor Emeritus
is the responsibility of the student.
Program Description
The McBride Honors Program seeks to enroll students
The Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department
who can profit most from, and contribute most to, the
(MCS) offers an undergraduate degree in which the student
learning experiences upon which the program is based, the
may select a program in the mathematical and computer
idea being to bring bright young minds into situations where
sciences. There are two tracks: one is Mathematical and
they will be challenged not only by the faculty, but also by
Computer Sciences with an emphasis on modeling, analysis
their colleagues. Whereas many more conventional honors
and computation, the other is the computer sciences option.
programs admit students almost exclusively on the basis of
Either track offers a unique opportunity to study mathemati-
academic record, in the McBride Honors Program test
cal and computer sciences in an engineering environment.
scores, grade point, and class rank form only part of the
Both tracks emphasize technical competence, problem
criteria used in the admission process. Students must
solving, team work, projects, relation to other disciplines,
demonstrate their leadership potential, versatility of mind,
and verbal, written, and graphical skills.
and writing and speaking abilities through an essay and
through an interview with faculty members.
The department provides the teaching skills and
technical expertise to develop mathematical and computer
Although the educational experiences in the McBride
sciences capabilities for all Colorado School of Mines
Honors Program are rigorous and demand a high degree of
students. In addition, MCS programs support targeted
persistence from the students, CSM graduates who have
undergraduate majors in mathematical and computer
completed the program have gained positions of their choice
sciences and also graduate degree programs relevant to
in industry more easily than others and have been quite
mathematical and computer sciences aspects of the CSM
successful in winning admission to high-quality graduate
mission.
and professional schools.
In the broad sense, these programs stress the develop-
Minor and Certificate: Students completing the
ment of practical applications techniques to enhance the
program receive a certificate and are recognized as having
overall attractiveness of mathematical and computer
earned a Minor in Public Affairs for Engineers.
sciences majors to a wide range of employers in industry.
More specifically, we utilize a summer “field session”
program to engage high level undergraduate students in
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
59

problems of practical applicability for potential employers.
Working cooperatively in multi-disciplinary teams;
Field session is designed to simulate an industrial job or
Choosing appropriate technology to solve problems in
research environment; students work on a project in small
other disciplines.
teams, make weekly project reports and present final written
Communicate mathematics/computer sciences effec-
and oral reports. The close collaboration with potential
tively, by
employers or professors improves communication between
Communicating orally;
field session students and the private sector as well as with
sponsors from other disciplines on campus.
Communicating in writing;
Working cooperatively in teams;
Mathematical and Computer Sciences majors can use a
Creating well documented and well structured
twelve credit hour block of free electives to take additional
programs;
courses of special interest to them. This adds to the
flexibility of the program and qualifies students for a wide
Understanding and interpreting written material in
variety of careers.
mathematics/computer sciences.
Curriculum
Any program of this type requires emphasis in study
The calculus sequence emphasizes mathematics applied
areas which utilize the special skills of the Department.
to problems students are likely to see in other fields. This
These areas are:
supports the curricula in other programs where mathematics
Applied Mathematics: Classical scattering theory,
is important, and assists students who are underprepared in
dynamical systems, nonlinear partial differential equa-
mathematics. Directives in the mathematics curriculum
tions, numerical analysis, seismic inversion methods,
include:
symbolic computing, and mathematics education.
applied problems in the mathematics courses and
Applied Computer Sciences: Artificial intelligence, neural
ready utilization of mathematics in the science and
networks, parallel processing, pattern recognition,
engineering courses.
computer vision, and fuzzy set theory.
This emphasis on the utilization of mathematics and
Applied Statistics: Stochastic modeling, resampling
computer sciences continues through the upper division
methods, statistical genetics, statistical methods in
courses. Another aspect of the curriculum is the use of a
cosmology, and inverse problems.
spiraling mode of learning in which concepts are revisited to
Program Goals and Objectives (Bachelor of
deepen the students’ understanding. The applications, team
Science in Mathematical and Computer
work, assessment, and communications emphasis directly
Sciences)
address ABET criteria and the CSM graduate profile. The
Develop technical expertise within mathematics/
curriculum offers two study options, one in modeling,
computer sciences, by
analysis and computation, and the other in computer
Designing and implementing systems and solutions
science.
within mathematics/computer sciences;
Degree Requirements (Mathematical and
Using appropriate technology as a tool to solve
Computer Sciences)
problems in mathematics/computer sciences;
Modeling, Analysis and Computation Option
Creating efficient algorithms and well structured
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
programs.
MACS213 Calc. for Scientists & Engn’rs III
4
4
Develop breadth and depth of knowledge within
MACS261 Computer Programming Concepts
3
3
mathematics/computer sciences, by
EPIC251 Design II
2
3
3
Extending course material to solve original problems;
PHGN200 Physics II
3.5
3
4.5
Applying knowledge of mathematics/computer
EBGN211 Principles of Economics
3
3
sciences;
PAGN201 Physical Education III
2
0.5
Identifying, formulating and solving mathematics/
Total
18
computer sciences problems;
Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
Analyzing and interpreting data.
MACS262 Data Structures
3
3
Develop an understanding and appreciation of the
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
relationship of mathematics/computer sciences to other
MACS332 Linear Algebra
3
3
fields, by
SYGN200 Human Systems
3
3
Applying mathematics/computer sciences to solve
Free Elective
3
3
problems in other fields;
PAGN202 Physical Education IV
2
0.5
Total
15.5
60
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Junior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
MACS341 Mach. Org. & Assembly Lang. Prog. 3
3
MACS306 Software Engineering
3
3
SYGN201/2 Engineered Earth Systems
3
3
MACS323 Prob. and Statistics for Engineers
3
3
Technical Area of Special Interest
3
3
MACS333 Intro. to Mathematical Modeling
3
3
Total
15
SYGN201/2 Engineered Earth Systems
3
3
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
Technical Area of Special Interest
3
3
MACS442 Operating Systems
3
3
Total
15
MACS358 Discrete Math & Algebraic Struct.
3
3
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
Free electives
6
6
MACS358 Discrete Math & Algeb. Struct.
3
3
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective I
3
3
MACS— Mathematics Elective
3
3
Technical Area of Special Interest
3
3
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective I
3
3
Total
18
Free Electives
6
6
Summer Field Session
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
Technical Area of Special Interest
3
3
MACS370 Field Course (six weeks)
6
Total
18
Total
6
Summer Field Session
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
MACS370 Field Course (six weeks)
6
MACS400 Princ. of Programming Languages
3
3
Total
6
MACS461 Senior Seminar
1
1
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
MACS Computer Science Electives
6
6
MACS401 Applied Analysis
3
3
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective II
3
3
MACS440 Parallel Comp. for Sci. and Eng.
3
3
Technical Area of Special Interest
3
3
MACS461 Senior Seminar
1
1
Total
16
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective II
3
3
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
MACS— Mathematics Elective
3
3
MACS406 Dsgn. & Analysis of Algorithms
3
3
Technical Area of Special Interest
3
3
MACS462 Senior Seminar
1
1
Total
16
MACS Computer Science Elective
3
3
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective III
3
3
MACS407 Numerical Methods
3
3
Free elective
3
3
MACS462 Senior Seminar
1
1
Technical Area of Special Interest
3
3
MACS— Mathematics Elective
3
3
Total
16
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective III
3
3
Degree Total
137.5
Free Elective
3
3
Minors in Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Technical Area of Special Interest
3
3
For an Area of Special Interest in Mathematical
Total
16
Sciences, the student should take the following:
Degree Total
137.5
MACS323 Probability and Statistics for Engineers
Computer Sciences Option
MACS332 Linear Algebra
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
MACS333 Introduction to Mathematical Modeling
MACS213 Calc. for Scientists & Engn’rs III
4
4
MACS407 Introduction to Numerical Methods
MACS261 Computer Program’ng Concepts
3
3
For the Minor, in addition the student should take:
EPIC251 Design II
3
1
3
MACS261 Computer Programming Concepts
PHGN200 Physics II
3
3
4.5
MACS4XX One additional 400-level course
EBGN211 Principles of Economics
3
3
For an Area of Special Interest in Computer Sciences,
PAGN201 Physical Education III
2
0.5
the student should take the following:
Total
18
Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
MACS262 Data Structures
MACS262 Data Structures
3
3
MACS306 TSoftware Engineering
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
MACS341 Machine Organization and Assembly Language
MACS332 Linear Algebra
3
3
Programming
SYGN200 Human Systems
3
3
MACS406 Design and Analysis of Algorithms or
Free Elective
3
3
MACS407 Introduction to Numerical Methods
PAGN202 Physical Education IV
2
0.5
For the Minor, in addition the student should take two
Total
15.5
400-level courses, which may not be computer languages
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
transferred from another university.
MACS306 Software Engineering
3
3
MACS323 Prob. and Stat. for Engineers
3
3
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
61

Metallurgical and
The metallurgical and materials engineering discipline is
founded on fundamentals in chemistry, mathematics and
Materials Engineering
physics which contribute to building the knowledge-base
and developing the skills for the processing of materials so
JOHN J. MOORE, Professor and Department Head
as to achieve specifications requested for a particular
GLEN R. EDWARDS, Professor
industrial or advanced product. The engineering principles
JOHN P. HAGER, Professor
in this discipline include: crystal structure and structural
STEPHEN LIU, Professor
analysis, thermodynamics of materials, reaction kinetics,
GERARD P. MARTINS, Professor
transport phenomena, phase equilibria, phase transforma-
DAVID K. MATLOCK, Professor
tions, microstructural evolution and properties of materials.
DAVID L. OLSON, Professor
The core-discipline fundamentals are applied to a variety
DENNIS W. READEY, Professor
of materials processes including: comminution and
JOHN G. SPEER, Professor
concentration of minerals, extraction and refining of
CHESTER J. VANTYNE, Professor
materials, alloy development, casting, mechanical working,
BAKI YARAR, Professor
joining and forming, ceramic particle processing, high
ROBERT H. FROST, Associate Professor
temperature reactions and synthesis of engineered materials.
BRAJENDRA MISHRA, Associate Professor
In each stage of processing, the effects of resultant micro-
IVAR E. REIMANIS, Associate Professor
structures and morphologies on materials properties and
STEVEN W. THOMPSON, Associate Professor
performance are emphasized.
KELLY T. MILLER, Assistant Professor
FREDERICK J. FRAIKOR, Research Professor
Laboratories, located in Nathaniel Hill Hall, are among
C. SURYANARAYANA, Research Professor
the best in the nation. The laboratories, in conjunction with
LIVIV-IVLIAN PALADE, Research Assistant Professor
class-room instruction, provide for a well integrated
JOHN P. WISE, Research Assistant Professor
education of the undergraduates working towards their
ELI MATEEVA, Research Associate
baccalaureate degrees. These facilities are well-equipped
GEORGE S. ANSELL, President and Professor Emeritus
and dedicated to: particulate and chemical/extraction
W. REX BULL, Professor Emeritus
metallurgical-and-materials processing, foundry science,
GEORGE KRAUSS, Professor University Emeritus
corrosion and hydro-/electro-metallurgical studies, physical
WILLIAM M. MUELLER, Vice President for Academic Affairs
and mechanical metallurgy, welding and joining, forming
and Professor Emeritus
and processing-and-testing of ceramic materials. Mechanical
testing facilities include computerized machines for tensile,
Program Description
compression, torsion, toughness, fatigue and thermo-
Metallurgical and materials engineering plays a role in
mechanical testing. There are also other highly specialized
all processes which convert raw materials into useful
research laboratories dedicated to: robotics, artificial
products adapted to human needs. The primary objective of
intelligence, vapor deposition, and plasma and high-
the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering program is to
temperature reaction-systems. Support analytical-laborato-
provide undergraduates with a fundamental knowledge-base
ries for surface analyses, emission spectrometry, X-ray
associated with materials-processing, their properties, and
analyses, optical microscopy and image analysis, electron
their selection and application. Upon graduation, students
microscopy, including an analytical scanning transmission
would have acquired and developed the necessary back-
electron microscopy and the latest in scanning electron
ground and skills for successful careers in the materials-
microscopy, and micro-thermal-analysis/mass spectrometry.
related industries. Furthermore, the benefits of continued
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering involves all of the
education toward graduate degrees and other avenues, and
processes which turn raw materials into final useful products
the pursuit of knowledge in other disciplines should be well
adapted to human needs. The objective of the Metallurgical
inculcated.
and Materials Engineering program is to provide a funda-
The emphasis in the Department is on materials
mental knowledge of materials processing, properties,
processing operations which encompass: the conversion of
selection and application in order to provide graduates with
mineral and chemical resources into metallic, ceramic or
the background and skills needed for successful careers in
polymeric materials; the synthesis of new materials; refining
materials related industries, for continued education toward
and processing to produce high performance materials for
graduate degrees and for the pursuit of knowledge in other
applications from consumer products to aerospace and
disciplines.
electronics.
Program Goals (Bachelor of Science in
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering)
The Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Program is
designed to support five primary educational goals.
62
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

u Provide a thorough knowledge of materials engineer-
3. Statistical Process Control and Design of Experiments:
ing fundamentals.
Statistical process-control, process capability- analysis
u Provide experience in the applications of fundamental
and design of experiments.
materials-concepts to solve problems.
C. MME Focus Areas: The three Focus Areas within
u Build written and oral communications skills in
the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering curriculum are:
conjunction with teamwork skills.
1. Physicochemical Processing of Materials
u Impart the ability for self-acquisition of knowledge
2. Physical Metallurgy
and continued education.
3. Materials Science
u Impart a breadth of knowledge which enables a
D. MME Curriculum Requirements: The Metallurgi-
choice of solutions to materials engineering prob-
cal and Materials Engineering course sequence is designed
lems.
to fulfill the program goals and to satisfy the curriculum
Curriculum
requirements. The time sequence of courses organized by
The Metallurgical and Materials Engineering (MME)
degree program, year and semester, is listed below.
curriculum is organized to provide three educational
Degree Requirements (Metallurgical and
components: fundamentals of materials, applications of the
Materials Engineering)
fundamentals, and emphasis in one of three focus areas.
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
A. MME Basics: The basic curriculum in the Metallur-
DCGN209 Introduction to Thermodynamics
3
3
gical and Materials Engineering Department will provide a
MACS213 Calculus for Scientists & Engnr’s III
4
4
background in the following topic areas:
PHGN200 Physics II
3.5 3
4.5
1. Crystal Structures and Structural Analysis: Crystal
SYGN202 Engineered Materials Systems
3
3
systems; symmetry elements and miller indices; atomic
MACS260 Fortran Programming
2
2
bonding; metallic, ceramic and polymeric structures; x-
PAGN201 Physical Education III
2
0.5
ray and electron diffraction; stereographic projection and
Total
17
crystal orientation; long range order; defects in materials.
Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
2. Thermodynamics of Materials: Heat and mass balances;
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
thermodynamic laws; chemical potential and chemical
PHGN300 Modern Physics
3
3
equilibrium; solution thermodynamics & solution models;
DCGN241 Statics
3
3
partial molar and excess quantities; solid state thermody-
EPIC251 Design II
2
3
3
namics; thermodynamics of surfaces; electrochemistry.
EBGN211 Principles of Economics
3
3
3. Transport Phenomena and Kinetics: Heat, mass and
SYGN200 Human Systems
3
3
momentum transport; transport properties of fluids;
PAGN202 Physical Education IV
2
0.5
diffusion mechanisms; reaction kinetics; nucleation and
Total
18.5
growth kinetics.
Summer Field Session
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
4. Phase Equilibria: Phase rule; binary and ternary systems;
MTGN272 Field Session
3
microstructural evolution; defects in crystals; surface
Total
3
phenomena; phase transformations eutectic, eutectoid,
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
martensitic, nucleation and growth, recovery; microstruc-
MTGN311 Structure of Materials
3
3
4
tural evolution; strengthening mechanisms; quantitative
MTGN381 Phase Equilibria
2
2
stereology; heat treating.
MTGN351 Metallurgical &
5. Properties of Materials: Mechanical properties (oxidation
Materials Thermodynamics
4
4
and corrosion); electrical, magnetic and optical proper-
EGGN320 Mechanics of Materials
3
3
ties: failure analysis.
MACS— Advanced Mathematics
3
3
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective I
3
3
B. MME Applications: The course content in Metallur-
Total
19
gical and Materials Engineering Curriculum will emphasize
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
the following applications:
MTGN334 Chemical Processing of Materials
3
3
1. Materials Processing: Particulate processing, thermo-
MTGN348 Microstructural Develop. of Materials 3
3
4
and electro-chemical materials-processing, hydrometallur-
MTGN352 Metallurgical & Materials Kinetics
3
3
gical processing, synthesis of materials, deformation
MTGN331 Particulate Materials Processing
3
3
processing, casting and welding.
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective II
3
3
2. Design and Application of Materials: Materials selection,
Free Elective
3
3
ferrous and nonferrous metals, ceramic materials,
Total
19
polymeric materials, composite materials and electronic
materials.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
63

Senior Year Fall Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
students with the specific educational requirements to begin
MTGN445 Mechanical Behavior of Materials
3
3
4
a career in microelectronics and, at the same time, a broad
MTGN461 Trans. Phen. & Reactor Design
and flexible background necessary to remain competitive in
for Met. & Mat. Engs.
2
3
3
this exciting and rapidly changing industry. The undergradu-
MTGN450 Stat Process Control &
ate electives which satisfy the requirements of the program
Design of Experiments
3
3
and an overall curriculum, are outlined in an informational
MTGN— MTGN Elective
3
3
package “Enhanced Program for Preparation for Microelec-
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective III
3
3
tronics” available from either the Physics or Metallurgical
Free Elective
3
3
and Materials Engineering Departments. A Program Mentor
Total
19
in each Department can also provide counseling on the
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
program.
MTGN466 Design, Selection & Use of Mats
1
6
3
Application for admission to this program should be
MTGN— MTGN Elective
3
3
made during the first semester of the sophomore year (in
MTGN— MTGN Elective
3
3
special cases, later entry may be approved, upon review, by
DCGN381 Electric Circuits, Electronics & Power 3
3
4
one of the program mentors). Undergraduate students
Free Electives
6
6
admitted to the program must maintain a 3.0 grade-point
Total
19
average or better. The graduate segment of the program does
Degree Total
147.5
not require a thesis; instead, an Engineering Report on a
Five Year Combined Metallurgical and Materials
case study is submitted to the student’s Master of Engineer-
Engineering Baccalaureate and Master of
ing Committee followed by an oral defense of the Report.
Engineering in Metallurgical and Materials
Additional details on the Master of Engineering can be
Engineering, with an Electronic-Materials
found in the Graduate Degree and Requirements section of
Emphasis.
the Graduate Bulletin. The case study is started during the
The Departments of Metallurgical and Materials
student’s senior design-project and completed during the
Engineering and Physics collaborate to offer a five-year
year of graduate study. A student admitted to the program is
program designed to meet the needs of the electronics
expected to select a graduate advisor, in advance of the
industry. Students who satisfy the requirements of the
graduate-studies final year, before the start of their senior
program, obtain an undergraduate degree in either Engineer-
year. The senior design/case-study topic is then identified
ing Physics or in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering in
and selected in consultation with the graduate advisor. A
four years and a Master of Engineering degree in Metallur-
formal application, during the senior year, for admission to
gical and Materials Engineering at the end of the fifth year.
the graduate program in Metallurgical and Materials
The program is designed to provide for a strong background
Engineering must be submitted to the Graduate School.
in science fundamentals, as well as specialized training in
Students who have maintained all the standards of the
the materials-science and processing needs of the electronics
program requirements leading up to this step, can expect to
industry. Thus, the goal of the program is to provide
be admitted.
64
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

AROTC Scholarships to attend the Colorado School of
Military Science
Mines. AROTC Scholarships pay tuition and fees (within
the limits set by the law), provides a book allowance and
(Army ROTC-AROTC)
pay the cadets a subsistence allowance of $150 per month
The Military Science Program at the Colorado School of
during the school year for the duration of the scholarship.
Mines develops the qualities of citizenship and leadership in
The student may pursue any 4-year degree program offered
the individual which are desirable in both military and
at CSM. Upon graduation, AROTC Scholarship cadets
civilian enterprises. Successful completion of the four-year
receive commissions and will be required to serve in the
program qualifies the student for a commission as a Second
military for four years of a active duty and four years of
Lieutenant in the United States Army, Army Reserve or
Reserve Forces duty, for a total of eight years. Individuals
Army National Guard. Full benefit of the program is
interested in applying for AROTC Scholarships should
achieved by participating in the four-year program;
contact high school guidance counselors or the Professor of
however, late entry may be possible by attendance at the
Military Science, CSM, no later than the first month of the
summer Basic Camp.
senior year in high school. There are also 2-year and 3-year
Basic Course. (Freshman and Sophomore-level Military
AROTC Scholarships available to students already in
Science): No obligation is incurred by enrolling in any
college. A 2-year AROTC Reserve Forces Duty Scholar-
Freshman or Sophomore-level Military Science course
ship is available for cadets entering the Advanced Military
(except by Military Science Scholarship winners). Students
Science course who wish to pursue a Reserve Forces
receive training in military skills such as drill and ceremo-
military obligation. Another option available to cadets is the
nies, uniform wear, customs and courtesies of the service,
Department of the Army Scientific and Engineering AROTC
small unit tactics, and background information on the role
Cooperative Program (DASE AROTC CO-OP). DASE
and organization of the Army. Freshman cadets will receive
students are hired as Department of the Army civilians.
extensive training and practical experience in using a map
They receive the pay, insurance, sick leave and other
and compass to navigate cross-country. Sophomore cadets
benefits provided DA civilian employees. In addition, upon
will receive training in First Aid. Additionally, all cadets
successful completion of the program, students will have the
receive training, and have the opportunity to participate, in
opportunity for continued employment. Qualified students
several outdoor activities. These include skiing (both
may receive financial assistance of up to $5,000 per year to
downhill and cross-country), rock climbing, rappelling, rope
cover cost of tuition, books and living expenses.
bridging, outdoor survival skills, and rafting.
Navy ROTC (NROTC)
Advanced AROTC. Enrollment in the last two years of
AROTC is both elective and selective for nonscholarship
Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps
students. Applicants must demonstrate academic profi-
Colorado School of Mines students may pursue a
ciency, leadership ability and officer potential. The
commission as a officer in the U.S. Navy or Marine Corps
Advanced Course builds on the individual skills learned in
through a cross town agreement with the Naval ROTC Unit
the Basic Course. During the Junior year (MSIII) cadets
at the University of Colorado, Boulder. NROTC offers two-
receive training in small unit tactics in preparation for their
year and four-year scholarship programs and college (non-
attendance at the AROTC Advanced Camp (normally
scholarship) programs. Navy scholarships may be earned
attended during the summer after their Junior year). Cadets
through a national competition based on college board
also receive training in management, ethics and leadership,
exams and high school record, or while the student is
as well as practical experience in performing as the leader in
enrolled in college based on college grades and military
a stressful environment. The senior level (MSIV) cadets
performance. Scholarship students receive tuition and fees,
receive training on how the Army functions at a higher level
books, and a $100 per month subsistence allowance during
by planning and executing many of the Cadet Battalion
their last two years in the program (advanced standing).
activities.
NROTC students attending Colorado School of Mines
AROTC Credit. Military Science credits may be applied
must attend a weekly drill session at the University of
to the free elective portion of the degree programs, or used
Colorado Boulder campus and fulfill other military
in the Military Science minor program. Military Supplies.
responsibilities. Additionally, they must complete a series
Military Science textbooks, uniforms and accessories are
of Naval Science courses at the Boulder campus by special
issued free of charge to students in the AROTC program.
arrangement with the appropriate NROTC staff instructor.
Students enrolled in Advanced Military Science courses also
Navy option students must complete course work in
receive a subsistence allowance of $150 per month during
calculus, physics, computer science, American military
the regular school year. AROTC Scholarships. The United
history or national security policy, and a foreign language.
States Government offers qualified male or female appli-
Marine Corps option students are required to complete
cants
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
65

courses in American military history or national security
degree completion. It consists of three parts: the General
policy and a foreign language. Students should check with
Military Course (GMC) for lower division (normally
their NROTC class advisor to determine specific course
freshmen and sophomore) students; the Professional Officer
offerings which fulfill the above requirements.
Course (POC) for upper division students (normally juniors
and seniors); and Leadership Laboratory (LLAB— attended
Commissioned Service. The mission of the NROTC
by all cadets). Completion of a four-week summer training
program is to provide regular and reserve officers to the
course is required prior to commissioning.
fleet and Marine Corps for service in the “Unrestricted
Line” fields. Unrestricted Line officers specialize in one of
Modified Two-Year Program
the following: Surface ships, submarines, aviation (Pilot or
All undergraduate and graduate students are eligible for
Naval Flight Officer), Special Warfare (SEALs) or Special
this program. It is offered to full-time, regularly enrolled
Operations (Diving, Salvage, Explosive Ordnance Dis-
degree students and requires at least two years of full-time
posal). Marine Corps officer commissionees enter a variety
college (undergraduate or graduate level, or a combination).
of fields including infantry, aviation, armor, and combat
Those selected for this program must complete a six-week
engineering. Regardless of the type of commission earned,
field training program during the summer months as a
regular or reserve, virtually all NROTC graduates serve on
prerequisite for entry into the Professional Officer Course
active duty after commissioning. Men and women interested
the following fall semester.
in these and other programs leading to commissions in the
Leadership Lab
Naval Service are encouraged to contact the NROTC Unit at
All AFROTC cadets must attend Leadership Lab (1-1/2
492-8287 or in person at Folsom Stadium, Gate 6, Room
hours per week). The laboratory involves a study of Air
241, University of Colorado, Boulder.
Force customs and courtesies, drill and ceremonies, career
Air Force ROTC (AFROTC)
opportunities, and the life and work of an Air Force junior
Air Force Reserve Officer Training
officer.
Corps
Other AFROTC Programs
Other programs are frequently available based on current
U.S. Air Force ROTC offers several programs leading to
Air Force needs. Any AFROTC staff member in Boulder
a commission in the U.S. Air Force upon receipt of at least a
(303 492-8351) can discuss best alternatives. Interested
baccalaureate degree.
students should make initial contact as early as possible to
Standard Four-Year Program
create the best selection opportunity, as selection is on a
This standard program is designed for incoming
competitive basis. There is no obligation until a formal
freshmen or any student with four years remaining until
contract is entered.
66
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Mining Engineering
Program Goals (Bachelor of Science in Mining
Engineering)
TIBOR G. ROZGONYI, Professor and Department Head
The education goals the Mining Engineering Department
M.U. OZBAY, Professor
aspires to accomplish can be seen in the attributes of our
LEVENT OZDEMIR, Professor and Director of Earth Mechanics
graduates. The graduate is equipped with:
Institute
KADRI DAGDELEN, Associate Professor
u A sound knowledge in the required basic sciences and
MATTHEW J. HREBAR, III, Associate Professor
engineering fundamentals;
MARK KUCHTA, Assistant Professor
u Knowledge and experience in application of engineer-
MIKLOS D. G. SALAMON, Professor Emeritus
ing principles to the exploitation of earth’s resources
Program Description
and construction of earth (rock) systems in an engineer-
ing systems orientation and setting;
Mining engineering is a broad profession which
u Ability to solve complex mining and earth systems
embraces all required activities to facilitate the recovery of
related problems;
valuable minerals and products from the earth’s crust for the
u Capability for team work, decision making;
benefit of humanity. It is one of the oldest engineering
professions which continues to grow in importance. It has
u Appreciation of the global role of minerals in the
often been said: “If it was not grown in the field or fished
changing world;
out of the water, then it must have been mined.” An
u Desire for continuing education, intellectual and
adequate supply of mineral products at competitive prices is
professional development, analysis and creativity;
the life blood of the continuing growth of industrialized
u Self confident, articulate, with high professional and
nations and the foundation of the progress for the develop-
ethical standards.
ing countries.
Curriculum
The function of the mining engineer is to apply knowl-
The mining engineering curriculum is devised to
edge of pertinent scientific theory, engineering fundamen-
facilitate the widest employability of CSM graduates. The
tals, and improved technology to recover natural resources.
curriculum is based on scientific engineering and geologic
Mining is a world-wide activity involving the extraction of
fundamentals and the application of these fundamentals to
nonmetallics, metal ores of all kinds, and solid fuel and
design and operate mines and to create structures in rock.
energy sources such as coal and nuclear materials. In
To achieve this goal, the curriculum is designed to ensure
addition to mineral extraction, the skills of mining engineers
that the graduates:
are also needed in a variety of fields where the earth’s crust
u become broad based mining engineers who can tackle
is utilized. The construction industry, with its requirements
the problems of both hard and soft rock mining,
of developing earth (rock) systems, tunnels and under-
regardless of whether the mineral deposit requires
ground chambers, and the hazardous waste disposal industry
surface or underground methods of extraction,
are examples of such applications. These are expanding
u have an opportunity, through elective courses, to
needs, with a shortage of competent people; the mining
specialize in one or more aspects of the mining
engineer is well qualified to meet these needs.
engineering profession,
The importance of ecological and environmental
u who are interested in an academic or research career, or
planning is recognized and given significant attention in all
wish to pursue employment in related fields, have a
aspects of the mining engineering curriculum.
sufficiently sound scientific and engineering founda-
CSM mining engineering students study the principles
tion to do so effectively.
and techniques of mineral exploration and underground and
This purpose permeates both the lower and upper
surface mining operations. Studies include rock mechanics,
division courses. Another important aspect of the curricu-
rock fragmentation, plant and mine design, mine ventilation,
lum is the development of the students’ capabilities to be a
surveying, valuation, industrial hygiene, mineral law, mine
team member, with the added goal of preparing our
safety, computing and operations research. Throughout the
graduates for a leadership in their professional life. The
mining engineering curriculum, a constant effort is made to
curriculum focuses on the application of engineering
maintain a balance between theoretical principles and their
principles to solving problems, in short, engineering design
engineering applications. The mining engineering graduate
in an earth systems approach.
is qualified for positions in engineering, supervision, and
Degree Requirements (Mining Engineering)
research.
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
MACS213 Calc. for Scientists & Engn’rs III
4
4
PHGN200 Physics II
3.5
3
4.5
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
67

EBGN211 Principles of Economics
3
3
Petroleum Engineering
MNGN317 Statics/Dynamics
4
4
EPIC251 Design II
2
3
3
CRAIG W. VAN KIRK, Professor and Department Head
PAGN201 Physical Education III
2
0.5
JOHN R. FANCHI, Professor
Total
19
RICHARD L. CHRISTIANSEN, Associate Professor
Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
RAMONA M. GRAVES, Associate Professor
EGGN351 Fluid Mechanics
3
3
ROBERT S. THOMPSON, Associate Professor
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
ERDAL OZKAN, Associate Professor
GEOL210 Materials of the Earth
2
3
3
ALFRED W. EUSTES III, Assistant Professor
MNGN210 Introductory Mining
3
3
JON R. CARLSON, Research Professor
SYGN201 Engineered Earth Systems
3
3
MARK G. MILLER, Research Assistant Professor
EGGN320 Mechanics of Materials
3
3
BILLY J. MITCHELL, Professor Emeritus
PAGN202 Physical Education IV
2
0.5
HOSSEIN KAZEMI, Adjunct Professor
Total
18.5
Program Description
Summer Field Session
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
The primary objectives of petroleum engineering are the
MNGN300 Summer Field Session
5
environmentally sound exploration, development, evalua-
Total
5
tion, and recovery of oil, gas, and other fluids in the earth.
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
Skills in this branch of engineering are needed to meet the
EGGN371 Engineering Thermodynamics
3
3
world’s ever-increasing demand for hydrocarbon fuel,
MNGN308 Mine Safety
1
1
thermal energy, and waste and pollution management.
MNGN309 Mine Operations Lab
8
2
MNGN312 Surface Mine Design
2
3
3
Graduates of the program are in high demand in private
MNGN321 Introductory Rock Mechanics
2
3
3
industry, as evidenced by the strong job market and high
SYGN200 Human Systems
3
3
salaries. The petroleum industry offers a wide range of
Free Elective
3
3
employment opportunities for Petroleum Engineering
Total
18
students during summer breaks and after graduation.
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
Exciting experiences range from field work in producing oil
DCGN381 Electrical Circuits, Elec. & Pwr
3
3
and gas fields to office jobs in small towns or large cities.
MACS323 Probability and Stat. for Engn’rs
3
3
Worldwide travel and overseas assignments are available for
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective I
3
3
interested students. In addition to exciting careers in the
MNGN316 Coal Mining Methods and Design
2
2
3
petroleum industry, many Petroleum Engineering graduates
EBGN312 Macroeconomics
3
3
find rewarding careers in the environmental arena, law,
GEOL308 Structural Geology
2
3
3
medicine, business, and many other walks of life.
Total
18
The department offers a semester abroad opportunity in
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
Austria through a formal exchange program with the
MNGN314 Underground Mine Design
2
3
3
Petroleum Engineering Department at the Mining University
MNGN414 Mine Plant Design
2
3
3
in Leoben, Austria. Qualified undergraduate and graduate
MNGN428 Mining Eng. Design Report I
3
1
students from each school can attend the other for one
MNGN438 Introduction to Geostatistics
1
3
2
semester and receive full transfer credit back at the home
MTGN322/323 Introduction to Mineral Process.3
3
4
university.
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective II
3
3
Graduate courses emphasize the research aspects of the
Free Elective
3
profession, as well as advanced engineering applications, all
Total
19
of which culminate in the preparation and written presenta-
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
tion of an acceptable thesis by the student. Qualified
MNGN429 Mining Eng. Design Report II
3
2
graduate students may earn the Master of Science, Master of
MNGN433 Mine Systems Analysis I
3
3
Engineering, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees.
MNGN427 Mine Valuation
2
2
MNGN424 Mine Ventilation
2
3
3
A new lab wing was completed in 1993 and the existing
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective III
3
3
office and classroom building was renovated in 1994 at a
GEGN405 Mineral Deposits
2
2
total project cost exceeding $10 million. New lab equipment
Free Elective
3
added during the past few years total more than $2 million.
Total
18
The department has state-of-the-art laboratories in a wide
DegreeTotal
148.5
range of technical areas, including the following under-
graduate labs:
68
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Computer Laboratory
analysis. See the department secretaries for the registration
A state-of-the-art computer lab for student use includes
procedure.
Pentium computers running under Windows NT. The
Program Goals (Bachelor of Science in
software available to the student includes standard word
Petroleum Engineering)
processing and spreadsheet programs and more than
The Mission of the Petroleum Engineering Department
$1,000,000 in donated software used by oil and gas
has evolved naturally over time in response to the needs of
companies and research labs around the world.
the graduates; in concert with the Colorado School of Mines
Drilling Simulator Laboratory
Institutional Mission Statement and the Profile of the Future
Rare on university campuses, this lab contains a full-
Graduate; and in recognition of accreditation requirements
scale drilling rig simulator. It includes drilling controls that
specified by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and
can be used to simulate onshore and offshore drilling
Technology. The Mission of the Petroleum Engineering
operations.
Department is:
Reservoir Characterization Laboratory
To educate engineers for the worldwide petroleum
Properties of rock are measured that affect economic
industry at the undergraduate and graduate levels, perform
development of reservoir resources of oil and gas. Measured
research that enhances the state-of-the-art in petroleum
properties include permeability, porosity, and relative
technology, and to serve the industry and public good
permeability. “Hands on” experiences with simple and
through professional societies and public service. This
sophisticated equipment are provided.
mission is achieved through proactive leadership in
providing a solid foundation for both the undergraduate and
Drilling Fluids Laboratory
graduate programs. Students are well prepared for life-long
Modern equipment enables students to evaluate and
learning, an international and diverse career, further
design fluid systems required in drilling operations.
education, and public service. The program emphasizes
Fluids Characterization Laboratory
integrated and multidisciplinary teamwork in classroom
A variety of properties for fluids from oil and gas
instruction and in research, and actively pursues interdisci-
reservoirs are measured for realistic conditions of elevated
plinary activities with many other CSM departments,
temperature and pressure. This laboratory accentuates
particularly the Earth Science/Engineering programs.
principles studied in lectures.
The department’s specific educational goals are the
Petroleum Engineering Summer Field Camps
following:
Two summer sessions, one after the completion of the
1. Broad education
sophomore year and one after the junior year, are important
CSM design and system courses
parts of the educational experience. The first is a two-week
Effective communication
session designed to introduce the student to the petroleum
Skills necessary for diverse and international profes-
industry. Petroleum Engineering, a truly unique and exciting
sional career
engineering discipline, can be experienced only by visiting
Recognition of need and ability to engage in lifelong
petroleum operations. Historically the areas visited have
learning
included Europe, Alaska, Canada, the Gulf Coast, the West
2. Solid foundation in engineering principles
Coast and the Rocky Mountain Region.
and practices
The second two-week session, after the junior year, is an
Society of Petroleum Engineers’ ABET Guidelines
in-depth study of the Rangely Oil Field and surrounding
Strong petroleum engineering department faculty with
geology in Western Colorado. This is the largest oil field in
diverse background
the Rocky Mountain region and has undergone primary,
Technical seminars, field trips, and field sessions
secondary, and enhanced recovery processes. The study is
3. Applied problem solving skills
multidisciplinary with CSM’s Geology and Geophysics
Designing and conducting experiments
Departments combining to form an integrated approach to
Analyzing and interpreting data
education as well as engineering. Environmental impact,
Problem solving skills in engineering practice
safety development, production design, and reservoir
Working real world problems
management are the areas of focus.
4. An understanding of ethical, social, environmental,
and professional responsibilities
It is recommended that all students considering majoring
Following established Department and Colorado
or minoring in Petroleum Engineering sign up for the
School of Mines honor codes
elective course PEGN 102 in the spring semester. Seniors
Integrating ethical and environmental issues into real
may take 500-level graduate courses that include topics such
world problems
as drilling, reservoir, and production engineering, reservoir
Awareness of health and safety issues
simulation and characterization, and economics and risk
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
69

5. Multidisciplinary team skills
MACS213 Calculus for Scientists & Engn’rs III 4
4
Integrated information and data from multiple sources
PHGN200 Physics II
3.5
3
4.5
Critical team skills
PAGN201 Physical Education III
2
0.5
Total
18
Curriculum
Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
All disciplines within petroleum engineering are covered
EPIC251 Design II
2
3
3
to great depth at the undergraduate and graduate levels, both
DCGN209 Introduction to Thermodynamics
3
3
in the classroom and laboratory instruction, and in research.
PEGN205 Computers in the Geosciences I
1
1
Specific areas include fundamental fluid and rock behavior,
EGGN320 Mechanics of Materials
3
3
drilling, formation evaluation, well completions and
PEGN308 Rock Properties
2
3
3
stimulation, well testing, production operations and artificial
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
lift, reservoir engineering, supplemental and enhanced oil
SYGN200 Human Systems
3
3
recovery, economic evaluation of petroleum projects,
Total
19
environmental and safety issues, and the computer simula-
Summer Field Session
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
tion of most of these topics.
PEGN315 Summer Field Session I
2
2
The petroleum engineering student studies mathematics,
Total
2
computer science, chemistry, physics, general engineering,
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
the humanities, technical communication (including report
GEOL315 Sedimentology & Stratigraphy
2
3
3
writing, oral presentations, and listening skills), and
DCGN381 Electric Circuits, Elec. & Pwr.
3
3
environmental topics. A unique aspect is the breadth and
EGGN250 Multidisciplinary Engineering Lab I
4.5
1.5
depth of the total program structured in a manner that
PEGN310 Petroleum Fluid Properties
2
3
3
prepares each graduate for a successful career from the
PEGN311 Drilling Engineering
3
3
4
standpoints of technical competence, managerial abilities,
PEGN419 Well Log Anal. & Formation Eval.
2
3
3
and multidisciplinary experiences. The needs for continued
PEGN305 Computers in the Geosciences II
1
1
learning and professionalism are stressed.
Total
18.5
The strength of the program comes from the high quality
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
of students and professors. The faculty has expertise in
GEOL308 Intro. Applied Structural Geology
2
3
3
teaching and research in all the major areas of petroleum
MACS323 Statistics for Geo-engineers
3
3
engineering listed above. Additionally, the faculty members
EGGN351 Fluid Mechanics
3
3
have significant industrial backgrounds that lead to
EGGN350 Multidisciplinary Engineering Lab II
4.5
1.5
meaningful design experiences for the students. Engineering
PEGN361 Well Completions
3
3
design is taught throughout the curriculum including a
PEGN411 Mechanics of Petrol. Production
3
3
senior design course on applying the learned skills to real
Free Elective
3
3
world reservoir development and management problems.
Total
19.5
The senior design course is truly multidisciplinary with
Summer Field Session
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
students and professors from the Petroleum Engineering,
PEGN316 Summer Field Session II
2
2
Geophysics, and Geology departments.
Total
2
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
The program has state-of-the-art facilities and equipment
PEGN481 Petroleum Seminar
1
1
for laboratory instruction and experimental research. To
PEGN423 Petroleum Reservoir Eng. I
3
3
maintain leadership in future petroleum engineering
PEGN413 Gas Meas. & Formation Evaluation
3
1
technology, decision making, and management, computers
PEGN426 Well Stimulation
3
3
are incorporated into every part of the program, from
PEGN422 Econ. & Eval. Oil & Gas Projects
3
3
undergraduate instruction through graduate student and
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective I
3
3
faculty research.
Free Elective
3
3
The department is close to oil and gas field operations,
Total
17
oil companies and research laboratories, and geologic
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
outcrops of nearby producing formations. There are many
PEGN424 Petroleum Reservoir Eng. II
3
3
opportunities for short field trips and for summer and part-
PEGN439 Multidisciplinary Team Design
2
3
3
time employment in the oil and gas industry in the Denver
PEGN414 Well Test Analysis and Design
3
3
metropolitan region or near campus.
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective II
3
3
Degree Requirements (Petroleum Engineering)
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective III
3
3
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem. hrs.
Free Elective
3
3
SYGN201 Engineered Earth Systems
3
3
PAGN202 Physical Education IV
2
0.5
EBGN211 Principles of Economics
3
3
Total
18.5
DCGN241 Statics
3
3
Degree Total
147.5
70
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Physical Education and
Swenson Intramural Complex
Two fields are available for intramural sports.
Athletics
Required Physical Education.
Every student at the Colorado School of Mines must
MARVIN L. KAY, Department Head, Professor and Athletic
Director
earn a minimum of two semester hours of physical educa-
J. PATRICK DYER, Associate Professor, Assistant Athletic
tion credit taken in four separate semesters. This is a
Director, Trainer
graduation requirement. PAGN101 and PAGN102 in
DAN R. LEWIS, Coach, Associate Athletic Director
sequence are required. Exceptions: (1) a medical excuse
MICHELE L. HARRIS, Coach, Senior Woman Administrator
verified by a physician; (2) veterans, honorably discharged
OSCAR BOES, Coach
from the armed forces; (3) entering students 26 years or
VIC L. DOPERALSKI, Coach
older or students holding a bachelor’s degree. Normally, it
JERRY L. HABERKORN, Coach
is fulfilled during the first two years of attendance. Transfer
TIMOTHY J. HARRISON, Coach
students should clear with the Admissions Offices regarding
JOE HERBERT, Coach
advanced standing in physical education. Participation in
JAMES JULIANA, Coach
intercollegiate athletics may be substituted for required
ALAN KAYLOR, Coach
semesters and hours of physical education. ROTC students
FRANK KOHLENSTEIN, Coach
may request of the Athletic Director that a waiver of the
MICHAEL MULVANEY, Coach
physical education requirement be granted when a similar
MARK ROBERTS, Coach
physical activity is required in their respective ROTC
VERSIE L. WALLACE, Coach
Programs.
STEVE WIMBERLY, Coach
Upper-class students who wish to continue taking
The Department of Physical Education and Athletics
physical education after completing graduation requirements
offers a four-fold physical education and athletics program
may re-enroll in any of the regularly scheduled classes on an
which includes (a) required physical education; (b)inter
elective basis.
collegiate athletics; (c) intramural athletics; and (d)
All students enrolled in physical education shall provide
recreational athletics.
their own gym uniform, shoes (non-marking soles), and
A large number of students use the college’s facilities for
swimming suit. A non-refundable $5.00 fee is assessed for
purely recreational purposes, including swimming, tennis,
the required locker and towel service. Towels and lockers
soccer, basketball, volleyball, handball, weight lifting,
are also available to students who are not enrolled in
softball, and racquetball.
physical education classes for the same fee.
Russell H. Volk Gymnasium
Intercollegiate Athletics
A tri-level complex containing a NCAA regulation
The School is a charter member of the Rocky Mountain
swimming pool, a basketball arena, two racquetball/handball
Athletic Conference (RMAC) and the National Collegiate
courts, wrestling room, weight training facility, locker space,
Athletic Association (NCAA). Sports offered include:
and offices for the Physical Education Department.
football, men’s and women’s basketball, wrestling, men’s
and women’s track, men’s and women’s cross country,
Steinhauer Field House
baseball, men’s and women’s tennis, men’s golf, men’s and
A completely renovated facility of 35,000-sq. ft., which
women’s swimming, men’s soccer, and women’s volleyball
provides for the needs of intercollegiate athletics, physical
and softball. One hour credit is given for a semester’s
education classes, intramurals and student recreation.
participation in each sport.
Baseball Diamond
Through a required athletic fee, all full-time students
Located west of Brooks Field and has seating accommo-
attending CSM become members of the CSM Athletic
dations for 500 spectators.
Association, which financially supports the intercollegiate
Brooks Field
athletic program. The Director of Athletics administers this
Named in honor of Ralph D. Brooks, former member of
program. All necessary equipment is furnished to students
the Board of Trustees of the School of Mines, Brooks Field
participating in intercollegiate athletics at CSM.
includes a football field equipped with lights and a steel-
Intramural Sports
concrete grandstand and bleachers which seat 3,500
The intramural athletic program features nearly all the
spectators. In addition, the Stadium has a 400-meter cinder
sports offered in the intercollegiate program and many more.
track, featuring a 100-meter straightway and other facilities
Fraternities, sororities, independent campus organizations
necessary for track and field meets.
and non-affiliated students provide participants. It is
Tennis Courts
governed by the CSM Intramural Council and administered
The Athletic Department maintains four tennis courts.
by a staff Intramural Director.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
71

Physics
gies, he or she is also capable of striking out in different
directions to develop new technologies. It is the excitement
DON L. WILLIAMSON, Professor and Department Head
of being able to work at this cutting edge that makes the
F. EDWARD CECIL, Professor
engineering physics degree attractive to many students.
REUBEN T. COLLINS, Professor
Career paths of CSM engineering physics graduates vary
THOMAS E. FURTAK, Professor
widely, illustrating the flexibility inherent in the program.
FRANK V. KOWALSKI, Professor
Approximately half of the graduating seniors go on to
JAMES A. McNEIL, Professor
graduate school in physics or a closely related field of
FRANKLIN D. SCHOWENGERDT, Professor
engineering. Some go to medical, law, or other professional
JOHN U. TREFNY, Professor and Vice President for Academic
post-graduate schools. Others find employment in fields as
Affairs
diverse as electronics, semiconductor processing, aerospace,
TIMOTHY R. OHNO, Associate Professor
materials development, nuclear energy, solar energy, and
DAVID M. WOOD, Associate Professor
geophysical exploration.
CHARLES G. DURFEE, Assistant Professor
JON H. EGGERT, Assistant Professor
The physics department maintains modern well-equipped
UWE GREIFE, Assistant Professor
laboratories for general physics, modern physics, electron-
MARIET A. HOFSTEE, Assistant Professor
ics, and advanced experimentation. There are research
PETER W. SUTTER, Assistant Professor
laboratories for the study of solid-state physics, surface
NATHAN PALMER, Lecturer
physics, materials science, optics, and nuclear physics. The
BRUCE H. MEEVES, Instructor
centerpiece of these facilities is a new NSF-funded
JAMES T. BROWN, Professor Emeritus
laboratory for solar and electronic materials. The depart-
F. RICHARD YEATTS, Professor Emeritus
ment also maintains well-equipped and -staffed electronic
WILLIAM B. LAW, Associate Professor Emeritus
and machine shops.
ARTHUR Y. SAKAKURA, Associate Professor Emeritus
Program Goals (Bachelor of Science in
ROBERT F. HOLUB, Research Professor
Engineering Physics)
VICTOR KAYDANOV, Research Professor
The physics department embraces the broad institutional
JEROME G. MORSE, Research Professor
goals as summarized in the Graduate Profile. The additional
JAMES E. BERNARD, Research Associate Professor
engineering physics program-specific goals are listed below.
Program Description
All engineering physics graduates must have the factual
Engineering Physics
knowledge and other thinking skills necessary to
Physics is the most basic of all sciences and the
construct an appropriate understanding of physical
foundation of most of the science and engineering disci-
phenomena in an applied context.
plines. As such, it has always attracted those who want to
All engineering physics graduates must have the ability
understand nature at its most fundamental level. Engineer-
to communicate effectively.
ing Physics is not a specialized branch of physics, but an
Throughout their careers engineering physics graduates
interdisciplinary area wherein the basic physics subject
should be able to function effectively in society.
matter, which forms the backbone of any undergraduate
Five-year Combined Engineering Physics
physics degree, is taken further toward application to
Baccalaureate and Engineering Masters Degrees
engineering. At CSM, the required engineering physics
curriculum includes all of the undergraduate physics courses
with Mechanical, Electrical, and Electronic
that would form the physics curriculum at any good
Materials Tracks
university, but in addition to these basic courses, the CSM
The Department of Physics in collaboration with the
requirements include pre-engineering and engineering
Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering and
courses, which physics majors at other universities would
with the Engineering Division offers five-year programs in
not ordinarily take. These courses include engineering
which students obtain an undergraduate degree in Engineer-
science, design, systems, summer field session and a
ing Physics as well as a non-thesis Masters Degree in an
capstone senior design sequence culminating in a senior
Engineering discipline. There are three tracks. The first
thesis.
two lead to a Masters degree in Engineering with a
mechanical or electrical specialty. Students in the third
This unique blend of physics and engineering makes it
track receive a Masters of Metallurgical and Materials
possible for the engineering physics graduate to work at the
Engineering with an electronic materials emphasis. The
interface between science and technology, where new
programs emphasize a strong background in fundamentals
discoveries are continually being put to practice. While the
of science, in addition to practical experience within an
engineering physicist is at home applying existing technolo-
72
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

engineering discipline. Many of the undergraduate electives
Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
of students involved in each track are specified. For this
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
reason, students are expected to apply to the program during
SYGN201/2 Engineered Systems
3
3
the first semester of their sophomore year (in special cases
PHGN300 Physics III / Modern Physics I
3
3
late entry can be approved by the program mentors). A 3.0
DCGN381 Electric Circuits, Electronics and Pwr. 3
3
grade point average must be maintained to remain in the
PHGN217 Analog Circuits
3
1
program and to be admitted into the appropriate engineering
Engineering Science Elective I
3
3
department for the graduate year.
PAGN202 Physical Education IV
2
0.5
Total
16.5
Students must complete a report or case study during the
Summer Field Session
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
fifth year. The case study should begin during the senior
PHGN384 Summer Field Session (6 weeks)
6
year as part of the Senior Design course. Participants must
Total
6
identify an Engineering advisor prior to their senior year
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
who will assist in choosing an appropriate project and help
PHGN315 Advanced Physics Lab I (WI)
3
1
coordinate the senior design project with the case study or
MACS347 Engineering Mathematics
3
3
report in the fifth year.
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective I
3
3
Interested students can obtain additional information and
DCGN209 Introduction to Thermodynamics
3
3
detailed curricula from the Physics Department or from the
PHGN317 Digital Circuits
2
3
3
participating Engineering Departments.
PHGN350 Intermediate Mechanics
4
4
The department offers Minors and Areas of Special
Total
17
Interest for non-Engineering Physics majors. The require-
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
ments are as follows:
PHGN361 Intermediate Electromagnetism
3
3
Area of Specialization: 12 sem. hrs. minimum
PHGN325 Modern Physics II
4
4
(includes PHGN100 or 200)
PHGN326 Advanced Physics Lab II (WI)
3
1
Minor: 18 sem. hrs. minimum (includes PHGN100 or
PHGN341 Thermal Physics
3
3
200)
Free Elective
3
3
Two courses (one year) of modern physics:
Total
14
PHGN300 Modern Physics I 3 sem. hrs. and
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
PHGN325 Modern Physics II 4 sem. hrs.
PHGN471 Senior Design I (WI)
1
6
3
One course:
PHGN462 Advanced Electromagnetism
3
3
PHGN341 Thermal Physics 3 sem. hrs. or
Engineering Science Elective II
3
3
PHGN350 Mechanics 4 sem. hrs. or
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective II
3
3
PHGN361 Electromagnetism 3 sem. hrs.
Free elective
3
3
Selected courses to complete the Minor: Upper division
Total
15
and/or graduate (500-level) courses which form a logical
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
sequence in a specific field of study as determined in
PHGN472 Senior Design II (WI)
1
6
3
consultation with the Physics Department and the student’s
Engineering Science Elective III
3
3
option department.
Engineering Science Elective IV
3
3
Degree Requirements (Engineering Physics)
Free Elective
3
3
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective III
3
3
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec.lab. sem. hrs.
Total
15
MACS213 Calculus for Scientists & Engn’rs III
4
4
Degree Total
134.5
PHGN200 Physics II
3.5 3
4.5
EPIC251 Design II
3
3
EBGN211 Principles of Economics
3
3
SYGN200 Human Systems
3
3
PAGN201 Physical Education III
2
0.5
Total
18
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
73

Section 6 -
Description of Courses
Student Life
Systems
SYGN101. EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS
CSM101. FRESHMAN SUCCESS SEMINAR A
(I, II, S) Fundamental concepts concerning the nature,
“college adjustment” course, taught in small groups,
composition and evolution of the lithosphere, hydrosphere,
designed to create an attitude among new CSM freshmen
atmosphere and biosphere of the earth integrating the basic
that will help them appreciate the value of higher education,
sciences of chemistry, physics, biology and mathematics.
particularly that offered at CSM, and to acquaint them with
Understanding of anthropological interactions with the
the techniques and School resources that will allow them to
natural systems, and related discussions on cycling of
develop to their fullest potential at CSM. 9-10 meetings
energy and mass, global warming, natural hazards, land use,
during semester; 0.5 semester hours.
mitigation of environmental problems such as toxic waste
Core Areas
disposal, exploitation and conservation of energy, mineral
and agricultural resources, proper use of water resources,
Design
biodiversity and construction. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4
semester hours.
Engineering Practices Introductory Course
Sequence (EPICS)
SYGN200. HUMAN SYSTEMS (I, II) This is a pilot course
ROBERT D. KNECHT, Design (EPICS) Program Director and
in the CSM core curriculum that articulates with LIHU100:
CEPR Research Professor
Nature and Human Values and with the other systems
Freshman Year
courses. Human Systems is an interdisciplinary historical
EPIC151. Design (EPICS) I introduces a design process that
examination of key systems created by humans - namely,
includes open-ended problem solving and team work
political, economic, social, and cultural institutions - as they
integrated with the use of computer software as tools to
have evolved worldwide from the inception of the modern
solve engineering problems. Computer applications
era (ca. 1500) to the present. This course embodies an
emphasize graphical visualization and production of clear
elaboration of these human systems as introduced in their
and coherent graphical images, charts, and drawings. Teams
environmental context in Nature and Human Values and will
assess engineering ethics, group dynamics and time
reference themes and issues explored therein. It also
management with respect to decision making. The course
demonstrates the cross-disciplinary applicability of the
emphasizes written technical communications and intro-
“systems” concept. Assignments will give students contin-
duces oral presentations. 3 semester hours.
ued practice in writing. Prerequisite: LIHU100. 3 semester
hours.
Sophomore Year
SYGN201. ENGINEERED EARTH SYSTEMS (I) An
EPIC251 Design (EPICS) II builds on the design process
introduction to Engineered Earth Systems. Aspects of
introduced in Design (EPICS) I which focuses on open-
appropriate earth systems and engineering practices in
ended problem solving in which students integrate team-
geological, geophysical, mining and petroleum engineering.
work and communications with the use of computer
Emphasis on complex interactions and feedback loops
software as tools to solve engineering problems. Computer
within and among natural and engineered systems. A case
applications emphasize information acquisition and
histories format provides an introduction to earth engineer-
processing based on knowing what new information is
ing fields. 2 hours lecture/seminar, 3 hours lab; 3 semester
necessary to solve a problem and where to find the informa-
hours.
tion efficiently. Teams analyze team dynamics through
weekly team meetings and progress reports. The course
SYGN202. ENGINEERED MATERIALS SYSTEMS (I, II)
emphasizes oral presentations and builds on written
Introduction to the structure, properties, and processing of
communications techniques introduced in Design (EPICS) I.
materials. The historical role that engineered and natural
Prerequisite: EPIC151. 3 semester hours.
materials have made on the advance of civilization.
Engineered materials and their life cycles through process-
74
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

ing, use, disposal and recycle. The impact that engineered
Chemical Engineering and Petroleum
materials have on selected systems to show the breadth of
Refining
properties that are important and how they can be controlled
Sophomore Year
by proper material processing. Recent trends in materials
ChEN200. COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN CHEMI-
development mimicking natural materials in the context of
CAL ENGINEERING Fundamentals of computer program-
the structure and functionality of materials in living systems.
ming as applied to the solution of chemical engineering
Prerequisites or concurrent: CHGN124, MACS112,
problems. Computational methods and algorithm develop-
PHGN100. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ment. Prerequisite: MACS112 or consent of instructor. 2
Distributed Core
hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
DCGN209. INTRODUCTION TO THERMODYNAMICS
ChEN201. MATERIAL AND ENERGY BALANCES
(I, II) Introduction to the fundamental principles of classical
Introduction to the principles of conservation of mass and
thermodynamics. Application of mass and energy balances
energy. Applications to chemical processing systems.
to a variety of systems. Entropy and the second law of
Relevant aspects of computer-aided process simulation.
thermodynamics. Introduction to phase equilibria and
Prerequisite: MACS315 (corequisite), ChEN200 or
chemical reaction equilibria. Ideal and nonideal solutions.
equivalent (as approved by ChEN Department Head) or
Electrochemistry. Prerequisites: CHGN121, CHGN124,
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MACS111, MACS112, PHGN100. 3 hours lecture; 3
semester hours.
Junior Year
ChEN307. FLUID MECHANICS Theory and application
DCGN241. STATICS (I, II, S) Forces, moments, couples,
of momentum transport and fluid flow in chemical engineer-
equilibrium, centroids and second moments of areas,
ing. Fundamentals of microscopic phenomena and applica-
volumes and masses, hydrostatics, friction, virtual work.
tion to macroscopic systems. Relevant aspects of computer-
Applications of vector algebra to structures. Prerequisite:
aided process simulation. Prerequisite: ChEN201,
Credit or concurrent enrollment in PHGN100, MACS112,
MACS315. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EPIC151 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ChEN308. HEAT TRANSFER Theory and applications of
DCGN381. INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL CIR-
energy transport: conduction, convection and radiation.
CUITS, ELECTRONICS AND POWER (I, II, S) This
Fundamentals of microscopic phenomena and application to
course provides an engineering science analysis of electrical
macroscopic systems. Relevant aspects of computer-aided
circuits. The following topics are included: DC and single-
process simulation. Prerequisite: ChEN201, ChEN307,
and three-phase AC circuit analysis, current and charge
MACS315, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
relationships. Ohm’s Law, resistors, inductors, capacitors,
semester hours.
equivalent resistance and impedance, Kirchoff’s Laws,
Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits, superposition and
ChEN312/313. UNIT OPERATIONS LABORATORY Field
source transformation, power and energy, maximum power
Session (I & II) Principles of mass, energy, and momentum
transfer, first order transient response, algebra of complex
transport as applied to laboratory-scale processing equip-
numbers, phasor representation, time domain and frequency
ment. Written and oral communications skills. Aspects of
domain concepts, effective and rms vales, complex power,
group dynamics, teamwork, and critical thinking. Prerequi-
apparent power, power factor, balanced delta and wye line
site: ChEN201, ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN357, ChEN375
and phase currents, filters, resonance, diodes, EM work,
6 hours lab; 6 semester hours.
moving charge in an electric field, relationship between EM
ChEN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION Cooperative
voltage and work, Faraday’s and Ampere’s Laws, magnetic
work/education experience involving employment of a
reluctance and ideal transformers. Prerequisite: PHGN200.
chemical engineering nature in an internship spanning at
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
least one academic semester. Prerequisite: consent of
instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
ChEN350. HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
Scholarly research of an independent nature. Prerequisite:
junior standing, consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
ChEN351. HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
Scholarly research of an independent nature. Prerequisite:
junior standing, consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
ChEN357. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THERMODY-
NAMICS Fundamentals of thermodynamics for application
to chemical engineering processes and systems. Phase and
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
75

reaction equilibria. Relevant aspects of computer-aided
ChEN409. PETROLEUM PROCESSES Application of
process simulation. Integrated laboratory experiments.
chemical engineering principles to petroleum refining.
Prerequisite: DCGN209, ChEN201, MACS315, or consent
Thermodynamics and reaction engineering of complex
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 1 hour lab; 4 semester hours.
hydrocarbon systems. Relevant aspects of computer-aided
process simulation for complex mixtures. Prerequisite:
ChEN375. MASS TRANSFER Fundamentals of stage-wise
CHGN221, CHGN351 and CHGN/353, ChEN201,
and diffusional mass transport with applications to chemical
ChEN357, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
engineering systems and processes. Relevant aspects of
semester hours.
computer-aided process simulation. Prerequisite: ChEN201,
ChEN308, ChEN357, or consent of instructor. 3 hours
ChEN415. POLYMER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
lecture; 3 semester hours.
Chemistry and thermodynamics of polymers and polymer
solutions. Reaction engineering of polymerization. Charac-
ChEN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMICAL ENGI-
terization techniques based on solution properties. Materials
NEERING Topical courses in chemical engineering of
science of polymers in varying physical states. Processing
special interest. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 1 to 6
operations for polymeric materials and use in separations.
semester hours.
Prerequisite: CHGN221, MACS315, ChEN357, or consent
ChEN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY Individual research
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
or special problem projects. Topics, content, and credit
ChEN416. POLYMER ENGINEERING AND TECHNOL-
hours to be agreed upon by student and supervising faculty
OGY Polymer fluid mechanics, polymer rheological
member. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and department
response, and polymer shape forming. Definition and
head, submission of “Independent Study” form to CSM
measurement of material properties. Interrelationships
Registrar. 1 to 6 credit hours.
between response functions and correlation of data and
Senior Year
material response. Theoretical approaches for prediction of
ChEN401. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN I
polymer properties. Processing operations for polymeric
Simulation of chemical processes. Synthesis, analysis, and
materials; melt and flow instabilities. Prerequisite:
evaluation of chemical processes. Costing and economic
ChEN307, MACS315, or consent of instructor. 3 hours
evaluation. Application of computer-aided process simula-
lecture; 3 semester hours.
tion to plant and process design. Prerequisite: ChEN201,
ChEN418. REACTION ENGINEERING Applications of
ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN357, ChEN375, or consent of
the fundamentals of thermodynamics, physical chemistry,
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
and organic chemistry to the engineering of reactive
ChEN402. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN II
processes. Reactor design; acquisition and analysis of rate
Continuation of ChEN401. Advanced computer-aided
data; heterogeneous catalysis. Relevant aspects of computer-
process simulation and process optimization. Prerequisite:
aided process simulation. Prerequisite: ChEN201,
ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN357, ChEN375, ChEN418 (co-
ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN357, MACS315, CHGN221,
requisite), or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
CHGN353, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
semester hours.
semester hours.
ChEN403. PROCESS DYNAMICS AND CONTROL
ChEN420. MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN CHEMICAL
Mathematical modeling and analysis of transient systems.
ENGINEERING Formulation and solution of chemical
Applications of control theory to response of dynamic
engineering problems using exact analytical solution
chemical engineering systems and processes. Prerequisite:
methods. Set-up and solution of ordinary and partial
ChEN201, ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN375, MACS315, or
differential equations for typical chemical engineering
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
systems and transport processes. Prerequisite: MACS315,
ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN375, or consent of instructor. 3
ChEN408 NATURAL GAS PROCESSING Application of
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
chemical engineering principles to the processing of natural
gas. Emphasis on using thermodynamics and mass transfer
ChEN421. ENGINEERING ECONOMICS Economic
operations to analyze existing plants. Relevant aspects of
analysis of engineering processes and systems. Interest,
computer-aided process simulation. Prerequisites:
annuity, present value, depreciation, cost accounting,
ChEN201, ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN357, ChEN375, or
investment accounting and financing of engineering
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
enterprises along with taxation, market evaluation and
break-even analysis. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 3
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
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Undergraduate Bulletin
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ChEN430. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA Theory and
Chemistry and Geochemistry
chemical engineering applications of momentum, heat, and
CHGN111. INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY Introductory
mass transport. Set up and solution of problems involving
college chemistry. Elementary atomic structure and the
equations of motion and energy. Prerequisite: ChEN307,
periodic chart, chemical bonding, properties of common
ChEN308, ChEN357, ChEN375, MACS315, or consent of
elements and their compounds, and stoichiometry of
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
chemical reactions. Must not be used for elective credit. 3
ChEN440. MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVES IN CHEMI-
hours lecture and recitation; 3 semester hours.
CAL ENGINEERING Applications of statistical and
CHGN121. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I (I,II) Study
quantum mechanics to understanding and prediction of
of matter and energy based on atomic structure, correlation
transport properties and processes. Relations between
of properties of elements with position in periodic chart,
microscopic properties of materials and systems to macro-
chemical bonding, geometry of molecules, phase changes,
scopic behavior. Prerequisite: ChEN307, ChEN308,
stoichiometry, solution chemistry, gas laws, and thermo-
ChEN357, ChEN375, CHGN351 and 353, CHGN221 and
chemistry. 3 hours lecture and recitation, 3 hours lab; 4
222, MACS315, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
semester hours.
semester hours
CHGN124. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II (I,II,S)
ChEN450. HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
Continuation of CHGN121 concentrating on chemical
Scholarly research of an independent nature. Prerequisite:
kinetics, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, organic
senior standing, consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
nomenclature, and chemical equilibrium (acid- base,
ChEN451. HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
solubility, complexation, and redox). Prerequisite: Credit in
Scholarly research of an independent nature. Prerequisite:
CHGN121. 3 hours lecture and recitation; 3 semester hours.
senior standing, consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
CHGN126. QUANTITATIVE CHEMICAL MEASURE-
ChEN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMICAL ENGI-
MENTS (I,II,S) Experiments emphasizing quantitative
NEERING Topical courses in chemical engineering of
chemical measurements. Prerequisite: Credit in or concur-
special interest. Prerequisite: consent of instructor 1 to 6
rent enrollment in CHGN124. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
semester hours.
CHGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (I, II)
ChEN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY Individual research or
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
special problem projects. Topics, content, and credit hours
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
to be agreed upon by student and supervising faculty
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
member. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and department
Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
head, submission of “Independent Study” form to CSM
CHGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
Registrar. 1 to 6 credit hours.
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
CHGN201. CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS LABO-
RATORY (II) Experiments in determining enthalpy, entropy,
free energy, equilibrium constants, vapor pressures,
colligative properties. Prerequisites DCGN209 or concur-
rent enrollment. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
CHGN221. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (I) Structure,
properties, and reactions of the important classes of organic
compounds, introduction to reaction mechanisms. Labora-
tory exercises including synthesis, product purification and
characterization. Prerequisite: CHGN124, CHGN126. 3
hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
CHGN222. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (II) Continuation
of CHGN221. Prerequisite: CHGN221. 3 hours lecture; 3
hours lab; 4 semester hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
77

CHGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (I, II)
CHGN341. DESCRIPTIVE INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
(II) The chemistry of the elements and periodic trends in
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
reactivity discussed in relation to the preparation and use of
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
inorganic chemicals in industry and the environment.
Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Prerequisite: CHGN222, DCGN209. 3 hours lecture; 3
semester hours.
CHGN299. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
CHGN351. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A MOLECULAR
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
PERSPECTIVE I (I) A study of chemical systems from a
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
molecular physical chemistry perspective. Includes an
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
introduction to quantum mechanics, atoms and molecules,
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
spectroscopy, bonding and symmetry, and an introduction to
modern computational chemistry. Prerequisite: CHGN124,
CHGN/ESGN302. INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMEN-
DCGN209, MACS315, PHGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours
TAL CHEMISTRY (I, II) Processes by which natural and
laboratory; 4 semester hours.
anthropogenic chemicals interact, react and are transformed
and redistributed in various environmental compartments.
CHGN353. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A MOLECULAR
Air, soil and aqueous (fresh and saline surface and
PERSPECTIVE II ( II) A continuation of CHGN351.
groundwaters) environments are covered, along with
Includes statistical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics,
specialized environments such as waste treatment facilities
chemical reaction mechanisms, electrochemistry, and
and the upper atmosphere. Prerequisites: ESGN200,
selected additional topics. Prerequisite: CHGN351. 3 hours
DCGN209. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
lecture; 3 hours laboratory; 4 semester hours.
CHGN323. QUALITATIVE ORGANIC ANALYSIS (II)
CHGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (I, II)
Identification, separation and purification of organic
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
compounds including use of modern physical and instru-
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
mental methods. Prerequisite: CHGN222. 1 hour lecture; 3
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
hours lab; 2 semester hours.
Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
CHGN335. INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS (II) Principles
CHGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
of AAS, AES, Visible-UV, IR, NMR, XRF, XRD, XPS,
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
electron, and mass spectroscopy; gas and liquid chromatog-
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
raphy; data interpretation. Prerequisite: DCGN209,
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
MACS112. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
CHGN336. ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY (I) Theory and
techniques of gravimetry, titrimetry (acid-base,
CHGN401. THEORETICAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
complexometric, redox, precipitation), electrochemical
(I) Periodic properties of the elements. Bonding in ionic and
analysis, chemical separations; statistical evaluation of data.
metallic crystals. Acid-base theories. Inorganic stereochem-
Prerequisite: DCGN209, CHGN335. 3 hours lecture; 3
istry. Nonaqueous solvents. Coordination chemistry and
semester hours.
ligand field theory. Prerequisite: CHGN341 or consent of
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CHGN337. ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY
(I) Laboratory exercises emphasizing sample preparation
CHGN402. BONDING THEORY AND SYMMETRY (II)
and instrumental methods of analysis. Prerequisite:
Introduction to valence bond and molecular orbital theories,
CHGN335, CHGN336 or concurrent enrollment. 3 hours
symmetry; introduction to group theory; applications of
lab; 1 semester hour.
group theory and symmetry concepts to molecular orbital
and ligand field theories. Prerequisite: CHGN341 or consent
CHGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (I,II,S)
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Supervised, full-time, chemistry-related employment for a
continuous six-month period (or its equivalent) in which
CHGN410/MLGN510. SURFACE CHEMISTRY (II)
specific educational objectives are achieved. Prerequisite:
Introduction to colloid systems, capillarity, surface tension
Second semester sophomore status and a cumulative grade-
and contact angle, adsorption from solution, micelles and
point average of at least 2.00. 0 to 3 semester hours.
microemulsions, the solid/gas interface, surface analytical
Cooperative Education credit does not count toward
techniques, van der Waal forces, electrical properties and
graduation except under special conditions.
colloid stability, some specific colloid systems (clays, foams
78
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

and emulsions). Students enrolled for graduate credit in
CHGN475. COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY (II)
MLGN510 must complete a special project. Prerequisite:
Prerequisites: CHGN351, CHGN401. 3 hours lecture; 3
DCGN209 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
semester hours.
semester hours.
CHGN490. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION
CHGN422. POLYMER CHEMISTRY LABORATORY (I)
Advanced methods of organic and inorganic synthesis; high-
Prerequisites: CHGN221. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
temperature, high-pressure, inert-atmosphere, vacuum-line,
and electrolytic methods. Prerequisites: CHGN323,
CHGN428. INTRODUCTORY BIOCHEMISTRY (I)
CHGN341. 6-week summer field session; 6 semester hours.
Introductory study of the major molecules of biochemistry-
amino acids, proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, lipids, and
CHGN495. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (I, II, S)
saccharides- their structure, chemistry, biological function,
Individual research project under direction of a member of
and biosynthesis. Stresses bioenergetics and the cell as a
the Departmental faculty. Prerequisites: Completion of
biological unit of organization. Discussion of classical
chemistry curriculum through the junior year or permission
genetics, molecular genetics, and protein synthesis.
of the department head. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Prerequisite: CHGN221 or permission of instructor. 3 hours
CHGN497. INTERNSHIP (I, II, S) Individual internship
lecture; 3 semester hours.
experience with an industrial, academic, or governmental
CHGN430/MLGN530. INTRODUCTION TO POLYMER
host supervised by a Departmental faculty member.
SCIENCE (I) An introduction to the chemistry and physics
Prerequisites: Completion of chemistry curriculum through
of macromolecules. Topics include the properties and
the junior year or permission of the department head.
statistics of polymer solutions, measurements of molecular
Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
weights, molecular weight distributions, properties of bulk
CHGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (I, II)
polymers, mechanisms of polymer formation, and properties
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
of thermosets and thermoplasts including elastomers.
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
Prerequisite: CHGN221 or permission of instructor. 3 hour
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
lecture, 3 semester hours.
Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
CHGN462. MICROBIOLOGY AND THE ENVIRON-
CHGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
MENT This course will cover the basic fundamentals of
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
microbiology, such as structure and function of procaryotic
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
versus eucaryotic cells; viruses; classification of micro-
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
organisms; microbial metabolism, energetics, genetics,
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
growth and diversity, microbial interactions with plants,
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
animals, and other microbes. Additional topics covered will
include various aspects of environmental microbiology such
as global biogeochemical cycles, bioleaching,
bioremediation, and wastewater treatment. Prerequisite:
Consent of instructor 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
Offered in alternate years.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
79

Economics and Business
Prerequisite: EBGN305. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Freshman Year
EBGN311. MICROECONOMICS (I, II) How markets for
EBGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS AND
goods and services work. Economic behavior of consumers,
BUSINESS (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course.
businesses, and government. Market structure and pricing.
Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and
Efficiency and equity. Public policies. Students may satisfy
student(s). Usually the course is offered only once.
the economics core requirement by taking the EBGN311/
Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit
312 sequence instead of EBGN211. Students considering a
hours.
major in economics are advised to take the EBGN311/312
sequence. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EBGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
EBGN312. MACROECONOMICS (I,II, S) Analysis of
member. A student and instructor agree on a subject matter,
gross domestic output and cyclical variability, plus the
content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study”
general level of prices and employment. The relationship
form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar.
between output and financial markets that affects the level
Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
of economic activity. Evaluation of government institutions
and policy options for stabilization and growth. Interna-
Sophomore Year
tional trade and balance of payments. Students may satisfy
EBGN211. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS (I,II) The basic
the economics core requirement by taking the EBGN311/
social and economic institutions of market capitalism.
312 sequence instead of EBGN211. Students considering a
Contemporary economic issues. Business organization.
major in economics are advised to take the EBGN311/312
Price theory and market structure. Economic analysis of
sequence. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
public policies. Discussion of inflation, unemployment,
monetary policy and fiscal policy. Students may elect to
EBGN314. PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (I)
satisfy the economics core requirement by taking both
Introduction of underlying principles, fundamentals, and
EBGN311 and EBGN312 instead of this course. Students
knowledge required of the manager in a complex, modern
considering a major in economics are advised to take the
organization. Prerequisite: Junior class standing. 3 hours
EBGN311/312 sequence. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
EBGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS AND
EBGN345. PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE (II) Introduction
BUSINESS (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course.
to financial markets and institutions, the investment process,
Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and
and financial management. Included is the study of interest
student(s). Usually the course is offered only once.
rate determination, time value of money, security analysis,
Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit
portfolio construction, investment strategies, performance
hours.
evaluation, the corporate investment decision, capital
budgeting, financing decisions, dividend policy, and
EBGN 299. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
working capital management. Prerequisite: EBGN305. 3
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
member. A student and instructor agree on a subject matter,
content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study”
EBGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS AND
form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar.
BUSINESS (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course.
Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and
student(s). Usually the course is offered only once.
Junior Year
Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit
EBGN305. FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (I, II) Survey and
hours.
evaluation of balance sheets and income and expense
statements, origin and purpose. Evaluation of depreciation,
EBGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
depletion, and reserve methods for tax and internal
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
management purposes. Cash flow analysis in relation to
member. A student and instructor agree on a subject matter,
planning and decision making. Inventory methods and cost
content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study”
controls related to dynamics of production and processing. 3
form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar.
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
EBGN306. MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (II) Introduc-
Senior Year
tion to cost concepts and principles of management
EBGN402. FIELD SESSION (S) A capstone course for
accounting including cost accounting. The course focuses
students majoring in economics. The field session may
on activities that create value for customers and owners of a
consist of either an independent research project or an
company and demonstrates how to generate cost-accounting
internship. In either case, a student prepares an analytical
information to be used in management decision making.
research paper on a topic in the area of economics and
80
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

business. Specific research issues are arranged between
course is to equip students to use operations research
students and the supervising faculty member. Prerequisite:
methods to cope with day-to-day problems arising in
Consent of instructor. 3 semester hours.
industry. Introduction to econometric modeling, break-even
analysis, and elementary theory of the firm. Introductory
EBGN409. MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS (I, II) The
applications of network, simulation, linear, and geometric
course applies mathematical tools to economic problems. It
programming methods. Prerequisite: MACS213. 3 hours
covers the mathematics needed to read published economic
lecture; 3 semester hours.
literature and to do advanced work in economics. It includes
topics from differential and integral calculus, matrix algebra,
EBGN 426. MANUFACTURING MANAGEMENT (II) In
differential equations, and dynamic programming. Applica-
firms that produce goods (versus services), the manufactur-
tions are taken from mineral, energy, and environmental
ing function typically manages the majority of the assets and
issues, requiring both analytical and computer solutions
employs the most workers. Manufacturing managers are
using such programs as GAMS and MATHEMATICA.
concerned with choices that lead to the efficient and
Prerequisites: MACS111, EBGN411, EBGN412, MACS323
effective utilization of these production resources. The effect
or MACS530, or graduate standing. 3 hours lecture; 3
of these choices is reflected directly in the costs of doing
semester hours.
business and therefore, the ultimate profitability of the firm.
Topics to be covered include forecasting, inventory
EBGN410. NATURAL RESOURCE ECONOMICS (I) The
management, material requirements planning, aggregate
threat and theory of resource exhaustion; commodity
planning, capacity planning, facility layout. Special
analysis and the problem of mineral market instability;
emphasis will be placed on the role of uncertainty and
cartels and the nature of mineral pricing; the environment,
methods for dealing with it. Prerequisite: EBGN425 or
government involvement, and mineral policy issues;
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
international mineral trade. Prerequisite: EBGN211 or
EBGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EBGN430. ENERGY ECONOMICS (I) Application of
models to understand markets for oil, gas, coal, electricity,
EBGN411. INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS (I, II,
and renewable energy resources. Models, modeling
S) A second course in microeconomics. Compared to the
techniques, and issues include: supply and demand, market
earlier course, this course is more rigorous mathematically
structure, transportation models, game theory, futures
and quantitatively. It also places more emphasis on
markets, environmental issues, energy policy, energy
advanced topics such as game theory, risk and uncertainty,
regulation, input-output models, linear and nonlinear
property rights, and external costs and benefits. Prerequisite:
programming, energy conservation. The emphasis is on
EBGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
developing appropriate models and applying them to current
EBGN412. INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS (I, II)
energy issues. Prerequisites: EBGN211 or EBGN311. 3
Intermediate macroeconomics provides a foundation for
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
analyzing the long-run and short-run effects of fiscal and
EBGN441. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (II) Theories
monetary policy on aggregate economic performance.
and determinants of international trade, including static and
Special emphasis on interactions between the foreign sector
dynamic comparative advantage and the gains from trade.
and the domestic economy. Analytical models are developed
The history of arguments for and against free trade. The
from the important schools of thought: Classical, Keynesian,
political economy of trade policy in both developing and
and New Classical. Prerequisite: EBGN312. 3 hours lecture;
developed countries. Prerequisite: EBGN311. 3 hours
3 semester hours.
lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
EBGN421 (CRGN421). ENGINEERING ECONOMICS
EBGN442. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (II) Theories of
(II) Time value of money concepts of present worth, future
development and underdevelopment. Sectoral development
worth, annual worth, rate of return and break-even analysis,
policies and industrialization. The special problems and
applied to after-tax economic analysis of mineral, petroleum
opportunities created by an extensive mineral endowment,
and general investments. Related topics on proper handling
including the Dutch disease and the resource-curse
of (1) inflation and escalation, (2) leverage (borrowed
argument. The effect of value-added processing and export
money), (3) risk adjustment of analyses using expected
diversification on development. Prerequisite: EBGN311.
value concepts, (4) mutually exclusive alternative analyses
3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours Offered alternate years.
and service producing alternatives. 3 hours lecture; 3
semester hours.
EBGN445. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS FINANCE An
introduction to financial issues of critical importance to
EBGN425. APPLICATIONS OF OPERATIONS RE-
multinational firms. Overview of international financial
SEARCH/ MANAGEMENT SCIENCE (I) Operations
markets. The international monetary system. Foreign-
research methods for immediate application. Emphasis on
exchange markets. International parity conditions, ex-
areas of production and inventory control. Principal aim of
change-rate forecasting, swaps and swap markets. Interna-
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
81

tional investments. Foreign-direct investment. Corporate
Engineering
strategy. The international debt crisis. Prerequisite:
Freshman Year
EBGN305. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGINEERING (I, II)
EBGN455. LINEAR PROGRAMMING (I) Geometric
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
interpretation of linear programming problems, the simplex
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
method, the revised simplex method, and the product form
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
of the inverse, duality theory, duel simplex, and applica-
Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
tions, sensitivity analysis, complementary slackness and
EGGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
applications. The emphasis is on formulation of business
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
and economic problems as linear programs, including
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
production planning, scheduling, staffing, blending, and
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
product mix applications, and modeling and solving the
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
problems on the computer. Efficiency and implementation
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
issues are discussed, and advanced topics include decompo-
sition methods for large-scale problems. The aim of the
Sophomore Year
course is to equip students to formulate and solve real world
EGGN233. ENGINEERING FIELD SESSION (S) The
problems as linear programs. Prerequisite: EBGN409,
principles of electrical instrumentation, machine shop
MACS112 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
practice, and surveying fundamentals will be demonstrated,
semester hours.
examined, and applied in detail. Prerequisite: EPIC251,
EBGN470. ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS (II) The
PHGN200/210, MACS260/261.
3 weeks in summer;
role of markets and other economic considerations in
3 semester hours.
controlling pollution. The effect of environmental policy on
EGGN250. MULTIDISCIPLINARY ENGINEERING
resource allocation. Benefit/cost analysis in decision making
LABORATORY (I) Laboratory experiments integrating
and associated problems of measuring benefits and costs.
instrumentation, circuits and power with computer data
Prerequisite: EBGN211 or EBGN311. 3 hours lecture, 3
acquisitions and sensors. Sensor data is used to transition
semester hours.
between science and engineering science. Engineering
EBGN490. ECONOMETRICS (I) Introduction to econo-
Science issues like stress, strains, thermal conductivity,
metrics, including ordinary least-squares and single-
pressure and flow are investigated using fundamentals of
equation models; two-stage least-squares and multiple-
equilibrium, continuity, and conservation. Prerequisite:
equation models; specification error, serial correlation,
DCGN381 or concurrent enrollment. 4.5 hours lab; 1.5
heteroskedasticity, and other problems; distributive-lag
semester hour.
models and other extensions, hypothesis testing and
EGGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGINEERING (I, II)
forecasting applications. Prerequisite: EBGN411,
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
MACS323. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
EBGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS AND
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
BUSINESS (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course.
Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and
Junior Year
student(s). Usually the course is offered only once.
EGGN311. ENGINEERING GRAPHICS II (I,II) Graphical
Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit
communication concepts related to the field of engineering,
hours.
including topics in CAD, modeling, dimensioning,
EBGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
tolerancing, assembly drawing and plan reading. This course
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
is designed to provide a strong basis for more advanced
member. A student and instructor agree on a subject matter,
analysis and design courses. Prerequisite: EPIC151,
content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study”
EPIC251 or equivalent. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2
form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar.
semester hours.
Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
EGGN315. DYNAMICS (I,II, S) Absolute and relative
motions. Kinetics, work-energy, impulse-momentum,
vibrations. Prerequisite: DCGN241 and MACS315. 3 hours
lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN320. MECHANICS OF MATERIALS (I,II) Funda-
mentals of stresses and strains, material properties. Axial,
torsion, bending, transverse and combined loadings. Stress
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at a point; stress transformations and Mohr’s circle for
EGGN351. FLUID MECHANICS (I,II,S) Properties of
stress. Beams and beam deflections, thin-wall pressure
liquids, manometers, one-dimensional continuity.
vessels, columns and buckling, fatigue principles, impact
Bernoulli’s equation, the impulse momentum principle,
loading. Prerequisite: DCGN241 or MNGN317. 3 hours
laminar and turbulent flow in pipes, meters, pumps, and
lecture; 3 semester hours.
turbines. Prerequisite: DCGN241 or MNGN317. 3 hours
lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN333. ADVANCED SURVEYING (I) The applied,
engineering applications of the principles learned in
EGGN353. FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL
beginning surveying. Use and applications of modern
SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING I (I) (p.a.) Topics covered
equipment: EDM’s, theodolites, GPS. Testing and adjust-
include: history of water related environmental law and
ment of equipment. Design and field staking of a road and
regulation, major sources and concerns of water pollution,
subdivision: H and V curves, earthwork, sewer lines.
water quality parameters and their measurement, material
Direction and positioning by astronomical observations of
and energy balances, water chemistry concepts, microbial
sun and Polaris. Control surveys, State Plane Coordinates,
concepts, aquatic toxicology and risk assessment. Prerequi-
NAD’83, global positioning. Legal and liability concepts.
site: MACS213/223. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisite: EGGN233. 2 hours lecture, 7 Saturdays field
EGGN354. FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL
work; 3 semester hours.
SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING II (II) (p.a.) Topics
EGGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (I,II,S)
covered include: history of environmental law and regula-
Supervised, full-time engineering-related employment for a
tion (air and soil), major sources and concerns of air and
continuous six-month period (or its equivalent) in which
soil pollution, soil science concepts, air science concepts,
specific educational objectives are achieved. Prerequisite:
mass and energy balances (air and soil), environmental
Second semester sophomore status and a cumulative grade-
quality of air and soil (physical, chemical and microbiologi-
point average of at least 2.00. 0 to 3 semester hours. Credit
cal parameters), air and soil toxicology and risk assessment.
earned in EGGN340, Cooperative Education, may be used
Prerequisite: MACS213/223. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
as free elective credit hours if, in the judgment of the Co-op
hours
Advisor, the required term paper adequately documents the
EGGN371. THERMODYNAMICS I (I,II,S) Definitions,
fact that the work experience entailed high quality applica-
properties, temperature, phase diagrams, equations of state,
tion of engineering principles and practice. Applying the
steam tables, gas tables, work, heat, first and second laws of
credits as free electives requires submission by the student
thermodynamics, entropy, ideal gas, phase changes,
to the Co-op Advisor of a “Declaration of Intent to Request
availability, reciprocating engines, air standard cycles, vapor
Approval to Apply Co-op Credit toward Graduation
cycles. Prerequisite: MACS213/223.
3 hours lecture; 3
Requirements” form obtained from the Career Center.
semester hours.
EGGN342. STRUCTURAL THEORY (I, II) Analysis of
EGGN382. ENGINEERING CIRCUIT ANALYSIS (I)
determinate and indeterminate structures for both forces and
Frequency response, two-port networks, magnetically
deflections. Influence lines, work and energy methods,
coupled circuits, hybrid parameters, network analysis,
moment distribution, matrix operations, computer methods.
Fourier analysis and transforms, Laplace transforms, transfer
Prerequisite: EGGN320. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
function, and applications. Prerequisite: DCGN381 and
EGGN350. MULTIDISCIPLINARY ENGINEERING
EGGN383, and co-requisite MACS315. 3 hours lecture, 3
LABORATORY (II) Laboratory experiments integrating
hours lab; 4 semester hours.
electrical circuits, fluid mechanics, stress analysis, and other
EGGN385. ELECTRONIC DEVICES AND CIRCUITS (I,
engineering fundamentals using computer data acquisition
II) Semiconductor materials and characteristics, junction
and transducers. Fluid mechanics issues like compressible
diode operation, bipolar junction transistors, field effect
and incompressible fluid flow (mass and volumetric),
transistors, biasing techniques, four layer devices, amplifier
pressure losses, pump characteristics, pipe networks,
and power supply design, laboratory study of semiconductor
turbulent and laminar flow, cavitation, drag, and others are
circuit characteristics. Prerequisite: DCGN381 and
covered. Experimental stress analysis issues like compres-
EGGN250 or consent of department. 3 hours lecture, 3
sion and tensile testing, strain gage installation, Young’s
hours lab; 4 semester hours.
Modulus, stress vs. strain diagrams, and others are covered.
Experimental stress analysis and fluid mechanics are
EGGN388. INFORMATION SYSTEMS SCIENCE (I, II)
integrated in experiments which merge fluid power of the
The interpretation, representation and analysis of time-
testing machine with applied stress and displacement of
varying phenomena as signals which convey information
material specimen.. Prerequisite: DCGN381, EGGN383,
and noise; a quantitative treatment on the properties of
EGGN250. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment:
information and noise, and the degradation of signal fidelity
EGGN351, EGGN320. 4.5 hours lab; 1.5 semester hour.
through distortion, band limitation, interference and additive
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
83

noise. Introductory applications in the analysis of dynamic
research and development. Introduces principles and
data streams emanating from mechanical, structural and
concepts of guidance, position, and force sensing; vision
electronic systems, system diagnostics, data acquisition,
data processing; basic path and trajectory planning algo-
control and communications. Prerequisite: DCGN381.
rithms; and force and position control. Prerequisite:
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PHGN200/210. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN389. FUNDAMENTALS OF ELECTRIC MACHIN-
EGGN403. THERMODYNAMICS II (I, II) Thermody-
ERY I (I, II) Magnetic circuit concepts and materials,
namic relations, Maxwell’s Relations, Clapeyron equation,
transformer analysis and operation, special transformers,
fugacity, mixtures and solutions, thermodynamics of mixing,
steady state and dynamic analysis of rotating machines,
Gibbs function, activity coefficient, combustion processes,
synchronous and polyphase induction motors, fractional
first and second law applied to reacting systems, third law of
horsepower machines, laboratory study of external charac-
thermodynamics, real combustion processes, phase and
teristics of machines and transformers. Prerequisite:
chemical equilibrium, Gibbs rule, equilibrium of multicom-
DCGN381, EGGN250 or consent of department. 3 hours
ponent systems, simultaneous chemical reaction of real
lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
combustion processes, ionization, application to real
industrial problems. Prerequisite: EGGN351, EGGN371. 3
EGGN390/MTGN390. MATERIALS AND MANUFAC-
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
TURING PROCESSES (II) This course focuses on
available engineering materials and the manufacturing
EGGN407. INTRODUCTION TO FEEDBACK CON-
processes used in their conversion into a product or
TROL SYSTEMS (I,II) System modeling through an energy
structure as critical considerations in design. Properties,
flow approach is presented, and modeling of electro-
characteristics, typical selection criteria, and applications are
mechanical and thermofluid systems are discussed.
reviewed for ferrous and nonferrous metals, plastics and
Feedback control design techniques using pole-placement,
composites. The nature, features, and economics of basic
root locus, and lead-log compensators are presented. Case
shaping operations are addressed with regard to their
studies using real-life problems are presented and analyzed.
limitations and applications and the types of processing
Prerequisite: DCGN381 and MACS315. 3 hours lecture; 3
equipment available. Related technology such as measure-
semester hours.
ment and inspection procedures, numerical control systems
EGGN408. INTRODUCTION TO OFFSHORE TECH-
and automated operations are introduced throughout the
NOLOGY (II) Introduction to practical offshore engineer-
course. Prerequisite: EGGN320, SYGN202.
3 hours
ing/design technology for the exploration, drilling, produc-
lecture; 3 semester hours.
tion and transportation of petroleum in the ocean. Practical
EGGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGINEERING (I, II)
analysis methods of environmental forces, hydrodynamics,
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
structural responses, and pipe flows for the design of
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
platform, riser, subsea completion and pipeline systems,
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
including environment-hydrodynamic-structure interactions.
Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
System design parameters. Industry practice and the current
state-of-the- art technology for deep ocean drilling.
EGGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
Prerequisites: MACS315, EGGN320, EGGN351 and
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
EGGN411. MACHINE DESIGN (I, II) Introduction to the
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
principles of mechanical design. Consideration of the
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
behavior of materials under static and cyclic loading; failure
considerations. Application of the basic theories of
Senior Year
mechanics, kinematics, and mechanics of materials to the
EGGN400/MNGN400. INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS
design of basic machine elements, such as shafts, keys, and
FOR THE MINERALS AND CONSTRUCTION INDUS-
coupling; journal bearings, antifriction bearings, wire rope,
TRIES (II) Focuses on construction and minerals industries
gearing; brakes and clutches, welded connections and other
applications. Overview and introduction to the science and
fastenings. Prerequisite: EPIC251, EGGN315, and
engineering of intelligent mobile robotics and robotic
EGGN320. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
manipulators. Covers guidance and force sensing, percep-
tion of the environment around a mobile vehicle, reasoning
EGGN413. COMPUTER-AIDED ENGINEERING (I, II)
about the environment to identify obstacles and guidance
This course introduces the student to the concept of
path features and adaptively controlling and monitoring the
computer-aided engineering. Analytical techniques and
vehicle health. A lesser emphasis is placed on robot
finite-element software are used to solve engineering design
manipulator kinematics, dynamics, and force and tactile
problems. Emphasis is given to design projects that are
sensing. Surveys manipulator and intelligent mobile robotics
aimed at developing skills for design process, including
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Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

problem specification, modeling, analysis and visual display
data for solving engineering problems. Examples are
using computer-aided design equipment and software.
recommending design improvements to a refrigerator,
Prerequisite: EGGN320. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
diagnosing and predicting failures in refrigerators, computer
control of a hydraulic fluid power circuit in a fatigue test,
EGGN422. ADVANCED MECHANICS OF MATERIALS
analysis of structural failures in an off-road vehicle and
(II) General theories of stress and strain; stress and strain
redesign, diagnosis and prediction of failures in a motor/
transformations, principal stresses and strains, octahedral
generator system.. Prerequisites: EGGN381, EGGN383,
shear stresses, Hooke’s law for isotropic material, and
EGGN250, EGGN352, EGGN350, EGGN351, EGGN320;
failure criteria. Introduction to elasticity and to energy
concurrent enrollment in EGGN407. 3 hours lab; 1 semester
methods. Torsion of noncircular and thin-walled members.
hour.
Unsymmetrical bending and shear-center, curved beams,
and beams on elastic foundations. Introduction to plate
EGGN451. HYDRAULIC PROBLEMS (I) Review of
theory. Thick-walled cylinders and contact stresses.
fundamentals, forces on submerged surfaces, buoyancy and
Prerequisite: EGGN320. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
flotation, gravity dams, weirs, steady flow in open channels,
backwater curves, hydraulic machinery, elementary
EGGN430. GLOBAL POSITIONING (I) A follow-up
hydrodynamics, hydraulic structures. Prerequisite:
course to basic surveying which answers the fundamental
EGGN351. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
question “where are you?”. Determination of latitude and
longitude by astronomical and by GPS (Global Positioning
EGGN453. WASTEWATER ENGINEERING (II) Analysis
System) from satellites. Reduction of this data through
and design of primary, secondary and advanced wastewater
conformal and non-conformal projections to NAD’27 and
treatment systems. Includes analysis of nutrient and toxic
NAD’83 State Plane Coordinates, UTM and computer based
removal and residual issues. Also includes the design of
mapping bases, GIS (Geographic Information Systems). The
collection system and pump stations. Regulatory analysis
major user of this concept is anybody who uses a map or
under the Clean Water Act (CWA). Prerequisite:EGGN353.
who has to add information to a mapping base. Data
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (This course is pending
gathering will be optional. Prerequisite: EGGN233 or
approval for delivery in the 1999-2000 academic year.)
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN454. WATER SUPPLY ENGINEERING (I) (p.a.)
EGGN442. FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR ENGI-
Water supply availability and quality. Theory and design of
NEERS (II) A course combining finite element theory with
conventional potable water treatment unit processes. Design
practical programming experience in which the multi-
of distribution systems. Also includes regulatory analysis
disciplinary nature of the finite element method as a
under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). Prerequisite:
numerical technique for solving differential equations is
EGGN353. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
emphasized. Topics covered include simple ‘structural’
EGGN455. SOLID AND HAZARDOUS WASTE ENGI-
element, solid elasticity, steady state analysis, transient
NEERING (I) This course provides an introduction and
analysis. Students get a copy of all the source code
overview of the engineering aspects of solid and hazardous
published in the course textbook. Prerequisite: EGGN320. 3
waste management. The focus is on control technologies for
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
solid wastes from common municipal and industrial sources
EGGN444. DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES (I) Steel
and the end-of-pipe waste streams and process residuals that
properties; design of tension and compression members;
are generated in some key industries.
beams; bolted and welded connections and plate girders;
Prerequisite:EGGN354. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
both elastic and plastic methods will be applied to the
(This course is pending approval for delivery in the 1999-
design of a commercial building. Prerequisite: EGGN342. 2
2000 academic year.)
hours lecture, 3 hours design lab; 3 semester hours.
EGGN456. SCIENTIFIC BASIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL
EGGN445. DESIGN OF REINFORCED CONCRETE
REGULATIONS (II) (p.a.) A critical examination of the
STRUCTURES (II) Loads on structures, design of columns,
experiments, calculations and assumptions underpinning
continuous beams, slabs, retaining walls, composite beams,
numerical and narrative standards contained in federal and
introduction to prestressed and precast construction.
state environmental regulations. Top-down investigations of
Prerequisite: EGGN342. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours design lab;
the historical development of selected regulatory guidelines
3 semester hours.
and permitting procedures. Student directed design of
improved regulations. Prerequisite:EGGN353. 3 hours
EGGN450. MULTIDISCIPLINARY ENGINEERING
lecture; 3 semester hours.
LABORATORY III Laboratory experiments integrating
electrical circuits, fluid mechanics, stress analysis, and other
EGGN457. SITE REMEDIATION ENGINEERING (II)
engineering fundamentals using computer data acquisition
(p.a.) This course describes the engineering principles and
and transducers. Students will design experiments to gather
practices associated with the characterization and
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
85

remediation of contaminated sites. Methods for site
semester hours.
characterization and risk assessment will be highlighted
EGGN478. ENGINEERING DYNAMICS (I) Applications
while the emphasis will be on remedial action screening
of dynamics to design, mechanisms and machine elements.
processes and technology principles and conceptual design.
Kinematics and kinetics of planar linkages. Analytical and
Common isolation and containment and in situ and ex situ
graphical methods. Four-bar linkage, slider-crank, quick-
treatment technology will be covered. Computerized
return mechanisms, cams, and gears. Analysis of nonplanar
decision-support tools will be sued and case studies will be
mechanisms. Static and dynamic balancing of rotating
presented. Prerequisite: EGGN354. 3 hours lecture; 3
machinery. Free and forced vibrations and vibration
semester hours.
isolation. Prerequisite: EGGN315; concurrent enrollment in
EGGN461. SOIL MECHANICS (I, II) An introductory
MACS315. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
course covering the engineering properties of soil, soil
EGGN481. ADVANCED ELECTRONICS AND DIGITAL
phase relationships and classification. Principle of effective
SYSTEMS (I, II) Device models; transistors as amplifiers,
stress. Seepage through soils and flow nets. One-dimen-
switches, and gates; integrating differentiating wave shaping
sional consolidation theory. Soil compressibility and
and signal processing circuits. Small scale (SSI), medium
settlement prediction. Shear strength of soils. Pore pressure
scale (MSI), large scale (LSI) integration; logic components,
parameters. Introduction to earth pressure and slope stability
subsystems; analog-to- digital and digital-to-analog
calculations. Prerequisite: EGGN320 or concurrent
conversion techniques. Laboratory experience, evaluation,
enrollment. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
application and extension of lecture concepts. Prerequisite:
EGGN463. SOIL MECHANICS LABORATORY (I, II)
DCGN381 and EGGN250 or PHGN317 or consent of
Introduction to laboratory testing methods in soil mechan-
instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
ics. Classification, permeability, compressibility, shear
EGGN482. MICROCOMPUTER ARCHITECTURE AND
strength. Prerequisite: EGGN461 or concurrent enrollment.
INTERFACING (II) Microprocessor and microcontroller
3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
architecture focusing on hardware structures and elementary
EGGN464. FOUNDATIONS (I, II) Techniques of subsoil
machine and assembly language programming skills
investigation, types of foundations and foundation prob-
essential for use of microprocessors in data acquisition,
lems, selection of basis for design of foundation types.
control, and instrumentation systems. Analog and digital
Open-ended problem solving and decision making.
signal conditioning, communication, and processing. A/D
Prerequisite: EGGN461. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and D/A converters for microporcessors. RS232 and other
communication standards. Laboratory study and evaluation
EGGN466. CONSTRUCTION SITE ENGINEERING (I)
of microcomputer system; design and implementation of
Construction site investigations. Project planning, manage-
interfacing projects. Prerequisite: EGGN481 or consent of
ment, and scheduling. Construction equipment, materials,
instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
and methods. Engineering parameters affected by the
geologic environment. Construction organization, bidding,
EGGN483. INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION
contracts. Prerequisite: Senior standing in EG or GE or
AND SIGNAL PROCESSING (I) Signal classification;
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 field trips required;
Fourier transform; filtering; sampling; signal representation;
3 semester hours.
modulation; demodulation; applications to broadcast, data
transmission, and instrumentation. Prerequisite: EGGN382
EGGN471. HEAT TRANSFER (I, II) Engineering approach
or consent of department. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4
to conduction, convection, and radiation, including steady-
semester hours.
state conduction, nonsteady-state conduction, internal heat
generation conduction in one, two, and three dimensions,
EGGN484. POWER SYSTEMS ANALYSIS (I) Power
and combined conduction and convection. Free and forced
systems, three-phase circuits, per unit calculations, system
convection including laminar and turbulent flow, internal
components, stability cirteria, network faults, system
and external flow. Radiation of black and grey surfaces,
instrumentation, system grounding, load-flow, economic
shape factors and electrical equivalence. Prerequisite:
operation. Prerequisite: EGGN389. 3 hours lecture; 3
MACS315, EGGN351, EGGN371. 3 hours lecture; 3
semester hours.
semester hours.
EGGN485. INTRODUCTION TO HIGH POWER
EGGN473. FLUID MECHANICS II (I) Review of
ELECTRONICS (II) Power electronics are used in a broad
elementary fluid mechanics and engineering. Two-dimen-
range of applications from control of power flow on major
sional internal and external flows. Steady and unsteady
transmission lines to control of motor speeds in industrial
flows. Fluid engineering problems. Compressible flow.
facilities and electric vehicles, to computer power supplies.
Computer solutions of various practical problems for
This course introduces the basic principles of analysis and
mechanical and related engineering disciplines. Prerequisite:
design of circuits utilizing power electronics, including AC/
EGGN351 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
DC, AC/AC, DC/DC, and DC/AC conversions in their
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many configurations. Prerequisites: EGGN385, EGGN389.
Environmental Science and
3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
Engineering
EGGN487. ENGINEERING CONTROL LABORATORY I
Undergraduate Courses
(II) Experiments to verify principles of feedback control
ESGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL
systems. Prerequisite: EGGN407 or concurrent enrollment.
SCIENCE (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course.
3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and
EGGN488. RELIABILITY OF ENGINEERING SYSTEMS
student(s). Usually the course is offered only once.
(I) This course addresses uncertainty modeling, reliability
Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit
analysis, risk assessment, reliability-based design, predictive
hours.
maintenance, optimization, and cost- effective retrofit of
ESGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
engineering systems such as structural, sensory, electric,
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
pipeline, hydraulic, lifeline and environmental facilities.
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
Topics include introduction of reliability of engineering
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
systems, stochastic engineering system simulation, fre-
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
quency analysis of extreme events, reliability and risk
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
evaluation of engineering systems, and optimization of
ESGN200. INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL
engineering systems. Prerequisite: MACS323. 3 hours
SCIENCE (I) Topics covered are: history of environmental
lecture; 3 semester hours.
law and regulation; major sources of pollution; energy flow,
EGGN491. SENIOR DESIGN I (I, II) The first of a two-
nutrient cycling, ecosystem characteristics, population
semester course sequence giving the student experience in
dynamics in ecology; climatology, meteorology and air
the engineering design process. Realistic, open-ended
pollution; characteristics of aquatic systems, water pollution
design problems are addressed at the conceptual, engineer-
including inorganic and organic compounds, pathogenic
ing analysis, and the synthesis stages, and include economic
organisms, and basic treatment systems; solid waste and
and ethical considerations necessary to arrive at a final
agriculturally related pollution issues; and hazardous waste.
design. The design projects are chosen to develop student
Methods used to determine the level of contamination
creativity, use of design methodology and application of
including bioassays and toxicity tests will be discussed.
prior course work paralleled by individual study and
Recent case histories will be used extensively. Prerequisite:
research. Prerequisites: Permission of Capstone Design
MACS111 and CHGN121, and concurrent enrollment in
Course Committee, and: EGGN233, EGGN342; or,
PHGN100 or 110. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
completion of EGGN233, EGGN382 and concurrent
ESGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL
enrollment in EGGN407 and EGGN481; or, completion of
SCIENCE (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course.
EGGN233 and one of EGGN422, EGGN403, EGGN473, or
Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and
EGGN478 and concurrent enrollment in both EGGN411
student(s). Usually the course is offered only once.
and EGGN407. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester
Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit
hours.
hours.
EGGN492. SENIOR DESIGN II (I, II) This is the second of
ESGN301. ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY (I, II)
a two-semester course sequence to give the student
Organism structures, energy transformations, photosynthe-
experience in the engineering design process. Design
sis, respiration, reproduction, and adaptation are covered.
integrity and performance are to be demonstrated by
Physiological processes of plants, animals and people are
building a prototype or model and performing pre-planned
emphasized with respect to environmental issues. Examples
experimental tests, wherever feasible. Prerequisite:
are: mineral nutrition, water, relations, growth, and
EGGN491 1 hour lecture; 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
development. Prerequisites: ESGN200 or SYGN101. 3
EGGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGINEERING (I, II)
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
ESGN302/CHGN302. INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRON-
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
MENTAL CHEMISTRY (I, II) Processes by which natural
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
and anthropogenic chemicals interact, react and are
Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
transformed and redistributed in various environmental
EGGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
compartments. Air, soil and aqueous (fresh and saline
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
surface and groundwaters) environments are covered, along
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
with specialized environments such as waste treatment
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
facilities and the upper atmosphere. Prerequisites: ESGN200
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
or SYGN101. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
87

ESGN303/CRGN303. FUNDAMENTALS OF WATER
tion in batch reactors of unit processes such as coagulation,
AND WASTEWATER TREATMENT (I, II) Theory and
flocculation, sedimentation, chemical oxidation, biological
design of conventional potable water treatment unit
oxidation, air stripping and digestion. Effect of these
processes. Analysis and design of primary, secondary and
processes on selected water quality
tertiary wastewater treatment systems. Emphasis on mass
parameters.Prerequisites: ESGN303 . 1 hour lecture, 4 hours
balance approach to unit processes whenever applicable.
lab per week; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisites: ESGN200 or SYGN101. 3 hours lecture; 3
ESGN440. ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY MODELING
semester hours. ESGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENVI-
(II) Develop environmental quality models based on
RONMENTAL SCIENCE (I, II) Pilot course or special
complete-mix and plug-flow hydraulic analysis and air-
topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of
water-soil interface transfer. Analyze environmental quality
instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered
changes in natural systems including rivers, lakes and
only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit;
groundwater supplies. Prerequisites: ESGN303 or consent
1 to 6 credit hours.
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ESGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
ESGN473. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT (I)
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
Introduction to regulatory, management and engineering
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
aspects of hazardous waste and hazardous site management.
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
Topics include characterization, recovery, transportation,
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
storage, remediation, and disposal of wastes and sites.
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Prerequisites: ESGN200 or SYGN101. 3 hours lecture; 3
ESGN401. FUNDAMENTALS OF ECOLOGY (II)
semester hours.
Biological and ecological principles discussed and industrial
ESGN490. ENVIRONMENTAL LAW (I) Specially
examples of their use given. Analysis of ecosystem
designed for the needs of the environmental quality
processes, such as erosion, succession, and how these
engineer, scientist, planner, manager, government regulator,
processes relate to engineering activities, including
consultant, or advocate. Highlights include how our legal
engineering design and plant operation. Criteria and
system works, environmental law fundamentals, all major
performance standards analyzed for facility siting, pollution
US EPA/state enforcement programs, the National Environ-
control, and mitigation of impacts. North American
mental Policy Act, air and water pollutant laws, risk
ecosystems analyzed. Concepts of forestry, range, and
assessment and management, and toxic and hazardous
wildlife management integrated as they apply to all the
substance laws (RCRA, CERCLA, TSCA, LUST, etc).
above. Three to four weekend field trips will be arranged
Prerequisites: ESGN200 or SYGN101. 3 hours lecture; 3
during the semester. Prerequisite: ESGN301. 3 hours
semester hours.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
ESGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL
ESGN412. ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY (I)
SCIENCE (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course.
Introduction to general concepts of ecology, biochemistry,
Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and
toxicology. The introductory material will provide a
student(s). Usually the course is offered only once.
foundation for understanding why, and to what extent a
Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit
variety of products and by-products of advanced industrial-
hours.
ized societies are toxic. Classes of substances to be
examined include metals, coal, petroleum products, organic
ESGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
compounds, pesticides, radioactive materials, others.
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
Prerequisites: ESGN301. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
ESGN430. ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING LABO-
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
RATORY (II) Laboratory techniques for measuring water
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
quality parameters such as pH, alkalinity, dissolved oxygen,
ammonia, nitrate, trubidity and solids. Laboratory investiga-
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Geology and Geological Engineering
GEOL221. OPTICAL MINERALOGY (I) Petrographic
Freshman Year
analysis of behavior of light in crystalline substances.
Identification of non-opaque rock-forming minerals using
GEOL102. INTRODUCTION TO GEOLOGICAL
oil immersion media and thin-section techniques; complete
ENGINEERING (II) Presentations by faculty members and
treatment of crystal optics and petrogenetic significance of
outside professionals of case studies to provide a compre-
genetic groupings of minerals. Prerequisite: GEOL212.
hensive overview of the fields of Geology and Geological
2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
Engineering and the preparation necessary to pursue careers
in those fields. A short paper on an academic professional
GEGN/GEOL298. SEMINAR IN GEOLOGY OR GEO-
path will be required. Prerequisite: SYGN101 or concurrent
LOGICAL ENGINEERING (I, II) Special topics classes
enrollment. 1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour.
taught on a one-time basis. May include lecture, laboratory
and field trip activities. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor
GEGN/GEOL198. SEMINAR IN GEOLOGY OR GEO-
and department head. Variable credit; 1 to 6 semester hours.
LOGICAL ENGINEERING (I, II) Special topics classes
taught on a one-time basis. May include lecture, laboratory
GEGN299. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING
and field trip activities. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor
GEOLOGY OR ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY (I,
and department head. Variable credit; 1 to 6 semester hours.
II) Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field
problems in geology. Prerequisite: “Independent Study”
GEGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING
form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar.
GEOLOGY OR ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY (I,
Variable credit; 1 to 6 semester hours.
II) Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field
problems in geological engineering or engineering
GEOL299. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GEOLOGY (I, II)
hydrogeology. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form must
Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems
be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit;
in geology. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form must be
1 to 6 credit hours.
completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit;
1 to 6 semester hours.
GEOL199. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GEOLOGY (I, II)
Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems
Junior Year
in geology. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form must be
GEGN306. PETROLOGY (II) Shares lectures and topics
completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1
with GEGN307. Laboratory is presented without use of
to 6 credit hours.
optical microscope. Prerequisite: GEOL212, GEOL314,
Sophomore Year
DCGN209. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
GEOL201. HISTORICAL GEOLOGY AND PALEON-
GEGN307. PETROLOGY (II) An introduction to igneous,
TOLOGY (I) Introduction to principles of historical geology
sedimentary and metamorphic processes, stressing the
used in understanding evolution of the Earth’s lithosphere,
application of chemical and physical mechanisms to study
hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere through geologic
the origin, occurrence, and association of rock types.
time. Consideration of the historical aspects of plate
Emphasis on the megascopic and microscopic classification,
tectonics, the geologic development of North America, and
description, and interpretation of rocks. Analysis of the
important events in biological evolution and the resulting
fabric and physical properties. Prerequisite: GEOL212,
fossil assemblages through time. Study of fossil morphol-
GEOL314, GEOL221, DCGN209.
ogy, classification and taxonomy, and applications in
3 hours lecture, 6 hours lab; 5 semester hours.
paleobiology, paleoecology, and biostratigraphy. Prerequi-
GEOL308. INTRODUCTORY APPLIED STRUCTURAL
site: SYGN101.
GEOLOGY (II) Nature and origin of structural features of
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
Earth’s crust emphasizing oil entrapment and control of ore
GEOL210. MATERIALS OF THE EARTH (II) Minerals,
deposition. Structural patterns and associations are
rocks and fluids in the Earth, their physical properties and
discussed in context of stress/strain and plate tectonic
economic applications. Processes of rock formation.
theories, using examples of North American deformed belts.
Laboratories stress the recognition and classification of
Lab and field projects in structural geometry, map air photo
minerals and rocks and measurement of their physical
and cross section interpretation, and structural analysis.
properties. Prerequisite: SYGN101.
Course required of all PEGN and MNGN students.
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisite: SYGN101.
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
GEOL212. MINERALOGY (I) Introduction to crystallogra-
phy; crystal systems, classes. Chemical and physical
GEOL309. STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY AND TECTON-
properties of minerals related to structure and composition.
ICS (I) Recognition, habitat, and origin of deformational
Occurrence and associations of minerals. Identification of
structures related to stresses and strains (rock mechanics and
common minerals. Prerequisite: SYGN101, CHGN124.
microstructures) and modern tectonics. Structural develop-
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
89

ment of the Appalachian and Cordilleran systems. Compre-
Second semester sophomore status and a cumulative grade-
hensive laboratory projects use descriptive geometry,
point average of at least 2.00. 1 to 3 semester hours.
stereographic projection, structural contours, map and air
Cooperative Education credit does not count toward
photo interpretation, structural cross section and structural
graduation except under special conditions.
pattern analysis. Required of Geological and Geophysical
GEGN342. ENGINEERING GEOMORPHOLOGY (I)
Engineers. Prerequisite: SYGN101, GEOL201 and
Study of interrelationships between internal and external
GEOL212 or GEOL210.
earth processes, geologic materials, time, and resulting
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
landforms on the Earth’s surface. Influences of geomorphic
GEOL314. STRATIGRAPHY (II) Lectures and laboratory
processes on design of natural resource exploration
and field exercises in concepts of stratigraphy and bios-
programs and siting and design of geotechnical and
tratigraphy, facies associations in various depositional
geohydrologic projects. Laboratory analysis of geomorphic
environments, sedimentary rock sequences and geometries
and geologic features utilizing maps, photo interpretation
in sedimentary basins, and geohistory analysis of sedimen-
and field observations. Prerequisite: SYGN101.
tary basins. Prerequisite: SYGN101, GEOL201.
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
GEGN/GEOL398. SEMINAR IN GEOLOGY OR GEO-
GEOL315. SEDIMENTOLOGY AND STRATIGRAPHY
LOGICAL ENGINEERING (I, II) Special topics classes
(I) Lecture, laboratory and field exercises on the genesis and
taught on a one-time basis. May include lecture, laboratory
classification of sediments, sedimentary rocks, siliciclastic
and field trip activities. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor
and chemical depositional systems, lithostratigraphy, and
and department head. Variable credit; 1 to 6 semester hours.
biostratigraphy methods of correlation, and basin modeling.
GEGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING
Applications of sedimentology and stratigraphy in petro-
GEOLOGY OR ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY(I, II)
leum exploration and production stressed throughout the
Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems
course.. Prerequisite: SYGN101.
in geological engineering or engineering hydrogeology.
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form must be completed
GEGN316. FIELD GEOLOGY (S) Six weeks of field work,
and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit
stressing geology of the Southern Rocky Mountain
hours.
Province. Measurement of stratigraphic sections. Mapping
GEOL399. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GEOLOGY (I, II)
of igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary terrain using air
Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems
photos, topographic maps, plane table, and other methods.
in geology. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form must be
Diversified individual problems in petroleum geology,
completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1
mining geology, engineering geology, structural geology,
to 6 semester hours.
and stratigraphy. Formal reports submitted on several
problems. Frequent evening lectures and discussion
Senior Year
sessions. Field trips emphasize regional geology as well as
GEGN401. MINERAL DEPOSITS (I) Introductory
mining, petroleum, and engineering projects. Prerequisite:
presentation of magmatic, hydrothermal, and sedimentary
GEOL201, GEOL314, GEGN306 or GEGN307, GEOL309,
metallic ore deposits. Chemical, petrologic, structural, and
and GEGN317.
1 to 6 semester hours (Field Term).
sedimentological processes that contribute to ore formation.
Description of classic deposits representing individual
GEGN317. GEOLOGIC FIELD METHODS (II) Methods
deposit types. Review of exploration sequences. Laboratory
and techniques of geologic field observations and interpreta-
consists of hand specimen study of host rock-ore mineral
tions. Lectures in field techniques and local geology.
suites and mineral deposit evaluation problems. Prerequi-
Laboratory and field project in diverse sedimentary, igneous,
site: GEGN316 and DCGN209.
metamorphic, structural, and surficial terrains using aerial
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
photographs, topographic maps and compass and pace
methods. Geologic cross sections maps, and reports.
GEGN403. MINERAL EXPLORATION DESIGN (I)
Weekend exercises required. Prerequisite to GEGN316.
Exploration project design: commodity selection, target
Prerequisite: GEOL201, GEOL314, GEOL309 or
selection, genetic models, alternative exploration ap-
GEOL308. Completion or concurrent enrollment in
proaches and associated costs, exploration models, property
GEGN210 or GEOL212 or GEGN306 or GEGN307.
acquisition, and preliminary economic evaluation. Lectures
1 hour lecture, 8 hours field; 2 semester hours.
and laboratory exercises to simulate the entire exploration
sequence from inception and planning through implementa-
GEGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (I,II,S)
tion to discovery, with initial ore reserve calculations and
Supervised, full-time, engineering-related employment for a
preliminary economic evaluation. Prerequisite: GEGN401
continuous six-month period (or its equivalent) in which
or concurrent enrollment.
specific educational objectives are achieved. Prerequisite:
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
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GEGN404. ORE MICROSCOPY/ FLUID INCLUSIONS
of aquifer tests; water chemistry, water quality, and
(II) Identification of ore minerals using reflected light
contaminant transport. Laboratory sessions on water
microscopy, micro-hardness, and reflectivity techniques.
budgets, water chemistry, properties of porous media,
Petrographic analysis of ore textures and their significance.
solutions to hydraulic flow problems, analytical and digital
Guided research on the ore mineralogy and ore textures of
models, and hydrogeologic interpretation. Prerequisite:
classic ore deposits. Prerequisites: GEGN 306, GEGN401,
mathematics through calculus and differential equations,
or consent of instructor. 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
structural geology, and sedimentation/stratigraphy, or
consent of instructor.
GEGN405. MINERAL DEPOSITS (I) Physical and
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
chemical characteristics and geologic and geographic setting
of magmatic, hydrothermal, and sedimentary metallic
GEGN468. ENGINEERING GEOLOGY AND
mineral deposits from the aspects of genesis, exploration,
GEOTECHNICS (I) Application of geology to evaluation of
and mining. For non-majors. Prerequisite: GEOL210,
construction, mining, and environmental projects such as
GEOL308 or concurrent enrollment.
dams, waterways, tunnels, highways, bridges, buildings,
2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
mine design, and land-base waste disposal facilities. Design
projects including field, laboratory, and computer analyses
GEGN438. PETROLEUM GEOLOGY (I) Reservoir rocks,
are an important part of the course. Prerequisite: MNGN321
types of traps, temperature and pressure conditions of the
and concurrent enrollment in EGGN461/EGGN463 or
reservoir, theories of origin and accumulation of petroleum,
consent of instructor.
geology of major petroleum fields and provinces of the
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 semester hours.
world, and methods of exploration for petroleum. Term
report required. Laboratory consists of study of well
GEGN469. ENGINEERING GEOLOGY DESIGN (II) This
samples, plotting of lithologic logs, correlation of electric
is a capstone design course that emphasizes realistic
and other types of logs, preparation of structure contour
engineering geologic/geotechnics projects. Lecture time is
maps. Field problem may be included. Prerequisite:
used to introduce projects and discussions of methods and
GEOL309 or GEOL315; GEGN316 or GPGN386 or
procedures for project work. Several major projects will be
PEGN316. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
assigned and one to two field trips will be required. Students
work as individual investigators and in teams. Final written
GEGN439. MULTI-DISCIPLINARY PETROLEUM
design reports and oral presentations are required. Prerequi-
DESIGN (II) This is a multi-disciplinary design course that
site: GEGN468 or equivalent.
integrates fundamentals and design concepts in geological,
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
geophysical, and petroleum engineering. Students work in
integrated teams from each of the disciplines. Open-ended
GEGN470. GROUND-WATER ENGINEERING DESIGN
design problems are assigned including the development of
(II) Application of the principles of hydrogeology and
a prospect in an exploration play and a detailed engineering
ground-water engineering to water supply, geotechnical, or
field study. Detailed reports are required for the prospect
water quality problems involving the design of well fields,
evaluation and engineering field study. Prerequisite: GE
drilling programs, and/or pump tests. Engineering reports,
Majors: GEOL308 or GEOL309, GEGN438, GEGN316; PE
complete with specifications, analyses, and results, will be
majors: PEGN316, PEGN414, PEGN422, PEGN423,
required. Prerequisite: GEGN467 or equivalent or consent
PEGN424 (or concurrent) GEOL308; GP Majors:
of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
GPGN302 and GPGN303.
GEGN475. APPLICATIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC INFOR-
2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
MATION SYSTEMS (I) An introduction to Geographic
GEGN442. ADVANCED ENGINEERING GEOMOR-
Information Systems (GIS) and their applications to all areas
PHOLOGY (II) Application of quantitative geomorphic
of geology and geological engineering. Lecture topics
techniques to engineering problems. Map interpretation,
include: principles of GIS, data structures, digital elevation
photo interpretation, field observations, computer modeling,
models, data input and verification, data analysis and spatial
and GIS analysis methods. Topics include: coastal engineer-
modeling, data quality and error propagation, methods of
ing, fluvial processes, river engineering, controlling water
GIS projects, as well as video presentations. Prerequisite:
and wind erosion, permafrost engineering. Multi-week
SYGN101. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
design projects and case studies. Prerequisite: GEGN342
GEGN476. DESKTOP MAPPING APPLICATIONS FOR
and GEGN468, or graduate standing; GEGN475/575
PROJECT DATA MANAGEMENT (I,II) Conceptual
recommended.
overview and hands-on experience with a commercial
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
desktop mapping system. Display, analysis, and presentation
GEGN467. GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING (I) Theory
mapping functions; familiarity with the software compo-
of groundwater occurrence and flow. Relation of groundwa-
nents, including graphical user interface (GUI); methods for
ter to surface water; potential distribution and flow; theory
handling different kinds of information; organization and
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
91

storage of project documents. Use of raster and vector data
Oceanography
in an integrated environment; basic raster concepts;
GEOC407. ATMOSPHERE, WEATHER AND CLIMATE
introduction to GIS models, such as hill shading and cost/
(II) An introduction to the Earth’s atmosphere and its role in
distance analysis. Prerequisite: No previous knowledge of
weather patterns and long term climate. Provides basic
desktop mapping or GIS technology assumed. Some
understanding of origin and evolution of the atmosphere,
computer experience in operating within a Windows
Earth’s heat budget, global atmospheric circulation and
environment recommended.
modern climatic zones. Long- and short-term climate
1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour
change including paleoclimatology, the causes of glacial
GEGN481. ADVANCED HYDROGEOLOGY (I) Lectures,
periods and global warming, and the depletion of the ozone
assigned readings, and discussions concerning the theory,
layer. Causes and effects of volcanic eruptions on climate,
measurement, and estimation of ground water parameters,
El Nino, acid rain, severe thunderstorms, tornadoes,
fractured-rock flow, new or specialized methods of well
hurricanes, and avalanches are also discussed. Microcli-
hydraulics and pump tests, tracer methods, and well
mates and weather patterns common in Colorado. Prerequi-
construction design. Design of well tests in variety of
site: Completion of CSM freshman technical core, or
settings. Prerequisites: GEGN467 or consent of instructor.
equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
alternate years; Spring 1996.
GEGN483. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF
GEOC408. INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY (II)
GROUNDWATER SYSTEMS (II) Lectures, assigned
An introduction to the scientific study of the oceans,
readings, and direct computer experience concerning the
including chemistry, physics, geology, biology, geophysics,
fundamentals and applications of analytical and finite-
and mineral resources of the marine environment. Lectures
difference solutions to ground water flow problems as well
from pertinent disciplines are included. Recommended
as an introduction to inverse modeling. Design of computer
background: basic college courses in chemistry, geology,
models to solve ground water problems. Prerequisites:
mathematics, and physics. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Familiarity with computers, mathematics through differen-
Offered alternate years; Spring 1997.
tial and integral calculus, and GEGN467.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
GEGN/GEOL498. SEMINAR IN GEOLOGY OR GEO-
LOGICAL ENGINEERING (I, II) Special topics classes
taught on a one-time basis. May include lecture, laboratory
and field trip activities. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor
and department head. Variable credit; 1 to 6 semester hours.
GEGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING
GEOLOGY OR ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY (I,
II) Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field
problems in geological engineering or engineering
hydrogeology. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form must
be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit;
1 to 6 credit hours.
GEOL499. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GEOLOGY (I, II)
Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems
in geology. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form must be
completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit;
1 to 6 credit hours.
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department head for evaluation as a special topics course. If
Geophysics
selected, the course can be taught only once under the 298
Freshman/Sophomore Year
title before becoming a part of the regular curriculum under
GPGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN GEOPHYSICS (I, II)
a new course number and title. Prerequisite: Consent of
New topics in geophysics. Each member of the academic
department. Credit-variable, 1 to 6 hours.
faculty is invited to submit a prospectus of the course to the
department head for evaluation as a special topics course. If
GPGN299. GEOPHYSICS: SEEING THE UNSEEN (II)
selected, the course can be taught only once under the 198
Through geophysics, we gain understanding of the charac-
title before becoming part of the regular curriculum under a
teristics of, and processes within, the Earth’s interior based
new course number and title. Prerequisite: Consent of
on measurements of physical properties taken on the Earth’s
department. Credit-variable, 1 to 6 hours.
surface. These include gravity, magnetism, electric and
electromagnetic phenomena, seismic waves, and heat flow.
GPGN199. GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION (I, II)
In this overview course, we encounter the people, history,
Individual project; instrument design, data interpretation,
puzzles and applications of geophysics. We discover its
problem analysis, or field survey. Prerequisites: Consent of
relationship to other physical sciences, new frontiers and
department and “Independent Study” form must be
future horizons and career opportunities within this broadly
completed and submitted to the Registrar. Credit dependent
defined, applied science. Prerequisite: SYGN101 or
upon nature and extent of project, not to exceed 6 semester
concurrent enrollment. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
hours.
Junior Year
GPGN210. MATERIALS OF THE EARTH (II) Introduc-
GPGN302. SEISMIC METHODS I: INTRODUCTION TO
tion to the physical and chemical properties and processes in
SEISMIC METHODS (II) This is an introductory study of
naturally occurring materials. Combination of elements to
seismic methods for imaging the Earth’s subsurface, with
become gases, liquids and solids (minerals), and aggregation
emphasis on reflection seismic exploration. Starting with the
of fluids and minerals to become rocks and soils. Basic
history and development of seismic exploration, the course
material properties that describe the occurrence of matter
proceeds through an overview of methods for acquisition of
such as crystal structure, density, and porosity. Properties
seismic data in land, marine, and transitional environments.
relating to simple processes of storage and transport through
Underlying theoretical concepts, including working initially
the diffusion equation (such as Fick’s, Ohm’s, Hooke’s,
with traveltime equations for simple subsurface geometries,
Fourier’s, and Darcy’s Laws) as exhibited in electric,
are used to introduce general issues in seismic data
magnetic, elastic, mechanical, thermal, and fluid flow
processing, as well as the nature of seismic data interpreta-
properties. Coupled processes (osmosis, electromagnetic,
tion. The course introduces basic concepts, mathematics,
nuclear magnetic relaxation). The necessity to statistically
and physics of seismic wave propagation (including
describe properties of rocks and soils. Multiphase mixing
derivation of the one-dimensional acoustic wave equation
theories, methods of modeling and predicting properties.
and its solution in multi-layered medium), emphasizing
Inferring past processes acting on rocks from records left in
similarities with the equations and physics that underlay all
material properties. Environmental influences from
geophysical methods. Using analysis of seismometry as a
temperature, pressure, time and chemistry. Consequences of
first example of linear time-invariant systems, the course
nonlinearity, anisotropy, heterogeneity and scale. Prerequi-
brings Fourier theory and filter theory to life through
sites: PHGN200 and MACS112, or consent of instructor. 3
demonstrations of their immense power in large-scale
hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
processing of seismic data to improve signal-to-noise ratio
GPGN220 ELEMENTS OF CONTINUUM MECHANICS
and ultimately the accuracy of seismic images of the Earth’s
AND WAVE PROPAGATION (II) Introduction to con-
subsurface. Prerequisites: PHGN200, MACS213,
tinuum mechanics and elastic wave propagation with an
MACS349, MACS315, and GPGN210, or consent of
emphasis on principles and results important in seismology
instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
and earth sciences in general. Topics include a brief
GPGN303. GRAVITY AND MAGNETIC METHODS (I)
overview of elementary mechanics, stress and strain,
Introduction to land, airborne, oceanographic, and borehole
Hooke’s law, notions of geostatic pressure and isostacy,
gravity and magnetic exploration. Reduction of observed
fluid flow and Navier-Stokes equation. Basic discussion of
gravity and magnetic values. Theory of potential-field
the wave equation for elastic media, plane waves and their
anomalies introduced by geologic distributions. Methods
reflection/transmission at interfaces. Prerequisites:
and limitations of interpretations. Prerequisites: PHGN200,
MACS213, PHGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MACS213, MACS349, MACS315, and GPGN210, or
GPGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN GEOPHYSICS (I, II)
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4
New topics in geophysics. Each member of the academic
semester hours.
faculty is invited to submit a prospectus of the course to the
Colorado School of Mines
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1999-2000
93

GPGN306. LINEAR SYSTEMS (II) Beginning with simple
geophysical method, design geophysical surveys, prepare
linear systems of coupled elements (springs and masses or
and submit formal bids to clients contracting the work, and
electrical circuits, for instance) we study linearity, superpo-
collect, process, and interpret the resulting data. Emphasis is
sition, damping, resonance and normal modes. As the
placed on understanding the processes used in designing
number of elements increases we end up with the wave
and interpreting the results of geophysical exploration
equation, which leads, via separation of variables, to the
surveys. Prior exposure to computer applications such as
first signs of Fourier series. One of the unifying mathemati-
web browsers, spreadsheets, and word processors is helpful.
cal themes in this course is orthogonal decomposition,
Prerequisites: MACS213, PHGN200, and SYGN101. 3
which we first encounter in the comfort of finite dimen-
hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
sional vector spaces associated with springs and masses. But
GPGN315. FIELD METHODS FOR GEOPHYSICISTS I
the idea extends naturally to infinite dimensional spaces
(I) Practical application of methods and techniques used by
where it appears as a Fourier series. The course culminates
earth scientists to locate points on the Earth’s surface and
in an exposition of Fourier series, integrals and transforms,
display information gathered in geologic field mapping.
both discrete and continuous. Throughout, these ideas are
Students gain experience with the use and range of
motivated by and applied to current geophysical problems
applicability of a variety of surveying methods and
such as normal mode seismology, acoustic wave propagation
instruments, and to the basic tools and techniques used in
and spectral analysis of time series. In addition to the
geologic field mapping and interpretation. Prerequisites:
lectures, there will be classroom and laboratory demonstra-
PHGN200, MACS213, MACS315, GPGN210, and
tions, and all students will complete a variety of computer
concurrent enrollment in GEOL309, or consent of instruc-
exercises, using packages such as Mathematica and Matlab.
tor. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours
Prerequisite: PHGN200, MACS213, and MACS315, or
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
GPGN316. FIELD METHODS FOR GEOPHYSICISTS II
(II) Tools and techniques for designing and conducting
GPGN308. INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL AND
geophysical surveys such as seismic, gravity, magnetic,
ELECTROMAGNETIC METHODS (II) This is an
electrical and others. Study of the exploration process and
introductory course to the study of electrical and electro-
the use of modeling and simulation to optimize survey
magnetic methods for exploring the subsurface of the
design. Survey planning, mobilization and demobilization.
ground. The history of the various methods is included as
Proper use of field instruments to enhance signals, minimize
the course progresses through the introduction of the
noise and ensure safety data quality. Equipment and
various methods. Electrical properties of rocks including
techniques for field processing for quality assurance.
electrical anisotropy are reviewed. Methods introduced
Prerequisite: PHGN200, MACS213 MACS315, GPGN210,
include: natural source methods (self potential, telluric,
GPGN315, and GEOL314, or consent of instructor. 3 hours
audio-magnetotelluric, and magnetotelluric) and man-made
lab (some Saturdays in lieu of labs); 1 semester hour
methods (direct current resistivity, sounding and profiling,
variety of electrode arrays, imaging, induced polarization,
GPGN321. THEORY OF FIELDS I: STATIC FIELDS (I)
ground penetrating radar, ground and airborne electromag-
Introduction to the theory of gravitational, magnetic, and
netic methods, and laboratory methods). Both theory and
electrical fields encountered in geophysics. Emphasis on the
practice of the large variety of electrical and electromagnetic
mathematical and physical foundations of the various
methods are introduced, along with their advantages and
phenomena and the similarities and differences in the
limitations, ambiguities and uncertainties, and the extremely
various field properties. Physical laws governing the
wide range of applications in exploring the subsurface to
behavior of the gravitational, electric, and magnetic fields.
depths ranging from less than a meter to tens of kilometers.
Systems of equations of these fields. Boundary value
Application of these methods is demonstrated for a large
problems. Uniqueness theorem. Influence of a medium on
variety of exploration goals including environmental,
field behavior. Prerequisite: PHGN200, MACS213, and
mining, groundwater, petroleum, geothermal, basin studies,
MACS315, and concurrent enrollment in MACS349 or
and deep crust investigations. Included are methods of data
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
acquisition and field procedures, and pitfalls in data
GPGN322. THEORY OF FIELDS II: TIME-VARYING
interpretation are introduced. Prerequisites: PHGN200,
FIELDS (II) Constant electric field. Coulomb’s law. System
MACS213, MACS349, MACS315, GPGN210, and
of equations of the constant electric field. Stationary electric
GPGN321, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours
field and the direct current in a conducting medium. Ohm’s
lab; 4 semester hours.
law. Principle of charge conservation. Sources of electric
GPGN311. SURVEY OF EXPLORATION GEOPHYSICS
field in a conducting medium. Electromotive force.
(I) The fundamentals of geophysical exploration are taught
Resistance. System of equations of the stationary electric
through the use of a series of computer simulations and field
field. The magnetic field, caused by constant currents. Biot-
exercises. Students explore the physics underlying each
Savart law. The electromagnetic induction. Faraday’s law.
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Prerequisite: GPGN321, or consent of instructor. 3 hours
necessarily Matlab, is assumed. Prerequisite: PHGN200,
lecture; 3 semester hours.
MACS213, MACS315, MACS349, and GPGN306. 3 hours
lecture; 3 semester hours.
GPGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (I, II, S)
Supervised, full-time, engineering-related employment for a
GPGN414. ADVANCED GRAVITY AND MAGNETIC
continuous six-month period (or its equivalent) in which
METHODS (II) Instrumentation for land surface, borehole,
specific educational objectives are achieved. Prerequisite:
sea floor, sea surface, and airborne operations. Reduction of
Second semester sophomore status and a cumulative grade-
observed gravity and magnetic values. Theory of potential
point average of 2.00. 0 to 3 semester hours. Cooperative
field effects of geologic distributions. Methods and
Education credit does not count toward graduation except
limitations of interpretation. Prerequisite: GPGN303, or
under special conditions.
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4
semester hours.
GPGN386. GEOPHYSICS FIELD CAMP (S) Introduction
to geological and geophysical field methods. The program
GPGN419 WELL LOG ANALYSIS AND FORMATION
includes exercises in geological surveying, stratigraphic
EVALUATION (I) The basics of core analyses and the
section measurements, geological mapping, and interpreta-
principles of all common borehole instruments are reviewed.
tion of geological observations. Students conduct geophysi-
The course shows (computer) interpretation methods that
cal surveys related to the acquisition of seismic, gravity,
combine the measurements of various borehole instruments
magnetic, and electrical observations. Students participate in
to determine rock properties such as porosity, permeability,
designing the appropriate geophysical surveys, acquiring the
hydrocarbon saturation, water salinity, ore grade, ash-
observations, reducing the observations, and interpreting
content, mechanical strength, and acoustic velocity. The
these observations in the context of the geological model
impact of these parameters on reserves estimates of
defined from the geological surveys. Prerequisites:
hydrocarbon reservoirs and mineral accumulations are
GEOL309, GEOL314, [Origin & Evolution of Earth],
demonstrated. Prerequisite: MACS315, MACS349,
GPGN302, 303, 308, 315 and 316, or consent of instructor.
GPGN302, GPGN303, GPGN308. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours
Up to 6 weeks field; up to 6 semester hours.
lab; 3 semester hours.
GPGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN GEOPHYSICS (I, II)
GPGN422. ADVANCED ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRO-
New topics in geophysics. Each member of the academic
MAGNETIC METHODS (I) In depth study of the applica-
faculty is invited to submit a prospectus of the course to the
tion of electrical and electromagnetic methods to crustal
department head for evaluation as a special topics course. If
studies, minerals exploration, oil and gas exploration, and
selected, the course can be taught only once under the 398
groundwater. Laboratory work with scale and mathematical
title before becoming a part of the regular curriculum under
models coupled with field work over areas of known
a new course number and title. Prerequisite: Consent of
geology. Prerequisite: GPGN308, or consent of instructor. 3
department. Credit-variable, 1 to 6 hours.
hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
GPGN399. GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION (I, II)
GPGN438. GEOPHYSICS PROJECT DESIGN (I, II)
Individual project; instrument design, data interpretation,
Complementary design course for geophysics restricted
problem analysis, or field survey. Prerequisites: Consent of
elective course(s). Application of engineering design
department and “Independent Study” form must be
principles to geophysics through advanced work, individual
completed and submitted to the Registrar. Credit dependent
in character, leading to an engineering report or senior thesis
upon nature and extent of project, not to exceed 6 semester
and oral presentation thereof. Choice of design project is to
hours.
be arranged between student and individual faculty member
who will serve as an advisor, subject to department head
Senior Year
approval. Prerequisite: GPGN302, 303, 308, and completion
GPGN404. DIGITAL SIGNAL ANALYSIS (I) The
of or concurrent enrollment in geophysics method courses in
fundamentals of one-dimensional digital signal processing
the general topic area of the project design. 1 hour lecture, 6
as applied to geophysical investigations are studied.
hours lab; 3 semester hours.
Students explore the mathematical background and practical
consequences of the sampling theorem, convolution,
GPGN439. GEOPHYSICS PROJECT DESIGN (II)
deconvolution, the Z and Fourier transforms, windows, and
GEGN439/PEGN439. MULTI-DISCIPLINARY PETRO-
filters. Emphasis is placed on applying the knowledge
LEUM DESIGN (II) This is a multidisciplinary design
gained in lecture to exploring practical signal processing
course that integrates fundamentals and design concepts in
issues. This is done through homework assignments that
geological, geophysical, and petroleum engineering.
require the programming and testing of classroom deriva-
Students work in integrated teams consisting of students
tions in Matlab, or some such similar programming
from each of the disciplines. Multiple open-end design
language, and applying the resulting algorithms to data.
problems in oil and gas exploration and field development,
Knowledge of a computer programming language, not
including the development of a prospect in an exploration
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play and a detailed engineering field study, are assigned.
Liberal Arts and International Studies
Several detailed written and oral presentations are made
Humanities (LIHU)
throughout the semester. Project economics including risk
LIHU100. NATURE AND HUMAN VALUES Nature and
analysis are an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: GP
Human Values will focus on diverse views and critical
Majors: GPGN302 and GPGN303; PE majors: PEGN316,
questions concerning traditional and contemporary issues
PEGN414, PEGN422, PEGN423, PEGN424 (or concur-
linking the quality of human life and Nature, and their
rent) GEOL308; GE Majors: GEOL308 or GEOL309,
interdependence. The course will examine various discipli-
GEGN438, GEGN316. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 3
nary and interdisciplinary approaches regarding two major
semester hours.
questions: 1) How has Nature affected the quality of human
GPGN452. ADVANCED SEISMIC METHODS (I)
life and the formulation of human values and ethics? (2)
Historical survey. Propagation of body and surface waves in
How have human actions, values, and ethics affected
elastic media; transmission and reflection at single and
Nature? These issues will use cases and examples taken
multiple interfaces; energy relationships; attenuation factors,
from across time and cultures. Themes will include but are
data processing (including velocity interpretation, stacking,
not limited to population, natural resources, stewardship of
and migration) interpretation techniques including curved
the Earth, and the future of human society. This is a writing-
ray methods. Acquisition, processing, and interpretation of
intensive course that will provide instruction and practice in
laboratory model data; seismic processing using an
both expository and technical writing, using the disciplines
interactive workstation. Prerequisites: GPGN302 and
and perspectives of the humanities and social sciences. 4
concurrent enrollment in GPGN404, or consent of instruc-
hours lecture/recitation; 4 semester hours.
tor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
LIHU198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES (I, II)
GPGN494. PHYSICS OF THE EARTH (II) Students will
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
explore the fundamental observations from which physical
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
and mathematical inferences can be made regarding the
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
Earth¡s origin, structure, and evolution. These observations
Variable credit: 1 to 6 semester hours.
include traditional geophysical observations (e.g., seismic,
gravity, magnetic, and radioactive) in addition to geochemi-
LIHU298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES (I, II)
cal, nucleonic, and extraterrestrial observations. Emphasis is
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
placed on not only cataloging the available data sets, but on
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
developing and testing quantitative models to describe these
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
disparate data sets. Prerequisites: GEOL201, GPGN302,
Variable credit: 1 to 6 semester hours.
303, 306, 308, [Origin & Evolution of Earth], PHGN224,
LIHU300. THE JOURNEY MOTIF IN MODERN
PHGN200, MACS315, and MACS349, or consent of
LITERATURE This course will explore the notion that life
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
is a journey, be it a spiritual one to discover one’s self or
GPGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN GEOPHYSICS (I, II)
geographical one to discover other lands and other people.
New topics in geophysics. Each member of the academic
The exploration will rely on the major literary genres—
faculty is invited to submit a prospectus of the course to the
drama, fiction, and poetry— and include authors such as
department head for evaluation as a special topics course. If
Twain, Hurston, Kerouac, Whitman, and Cormac McCarthy.
selected, the course can be taught only once under the 498
A discussion course. Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite
title before becoming a part of the regular curriculum under
or corequisite: SYGN200.
a new course number and title. Prerequisite: Consent of
3 hours lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
department. Credit-variable, 1 to 6 hours.
LIHU301. WRITING FICTION If you like being read to
GPGN499. GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION (I, II)
and hearing a variety of stories, this class is for you.
Individual project; instrument design, data interpretation,
Students will write weekly exercises and read their work for
problem analysis, or field survey. Prerequisite: Consent of
the pleasure and edification of the class. The midterm in this
department in “Independent Study” form must be completed
course will be the production of a short story. The final will
and submitted to the Registrar. Credit dependent upon
consist of a completed, revised short story. The best of these
nature and extent of project, not to exceed 6 semester hours.
works may be printed in a future collection. Prerequisite:
LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
3 hours lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
LIHU310. HUMEN: CONNECTIONS BETWEEN
HUMANITIES AND CHEMICAL ENGINEERING This
course is taught in conjunction with CRGN201, ‘Chemical
Process Principles’(3 semester hours) and is part of an
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integration program known as HumEn (humanities +
size permits. Tests will be both objective and essay types.
engineering). The combination of these two courses is
Prerequisite: LIHU 100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
designed to help CSM students make appropriate connec-
SYGN200. 3 hours lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
tions between humanities and their technical work,
LIHU360. HISTORY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY:
connections which will allow them to appreciate the
BEGINNING TO 1500 Topics include: technology of
importance of humanistic understanding in their profes-
hunting and gathering societies, the development of
sional pursuits and in their lives. Courses in the program are
agriculture, writing, metallurgy, astronomy, mathematics;
team-taught by an engineering faculty member and a
Roman architecture and civil engineering, the role of
humanities faculty member, each are expert in his/her own
technology in the development of complex societies in the
field, each knowledgeable of the other’s field. In this way,
Near East and Mediterranean areas, Medieval military and
students are exposed to the importance of humanistic
agricultural technology and the rise of feudalism; the
considerations in solving complex technical problems.
movement of the economic center of Europe from the
Note: LIHU310, ‘Connections between Humanities and
Mediterranean to the North Sea. Includes some discussion
Chemical Engineering,’ can be take only in conjunction
of archaeological method including excavation techniques
with CRGN201, not as a stand-alone course. Chemical
and dating methods. Requires a 15-25 page analytical
engineering majors who apply and are selected to take
annotated bibliography or research paper, a 10-15 minute
CRGN201 in this format will satisfy one of their LAIS mid-
oral presentation, and a 2-hour take-home exam. Prerequi-
level requirements by taking a combination of courses.
site: LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3
Chemical engineering students interested in participating in
hours lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
the HumEn program should contact either the Department
of Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining or the
LIHU361. HISTORY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY:
Division of Liberal Arts and International Studies for
1500 TO THE PRESENT Topics include: the age of
application procedures. Prerequisite: LIHU100 and
exploration and the industrial revolution; the origins of
permission from instructor.. Prerequisite or corequisite:
modern natural science: Copernicus, Galileo, Newton.
SYGN200. 3 hours lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
Emphasis is on understanding the origins of the industrial
revolutions in Western Europe. Includes some discussion of
LIHU330. WESTERN CIVILIZATION SINCE THE
non-European science and technology in this context.
RENAISSANCE Major historical trends in Western
Further treats: the spread of industrialization from Western
civilization since the Renaissance. This course provides a
Europe to the United States and elsewhere; the rise of
broad understanding of the historical events, issues, and
institutionalized and applied science; the revolution in
personalities which shaped contemporary Western civiliza-
physics. Emphasis on the social choice of technology and its
tion. Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
consequences. Includes detailed treatment of selected
SYGN200. 3 hours lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
examples of technologies: e.g., the chemical industry;
LIHU334. LITERARY HERITAGE OF THE WESTERN
electric power distribution; automobile transportation;
WORLD A study of representative works that have
telecommunications. Requires 15-25 page research paper,
contributed significantly to the literary heritage of Western
10-15 minute oral presentation, and a 2-hour take-home
civilization. Selections read from various genres (drama,
exam. Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
fiction, poetry, essay) range in time from ancient Greece to
SYGN200. 3 hours lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
the present. Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite or
LIHU375. PATTERNS OF AMERICAN CULTURE A
corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours lecture/discussion; 3
survey of American cultural history through an examination
semester hours.
of significant works of literature and of social and intellec-
LIHU339. MUSICAL TRADITIONS OF THE WESTERN
tual history. Works chosen may vary from year to year, but
WORLD An introduction to music of the Western world
the goal of the course will remain constant: the understand-
from its beginnings to the present. Prerequisite: LIHU100.
ing of those cultural aspects that help to define America.
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours lecture/
Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
discussion; 3 semester hours.
SYGN200. 3 hours lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
LIHU350. HISTORY OF WAR History of War looks at war
LIHU398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES (I, II)
primarily as a significant human activity in the history of the
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
Western World since the times of Greece and Rome to the
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
present. The causes, strategies, results, and costs of various
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
wars will be covered, with considerable focus on important
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. Variable credit: 1 to
military and political leaders as well as on noted historians
6 hours.
and theoreticians. The course is primarily a lecture course
Note: Students enrolling in 400-level courses are
with possible group and individual presentations as class
required to have senior standing or permission of instructor.
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LIHU401. THE AMERICAN DREAM: ILLUSION OR
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3
REALITY? This seminar will examine ‘that elusive phrase,
semester hours
the American dream,’ and ask what it meant to the pioneers
LIHU410. ROMANTICISM TO IMPRESSIONISM
in the New World, how it withered, and whether it has been
Romanticism to Impressionism is a seminar on aspects of
revived. The concept will be critically scrutinized within
European (primarily French) cultural history of the
cultural contexts. The study will rely on the major genres of
nineteenth century. Emphasis is on art and literature from
fiction, drama, and poetry, but will venture into biography
the era of Napoleon I to that of the Third Republic. This is
and autobiography, and will range from Thoreau’s Walden to
the age of industrial revolution, rapid growth of cities,
Kerouac’s On the Road and Boyle’s Budding Prospects.
exploitation of the working class, the beginnings of
Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
socialism, and the triumph of capitalism. Artists to be
SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
covered range from Delacroix to Monet; authors include Sir
LIHU402. HEROES AND ANTIHEROES: A TRAGIC
Walter Scott and Emile Zola. Prerequisite: LIHU100.
VIEW This course features heroes and antiheroes (average
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3
folks, like most of us), but because it is difficult to be heroic
semester hours.
unless there are one or more villains lurking in the shadows,
LIHU470. BECOMING AMERICAN: LITERARY
there will have to be an Iago or Caesar or a politician or a
PERSPECTIVES This course will explore the increasing
member of the bureaucracy to overcome. Webster’s defines
heterogeneity of U.S. society by examining the immigration
heroic as ‘exhibiting or marked by courage and daring.’
and assimilation experience of Americans from Europe,
Courage and daring are not confined to the battlefield, of
Africa, Latin America, and Asia as well as Native Ameri-
course. One can find them in surprising places— in the
cans. Primary sources and works of literature will provide
community (Ibsen’s Enemy of the People), in the psychiatric
the media for examining these phenomena. In addition,
ward (Kesey’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’
s Nest), in the
Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.’s thesis about the ‘unifying ideals
military (Heller’s Catch-22), on the river (Twain’s The
and common culture’ that have allowed the United States to
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn or in a “bachelor pad”
absorb immigrants from every corner of the globe under the
(Simon’s Last of the Red Hot Lovers). Prerequisite:
umbrella of individual freedom, and the various ways in
LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
which Americans have attempted to live up to the motto ‘e
seminar; 3 semester hours.
pluribus unum’ will also be explored. Prerequisite:
LIHU403. MYTHOLOGY This course is designed to give
LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
students a familiarity with important Greek myths, espe-
seminar; 3 semester hours.
cially in terms of their imaginative and dramatic appeal.
LIHU479. THE AMERICAN MILITARY EXPERIENCE
Considerations regarding the nature of that appeal will
A survey of military history, with primary focus on the
provide means for addressing the social function of myth,
American military experience from 1775 to present.
which is a central issue for the course. The class will also
Emphasis is placed not only on military strategy and
examine various issues of anthropological and philosophical
technology, but also on relevant political, social, and
significance pertaining to the understanding of myth,
economic questions. Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite
including the issue of whether science is a form of myth.
or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester
The final assignment will provide an opportunity to address
hours. Open to ROTC students or by permission of the
either Greek or non-Greek myth. Prerequisite: LIHU100.
LAIS Division.
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3
semester hours.
LIHU480. URBAN QUALITY OF LIFE This course is
intended to engage students with the marvelous potential
LIHU404. TRANSCENDENT VISION Imagination can
and appalling problems of some of the world’s cities.
take us beyond the limits imposed by conventional mecha-
Primary focus will be on cultural history and the designed
nistic thinking about life and the universe. Spiritual vision
environment, including issues of traffic, housing, and
can reveal a living universe of great power, beauty, and
environmental quality. Emphasis will be on the humanistic
intrinsic value. Yet people accept existence in a world
dimensions of a range of issues normally associated with
supposedly built out of dead matter. To transcend ordinary
urban sociology. Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite or
experience, we must set out on an adventure, a journey into
corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
new and strange worlds. Works of imaginative literature
provide gateways to new worlds in which the universe is a
LIHU498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES (1, II)
transcendent experience that gives full meaning to existence.
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
This course explores ideas and images of the universe as a
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
revelation of transcendent value. A major issue considered
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
in the course is the implication of comparing European and
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. Variable credit: 1 to
Native American world views. Prerequisite: LIHU100.
6 semester hours.
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LIHU499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
ties and social sciences work. We will use methods from
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
various disciplines to study religion-history of religions and
member. For students who have completed their LAIS
religious thought, sociology, anthropology and ethnography,
requirements. Instructor consent required. Prerequisite:
art history, study of myth, philosophy, analysis of religious
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
texts and artifacts (both contemporary and historical),
to the registrar. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
analysis of material culture and the role it plays in religion,
Variable credit: 1 to 6 hours.
and other disciplines and methodologies. We will look at the
question of objectivity; is it possible to be objective? We
Systems (SYGN)
will approach this methodological question using the
SYGN200. HUMAN SYSTEMS This is a pilot course in
concept “standpoint.” For selected readings, films, and your
the CSM core curriculum that articulates with LIHU100,
own writings, we will analyze what the “standpoint” is.
Nature and Human Values, and with the other systems
Prerequisite: LIHU 100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
courses. Human Systems is an interdisciplinary historical
SYGN200. 3 hours lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours
examination of key systems created by humans— namely,
political, economic, social, and cultural institutions— as they
LISS320. THE PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN PROBLEM-
have evolved worldwide from the inception of the modern
SOLVING Introduction to, and study of, basic concepts
era (ca. 1500) to the present. This course embodies an
relating to self-development, group interactions, and
elaboration of these human systems as introduced in their
interpersonal skills. Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite or
environmental context in Nature and Human Values and will
corequisite: SYGN200.
reference themes and issues explored therein. It also
3 hours lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
demonstrates the cross-disciplinary applicability of the
LISS330. MANAGING CULTURAL DIFFERENCES
‘systems’ concept. Assignments will give students continued
Developing awareness and sensitivities of differences
practice in writing. Prerequisite: LIHU100.
among cultures, their interrelationship; acquiring basic
3 hours lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
cultural literacy; acculturation processes of ethics, values,
and behavior in the United States. Prerequisite: LIHU100.
Social Sciences (LISS)
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
LISS198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCE (I, II)
3 hours lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
LISS335. INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
International Political Economy is a study of contentious
Variable credit: 1 to 6 semester hours.
and harmonious relationships between the state and the
market on the nation-state level, between individual states
LISS298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCE (I, II)
and their markets on the regional level, and between region-
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
states and region-markets on the global level. Prerequisite:
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
3 hours lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
Variable credit: 1 to 6 semester hours.
LISS340. POLITICAL ECONOMY OF LATIN AMERICA
LISS300. CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY A study of the
A broad survey of the interrelationship between the state
social behavior and cultural development of man. Prerequi-
and economy in Latin America as seen through an examina-
site: LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
tion of critical contemporary and historical issues that shape
3 hours lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
polity, economy, and society. Special emphasis will be given
LISS310. COMPARATIVE IDEOLOGIES IN THE
to the dynamics of interstate relationships between the
MODERN WORLD An examination of the political and
developed North and the developing South. Prerequisite:
economic ideologies in the contemporary world, their
LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
evolution and influence on the conduct of nations. Special
3 hours lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
emphasis will be placed on the impact of these ideologies on
LISS342. POLITICAL ECONOMY OF ASIA A broad
East-West relations and the development of the non-western
survey of the interrelationship between the state and
world. Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
economy in East and Southeast Asia as seen through an
SYGN200. 3 hours lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
examination of critical contemporary and historical issues
LISS312. INTRODUCTION TO RELIGIONS This course
that shape polity, economy, and society. Special emphasis
has two focuses. We will look at selected religions empha-
will be given to the dynamics of interstate relationships
sizing their popular, institutional, and contemplative forms;
between the developed North and the developing South.
these will be four or five of the most common religions:
Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and/or Islam.
SYGN200. 3 hours lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
The second point of the course focuses on how the humani-
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Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
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LISS344. POLITICAL ECONOMY OF THE MIDDLE
relates to our lives directly and intimately, will be the
EAST A broad survey of the interrelationships between the
centerpiece of the course. Both parts will address the new
state and market in the Middle East as seen through an
challenges constitutional interpretation faces due to recent
examination of critical contemporary and historical issues
advances in science and technology (medicine, new biology,
that shape polity, economy, and society. Special emphasis
electronic and information technologies, and behavioral
will be given to the dynamics between the developed North
sciences). Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite or
and the developing South. Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prereq-
corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours lecture/discussion; 3
uisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours lecture/discussion;
semester hours.
3 semester hours.
LISS375. INTRODUCTION TO LAW AND LEGAL
LISS351. THE HISTORY OF EASTERN EUROPE AND
SYSTEMS Examination of different approaches to,
RUSSIA SINCE 1914 The course will trace the develop-
principles of, and issues in the law in the U.S. and other
ments in Eastern Europe and Russia from 1914 to the
societies. Prerequisite: LIHU 100. Prerequisite or
present, with emphasis on the development of communism,
corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours lecture/discussion; 3
World War II, the Cold War, the fall of communism, and the
semester hours.
resulting efforts to democratize the former communist states.
LISS380. ENVIRONMENT AND HUMAN ADAPTATION
Countries covered will include Russia, Poland, Hungary, the
OF EARLY PEOPLE IN AMERICA This course empha-
Czech Republic, Slovakia, Romania, Bulgaria, Albania,
sizes technology choice and its long-term social and
Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia, Macedonia, and Serbia/
ecological consequences. It traces the evolution of technol-
Montenegro. The course is primarily lecture, with opportu-
ogy and human environmental adaptations from the arrival
nities for individual and group presentations and papers.
of people in the Americas to the beginnings of agriculture
Tests will be both objective and essay. Prerequisite:
and settled life, focusing mainly on Paleo-Indian and
LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
Archaic cultures of Meso-America and the Greater South-
lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
west. It includes films, a museum visit, hands-on experience
LISS362. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY An
with reconstructions of tools and weapons, and an introduc-
introductory survey of current issues relating to national
tion to computer modeling of hunting and foraging
science and technology policy in the U.S. Prerequisite:
strategies. Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite or
LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
corequisite: SYGN200. 1 hour lecture/discussion; 1
lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
semester hour.
LISS364. ENGINEERING, SCIENCE, AND TECHNOL-
LISS381. ENVIRONMENT AND HUMAN ADAPTATION
OGY: SOCIAL/ENVIRONMENTAL CONTEXT Social
IN PRE-EUROPEAN MESO-AMERICA This course
context and social effects of engineering, science, and
emphasizes technology choice and its long-term social and
technology, with strong emphasis on ecological
ecological consequences, including the gradual development
sustainability of resource use and of technological activity in
of complex societies and their sudden ‘collapse.’ It traces
general, from both social and comprehensively ecological
the evolution of science, technology, and human environ-
viewpoints. Examination of the relationship between social
mental adaptations from the beginnings of agriculture to
values and technological developments, and of how
European contact in three representative culture areas of
engineering alternatives imply social alternatives; engineer-
Meso-America: the Valley of Oaxaca (Zapotec); the Valley
ing as a means of ecological rationality. Prerequisite:
of Mexico (Aztec); and the Eastern Lowlands of Mexico
LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
and Central America (Maya). It includes films, museum
lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
visits, and hands-on experience with artifacts. Prerequisite:
LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 2 hours
LISS372. THE AMERICAN POLITICAL EXPERIENCE A
lecture/discussion; 2 semester hours.
study of key elements in the American political system (e.g.,
the Constitution, the Presidency, federalism, public
LISS382. ENVIRONMENT AND HUMAN ADAPTATION
opinion), their historical development, and how they affect
IN THE PRE-EUROPEAN SOUTHWEST This course
policy-making on controversial issues. Prerequisite:
emphasizes technology choice and its long term social and
LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
ecological consequences, including the gradual development
lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
of complex societies and their sudden ‘collapse.’ It traces
the evolution of science, technology, and human environ-
LISS374. THE CONSTITUTION AND A CHANGING
mental adaptations from the beginnings of agriculture to
AMERICA A highly selective study of the Constitution of
European contact in three representative culture areas of the
the United States, the course consists of two parts: the first
Greater Southwest: the San Juan Basin (Anasazi); the Gila-
organized around the concept of power and the second
Salt Basin (Hohokam); the Northwestern Chihuahua (Casas
around the concept of rights. The Bill of Rights, since it
Grandes). It includes films, museum visits, and hands-on
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1999-2000

experience with artifacts. Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequi-
LISS432. CULTURAL DYNAMICS OF GLOBAL
site or corequisite: SYGN200. 2 hours lecutre/discussion; 2
DEVELOPMENT Role of cultures and nuances in world
semester hours.
development; cultural relationship between the developed
North and the developing South, specifically between the
LISS383. ENVIRONMENT AND HUMAN ADAPTATION
U.S. and the Third World. Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prereq-
IN POST-CONTACT SOUTHWEST This course traces the
uisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
cultural development of the Greater Southwest from
3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
European contact to the present, focusing on the interaction
among indigenous cultures and successive Hispanic and
LISS434. INTERNATIONAL FIELD PRACTICUM For
Anglo-American conquerors producing the contemporary,
students who go abroad for an on-site practicum involving
multi-cultural society. Concept, practice, and effect of
their technical field as practiced in another country and
Hispanic and Anglo-American policies for indigenous
culture; required course for students pursuing a certificate in
cultures are compared. The socio-economic history of
International Political Economy; all arrangements for this
Anglo-Hispanic relations is examined. Contemporary issues
course are to be supervised and approved by the advisor of
of economic development as well as cultural and environ-
the International Political Economy minor program.
mental preservation are considered from an historical
Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
perspective. Includes films and a museum visit. Prerequisite:
SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
LISS435. POLITICAL RISK ASSESSMENT This course
1 hour lecture/discussion; 1 semester hour.
will review the existing methodologies and techniques of
LISS398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCE (I, II)
risk assessment in both country-specific and global
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
environments. It will also seek to design better ways of
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
assessing and evaluating risk factors for business and public
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
diplomacy in the increasingly globalized context of
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. Variable credit: 1 to
economy and politics wherein the role of the state is being
6 semester hours.
challenged and redefined. Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prereq-
uisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
LISS 410. UTOPIAS/DYSTOPIAS This course studies the
3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
relationship between society, technology, and science using
fiction and film as a point of departure. A variety of science
LISS436. ETHICS OF GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT This
fiction novels, short stories, and films will provide the
course looks at Western economic development efforts since
starting point for discussions. These creative works will also
World War II and asks basic questions about this process:
be concrete examples of various conceptualizations that
What is development? How is it done, in practice, by
historians, sociologists, philosophers, and other scholars
different actors? What motivates them to practice develop-
have created to discuss the relationship. Prerequisite: LIHU
ment? The course also asks fundamental questions about the
100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
ethics of these development practices: What are the
3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
philosophical goals of development? How can these goals
be defended (or disputed) within the value systems of
LISS430. CRITICAL WORLD ISSUES Selected issues of
various cultures from East and West? Is there any ethical
contemporary world affairs, with emphasis on political,
context in which development is not an unchallenged good?
economic, diplomatic, and military significance, protean
Is sustainability primarily a technical or an ethical concept?
relationships between the East and West; dynamics of
Included are discussions of the international “development
North/South interdependency. Prerequisite: LIHU100.
project” since 1945; globalization; elements of moral
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
philosophy, including cultural relativism, subjectivism,
3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
egoism, utilitarianism, Kantian ethics, and the social
LISS431. GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES Critical
contract; case studies of societies responding to changes
examination of interactions between development and the
brought by development; and statistical data about the
environment and the human dimensions of global change;
progress of development worldwide in the past 50 years.
social, political, economic, and cultural responses to the
Prerequisite: LIHU 100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
management and preservation of natural resources and
SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
ecosystems on a global scale. Exploration of the meaning
LISS440. LATIN AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT A senior
and implications of “Stewardship of the Earth” and
seminar designed to explore the political economy of current
“Sustainable Development.” Prerequisite: LIHU100.
and recent past development strategies, models, efforts, and
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
issues in Latin America, one of the most dynamic regions of
3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
the world today. Development is understood to be a
nonlinear, complex set of processes involving political,
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
101

economic, social, cultural, and environmental factors whose
corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
ultimate goal is to improve the quality of life for individuals.
LISS461. TECHNOLOGY AND GENDER: ISSUES This
The role of both the state and the market in development
course focuses on how women and men relate to technology.
processes will be examined. Topics to be covered will vary
Several traditional disciplines will be used: philosophy,
as changing realities dictate but will be drawn from such
history, sociology, literature, and a brief look at theory. The
subjects as inequality of income distribution; the role of
class will begin discussing some basic concepts such as
education and health care; region-markets; the impact of
gender and sex and the essential and/or social construction
globalization; institution-building; corporate-community-
of gender, for example. We will then focus on topical and
state interfaces; neoliberalism; privatization; democracy;
historical issues. We will look at modern engineering using
and public policy formulation as it relates to development
sociological studies that focus on women in engineering. We
goals.. Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
will look at some specific topics including military tech-
SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
nologies, ecology, and reproductive technologies. Prerequi-
LISS450. AMERICAN MINING HISTORY This course
site: LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
asks the question, “how do we know what happened in the
3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
past?” using Western American mining history as the case
LISS470. POWER IN AMERICA: ILLUSIONS AND
study. The course will include primary texts those written at
REALITIES The course will probe into the realities of
the time that the historical events occurred and secondary
power as opposed to illusions and simplistic perceptions. It
sources, scholars’ and popularizers’ reconstructions. We
will address questions such as: does the person or the
will look at several approaches: scholarly studies, such as
institution have the power we think they have? How much is
labor, technology, quantitative, and social history. Oral
fact and how much is fiction? Have new forms of power
history will be approached through song and video material.
emerged to displace the old? The study will be confined to
We will study industrial archaeology by visiting the Western
the American scene due to limited time. Prerequisite:
Mining Museum in Colorado Springs. The movie
LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
“Matewan” illustrates how Americans make myths out of
3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
history. Students unfamiliar with mining can earn extra
credit by a visit to the CSM experimental mine. In all these
LISS480. ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY
cases, we will discuss the standpoint of the authors of
Seminar on environmental policies and the political and
primary sources and scholarly accounts. We will discuss
governmental processes that produce them. Group discus-
how we represent all different historical viewpoints and
sion and independent research on specific environmental
discuss how we know what is historically true–what really
issues. Primary but not exclusive focus on the U.S.
happened. Prerequisite: LIHU 100. Prerequisite or
Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
LISS455. JAPANESE HISTORY AND CULTURE
LISS482. WATER POLITICS AND POLICY Seminar on
Japanese History and Culture is a senior seminar taught in
water policies and the political and governmental processes
Japanese that covers Japan’s historical and cultural
that produce them, as an exemplar of natural resource
foundations from earliest times through the modern period.
politics and policy in general. Group discussion and
It is designed to allow students who have had three
independent research on specific politics and policy issues.
semesters of Japanese language instruction (or the equiva-
Primary but not exclusive focus on the U.S. Prerequisite:
lent) to apply their knowledge of Japanese in a social
LIHU100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
science-based course. Major themes will include: cultural
3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
roots; forms of social organization; the development of
LISS484. POPULATION, ENVIRONMENT AND
writing systems; the development of religious institutions;
RESOURCES Will continued global population growth at
the evolution of legal institutions; literary roots; and clan
projected rates exhaust natural resources, damage the
structure. Students will engage in activities that enhance
environment and degrade the quality of human life? Are
their reading proficiency, active vocabulary, translation
public policies to control population growth needed? What
skills, and expository writing abilities. Text is in Japanese.
should these policies be? This course will examine these
Prerequisites: LIHU 100; three semesters of college-level
questions. The examination will be informed by an
Japanese or permission of instructor. Prerequisite or
introduction to demographic analysis, population history
corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
and the socio-economic determinants of population
LISS460. TECHNOLOGY AND WILDERNESS A seminar
dynamics. Alternative conceptions of “optimum sustainable
on the values of wild nature in comparison to technological
population” will provide a framework for examining
values with a view to the impact on environmental manage-
population-related natural resource depletion and environ-
ment policies. Prerequisite: LIHU100. Prerequisite or
ment change. Public policy responses to population issues
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such as fertility control, immigration limits and foreign aid
expressions of daily conversation, and Spanish American
restrictions will be discussed. Prerequisite: LIHU 100.
culture. 3 semester hours.
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
LIFL321. SPANISH II Continuation of Spanish I with an
3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
emphasis on acquiring conversational skills as well as
LISS498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCE (I, II)
further study of grammar, vocabulary, and Spanish Ameri-
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
can culture. 3 semester hours.
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
LIFL421. SPANISH III Emphasis on furthering conversa-
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
tional skills and a continuing study of grammar, vocabulary,
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. Variable credit: 1 to
and Spanish American culture. 3 semester hours.
6 semester hours.
LIFL222. ARABIC I Fundamentals of spoken and written
LISS499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
Arabic with an emphasis on vocabulary, idiomatic expres-
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
sions of daily conversation, and culture of Arabic-speaking
member. For students who have completed their LAIS
societies. 3 semester hours.
requirements. Instructor consent required. Prerequisite:
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
LIFL322. ARABIC II Continuation of Arabic I with an
to the registrar. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
emphasis on acquiring conversational skills as well as
Variable credit: 1 to 6 hours.
further study of grammar, vocabulary, and culture of Arabic
speaking societies. 3 semester hours.
Foreign Languages (LIFL)
LIFL422. ARABIC III Emphasis on furthering conversa-
A variety of foreign languages is available through the
tional skills and a continuing study of grammar, vocabulary,
LAIS Division. Students interested in a particular language
and culture of Arabic-speaking societies. 3 semester hours.
should check with the LAIS Division Office to determine
when these languages might be scheduled. In order to gain
LIFL223. GERMAN I Fundamentals of spoken and written
basic proficiency from their foreign language study, students
German with an emphasis on vocabulary, idiomatic
are encouraged to enroll for at least two semesters in
expressions of daily conversation, and German culture.
whatever language(s) they elect to take. If there is sufficient
3 semester hours.
demand, the Division can provide third- and fourth-semester
LIFL323. GERMAN II Continuation of German I with an
courses in a given foreign language. No student is permitted
emphasis on acquiring conversational skills as well as
to take a foreign language that is either his/her native
further study of grammar, vocabulary, and German culture.
language or second language. Proficiency tests may be used
3 semester hours.
to determine at what level a student should be enrolled, but
a student cannot receive course credit by taking these tests.
LIFL423. GERMAN III Emphasis on furthering conversa-
tional skills and a continuing study of grammar, vocabulary,
Foreign Language Policy
and German culture. 3 semester hours.
Students will not receive credit toward their LAIS or
Free Elective graduation requirements for taking a foreign
LIFL224. RUSSIAN I Fundamentals of spoken and written
language in which they have had previous courses as per the
Russian with an emphasis on vocabulary, idiomatic
following formula:
expressions of daily conversation, and Russian culture.
3 semester hours.
If a student has taken one year in high school or one
semester in college, he/she will not receive graduation credit
LIFL324. RUSSIAN II Continuation of Russian I with an
for the first semester in a CSM foreign language course.
emphasis on acquiring conversational skills as well as
Likewise, if a student has taken two years in high school or
further study of grammar, vocabulary, and Russian culture.
two semesters in college, he/she will not receive graduation
3 semester hours.
credit for the second semester, and if a student has taken
LIFL424. RUSSIAN III Emphasis on furthering conversa-
three years in high school or three semesters in college, he/
tional skills and a continuing study of grammar, vocabulary,
she will not receive graduation credit for the third semester.
and Russian culture. 3 semester hours.
LIFL198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN A FOREIGN LAN-
LIFL225. FRENCH I Fundamentals of spoken and written
GUAGE (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics
French with an emphasis on vocabulary, idiomatic expres-
chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s).
sions of daily conversation, and French-speaking societies.
Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite:
3 semester hours.
Instructor consent. Variable credit: 1 to 6 semester hours.
LIFL325. FRENCH II Continuation of French I with an
LIFL221. SPANISH I Fundamentals of spoken and written
emphasis on acquiring conversational skills as well as
Spanish with an emphasis on vocabulary, idiomatic
further study of grammar, vocabulary, and French- speaking
societies. 3 semester hours.
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Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
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LIFL425. FRENCH III Emphasis on furthering conversa-
Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite:
tional skills and a continuing study of grammar, vocabulary,
Instructor consent. Variable credit: 1 to 6 semester hours.
and French-speaking societies. 3 semester hours.
LIFL299. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
LIFL226. PORTUGUESE I Fundamentals of spoken and
independent study in a given foreign language. Prerequisite:
written Portuguese with an emphasis on vocabulary,
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
idiomatic expressions of daily conversation, and Brazilian
to the registrar. Variable credit: 1 to 6 hours.
culture. 3 semester hours.
LIFL398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN A FOREIGN LAN-
LIFL326. PORTUGUESE II Continuation of Portuguese I
GUAGE (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics
with an emphasis on acquiring conversational skills as well
chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s).
as further study of grammar, vocabulary, and Brazilian
Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite:
culture. 3 semester hours.
Instructor consent. Variable credit: 1 to 6 semester hours.
LIFL426. PORTUGUESE III Emphasis on furthering
LIFL399. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I,II) Individual
conversational skills and a continuing study of grammar,
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
vocabulary, and Brazilian culture. 3 semester hours.
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
LIFL227. CHINESE I Fundamentals of spoken and written
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
Chinese with an emphasis on vocabulary, idiomatic
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
expressions of daily conversation, and Chinese culture.
3 semester hours.
LIFL498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN A FOREIGN LAN-
GUAGE (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics
LIFL327. CHINESE II Continuation of Chinese I with an
chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s).
emphasis on acquiring conversational skills as well as
Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite:
further study of grammar, vocabulary, and Chinese culture.
Instructor consent. Variable credit: 1 to 6 semester hours.
3 semester hours.
LIFL499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
LIFL427. CHINESE III Emphasis on furthering conversa-
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
tional skills and a continuing study of grammar, vocabulary,
member. For students who have completed their LAIS
and Chinese culture. 3 semester hours.
requirements. Instructor consent required. Prerequisite:
LIFL228. INDONESIAN I Fundamentals of spoken and
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
written Indonesian with an emphasis on vocabulary,
to the registrar. Variable credit: 1 to 6 hours.
idiomatic expressions of daily conversation, and Indonesian
The Guy T. McBride, Jr. Honors Program in
culture. 3 semester hours.
Public Affairs for Engineers (LIHN)
LIFL328. INDONESIAN II Continuation of Indonesian I
LIHN101A. HONORS SEMINAR ONE PARADOXES
with an emphasis on acquiring conversational skills as well
OF THE HUMAN CONDITION (II) Study of the paradoxes
as further study of grammar, vocabulary, and Indonesian
in the human condition expressed in significant texts in
culture. 3 semester hours.
classics, literature, moral philosophy, and history
LIFL428. INDONESIAN III Emphasis on furthering
(LIHN101A); drama and music, both classical and contem-
conversational skills and a continuing study of grammar,
porary (LIHN101B); or history, biography, and fiction
vocabulary, and Indonesian culture. 3 semester hours.
(LIHN101C). The seminar will encourage a value-oriented
approach to the texts. Prerequisite: Freshman status in the
LIFL229. JAPANESE I Fundamentals of spoken and written
McBride Honors Program. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester
Japanese with an emphasis on vocabulary, idiomatic
hours.
expressions of daily conversation, and Japanese culture.
3 semester hours.
LIHN200A. HONORS SEMINAR TWO CULTURAL
ANTHROPOLOGY: A STUDY OF DIVERSE CULTURES
LIFL329. JAPANESE II Continuation of Japanese I with an
A study of cultures within the United States and abroad and
emphasis on acquiring conversational skills as well as
the behavior of people. The seminar will emphasize the
further study of grammar, vocabulary, and Japanese culture.
roles of languages, religions, moral values, and legal and
3 semester hours.
economic systems in the cultures selected for inquiry.
LIFL429. JAPANESE III Emphasis on furthering conversa-
Prerequisite: Sophomore status in the McBride Honors
tional skills and a continuing study of grammar, vocabulary,
Program. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
and Japanese culture. 3 semester hours.
LIHN201A. HONORS SEMINAR THREE COMPARA-
LIFL298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN A FOREIGN LAN-
TIVE POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC SYSTEMS (II) This
GUAGE (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics
course constitutes a comparative study of the interrelation-
chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s).
ships between political and economic systems in theory and
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practice. Totalitarianism, authoritarianism, democracy,
America (Brazil or Chile), Middle East/Africa (Turkey or
anarchy, socialism, and communism will be examined in
South Africa). Students taking this seminar in preparation
their historical and theoretical contexts and compared with
for a McBride sponsored trip abroad will be expected to
baseline concepts of what constitutes a political system.
take a brief intensive language course before departure. 3
Economics will be studied from a historical/developmental
hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
approach, examining classical and neo-classical economics
LIHN400A. MCBRIDE PRACTICUM (SUMMER) An off-
and theories of major western economists, including Smith,
campus practicum which may include an internship in a
Marx, and Keynes. Specific nation or area case studies will
company, government agency, or public service organization
be used to integrate concepts and to explore possible new
(domestic or foreign), or foreign study as a part of a
global conditions which define the roles of governments and
McBride group or individually. The practicum must have
other institutions in the development, planning, and control
prior approval of the Principal Tutor. All students complet-
of economic activities and social policy. Prerequisites:
ing a practicum are expected to keep an extensive journal
Sophomore status in the McBride Honors Program;
and write a professional report detailing, analyzing, and
LIHN101, LIHN200 or permission of instructor. 3 hours
evaluating their experiences. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester
seminar; 3 semester hours.
hours.
LIHN300A. HONORS SEMINAR FOUR INTERNA-
LIHN401A. HONORS SEMINAR SIX STUDY OF
TIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY International political
LEADERSHIP AND POWER (I) An intellectual examina-
economy is the study of the dynamic relationships between
tion into the nature of leadership and power. Focuses on
nation-states and the global marketplace. Topics include:
understanding and interpreting the leadership role, both its
international and world politics, money and international
potential and its limitations, in various historical, literary,
finance, international trade, multinational and global
political, socio-economic, and cultural contexts. Exemplary
corporations, global development, transition economies and
leaders and their antitypes are analyzed. Characteristics of
societies, and developing economies and societies. Prerequi-
leaders are related to their cultural and temporal context.
sites: EBGN211, LIHN201. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester
This course will ask questions regarding the morality of
hours.
power and its uses. Leadership in technical and non-
LIHN300B. HONORS SEMINAR FOUR TECHNOL-
technical environments will be compared and contrasted.
OGY AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC CHANGE (I) A critical
Additionally, power and empowerment, and the complica-
analysis of the interactions among science, technology, and
tions of becoming or of confronting a leader are scrutinized.
American values and institutions. The seminar will study the
3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
role of technology in American society and will debate the
LIHN402A. SENIOR HONORS SEMINAR SCIENCE,
implications of technology transfer from developed to
TECHNOLOGY, AND ETHICS (II) A comprehensive
developing nations. Students will learn to relate technologi-
inquiry into ethical and moral issues raised by modern
cal issues to socio-economic and religious aspects of society
science and technology. Issues covered include: the
and explore the moral and social consequences of techno-
contention that science is value neutral; the particular sorts
logical innovations. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
of ethical problems faced by engineers in their public and
LIHN301A. HONORS SEMINAR FIVE U.S. PUBLIC
political roles in deciding uses of materials and energy; the
POLICY: DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN Detailed examina-
personal problems faced in the development of a career in
tion of United States public policy, using a case study
science and technology; the moral dilemmas inherent in
approach to guide students to understand the various aspects
using natural forms and energies for human purposes; and
of policy making and the participants in the process. As an
the technologically dominated modern civilization.
outcome of this seminar, students will have the ability to
Literature is used as case studies to illustrate these themes
engage in informed, critical analyses of public policy, and
and to bring them home personally to students. 3 hours
will understand the process and how they may become
seminar; 3 semester hours.
involved in it. Students may spend spring break in Washing-
Communication (LICM)
ton D.C. as part of this seminar. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester
Courses in communication do not count toward the LAIS
hours.
restricted elective requirement but may be taken for free
LIHN301B HONORS SEMINAR FIVE FOREIGN AREA
elective credit and to complete a communications minor or
STUDY (II) A survey of current public policy issues of a
Area of Special Interest (ASI).
selected country or region, based on a broad survey of
LICM301. PROFESSIONAL ORAL COMMUNICATION
history and culture as well as contemporary social, techno-
A five-week course which teaches the fundamentals of
logical, economic and political trends. The areas to be
effectively preparing and presenting messages. “Hands-on”
studied will be in a three year rotation; Far East (China and
course emphasizing short (5- and 10-minute) weekly
Taiwan or Hong Kong, Indonesia and/or Malaysia), Latin
presentations made in small groups to simulate professional
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
105

and corporate communications. Students are encouraged to
Materials Science
make formal presentations which relate to their academic or
(Interdisciplinary Program)
professional fields. Extensive instruction in the use of
The interdisciplinary Materials Science Program is
visuals. Presentations are rehearsed in class two days prior
administered jointly by the Departments of Chemical
to the formal presentations, all of which are video-taped and
Engineering and Petroleum Refining, Chemistry and
carefully evaluated. 1 hour lecture/lab; 1 semester hour.
Geochemistry, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering,
LICM304. PRACTICUM IN TUTORING Designed to
Physics and the Division of Engineering. Each department is
provide an intensive training program for students who will
represented on both the Governing Board and the Graduate
serve as peer tutors in the LAIS Writing Center. Course
Affairs Committee which are responsible for the operation
emphasis will be on theoretical bases of tutoring as well as
of the program.
practice. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 1-3
Listed below are 400-level undergraduate courses which
hours lecture/lab; 1-3 semester hours.
are cross-listed with 500-level Materials Science courses.
LICM 306. SELECTED TOPICS IN WRITTEN COMMU-
Additional courses offered by the Program Departments, not
NICATION Information on courses designated by this
listed here, may also satisfy the course-requirements towards
number may be obtained from the LAIS Division. Prerequi-
a graduate degree in this Program. Consult the Materials
site: Will depend on the level of the specific course. 1 - 3
Science Program Guidelines for Graduate Students and the
hours lecture/lab; 1-3 semester hours.
Program Departments course-listings. It should be noted
that the course requirement for graduate-level registration
Music (LIMU)
for a MLGN”500"-level course which is cross-listed with a
A cultural opportunity for students with music skills to
400-level course-number, will include an additional course-
continue study in music for a richer personal development.
component above that required for 400-level credit.
Free elective hours required by degree-granting departments
MLGN502/PHGN440. SOLID STATE PHYSICS (II) An
may be satisfied by a maximum of 3 semester hours total of
elementary study of the properties of solids including
concert band (i.e., spring semester), chorus, or physical
crystalline structure and its determination, lattice vibrations,
education and athletics.
electrons in metals, and semiconductors. Prerequisite:
LIMU101, 102, 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, 402. BAND
PHGN300 or PHGN325 and MACS315. 3 hours lecture; 3
Study, rehearsal, and performance of concert, marching and
semester hours.
stage repertory. Emphasis on fundamentals of rhythm,
MLGN505*/MTGN445. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES
intonation, embouchure, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1
OF MATERIALS (I) Mechanical properties and relation-
semester hour.
ships. Plastic deformation of crystalline materials. Relation-
LIMU111, 112, 211, 212, 311, 312, 411, 412. CHORUS
ships of microstructures to mechanical strength. Fracture,
Study, rehearsal, and performance of choral music of the
creep, and fatigue. Prerequisite: MTGN348. 3 hours lecture;
classical, romantic, and modern periods with special
3 hours lab; 3*/4 semester hours. * This is a 3 hour-credit
emphasis on principles of diction, rhythm, intonation,
graduate-course in the Materials Science Program and a 4
phrasing, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour.
hour-credit undergraduate-course in the MTGN program.
LIMU340. MUSIC THEORY The course begins with the
MLGN512/MTGN412. CERAMIC ENGINEERING (II)
fundamentals of music theory and moves into their more
Application of engineering principles to nonmetallic and
complex applications. Music of the common practice period
ceramic materials. Processing of raw materials and produc-
is considered. Aural and visual recognition of harmonic
tion of ceramic bodies, glazes, glasses, enamels, and
materials covered is emphasized. Prerequisite: LIHU 339 or
cements. Firing processes and reactions in glass bonded as
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture/discussion; 3 semester
well as mechanically bonded systems. Prerequisite:
hours.
MTGN348. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(See also LIHU339. MUSICAL TRADITIONS OF THE
MLGN515/MTGN415. ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES AND
WESTERN WORLD in preceding list of LAIS courses.)
APPLICATIONS OF MATERIALS (II) Survey of the
electrical properties of materials, and the applications of
materials as electrical circuit components. The effects of
chemistry, processing, and microstructure on the electrical
properties will be discussed, along with functions, perfor-
mance requirements, and testing methods of materials for
each type of circuit component. The general topics covered
are conductors, resistors, insulators, capacitors, energy
106
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

convertors, magnetic materials, and integrated circuits.
MLGN544/MTGN414 PROCESSING OF CERAMICS (II)
Prerequisites: PHGN200/210, MTGN311 or MLGN501,
A description of the principles of ceramic processing and
MTGN412/MLGN512, or consent of instructor. 3 hours
the relationship between processing and microstructure.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
Raw materials and raw material preparation, forming and
fabrication, thermal processing, and finishing of ceramic
MLGN516/MTGN416 PROPERTIES OF CERAMICS (II)
materials will be covered. Principles will be illustrated by
A survey of the properties of ceramic materials and how
case studies on specific ceramic materials. A project to
these properties are determined by the chemical structure
design a ceramic fabrication process is required. Field trips
(composition), crystal structure, and the microstructure of
to local ceramic manufacturing operations are included.
crystalline ceramics and glasses. Thermal, optical, and
Prerequisites: MTGN311, MTGN331, and MTGN412/
mechanical properties of single-phase and multi-phase
MLGN512 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
ceramics, including composites, are covered. Prerequisites:
semester hours.
PHGN200/210, MTGN311 or MLGN501, MTGN412/
MLGN512 or consent of instructor. 3 semester hours; 3
MLGN550/MLGN450. STATISTICAL PROCESS
hours lecture
CONTROL AND DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS(II) An
introduction to statistical process control, process capability
MLGN519/MTGN419. NON-CRYSTALLINE
analysis and experimental design techniques. Statistical
MATERIALS(II) An introduction to the principles of glass
process control theory and techniques will be developed and
science-and-engineering and non-crystalline materials in
applied to control charts for variables and attributes
general. Glass formation, structure, crystallization and
involved in process control and evaluation. Process
properties will be covered, along with a survey of commer-
capability concepts will be developed and applied for the
cial glass compositions, manufacturing processes and
evaluation of manufacturing processes. The theory and
applications. Prerequisites: MTGN311 or MLGN501,
application of designed experiments will be developed and
MLGN512/MTGN412, or consent of instructor. 3 hours
applied for full factorial experiments, fractional factorial
lecture; 3 semester hours.
experiments, screening experiments, multilevel experiments
MLGN530/CHGN430. INTRODUCTION TO POLYMER
and mixture experiments. Analysis of designed experiments
SCIENCE (II) An introduction to the chemistry and physics
will be carried out by graphical and statistical techniques.
of macromolecules. Topics include the properties and
Computer software will be utilized for statistical process
statistics of polymer solutions, measurements of molecular
control and for the design and analysis of experiments.
weights, molecular weight distributions, properties of bulk
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3
polymers, mechanisms of polymer formation, and properties
semester hours
of thermosets and thermoplasts including elastomers.
Prerequisite: CHGN327 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
lecture; 3 semester hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
107

computer assignments, using Mathematica, are included.
Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Prerequisite: MACS112 or MACS 122. 4 hours lecture; 4
Freshman Year
semester hours.
MACS100. INTRODUCTORY TOPICS FOR CALCULUS
(S) An introduction and/or review of topics that are essential
MACS223. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND
to the background of an undergraduate student at CSM. This
ENGINEERS III HONORS (I,II) Same topics as those
course serves as a preparatory course for the Calculus
covered in MACS213 but with additional material and
curriculum and includes material from Algebra, Trigonom-
problems. Prerequisite: Consent of Department Head. 4
etry, Mathematical Analysis, and Calculus. Topics include
hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
basic algebra and equation solving, solutions of inequalities,
MACS224 CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGI-
trigonometric functions and identities, functions of a single
NEERS III HONORS (AP) (I) Early introduction of
variable, continuity and limits of functions. Prerequisite:
vectors, linear algebra, multivariable calculus with an
Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
introduction to Mathematica. Vector fields, line and surface
MACS111. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND
integrals. Prerequisite: 4 or 5 on the AP (BC) exam or
ENGINEERS I (I, II, S) First course in the calculus
consent of Department Head. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester
sequence, including elements of plane geometry. Functions,
hours.
limits, continuity, and derivatives and their application.
MACS260. FORTRAN PROGRAMMING (I,II) Program-
Definite and indefinite integrals; applications and numerical
ming techniques and program structure, debugging and
approximations. Prerequisite: precalculus. 4 hours lecture; 4
verification of programs, data representation, computer
semester hours.
solution of scientific and engineering problems using the
MACS112 CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGI-
Fortran 90 language. Prerequisite: none. 2 hours lecture; 2
NEERS II (I, II, S) Vectors, computational linear algebra,
semester hours.
and multivariable calculus. Prerequisite: MACS111 or
MACS261. COMPUTER PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS
Advanced Placement credit in Calculus AB or BC. 4 hours
(I,II,S) Computer programming in a contemporary language
lecture; 4 semester hours.
such as C++, using software engineering techniques.
MACS121. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND
Problem solving, program design, documentation, debug-
ENGINEERS I HONORS (I) Same topics as those covered
ging practices. Language skills: input/output, control,
in MACS111 but with additional material and problems.
repetition, files, functions, recursion, arrays, pointers,
Prerequisite: Consent of Department Head. 4 hours lecture;
abstract data types. Introduction to operating systems,
4 semester hours.
visualization, object-oriented programming. Application to
problems in science and engineering. Prerequisite: none. 3
MACS122. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ENGINEERS II HONORS (I) Same topics as those covered
in MACS112 but with additional material and problems.
MACS262. DATA STRUCTURES (I,II) Abstract data
Prerequisite: Consent of department. 4 hours lecture; 4
types, user-defined data structures, linked lists, stacks,
semester hours.
queues, graphs, trees, binary trees, binary search trees, hash
tables, searching and sorting. Prerequisite: MACS261. 3
MACS198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MATHEMATICAL
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
AND COMPUTER SCIENCES (I, II) Pilot course or
special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests
MACS298. SPECIAL TOPICS (I,II,S) Selected topics
of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered
chosen from special interests of instructor and students.
only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit;
Prerequisite: Consent of Department Head. 1 to 3 semester
1 to 6 credit hours.
hours.
MACS199. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
MACS299. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I,II) Individual
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
member; also, when a student and instructor agree on a
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
subject matter, content and credit hours. Prerequisite:
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
Independent Study form must be completed and submitted
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
to the Registrar. Variable Credit: 1 to 6 semester hours.
Sophomore Year
Junior Year
MACS213. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND
MACS306. SOFTWARE ENGINEERING (I,II) Top down
ENGINEERS III (I,II,S) Vector fields, line and surface
program design, problem decomposition, iterative refine-
integrals, techniques of integration and infinite series as they
ment techniques, program structure, data types, and program
apply to solutions of differential equations. Several
modularity. Program file handling, use of text editors in
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Colorado School of Mines
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program development, and text manipulations. Extension of
lead to a mathematical model. The course concentrates on
good programming practices to areas such as numerical
difference and differential equation models. In each case,
computations, string processing, linear data structures and
the student solves the model and analyze how the model and
their applications, use of tree structures in problem solving.
its solutions are useful in understanding the original
Prerequisite: MACS262. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
problem. Prerequisites: MACS315, or consent of instructor.
3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
MACS312. INTRODUCTION TO DIFFERENTIAL
EQUATIONS FOR SCIENTISTS & ENGINEERS (I,II,S)
MACS340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (I,II,S)
An introduction to differential equations with special
Supervised, full-time engineering-related employment for a
emphasis on problems in the earth related fields. Topics
continuous six-month period (or its equivalent) in which
include first and second order ordinary differential equa-
specific educational objectives are achieved. Prerequisite:
tions, numerical methods of solution, solutions of non-
Second semester sophomore status and a cumulative grade
homogeneous equations, and applications of second order
point average of at least 2.00. 0 to 3 semester hours.
equations. Prerequisite: MACS213 or MACS223.
Cooperative Education credit does not count toward
2 hours lecture; 2 credit hours.
graduation except under special conditions.
MACS315. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (I,II,S)
MACS341. MACHINE ORGANIZATION AND ASSEM-
Classical techniques for first and higher order equations and
BLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING (I,II) Covers the
systems of equations. Laplace transforms. Phase plane and
basic concepts of both large and small computer architec-
stability analysis of non-linear equations and systems.
ture, with special emphasis on the machines that are
Applications to physics, mechanics, electrical engineering,
immediately available. Topics include machine level
and environmental sciences. Several computer assignments,
instructions and operating system calls used to write
using a numerical integration package, are included.
programs in assembly language for the available machines.
Prerequisite: MACS213 or MACS223. 3 hours lecture; 3
This course provides insight into the way computers operate
semester hours.
at the machine level; emphasis is on concepts and tech-
niques that can be extended to programming other comput-
MACS323. PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS FOR
ers. Prerequisite: MACS261. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
ENGINEERS I (I,II,S) Elementary probability. Bayes rule,
hours.
discrete and continuous probability models, data reduction
and presentation, interval estimation, hypothesis testing, and
MACS347. ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS I (I) Review
simple regression with special emphasis on applications in
of vectors, vector differential calculus, line and surface
mineral engineering. Prerequisite: MACS112 or MACS122.
integrals, integral theorems, matrices and determinants.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisite: MACS315. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Credit is allowed for only one of MACS347 or MACS349.
MACS324. PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS FOR
ENGINEERS II (II) Continuation of MACS323. Multiple
MACS348. ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS II (II)
regression analysis, analysis of variance, basic experimental
Complex numbers, complex analytic functions and complex
design, and distribution-free methods. Applications
integration. Power series, Taylor series, and Laurent series.
emphasized. Prerequisite: MACS323 or consent of
Residue integration method. Fourier series, integrals and
instructor 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
transforms. Partial differential equations. Prerequisite:
MACS315. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MACS325. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS WITH
HONORS (II) Same topics as those covered in MACS315
MACS349. TOPICS IN ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS
but with additional material and problems. Prerequisite:
(I) Vector algebra and calculus. Line, surface, and volume
Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
integrals. Matrix theory and applications. Introductory
complex variables, series and sequences. Prerequisite:
MACS332. LINEAR ALGEBRA (I,II) Systems of linear
MACS315. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Credit is
equations, matrices, determinants and eigenvalues. Linear
allowed for only one of MACS347 or MACS349.
operators. Abstract vector spaces. Applications selected
from linear programming, physics, graph theory, and other
MACS358. DISCRETE MATHEMATICS & ALGEBRAIC
fields. Prerequisite: MACS213 or MACS223. 3 hours
STRUCTURES (I,II) This course is an introductory course
lecture; 3 semester hours.
in discrete mathematics and algebraic structures. Topics
include: formal logic; proofs, recursion, analysis of
MACS333. INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL
algorithms; sets and combinatorics; relations, functions, and
MODELING. (I) This course gives students the opportunity
matrices; Boolean algebra and computer logic; trees,
to build mathematical models of real-world phenomena. It
grammars, and languages; semigroups; finite-state machines
considers several practical problems drawn from engineer-
and regular languages. Prerequisite: MACS213 or
ing and the sciences. For each, the problem is defined and
MACS223. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
then the student discovers how the underlying principles
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
109

MACS370. FIELD COURSE (S) Experience with industrial
a working knowledge of the LISP programming language.
type problems involving design and modeling using
The remainder of the course is devoted to exploring various
engineering, mathematics, and/or computer science.
Artificial Intelligence applications such as computer vision,
Analysis of data. Team work emphasized. Field trips to
speech analysis, speech generation, robotics, reasoning,
government or industrial installations, when appropriate.
knowledge representation, natural language processing and
Prerequisite: Consent of Department Head. 6-week summer
expert systems. Prerequisite: MACS262, MACS358. 3
field session; 6 semester hours.
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MACS398. SPECIAL TOPICS (I,II,S) Selected topics
MACS406. DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS
chosen from special interests of instructor and students.
(I,II) Divide-and-conquer: splitting problems into subprob-
Prerequisite: Consent of Department Head. 1 to 3 semester
lems of a finite number. Greedy: considering each problem
hours.
piece one at a time for optimality. Dynamic programming:
considering a sequence of decisions in problem solution.
MACS399. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I,II) Individual
Searches and traversals: determination of the vertex in the
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
given data set that satisfies a given property. Techniques of
member; also, when a student and instructor agree on a
backtracking, branch-and-bound techniques, techniques in
subject matter, content and credit hours. Prerequisite:
lower bound theory. Prerequisite: MACS213 or MACS223,
Independent Study form must be completed and submitted
MACS262, MACS358. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
to the Registrar. Variable Credit: 1 to 6 semester hours.
MACS407. INTRODUCTION TO NUMERICAL METH-
Senior Year
ODS (I,II) Roundoff error in floating point arithmetic,
MACS400. PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING LAN-
conditioning and stability, contemporary mathematical
GUAGES (I,II) Study of the principles relating to design,
software for solutions of linear algebraic systems, curve and
evaluation and implementation of programming languages
surface fitting, zeros of nonlinear equations, adaptive
of historical and technical interest are considered as
quadrature, multivariate quadrature, initial value problems
individual entities and with respect to their relationships to
in ordinary differential equations. Codes and sample drivers
other languages. Topics discussed for each language
are provided. Emphasis is on problem solving and the study
include: history, design, structural organization, data
of mathematical software using existing packages. Prerequi-
structures, name structures, control structures, syntactic
site: MACS315 and knowledge of computer programming.
structures, and implementation of issues. The primary
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
languages discussed are FORTRAN, ALGOL, COBOL,
PASCAL, LISP, ADA, C/C++, JAVA, PROLOG, PERL,
MACS411. INTRODUCTION TO EXPERT SYSTEMS (II)
BASIC. Prerequisite: MACS262. 3 hours lecture; 3
General investigation of the field of expert systems. The first
semester hours.
part of the course is devoted to designing expert systems.
The last half of the course is implementation of the design
MACS401. APPLIED ANALYSIS (I) This course is a first
and construction of demonstration prototypes of expert
course in analysis that lays out the context and motivation of
systems. Prerequisite: MACS262, MACS358.
3 hours
analysis in terms of the transition from power series to those
lecture; 3 semester hours.
less predictable, especially Fourier series, and shows some
of the traps into which even great mathematicians have
MACS415. INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS AND
fallen. The course is taught from an applied perspective.
COMPUTER VISION (II) General introduction of Artificial
Differentiability, continuity, and convergence are studied in
Intelligence in robotics and computer vision at the under-
this setting. Prerequisite: MACS213 or MACS223, and
graduate level. Reactive robot architecture are studied in
MACS332. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
detail. The course will emphasize hands-on experience with
one or more mobile robots and sensors. Field trips are
MACS403. DATABASE MANAGEMENT (I,II) Design
arranged to local industries which manufacture or use
and evaluation of information storage and retrieval systems,
robots. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
including defining and building a data base and producing
semester hours.
the necessary queries for access to the stored information.
Generalized database management systems, query lan-
MACS428. APPLIED PROBABILITY (II) Basic probabil-
guages, and data storage facilities. General organization of
ity. Probabilistic modeling. Discrete and continuous
files including lists, inverted lists and trees. System security
probability models and their application to engineering and
and system recovery, and system definition. Interfacing host
scientific problems. Empirical distributions, probability
language to database systems. Prerequisite: MACS262. 3
plotting, and testing of distributional assumptions. Prerequi-
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
site: MACS213 or MACS223. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
hours.
MACS404. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (I) General
investigation of the Artificial Intelligence field. Approxi-
mately the first third of the course is devoted to developing
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MACS434. INTRODUCTION TO PROBABILITY (I) An
MACS454. COMPLEX ANALYSIS (I) The complex plane.
introduction to the theory of probability essential to applied
Analytic functions, harmonic functions. Mapping by
problems in probability and statistics encountered in the
elementary functions. Complex integration, power series,
physical and social sciences, as well as engineering. Topics
calculus of residues. Conformal mapping. Prerequisite:
covered include combinatorics, axioms of probability,
MACS315. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
conditional probability and independence, discrete and
MACS455. PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (I)
continuous probability density functions, expectation,
Review of partial differentiation. Linear partial differential
jointly distributed random variables, Central Limit Theorem,
equations of the first and second order emphasizing the heat
laws of large numbers. Prerequisite: MACS 323. 3 hours
equation, wave equation, and potential equation. Methods
lecture; 3 semester hours.
including separation of variables with Fourier series, Sturm-
MACS435. INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL
Liouville techniques, and procedures to analyze forcing
STATISTICS (II) An introduction to statistical theory
functions. Prerequisite: MACS315. 3 hours lecture; 3
essential to applied problems in probability and statistics
semester hours.
encountered in the fields of pure and applied science, as
MACS461. SENIOR SEMINAR I Students present topics
well as engineering. Topics covered include sampling
using undergraduate mathematical and computing sciences
distributions, methods of point estimation, methods of
techniques, emphasizing critical analysis of assumptions and
interval estimation, significance testing for population
models. Prerequisite: Consent of Department Head. 1 hour
means and variances and goodness of fit, linear regression,
seminar; 1 semester hour.
analysis of variance. Prerequisite: MACS434. 3 hours
lecture; 3 semester hours.
MACS462. SENIOR SEMINAR II (II) 1 hour seminar; 1
semester hour.
MACS440. PARALLEL COMPUTING FOR SCIENTISTS
AND ENGINEERS (I) This course is designed to introduce
MACS491. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (I)
the field of parallel computing to all scientists and engi-
Individual investigation under the direction of a department
neers. The students have access to state of the art
faculty member. Written report required for credit. Prerequi-
supercomputers, and are taught how to solve scientific
site: Consent of Department Head. 1 to 3 semester hours, no
problems on these machines. They are introduced to various
more than 6 in a degree program.
software and hardware issues related to high performance
MACS492. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (II)
computing. Prerequisite: Programming experience in C,
Individual investigation under the direction of a department
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
faculty member. Written report required for credit. Prerequi-
MACS441. COMPUTER GRAPHICS (II) Data structures
site: Consent of Department Head. 1 to 3 semester hours, no
suitable for the representation of structures, maps, three-
more than 6 in a degree program.
dimensional plots. Algorithms required for windowing,
MACS498. SPECIAL TOPICS (I,II,S) Selected topics
color plots, hidden surface and line, perspective drawings.
chosen from special interests of instructor and students.
Survey of graphics software and hardware systems.
Prerequisite: Consent of Department Head. 1 to 3 semester
Prerequisite: MACS262. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
hours.
MACS442. OPERATING SYSTEMS (I,II) Covers the basic
MACS499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I,II) Individual
concepts and functionality of batch, timesharing and single-
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
user operating system components, file systems, processes,
member; also, when a student and instructor agree on a
protection and scheduling. Representative operating systems
subject matter, content and credit hours. Prerequisite:
are studied in detail. Actual operating system components
Independent Study form must be completed and submitted
are programmed on a representative processor. This course
to the Registrar. Variable Credit: 1 to 6 semester hours.
provides insight into the internal structure of operating
systems; emphasis is on concepts and techniques which are
valid for all computers. Prerequisite: MACS262,
MACS341. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
111

Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
requisite: MTGN302 or consent of instructor. 2 hours
Freshman Year
lecture; 2 semester hours.
MTGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METALLURGICAL
MTGN301. MATERIALS ENGINEERING DESIGN AND
AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING (I, II) Pilot course or
MAINTENANCE (I) Introduction of the necessary
special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests
metallurgical concepts for effective mine maintenance.
of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered
Topics to include steel selection, heat treatment, mechanical
only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. 1 to 3 semester
properties, casting design and alloys, casting defects,
hours.
welding materials and processes selection, weld defects,
weld design, forms of corrosion protection, stainless steel,
MTGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Independent
mechanical forming, aluminum and copper alloy systems,
work leading to a comprehensive report. This work may take
and metal failure identification. This course is designed for
the form of conferences, library, and laboratory work.
students from outside the Metallurgical and Materials
Choice of problem is arranged between student and a
Engineering Department. Prerequisite: Consent of instruc-
specific Department faculty-member. Prerequisite: Selection
tor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
of topic with consent of faculty supervisor; “Independent
Study Form” must be completed and submitted to Registrar.
MTGN302. FOUNDRY METALLURGY LABORATORY
1 to 3 semester hours.
(II) Experiments in the foundry to accompany the lectures of
MTGN300. Co-requisite: MTGN300. 3 hours lab; 1
Sophomore Year
semester hour.
MTGN212. MATERIALS ENGINEERING (I,II, S)
Relationship of atomic structure and bonding to mechanical,
MTGN311. STRUCTURE OF MATERIALS (I) Principles
thermal, electrical, and magnetic properties of organic,
of crystallography and crystal chemistry. Characterization of
ceramic, polycrystalline rock, and metallic materials.
crystalline materials using X-ray diffraction techniques.
Materials selection and applications to a variety of engineer-
Applications to include compound identification, lattice
ing problems. Prerequisite: PHGN200/210. 3 hours lecture;
parameter measurement, orientation of single crystals, and
3 semester hours.
crystal structure determination. Laboratory experiments to
accompany the lectures. Prerequisites: PHGN200/210 and
MTGN272. MATERIALS ENGINEERING (S) Relationship
MTGN272 or MTGN212. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4
of atomic structure and bonding to mechanical, thermal,
semester hours.
electrical and magnetic properties of organic, ceramic,
polycrystalline rock and metallic materials. Materials
MTGN322. INTRODUCTION TO MINERAL PROCESS-
selection and applications to a variety of engineering
ING (I) Principles and practice of size reduction, size
problems. Some laboratory work will be included. Prerequi-
separation, mineral concentration, and hydrometallurgical
sites: DCGN209 and PHGN200/210. 3 weeks; 3 semester
operations. This course is designed for students from
hours.
outside the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
Department. Prerequisite: PHGN200/210, MACS213/223. 3
MTGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METALLURGICAL
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING (I, II) Pilot course or
special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests
MTGN323. INTRODUCTORY MINERAL PROCESSING
of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered
LABORATORY (I) Experiments and assignments to
only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. 1 to 3 semester
accompany MTGN322. Prerequisite: MTGN322 or
hours.
concurrent enrollment. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
MTGN299. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Independent
MTGN331. PARTICULATE MATERIALS PROCESSING
work leading to a comprehensive report. This work may take
(I) Characterization and production of particles. Physical
the form of conferences, library, and laboratory work.
and interfacial phenomena involved in particulate processes.
Choice of problem is arranged between student and a
Process engineering. Applications to ores and powdered
specific Department faculty-member. Prerequisite: Selection
materials - size reduction and aggregation, concentration,
of topic with consent of faculty supervisor; “Independent
liquid/solid separation. Prerequisite: DCGN209. 3 hours
Study Form” must be completed and submitted to Registrar.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
1 to 3 semester hours.
MTGN334. CHEMICAL PROCESSING OF MATERIALS
Junior Year
(II) Development and application of fundamental principles
MTGN300. FOUNDRY METALLURGY (II) Design and
related to the processing of metals and materials by
metallurgical aspects of casting, patterns, molding materials
thermochemical and aqueous and fused salt electrochemical/
and processes, solidification processes, risering and gating
chemical routes. The course material will be presented
concepts, casting defects and inspection, melting practice,
within the framework of a formalism which will examine the
cast alloy selection. Prerequisite: PHGN200/210. Co-
necessary physical chemistry, thermodynamics, reaction
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mechanisms, and kinetics inherent to a wide selection of
MTGN390/EGGN390. MATERIALS AND MANUFAC-
chemical-processing systems. Since the formalizism is
TURING PROCESSES (I,II,S) This course focuses on
general the course will develop the knowledge required for
available engineering materials and the manufacturing
its application to other systems not specifically covered in
processes used in their conversion into a product or
the course. Prerequisite: MTGN351. 3 hours lecture; 3
structure as critical considerations in design. Properties,
semester hours.
characteristics, typical selection criteria, and applications are
reviewed for ferrous and nonferrous metals, plastics and
MTGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (I,II,S)
composites. The nature, features, and economics of basic
Supervised, full-time, engineering-related employment for a
shaping operations are addressed with regard to their
continuous six-month period (or its equivalent) in which
limitations and applications and the types of processing
specific educational objectives are achieved. Prerequisite:
equipment available. Related technology such as measure-
Second-semester sophomore status and a cumulative grade-
ment and inspection procedures, numerical control systems
point average of at least 2.00. 1 to 3 semester hours.
and automated operations are introduced throughout the
Cooperative Education credit does not count toward
course. Prerequisite: EGGN320 and MTGN212. 3 hours
graduation except under special conditions.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
MTGN348. MICROSTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (II)
MTGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METALLURGICAL
An introduction to the relationships between microstructure
AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING (I, II) Pilot course or
and properties of materials, with emphasis on metals.
special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests
Fundamentals of imperfections in crystalline materials,
of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered
phase equilibria, recrystallization and grain growth,
only once. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 1 to 3
strengthening mechanisms, and phase transformations.
semester hours.
Prerequisites: MTGN311 and MTGN351. 3 hours lecture, 3
hours lab; 4 semester hours.
MTGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Independent
work leading to a comprehensive report. This work may take
MTGN351. METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS
the form of conferences, library, and laboratory work.
THERMODYNAMICS (I) Applications of thermodynamics
Choice of problem is arranged between student and a
in extractive and physical metallurgy and materials science.
specific Department faculty-member. Prerequisite: Selection
Thermodynamics of solutions including solution models,
of topic with consent of faculty supervisor; “Independent
calculation of activities from phase diagrams, and measure-
Study Form” must be completed and submitted to Registrar.
ments of thermodynamic properties of alloys and slags.
1 to 3 semeter hours.
Reaction equilibria with examples in alloy systems and
slags. Predictions of phase stabilities. Thermodynamic
Senior Year
principles of phase diagrams in material systems, defect
MTGN412/MLGN512. CERAMIC ENGINEERING (II)
equilibrium and interactions. Prerequisite: DCGN209.
Application of engineering principles to nonmetallic and
4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
ceramic materials. Processing of raw materials and produc-
tion of ceramic bodies, glazes, glasses, enamels, and
MTGN352. METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS
cermets. Firing processes and reactions in glass bonded as
KINETICS (II) Introduction to reaction kinetics: chemical
well as mechanically bonded systems. Prerequisite:
kinetics, atomic and molecular diffusion, surface thermody-
MTGN348. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
namics and kinetics of interfaces and nucleation-and-
growth. Applications to materials processing and perfor-
MTGN414/MLGN544. PROCESSING OF CERAMICS (II)
mance aspects associated with gas/solid reactions, precipita-
Principles of ceramic processing and the relationship
tion and dissolution behavior, oxidation and corrosion,
between processing and microstructure. Raw materials and
purification of semiconductors, carburizing of steel,
raw materials preparation, forming and fabrication, thermal
formation of p-n junctions and other important materials
processing, and finishing of ceramic materials will be
systems. Prerequisite: MTGN351. 3 hours lecture; 3
covered. Principles will be illustrated by case studies on
semester hours.
specific ceramic materials. A project to design a ceramic
fabrication process is required. Field trips to local ceramic
MTGN381. INTRODUCTION TO PHASE EQUILIBRIA
manufacturing operations are included. Prerequisites:
IN MATERIALS SYSTEMS (I) Review of the concepts of
MTGN 311, MTGN 331, and MTGN 412/MLGN 512 or
chemical equilibrium and derivation of the Gibbs Phase
consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Rule. Application of the Gibbs Phase Rule to interpreting
one, two and three component Phase Equilibrium Diagrams.
MTGN415/MLGN515. ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES AND
Application to alloy and ceramic materials systems.
APPLICATIONS OF MATERIALS (II) Survey of the
Emphasis on the evolution of phases and their amounts and
electrical properties of materials, and the applications of
the resulting microstructural development. Prerequisite/Co-
materials as electrical circuit components. The effects of
requisite: MTGN351. 2hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
chemistry, processing and microstructure on the electrical
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
113

properties. Functions, performance requirements and testing
processes such as mineral concentration, value extraction
methods of materials for each type of circuit component.
and process metallurgy are studied in context. Fundamentals
General topics covered are conductors, resistors, insulators,
of metallurgical unit operations and unit processes with
capacitors, energy convertors, magnetic materials and
those applicable to waste and effluent control, disposal and
integrated circuits. Prerequisites: PHGN200, MTGN311 or
materials recycling are covered. Engineering design and
MLGN501, MTGN4l2/MLGN512, or consent of instructor.
engineering cost components are also included for some
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
examples chosen. The ratio of fundamentals to applications
coverage is about 1:1. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. 3
MTGN416/MLGN516. PROPERTIES OF CERAMICS (II)
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Survey of the properties of ceramic materials and how these
properties are determined by the chemical structure
MTGN430. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY OF IRON AND
(composition), crystal structure, and the microstructure of
STEELMAKING (I) Physical chemistry principles of blast
crystalline ceramics and glasses. Thermal, optical, and
furnace and direct reduction production of iron and refining
mechanical properties of single-phase and multiphase
of iron to steel. Discussion of raw materials, productivity,
ceramics, including composites, are covered. Prerequisites:
impurity removal, deoxidation, alloy additions, and ladle
PHGN200, MTGN311 or MLGN501, MTGN4l2 or consent
metallurgy. Prerequisite: MTGN334.
3 hours lecture; 3
of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
semester hours.
MTGN417. REFRACTORY MATERIALS (I) Refractory
MTGN431. HYDRO- AND ELECTRO-METALLURGY (I)
materials in metallurgical construction. Oxide phase
Physical and chemical principles involved in the extraction
diagrams to explain the behavior of metallurgical slags in
and refining of metals by hydro- and electrometallurgical
contact with materials of construction. Prerequisite: Consent
techniques. Discussion of unit processes in hyrdometallurgy,
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
electrowinning, and electrorefining. Analysis of integrated
flowsheets for the recovery of nonferrous metals. Prerequi-
MTGN419/MLGN519. NON-CRYSTALLINE
sites: MTGN334, MTGN351 and MTGN352. Co-requisite:
MATERIALS(II) An introduction to the principles of glass
MTGN461, MTGN433 or consent of instructor. 2 hours
science-and-engineering and non-crystalline materials in
lecture; 2 semester hours.
general. Glass formation, structure, crystallization and
properties will be covered, along with a survey of commer-
MTGN432. PYROMETALLURGY (II) Extraction and
cial glass compositions, manufacturing processes and
refining of metals including emerging practices. Modifica-
applications. Prerequisites: MTGN311 or MLGN501,
tions driven by environmental regulations and by energy
MLGN512/MTGN412, or consent of instructor. 3 hours
minimization. Analysis and design of processes and the
lecture; 3 semester hours.
impact of economic considerations. Prerequisite:
MTGN334. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MTGN421. FLOTATION (I) Solution chemistry and surface
chemistry as related to froth flotation. Absorption, interfa-
MTGN433. HYDRO- AND ELECTROMETALLURGY
cial free energy, flocculation, and dispersion and flotation
LABORATORY (I) Experiments to accompany the lectures
kinetics. Prerequisite: MTGN331. Co-requisite: MTGN423
in MTGN43. Co-requisite: MTGN43 or consent of
or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
instructor. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hours.
MTGN422. PROCESS ANALYSIS AND DEVELOP-
MTGN434. DESIGN AND ECONOMICS OF METAL-
MENT (II) Aspects of process development, plant design
LURGICAL PLANTS (II) Design of metallurgical process-
and management. Prerequisite: MTGN331. Co-requisite:
ing systems. Methods for estimating process costs and
MTGN424 or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture; 2
profitability. Performance, selection, and design of process
semester hours.
equipment. Integration of process units into a working plant
and its economics, construction, and operation. Market
MTGN423. FLOTATION LABORATORY (I) Experiments
research and surveys. Prerequisites: DCGN209, MTGN351
to accompany the lectures in MTGN42l. Co-requisite:
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MTGN42l or consent of instructor. 3 hours lab; 1 semester
hour.
MTGN436. CONTROL AND INSTRUMENTATION OF
METALLURGICAL PROCESSES (II) Analysis of
MTGN424. PROCESS ANALYSIS AND DEVELOP-
processes for metal extraction and refining using classical
MENT LABORATORY (II) Projects to accompany the
and direct-search optimization methods and classical
lectures in MTGN422. Prerequisite: MTGN422 or consent
process control with the aid of chemical functions and
of instructor. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
thermodynamic transfer operations. Examples from
MTGN429. METALLURGICAL ENVIRONMENT (I) This
processes in physicochemical and physical metallurgy.
course covers studies of the interface between metallurgical
Prerequisite: MTGN334 or consent of instructor. Co-
process engineering and environmental engineering areas.
requisite: MTGN438 or consent of instructor.
Wastes, effluents and their point sources in metallurgical
2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
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MTGN438. CONTROL AND INSTRUMENTATION OF
MTGN453. PRINCIPLES OF INTEGRATED CIRCUIT
METALLURGICAL PROCESSES LABORATORY (II)
PROCESSING (I) An introduction to the electrical
Experiments to accompany the lectures in MTGN436.
conductivity of semiconductor materials; qualitative
Prerequisite: MTGN436 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
discussion of active semiconductor devices; discussion of
lab; 1 semester hour.
the steps in integrated circuit fabrication; detailed investiga-
tion of the materials science and engineering principles
MTGN442. ALLOYING AND PHASE STABILITY (II)
involved in the various steps of VLSI device fabrication; a
Phase equilibrium of solid solutions, primary and intermedi-
presentation of device packaging techniques and the
ate phases, binary and ternary phase equilibrium diagrams,
processes and principles involved. Prerequisite: Consent of
multi-component systems. Phase transformations in ferrous
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
alloys, hardenability, heat treatment, surface modification,
alloying of steel, precipitation alloys and alloy design for
MTGN456. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY (II) Introduction
cast irons, stainless steels, and tool steels. Prerequisite:
to electron optics and the design and application of
MTGN348 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
transmission and scanning electron microscopes. Interpreta-
semester hours.
tion of images produced by various contrast mechanisms.
Electron diffraction analysis and the indexing of electron
MTGN445/MLGN505*. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES
diffraction patterns. Laboratory exercises to illustrate
OF MATERIALS (I) Mechanical properties and relation-
specimen preparation techniques, microscope operation, and
ships. Plastic deformation of crystalline materials. Relation-
the interpretation of images produced from a variety of
ships of microstructures to mechanical strength. Fracture,
specimens. Prerequisite: MTGN311 or consent of instructor.
creep, and fatigue. Prerequisite: MTGN348. 3 hours lecture,
Co-requisite: MTGN458. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
3 hours lab; 4/3* semester hours. *This is a 3 hour-credit
graduate-course in the Materials Science Program (ML) and
MTGN458. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY LABORATORY
a 4 hour-credit undergraduate-course in the MTGN
(II) Experiments to accompany the lectures in MTGN456.
program.
Co-requisite: MTGN456. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
MTGN450/MLGN550. STATISTICAL PROCESS
MTGN461.TRANSPORT PHENOMENA AND REACTOR
CONTROL AND DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS(I) An
DESIGN FOR METALLURGICAL-AND-MATERIALS
introduction to statistical process control, process capability
ENGINEERS (I) Introduction to the conserved-quantities:
analysis and experimental design techniques. Statistical
momentum, heat, and mass transfer, and application of
process control theory and techniques will be developed and
chemical kinetics to elementary reactor-design. Examples
applied to control charts for variables and attributes
from materials processing and process metallurgy. Molecu-
involved in process control and evaluation. Process
lar transport properties: viscosity, thermal conductivity, and
capability concepts will be developed and applied for the
mass diffusivity of materials encountered during processing
evaluation of manufacturing processes. The theory and
operations. Uni-directional transport: problem formulation
application of designed experiments will be developed and
based on the required balance of the conserved- quantity
applied for full factorial experiments, fractional factorial
applied to a control-volume. Prediction of velocity,
experiments, screening experiments, multilevel experiments
temperature and concentration profiles. Equations of
and mixture experiments. Analysis of designed experiments
change: continuity, motion, and energy. Transport with two
will be carried out by graphical and statistical techniques.
independent variables (unsteady-state behavior). Interphase
Computer software will be utilized for statistical process
transport: dimensionless correlations friction factor, heat,
control and for the design and analysis of experiments.
and mass transfer coefficients. Elementary concepts of
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3
radiation heat-transfer. Flow behavior in packed beds.
semester hours
Design equations for: Continuous- Flow/Batch Reactors
with Uniform Dispersion and Plug Flow Reactors. Digital
MTGN451. CORROSION ENGINEERING (II) Principles
computer methods for the design of metallurgical systems.
of electrochemistry. Corrosion mechanisms. Methods of
Laboratory sessions devoted to: Tutorials/Demonstrations to
corrosion protection including cathodic and anodic
facilitate the understanding of concepts related to selected
protection and coatings. Examples, from various industries,
topics; and, Projects with the primary focus on the operating
of corrosion problems and solutions. Prerequisite:
principles and use of modern electronic-instrumentation for
DCGN209. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
measurements on lab-scale systems in conjunction with
MTGN452. CERAMIC AND METAL MATRIX COMPOS-
correlation and prediction strategies for analysis of results.
ITES Introduction to the synthesis, processing, structure,
Prerequisites: MACS315, MTGN351 and MTGN352. 2
properties and performance of ceramic and metal matrix
hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
composites. Survey of various types of composites, and
MTGN463. POLYMER ENGINEERING (I) Introduction to
correlation between processing, structural architecture and
the structure and properties of polymeric materials, their
properties. Prerequisites: MTGN311, MTGN331,
deformation and failure mechanisms, and the design and
MTGN348, MTGN351. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
115

fabrication of polymeric end items. Molecular and crystallo-
Military Science (AROTC)
graphic structures of polymers will be developed and related
Freshman Year
to the elastic, viscoelastic, yield and fracture properties of
*Indicates courses that may be used to satisfy PAGN
polymeric solids and reinforced polymer composites.
semester requirements.
Emphasis on forming and joining techniques for end-item
fabrication including: extrusion, injection molding, reaction
*MSGN103. ADVENTURES IN LEADERSHIP I (I)
injection molding, thermoforming, and blow molding. The
Development of individual skills necessary to become an
design of end-items in relation to: materials selection,
effective small group leader. Training is challenging and
manufacturing engineering, properties, and applications.
encompasses a wide variety of skills. A major emphasis is
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
placed on map reading and land navigation principals,
semester hours.
including use of the lensatic compass, terrain interpretation,
intersection, resection, and magnetic declination. Cadets
MTGN464. FORGING AND FORMING (II) Introduction
also receive training in mountaineering skills, marksman-
to plasticity. Survey and analysis of working operations of
ship, physical training (PT), and military drill, and the Army
forging, extrusion, rolling, wire drawing and sheet-metal
organization. Lab Fee. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab, 1 hour
forming. Metallurgical structure evolution during working.
PT, and 80 hours field training; 2 semester hours.
Prerequisites: EGGN320 and MTGN348 or EGGN390. 2
hours lecture; 3 hours lab, 3 semester hours
*MSGN104. ADVENTURES IN LEADERSHIP II (II)
Continuation of MSGN103 training with increased
MTGN466. DESIGN: SELECTION AND USE OF
emphasis on leadership. Training also includes downhill and
MATERIALS (II) Selection of alloys for specific applica-
cross-country skiing, small unit tactics, and rafting. Lab Fee.
tions. Designing for corrosion resistant service; concept of
1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab, 1 hour PT, and 80 hours field
passivity. Designing for wear resistant service, for high
training; 2 semester hours.
temperature service and for high strength/weight applica-
tions. Introduction to the aluminum, copper, nickel, cobalt,
MSGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MILITARY SCIENCE
stainless steel, cast irons, titanium and refractory metals
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen
alloy-systems. Coating science and selection. Prerequisite:
from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually
MTGN348. 1 hour lecture, 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor
consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
MTGN475. METALLURGY OF WELDING (I) Introduc-
tion to welding processes thermal aspects; metallurgical
MSGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
evaluation of resulting microstructures; attendant phase
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
transformations; selection of filler metals; stresses; stress
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
relief and annealing; preheating and post heating; difficul-
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
ties and defects; welding ferrous and nonferrous alloys; and,
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
welding tests. Prerequisite: MTGN348. Co-requisite:
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
MTGN477. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
Sophomore Year
MTGN477. METALLURGY OF WELDING LABORA-
*MSGN203. ADVENTURES IN LEADERSHIP III (I)
TORY (I) Experiments to accompany the lectures in
Continues the development of those individual skills taught
MTGN475. Prerequisite: MTGN475. 3 hours lab; 1
in MSGN103 and 104. Increased emphasis on the role of the
semester hour.
Leader/Trainer. Cadets receive training in First Aid. As with
MTGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METALLURGICAL
MSGN103, the majority of the training is in the field. Lab
AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING (I, II) Pilot course or
Fee. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab and 80 hours field training;
special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests
2 semester hours.
of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered
*MSGN204. ADVENTURES IN LEADERSHIP IV (II) In
only once. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 1 to 3
this course emphasis is on development of leadership skills
semester hours.
necessary in a small group environment. Students are
MTGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Independent
trained in the mechanics of small unit tactics, the required to
advanced-work leading to a comprehensive report. This
perform in various leadership positions. Cadets take an
work may take the form of conferences, library, and
increased role in the planning and execution of cadet
laboratory work. Choice of problem is arranged between
activities. Lab Fee. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab, 1 hour PT,
student and a specific Department faculty-member.
and 80 hours field training; 2 semester hours.
Prerequisite: Selection of topic with consent of faculty
MSGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MILITARY SCIENCE
supervisor; “Independent Study Form” must be completed
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen
and submitted to Registrar. 1 to 3 semester hours.
from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually
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the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor
MSGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
Junior Year
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
MSGN301. APPLIED PRINCIPLES OF LEADERSHIP
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
AND COMMAND I (I) An introduction to the organization
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
of the U.S. Army in the field. Application of leadership
principles in the command environment emphasizing
Senior Year
motivation, performance counseling, group development,
MSGN401. ETHICS, PROFESSIONALISM, AND
ethics, and attention to detail. Lab Fee. Prerequisite:
MILITARY JUSTICE (I) An introduction to military ethics
Enrollment in the AROTC Advanced Course or consent of
and professionalism with emphasis on the code of the
department. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
officer. A study of military justice and its application to
military life. Orientation to Army administrative, training,
MSGN302. APPLIED PRINCIPLES OF LEADERSHIP
and logistics systems. Pre-commissioning orientation.
AND COMMAND II (II) The theory and practice of small
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the AROTC Advanced Course
unit tactical operations to include small unit tactics, military
or consent of department. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
problems analysis, communications techniques, and troop
leading procedures. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the AROTC
MSGN402. THE AMERICAN MILITARY EXPERIENCE
Advanced Course or consent of department. Lab Fee. 3
(II) A study of the history of the United States military in
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
order to better understand the role played by the armed
forces in American society today through a study of the
MSGN303. LEADERSHIP LABORATORY (I) Develop-
origins and development of military policy, organization and
ment of military leadership techniques to include prepara-
technology; relating these to political, social and economic
tion of operation plans, presentation of instruction, and
development during this period.
supervision of underclass military cadets. Instruction in
military drill, ceremonies, and customs and courtesies of the
MSGN403. LEADERSHIP LABORATORY (I) Continued
Army. Must be taken in conjunction with MSGN301.
development of leadership techniques by assignment in the
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the AROTC Advanced Course
command and staff positions in the Cadet Battalion. Cadets
or consent of department. Lab Fee. 2 hours lab, 1 hour PT,
are expected to plan and execute much of the training
80 hours field training; .5 semester hour.
associated with the day-to-day operations within the cadet
battalion. Utilizing the troop leading and management
MSGN304. LEADERSHIP LABORATORY (II) Continued
principles learned in previous classes, cadets analyze the
development of military leadership techniques with the
problems which the battalion faces, develop strategies, brief
major emphasis on leading an Infantry Squad. Training is
recommendations, and execute the approved plan. Lab Fee.
“hands-on”. Practical exercises are used to increase
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the AROTC Advanced Course
understanding of the principles of leadership learned in
or consent of department. 2 hours lab, 1 hour PT, and 80
MSGN302. Must be taken in conjunction with MSGN302.
hours field training; .5 semester hour.
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the ROTC Advanced Course or
consent of department. Lab Fee. 2 hours lab, 1 hour PT, 80
MSGN404. LEADERSHIP LABORATORY (II) Continued
hours field training; .5 semester hour.
leadership development by serving in the command and staff
positions in the Cadet Battalion. Cadets take a large role in
ADVANCED CAMP (Fort Lewis, WA) A six (6) week
determining the goals and direction of the cadet organiza-
Advanced Camp is required for completion of the AROTC
tion, under supervision of the cadre. Cadets are required to
program. The camp should be attended between the junior
plan and organize cadet outings and much of the training of
and senior year. The emphasis at Advanced Camp is placed
underclassmen. Lab Fee. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the
on the development of individual leadership initiative and
AROTC Advanced Course or consent of department. Lab
self-confidence. Students are rated on their performance in
Fee. 2 hours lab, 1 hour PT, and 80 hours field training; .5
various positions of leadership during the camp period. The
semester hour.
U.S. Army reimburses students for travel to and from
Advanced Camp. In addition, students receive approxi-
MSGN497. SPECIAL STUDIES IN LEADERSHIP AND
mately $600.00 pay while attending camp. Prerequisite:
SMALL GROUP DYNAMICS I (I) The course is specifi-
Enrollment in the AROTC Advanced Course and successful
cally geared to the unique leadership challenges faced by
completion of MSGN301 through 304.
individuals involved in CSM student government and other
campus leadership positions. Instruction emphasis is on
MSGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MILITARY SCIENCE
forces and dynamics which shape and define leader/
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen
manager’s job in the campus environment. Prerequisite:
from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually
Currently appointed or elected leader of a recognized
the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor
consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Colorado School of Mines
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1999-2000
117

student organization or consent of the department head. 1
the use of operational examples and historical Air Force
hour lecture and 5 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
leaders and will continue to develop their communication
skills. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC
MSGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MILITARY SCIENCE
cadets and complements this course by providing cadets
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen
with followership experiences. 1 hour lecture, 1.5 hours
from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually
lab; 1.5 semester hours.
the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor
consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
AFAS104. THE AIR FORCE WAY II A continuation of
THE AIR FORCE WAY I. One 1-hour lecture and one 1.5
MSGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
hour lab per week; 1.5 semester hours.
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
AFAS105. AIR FORCE MANAGEMENT AND LEADER-
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
SHIP I Two 1.5 hour seminars and one 1.5 hour lab per
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
week. This course is a study of leadership, management
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
fundamentals, professional knowledge, Air Force personnel
and evaluation systems, leadership ethics, and communica-
(AFROTC)
tion skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case
AFAS100. AFROTC P/T .5 hours
studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and
AFAS101. THE AIR FORCE TODAY I This course deals
management situations as a means of demonstrating and
with the US Air Force in the contemporary world through a
exercising practical application of the concepts being
study of the total force structure, strategic offensive and
studied. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements
defensive forces, general purpose forces, aerospacer support
this course by providing advanced leadership experiences in
forces, and the development of communicative skills. 1 hour
officer-type activities, giving students the opportunity to
lecture, 1.5 hours lab; 1.5 semester hour.
apply leadership and management principles of this course.
3 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab; 3.5 semester hours.
AFAS102. THE AIR FORCE TODAY II A continuation of
The Air Force Today I. 1 hour lecture, 1.5 hours lab; 1.5
AFAS106. AIR FORCE MANAGEMENT AND LEADER-
semester hour.
SHIP II A continuation of AIR FORCE MANAGEMENT
AND LEADERSHIP I. Two 1.5 hour seminars and 1.5 hour
AFAS103. THE AIR FORCE WAY I One 1-hour lecture
lab per week. 3 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab; 3.5 semester
and one 1.5 hour lab per week. This course is designed to
hours.
examine general aspects of air and space power through a
historical perspective. Utilizing this perspective, the course
AFAS107. NATIONAL SECURITY FORCES IN CON-
covers a time period from the first balloons and dirigibles to
TEMPORARY AMERICAN SOCIETY I. Two 1.5 hour
the space-age global positioning systems of the Persian Gulf
seminars and one 1.5 hour lab per week. This course
War. Historical examples are provided to extrapolate the
examines the national security process, regional studies,
development of Air Force capabilities (competencies), and
advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special
missions (functions) to demonstrate the evolution of what
topics of interest focus on the military as a profession,
has become today’s USAF air and space power. Further-
officership, military justice, civilian control of the military,
more, the course examines several fundamental truths
preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting
associated with war in the third dimension: e.g., Principles
military professionalism. Within this structure, continued
of War and Tenets of Air and Space Power. As a whole, this
emphasis is given to refining communication skills. A
course provides the students with a knowledge level
mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course
understanding for the general element and employment of
by providing advanced leadership and management
air and space power, from an institutional doctrinal and
principles of this course. 3 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab; 3.5
historical perspective. In addition, the students will continue
semester hours.
to discuss the importance of the Air Force Core Values with
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MNGN210. 1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour. Should be
Mining Engineering
taken concurrently with MNGN309.
Freshman Year
MNGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MINING ENGINEER-
MNGN309. MINING ENGINEERING LABORATORY (I)
ING (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics
Training in practical mine labor functions including:
chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s).
operation of jackleg drills, jumbo drills, muckers, and LHD
Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite:
machines. Training stresses safe operation of equipment and
Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
safe handling of explosives. Introduction to front-line
management techniques. Prerequisite: MNGN210. 2
MNGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
semester hours. Should be taken concurrently with
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
MNGN308.
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
MNGN312. SURFACE MINE DESIGN (I) Analysis of
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
elements of surface mine operation and design of surface
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
mining system components with emphasis on minimization
of adverse environmental impact and maximization of
Sophomore Year
efficient use of mineral resources. Ore estimates, unit
MNGN210. INTRODUCTORY MINING (I,II) Survey of
operations, equipment selection, final pit determinations,
mining and mining economics. Topics include mining law,
short- and long-range planning, road layouts, dump
exploration and sampling, reserve estimation, project
planning, and cost estimation. Prerequisite: MNGN210. 2
evaluation, basic unit operations including drilling, blasting,
hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
loading and hauling, support, shaft sinking and an introduc-
tion to surface and underground mining methods. Prerequi-
MNGN316. COAL MINING METHODS (II) Devoted to
site: None. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
surface and underground coal mining methods and design.
The surface mining portion emphasizes area mining
MNGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MINING ENGINEER-
methods, including pertinent design related regulations and
ING (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics
overburden removal systems. Pit layout and sequencing and
chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s).
overburden equipment selection and cost estimation are
Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite:
presented. The underground mining portion emphasizes
Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
general mine layout; detailed layout of continuous,
MNGN300. SUMMER FIELD SESSION (S) Introuction to
conventional, longwall, and shortwall sections; layout of
and use of the department’s Sun Workstation computing
auxiliary systems such as ventilation and haulage; general
system, as well as the application of various computer-aided
cost and manning requirements; and production analysis.
mine design software packages incorporated in upper-
Federal and state health and safety regulations are included
division mining courses. Classroom and field instruction in
in all aspects of mine layout. Prerequisite: MNGN210. 2
the theory and practice of surface and under- ground mine
hours lecture, 2 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
surveying. First, third and fifth weeks of the course are
MNGN321. INTRODUCTION TO ROCK MECHANICS
taught in th department’s computing laboratory on the CSM
Physical properties of rock, and fundamentals of rock
campus. Second and fourth weeks of the course are taught at
substance and rock mass response to applied loads.
the CSM Experimental Mine located in Idaho Springs, CO
Principles of elastic analysis and stress- strain relationships.
(20 miles west of Golden). The course begins with the start
Elementary principles of the theoretical and applied design
of the first field session and continues for five (%) weeks.
of underground openings and pit slopes. Emphasis on
Prerequisite: Completion of Sophomore Year Duration: First
practical applied aspects. Prerequisite: DCGN241 or
five weeks of summer term.
5 semester hours.
MNGN317, credit or concurrent registration in GEOL308 or
MNGN317. STATICS/DYNAMICS (I) For non-Engineer-
309. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
ing Division majors only. Forces, moments, couples,
MNGN323*. SPATIAL STATISTICS FOR ENGINEERS I
equilibrium, centroids, moments of inertia and friction.
(I, II) Elementary probability. Bayes rule, discrete and
Absolute and relative motions, kinetics, work-energy,
continuous probability models, data reduction and presenta-
impulse-momentum and angular impulse-momentum.
tion, interval estimation hypothesis testing, and sample
Prerequisite: PHGN100/110 Corequisite: MACS213/223. 4
regression with special emphasis on applications in mineral
hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
engineering as they apply to spatially correlated data. *The
Junior Year
course is requested to be appended by the Undergraduate
MNGN308. MINE SAFETY (I) Causes and prevention of
Council.
accidents. Mine safety regulations. Mine rescue training.
MNGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (I,II,S)
Safety management and organization. Prerequisite:
Supervised, full-time, engineering-related employment for a
continuous six-month period (or its equivalent) in which
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
119

specific educational objectives are achieved. Prerequisite:
MNGN424. MINE VENTILATION (II) Fundamentals of
Second semester sophomore status and a cumulative grade-
mine ventilation, including control of gas, dust, temperature,
point average of at least 2.00. 0 to 3 semester hours.
and humidity; stressing analysis and design of systems.
Cooperative Education credit does not count toward
Prerequisite: EGGN351, EGGN371 and MNGN314. 2
graduation except under special conditions.
hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
MNGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MINING ENGINEER-
MNGN427. MINE VALUATION (I) Course emphasis is on
ING (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics
the business aspects of mining. Topics include time
chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s).
valuation of money and interest formulas, cash flow,
Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite:
investment criteria, tax considerations, risk and sensitivity
Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
analysis, escalation and inflation and cost of capital.
Calculation procedures are illustrated by case studies.
MNGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
Computer programs are used. Prerequisite: Senior in
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
Mining, graduate status or consent of instructor. 2 hours
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
lecture; 2 semester hours.
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
MNGN428. MINING ENGINEERING EVALUATION
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
AND DESIGN REPORT I (I) Preparation of phase I
engineering report based on coordination of all previous
Senior Year
work. Includes mineral deposit selection, geologic descrip-
MNGN314. UNDERGROUND MINE DESIGN (I)
tion, mining method selection, ore reserve determination,
Selection, design, and development of most suitable
and permit process outline. Emphasis is on detailed mine
underground mining methods based upon the physical and
design and cost analysis evaluation in preparation for
the geological properties of mineral deposits (metallics and
MNGN429. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
nonmetallics), conservation considerations, and associated
environmental impacts. Reserve estimates, development and
MNGN429. MINING ENGINEERING EVALUATION
production planning, engineering drawings for development
AND DESIGN REPORT II (II) Preparation of formal
and extraction, underground haulage systems, and cost
engineering report based on all course work in the mining
estimates. Prerequisite: MNGN210. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours
option. Emphasis is on mine design, equipment selection,
lab; 3 semester hours.
production scheduling and evaluation. Prerequisite:
MNGN427, 428. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
MNGN404. TUNNELING (I) Modern tunneling tech-
niques. Emphasis on evaluation of ground conditions,
MNGN433. MINE SYSTEMS ANALYSIS I (II) Applica-
estimation of support requirements, methods of tunnel
tion of statistics, systems analysis, and operations research
driving and boring, design systems and equipment, and
techniques to mineral industry problems. Laboratory work
safety. Prerequisite: MNGN210, MNGN314. 3 hours
using computer techniques to improve efficiency of mining
lecture; 3 semester hours.
operations. Prerequisite: MACS323 or equivalent course in
statistics; senior or graduate status. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours
MNGN407. ROCK FRAGMENTATION (II) Theory and
lab; 3 semester hours.
application of rock drilling, rock boring, explosives,
blasting, and mechanical rock breakage. Design of blasting
MNGN436. UNDERGROUND COAL MINE DESIGN (II)
rounds, applications to surface and underground excavation.
Design of an underground coal mine based on an actual coal
Prerequisite: EGGN320 or concurrent enrollment. 3 hours
reserve. This course shall utilize all previous course material
lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in odd years.
in the actual design of an underground coal mine. Ventila-
tion, materials handling, electrical transmission and
MNGN414. MINE PLANT DESIGN (I) Analysis of mine
distribution, fluid mechanics, equipment selection and
plant elements with emphasis on design. Materials handling
application, mine plant design. Information from all basic
systems, dewatering, hoisting, compressed air, and other
mining survey courses will be used. Prerequisite:
power systems. Prerequisite: EGGN351 and DCGN381. 2
MNGN316, MNGN321, MNGN414, EGGN329 and
hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
MNGN381 or MNGN384. Concurrent enrollment with the
MNGN421. DESIGN OF UNDERGROUND EXCAVA-
consent of instructor permitted. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab;
TIONS (II) Design of underground openings in competent
3 semester hours.
and broken ground using rock mechanics principles. Rock
MNGN438. INTRODUCTION TO GEOSTATISTICS(I)
bolting design and other ground support methods. Coal,
Introduction to the application and theory of geostatistics in
evaporite, metallic and nonmetallic deposits included.
the mining industry. Review of elementary statistics and
Prerequisite: SYGN101, credit or concurrent enrollment in
traditional estimations techniques. Variograms, estimation
EGGN320. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
variance, block variance, kriging, and geostatistical concepts
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are presented. Prerequisite: MACS323 or equivalent. 1 hour
Petroleum Engineering
lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
Freshman Year
MNGN440. EQUIPMENT REPLACEMENT ANALYSIS
PEGN102. INTRODUCTION TO PETROLEUM INDUS-
(I) Introduction to the fundamentals of classical equipment
TRY (II) A survey of the elements comprising the petroleum
replacement theory. Emphasis on new, practical approaches
industry- exploration, development, processing, transporta-
to equipment replacement decision making. Topics include:
tion, distribution, engineering ethics and professionalism.
operating and maintenance costs, obsolescence factors,
This elective course is recommended for all PE majors,
technological changes, salvage, capital investments, minimal
minors, and other interested students.
average annual costs, optimum economic life, infinite and
2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
finite planning horizons, replacement cycles, replacement
PEGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PETROLEUM ENGI-
vs. expansion, maximization of returns from equipment
NEERING (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course.
replacement expenditures. Prerequisite: MNGN427, senior
Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and
or graduate status. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
student(s). Usually the course is offered only once.
MNGN445. OPEN PIT SLOPE DESIGN (II) Introduction
Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6
to the analysis and design of optimal pit slopes. Topics
semester hours.
include: economic aspects of slope angles, rock mass
PEGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
classification and strength determinations, geologic
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
structural parameters, properties of fracture sets, data
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
collection techniques, hydrologic factors, methods of
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
analysis, macrofab analysis, wedge intersections, monitoring
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
and maintenance of final pit slopes, classification of slides.
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 semester hours.
Prerequisite: MNGN321, GEOL308 or 309. 2 hours lecture;
2 semester hours.
Sophomore Year
PEGN205. COMPUTERS IN THE GEOSCIENCES I (II)
MNGN446. SLOPE DESIGN LABORATORY (II)
Introduction to computers and computer programming in the
Laboratory and field exercise in slope analysis and design.
geosciences. Emphasis will be on learning programming
Collection of data and specimens in the field for laboratory
techniques to expand the utility of desktop computers in
determination of physical properties for determination of
solving engineering problems. Overview of computer
slope angle stability. Application of computer software to
architecture and operating systems is presented. Prerequi-
slope stability determination for hard and soft rock environ-
site: SYGN101. 1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour.
ments. Prerequisite: MNGN321 and credit or concurrent
registration in MNGN445. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
PEGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PETROLEUM ENGI-
NEERING (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course.
MNGN482. MINE MANAGEMENT (II) Basic principles
Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and
of successful mine management, supervision, administrative
student(s). Usually the course is offered only once.
policies, industrial and human engineering. Prerequisite:
Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6
Senior or graduate status or consent of instructor. 2 hours
semester hours.
lecture; 2 semester hours. Offered in odd years.
Junior Year
MNGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MINING ENGINEER-
ING (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics
PEGN305. COMPUTERS IN THE GEOSCIENCES II (I)
chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s).
Continuation of PEGN205. Emphasis will be on enhancing
Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite:
programming techniques and developing complete applica-
Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
tions in a structured programming language. Prerequisite:
PEGN205. 1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour.
MNGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
PEGN308. RESERVOIR ROCK PROPERTIES (II)
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
Introduction to basic reservoir rock and fluid properties and
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
their measurements. Topics include fluid flow in porous
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
media, capillary pressure, compressibility, phase behavior of
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
multi-component hydrocarbon systems, and pressure-
volume-temperature calculations of reservoir fluids.
Prerequisites: DCGN241. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3
semester hours.
PEGN310. RESERVOIR FLUID PROPERTIES (I)
Properties of fluids encountered in petroleum engineering.
Phase behavior, density, viscosity, interfacial tension,
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
121

composition of oil, gas, and brine systems. Interpret lab data
PEGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PETROLEUM ENGI-
for engineering applications. Flash calculations with k-
NEERING (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course.
values and equations of state. Introduction to reservoir
Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and
simulation software. Prerequisites: DCGN209, PEGN308.
student(s). Usually the course is offered only once.
2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6
semester hours.
PEGN311. DRILLING ENGINEERING (I) Study of
drilling fluid design, rig hydraulics, casing design, drilling
PEGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
contracts, rig selection, rotary system, well cementing,
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
blowout control, drilling design, casing seat selection.
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
Prerequisite: PEGN315, DCGN241, EGGN351 and
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
EGGN352, or concurrent enrollment. 3 hours lecture, 3
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
hours lab; 4 semester hours.
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 semester hours.
PEGN315. SUMMER FIELD SESSION I (S) This two-
PEGN408/EGES408. INTRODUCTION TO OFFSHORE
week course taken after the completion of the sophomore
TECHNOLOGY (II) Introduction to offshore technology for
year is designed to introduce the student to field oil and gas
exploration drilling, production and transportation of
operations. Engineering design problems are integrated
petroleum in the ocean. Practical analysis methods for
throughout the three-week session. On-site visits to various
determining environmental forces, structural response, and
oil field operations in the past included the Rocky Mountain
pipe flow for the design of platforms, risers, subsea
region, the Gulf Coast, the West Coast, Alaska, Canada and
completion and pipeline systems, including environment-
Europe. Also included are environmental and safety issues
hydrodynamic-structure interactions. System design
as related to the petroleum industry. Prerequisites:
parameters. Industrial practice and state-of-the-art technol-
PEGN308. 2 semester hours.
ogy for deep ocean drilling. Prerequisite: MACS315 or
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PEGN316. SUMMER FIELD SESSION II (S) This two-
week course is taken after the completion of the junior year.
PEGN411. MECHANICS OF PETROLEUM PRODUC-
An intensive on-site study of the Rangely Oil Field is
TION (II) Nodal analysis for pipe and formation
undertaken. Emphasis is placed on the multidisciplinary
deliverability including single and multiphase flow. Natural
nature of reservoir management. Geologic methods
flow and design of artificial lift methods including gas lift,
incorporating both surface and subsurface data are used
sucker rod pumps, electrical submersible pumps, and
extensively. Teamwork is emphasized and whenever
hydraulic pumps. Prerequisite: PEGN308, PEGN310,
possible geology and geophysics students work with
PEGN311, and EGGN351.
petroleum students. Surface facility design for oil and gas
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
systems include deliverability calculations, flow line sizing,
PEGN419. WELL LOG ANALYSIS AND FORMATION
separator design, dehydration, compression and meter run
EVALUATION (I) An introduction to well logging methods,
design. Prerequisite: PEGN310, PEGN311, PEGN315,
including the relationship between measured properties and
PEGN361, PEGN411, PEGN419 and GEOL308,
reservoir properties. Analysis of log suites for reservoir size
GEOL315. 2 semester hours.
and content. Graphical and analytical methods will be
PEGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (I,II,S)
developed to allow the student to better visualize the
Supervised, full-time, engineering-related employment for a
reservoir, its contents, and its potential for production. Use
continuous six-month period (or its equivalent) in which
of the computer as a tool to handle data, create graphs and
specific educational objectives are achieved. Prerequisite:
log traces, and make computations of reservoir parameters is
Second semester sophomore status and a cumulative grade-
required. Prerequisite: PEGN308, PEGN310, concurrent
point average of at least 2.00. 0 to 3 semester hours.
enrollment in GEOL315, 308.
Cooperative Education credit does not count toward
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
graduation except under special conditions.
Senior Year
PEGN361. COMPLETION ENGINEERING (II) This class
PEGN413. GAS MEASUREMENT AND FORMATION
is a continuation into completion operations building upon
EVALUATION LAB (I) This lab investigates the properties
PEGN311, which covered the engineering behind drilling
of a gas such as vapor pressure, dew point pressure, and
operations. Topics are casing design, cement planning,
field methods of measuring gas volumes. The application of
completion techniques and equipment, tubing design,
well logging and formation evaluation concepts are also
wellhead selection, and sand control procedures. Prerequi-
investigated. Prerequisites: PEGN308, PEGN310,
site: PEGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PEGN419. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
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PEGN414. WELL TEST ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (II)
completions, and well productivity. Fluid types and
Solution to the diffusivity equation. Transient well testing:
properties; characterizations of compatibilities. Stimulation
build-up, drawdown, multi-rate test analysis for oil and gas.
techniques; acidizing and fracturing. Selection of proppants
Flow tests and well deliverabilities. Type curve analysis.
and fluids; types, placement and compatibilities. Estimation
Superposition, pulse and interference tests. Well test design
of rates, volumes and fracture dimensions. Reservoir
Prerequisite: PEGN426. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
considerations in fracture propagation and design. Prerequi-
site: PEGN311, PEGN361, PEGN411 and MACS315.
PEGN419 WELL LOG ANALYSIS AND FORMATION
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EVALUATION (I) The basics of core analyses and the
principles of all common borehole instruments are reviewed.
PEGN428. ADVANCED DRILLING ENGINEERING (II)
The course shows (computer) interpretation methods that
Rotary drilling systems with emphasis on design of drilling
combine the measurements of various borehole instruments
programs, directional and horizontal well planning. This
to determine rock properties such as porosity, permeability,
elective course is recommended for petroleum engineering
hydrocarbon saturation, water salinity, ore grade, ash-
majors interested in drilling. Prerequisite: PEGN311,
content, mechanical strength, and acoustic velocity. The
PEGN361. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
impact of these parameters on reserves estimates of
PEGN439/GEGN439/GPGN439. MULTIDISCIPLINARY
hydrocarbon reservoirs and mineral accumulations are
PETROLEUM DESIGN (II) This is a multidisciplinary
demonstrated. Prerequisite: PEGN308, PEGN310,
design course that integrates fundamentals and design
concurrent enrollment GEOL308. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours
concepts in geology, geophysics, and petroleum engineer-
lab; 3 semester hours.
ing. Students work in integrated teams consisting of students
PEGN422. ECONOMICS AND EVALUATION OF OIL
from each of the disciplines. Multiple open-ended design
AND GAS PROJECTS (I) Project economics for oil and gas
problems in oil and gas exploration and field development
projects under conditions of certainty and uncertainty.
are assigned. Several written and oral presentations are
Topics include time value of money concepts, discount rate
made throughout the semester. Project economics including
assumptions, measures of project profitability, costs, state
risk analysis are an integral part of the course. Prerequisite:
and local taxes, federal income taxes, expected value
PE majors: PEGN316, PEGN422, PEGN423, PEGN414 (or
concept, decision trees, bayesian analysis, the decision to
concurrent), PEGN424 (or concurrent) GEOL308; GE
purchase imperfect information, gambler’s ruin, and monte
Majors: GEOL308 or GEOL309, GEGN438, GEGN316;
carlo simulation techniques. Prerequisite: MACS323.
GP Majors: GPGN302 and GPGN303.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
PEGN423. PETROLEUM RESERVOIR ENGINEERING I
PEGN481. PETROLEUM SEMINAR (I) Written and oral
(I) Data requirements for reservoir engineering studies.
presentations by each student on current petroleum topics.
Material balance calculations for normal gas, retrograde gas
Prerequisite: Consent of department. 2 hours; 1 semester
condensate, solution-gas and gas-cap reservoirs with or
hour.
without water drive. Primary reservoir performance.
PEGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PETROLEUM ENGI-
Forecasting future recoveries by decline curve analysis and
NEERING (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course.
incremental material balance. Prerequisite: PEGN316,
Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and
PEGN419 and MACS315 (MACS315 only for non PEGN
student(s). Usually the course is offered only once.
majors). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6
PEGN424. PETROLEUM RESERVOIR ENGINEERING II
semester hours.
(II) Reservoir engineering aspects of supplemental recovery
PEGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
processes. Introduction to liquid-liquid displacement
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
processes (polymer, water, caustic, miscible, and surfactant
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
flooding). Gas-liquid displacement processes (lean gas, rich
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
gas, and CO2). Thermal recovery processes (steam and in
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
situ combustion). Introduction to numerical reservoir
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 semester hours.
simulation, history matching and forecasting. Prerequisite:
PEGN423. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PEGN426. WELL COMPLETIONS AND STIMULATION
(II) Completion parameters; design for well conditions.
Perforating, sand control, skin damage associated with
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
123

Physical Education and Athletics
PAGN301, PAGN302. ELECTIVE PERSONAL FITNESS
All students are required to complete PAGN101 and
(general) Prerequisite: PAGN101 and PAGN102 or consent
PAGN102 before they will be allowed to register in higher
of the Department Head. 3 hours activity; .5 semester hour.
level activity classes. The only exceptions to this require-
PAGN305 through 336. Activities are those listed in
ment are students enrolled in intercollegiate athletics and
PAGN205 through PAGN236, but will be numbered in the
transfer students. (See Required Physical Education.)
300’s. Students enrolled in some courses may be required to
Freshman Year
furnish own equipment. Prerequisite: PAGN101 and
PAGN101. PHYSICAL EDUCATION (I) (Required) A
PAGN102 or consent of the Department Head. 2 hours
general overview of life fitness basics which includes
activity; .5 semester hour.
exposure to educational units of Nutrition, Stress Manage-
Intercollegiate Athletics
ment, Drug and Alcohol Awareness, First Aid and CPR.
Instruction and practice in fundamentals and mechanics
Instruction in units of Walking, Jogging, Aerobics, and Self
of the selected sport in preparation for collegiate competi-
Defense provide the student an opportunity for learning and
tion. Satisfactory completion of any course fulfills one
beginning the basics of a healthy life style.
semester of physical education requirements. Note: All
PAGN102. PHYSICAL EDUCATION (II) (Required)
courses shown below, numbered 151 to 182 inclusive are
Sections in physical fitness, team and individual sports,
likewise offered as junior, and senior courses. For freshmen
relating to personal health and related leisure time activities.
and sophomores, they are numbered 151 to 182; juniors and
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or consent of the Department Head.
seniors, 351 to 382. Odd numbered courses are offered in
the fall, even numbered courses in the spring.
Sophomore and Junior Years
PAGN151. BASEBALL (I)
Students may select one of several special activities
PAGN152. BASEBALL (II)
listed below.
PAGN153. BASKETBALL (I) A-men; B-women
PAGN205 through PAGN236. (Students enrolling in these
PAGN154. BASKETBALL (II) A-men; B-women
courses may be required to furnish their own equipment.)
PAGN157. CROSS COUNTRY (I)
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of
PAGN159. FOOTBALL (I)
Department Head. 2 hours activity; .5 semester hour.
PAGN160. FOOTBALL (II)
PAGN205A. SELF-DEFENSE
PAGN161. GOLF (I)
PAGN205B. TAE KWON DO
PAGN162. GOLF (II)
PAGN209. BEGINNING GOLF (I)
PAGN167. SOCCER (I)
PAGN210. BEGINNING GOLF (II)
PAGN168. SOCCER (II)
PAGN211. ADVANCED RACQUETBALL (I)
PAGN169. SWIMMING (I)
PAGN212. ADVANCED RACQUETBALL (II)
PAGN170. SWIMMING (II)
PAGN215. TENNIS (I)
PAGN171. TENNIS (I)
PAGN216. TENNIS (II)
PAGN172. TENNIS (II)
PAGN217. CO-ED WEIGHT TRAINING (I)
PAGN173. TRACK (I)
PAGN218. CO-ED WEIGHT TRAINING (II)
PAGN174. TRACK (II)
PAGN217C. WOMEN’S WEIGHT TRAINING (I)
PAGN175. WRESTLING (I)
PAGN218C. WOMEN’S WEIGHT TRAINING (II)
PAGN176. WRESTLING (II)
PAGN219. JOGGING (I)
PAGN177. VOLLEYBALL (I)
PAGN220. JOGGING (II)
PAGN178. VOLLEYBALL (II)
PAGN221. ARCHERY (I)
PAGN179. SOFTBALL (I)
PAGN235. STEP AEROBICS (I)
PAGN180. SOFTBALL (II)
PAGN236. STEP AEROBICS (II)
Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1 semester hour.
Senior Year
Students may select one of several special activities
listed below. Personal fitness is a special activity program
for the graduating senior electing to continue his/her
personal fitness program with professional instruction and
guidance.
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Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Physics
acquisition. Laboratory experiences in the use of basic
PHGN100. PHYSICS I - MECHANICS (I,II,S) A first
electronic devices for physical measurements. Topics
course in physics covering the basic principles of mechanics
covered include diodes, transistors (FET and BJT),
using vectors and calculus. The course consists of a
operational amplifiers, filters, transducers, and integrated
fundamental treatment of the concepts and applications of
circuits. Emphasis on practical knowledge, including
kinematics and dynamics of particles and systems of
prototyping, troubleshooting, and laboratory notebook style.
particles, including Newton’s laws, energy and momentum,
Prerequisite: DCGN381 or concurrent enrollment. 3 hours
rotation, oscillations, and waves. Prerequisite: MACS111
lab; 1 semester hour.
and concurrent enrollment in MACS112/122 or consent of
PHGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS (I, II) Pilot course or special
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 1 hour recitation; 1.5 hours lab;
topics course. Prerequisite: Consent of Department. Credit
4.5 semester hours.
to be determined by instructor, maximum of 6 credit hours.
PHGN110. HONORS PHYSICS I - MECHANICS (I, II) A
Junior Year
course parallel to Physics 100 but in which the subject
PHGN300. PHYSICS III–MODERN PHYSICS I (I, II, S)
matter is treated in greater depth. Registration is restricted to
The third course in introductory physics for scientists and
students who are particularly interested in physics and can
engineers including an introduction to the special theory of
be expected to show above-average ability. Usually an A or
relativity, wave-particle duality, the Schroedinger equation,
B grade in MACS111/121 is expected. Prerequisite:
electrons in solids, nuclear structure and transmutations.
MACS111 and concurrent enrollment in MACS112/122 or
Prerequisite: PHGN200/210; Concurrent enrollment in
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 1 hour recitation; 1.5
MACS315. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
hours lab; 4.5 semester hours.
PHGN310. HONORS PHYSICS III–MODERN PHYSICS
PHGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS (I, II) Pilot course or special
(II) A course parallel to PHGN300 but in which the subject
topics course. Prerequisite: Consent of Department. Credit
matter is treated in greater depth. Registration is strongly
to be determined by instructor, maximum of 6 credit hours.
recommended for physics majors or those considering the
PHGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
physics option, but is not required. Prerequisite: PHGN200/
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
210 and concurrent enrollment in MACS315 or consent of
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
PHGN315. ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB I (I) Introduction
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
to laboratory measurement techniques as applied to modern
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
physics experiments. Experiments from optics, atomic
Sophomore Year
physics, and solid state physics. A writing intensive course
PHGN200. PHYSICS II-ELECTROMAGNETISM AND
with laboratory and computer design projects based on
OPTICS (I,II,S) Continuation of PHGN100. Introduction to
applications of modern physics. Prerequisite: PHGN300/310
the fundamental laws and concepts of electricity and
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
magnetism, electromagnetic devices, electromagnetic
PHGN317. SEMICONDUCTOR CIRCUITS- DIGITAL (I)
behavior of materials, applications to simple circuits,
Introduction to digital devices used in modern electronics.
electromagnetic radiation, and an introduction to optical
Topics covered include logic gates, flip-flops, timers,
phenomena. Prerequisite: PHGN100/110, concurrent
counters, multiplexing, analog-to- digital and digital-to-
enrollment in 213/223. 3 hours lecture; 1 hours recitation;
analog devices. Emphasis is on practical circuit design and
1.5 hours lab; 4.5 semester hours.
assembly. Prerequisite: DCGN381 and PHGN217 or
PHGN210. HONORS PHYSICS II–ELECTROMAGNE-
EGGN250, or consent of instructor. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours
TISM AND OPTICS (I, II) A course parallel to PHGN200
lab; 2 semester hours.
but in which the subject matter is treated in greater depth.
PHGN320. INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY AND
Registration is restricted to students who show particular
ASTROPHYSICS (II) Celestial mechanics; Kepler’s laws
interest and ability in the subject of physics. Usually an A or
and gravitation. Solar system and its contents. Electromag-
B grade in PHGN110 or an A grade in PHGN100 is
netic radiation and matter. Stars: distances, magnitudes,
expected. Prerequisite: PHGN100/110, concurrent enroll-
spectral classification, structure, and evolution. Variable and
ment in MACS213/223. 3 hours lecture; 1 hour recitation;
unusual stars, pulsars and neutron stars, supernovae, black
1.5 hours lab; 4.5 semester hours.
holes. Models for origin and evolution of universe.
PHGN217 ANALOG ELECTRONICS AND INSTRU-
Prerequisite: PHGN200/210. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
MENTATION LABORATORY (II) Introduction to
hours.
methods of electronic measurements, particularly the
application of oscilloscopes and computer based data
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
125

PHGN325. MODERN PHYSICS II (II) Continuation of
week summer session following the sophomore or junior
PHGN300/310. The quantum atom and the nucleus, wave-
year; 6 semester hours.
particle duality, Schroedinger theory, one-electron atoms,
PHGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS (I, II) Pilot course or special
multi-electron atoms, X-rays, collision theory, nuclear and
topics course. Prerequisites: Consent of department. Credit
particle physics. Prerequisite: PHGN300/310 and
to be determined by instructor, maximum of 6 credit hours.
MACS347. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
PHGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
PHGN326. ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB II (II) Continua-
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
tion of PHGN315. A writing intensive course which
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
expands laboratory experiments to include nuclear and solid
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
state physics. Prerequisite: PHGN315. 3 hours lab; 1
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
semester hour.
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
PHGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (I,II,S)
Senior Year
Supervised, full-time, engineering-related employment for a
PHGN402. GREAT PHYSICISTS (II) The lives, times, and
continuous six-month period (or its equivalent) in which
scientific contributions of key, historical physicists are
specific educational objectives are achieved. Prerequisite:
explored in an informal seminar format. Each week a
Second semester sophomore status and a cumulative grade-
member of the faculty will lead discussions about one or
point average of at least 2.00. 0 to 3 semester hours.
more different scientists who have figured significantly in
Cooperative Education credit does not count toward
the development of the discipline. Prerequisite: None. 1
graduation except under special conditions.
hour lecture; 1 semester hour.
PHGN341. THERMAL PHYSICS (II) An introduction to
PHGN404. PHYSICS OF THE ENVIRONMENT (II) An
statistical physics from the quantum mechanical point of
examination of several environmental issues in terms of the
view. The microcanonical and canonical ensembles. Heat,
fundamental underlying principles of physics including
work and the laws of thermodynamics. Thermodynamic
energy conservation, conversion and generation; solar
potentials; Maxwell relations; phase transformations.
energy; nuclear power and weapons, radioactivity and
Elementary kinetic theory. An introduction to quantum
radiation effects; aspects of air, noise and thermal pollution.
statistics. Prerequisite: DCGN209 and MACS347.
Prerequisite: PHGN200/210 or consent of instructor.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PHGN350. INTERMEDIATE MECHANICS (I) Begins
PHGN412. MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS (I) Mathematical
with an intermediate treatment of Newtonian mechanics and
techniques applied to the equations of physics; complex
continues through an introduction to Hamilton’s principle
variables, partial differential equations, special functions,
and Hamiltonian and Lagrangian dynamics. Includes
finite and infinite- dimensional vector spaces. Green’s
systems of particles, linear and driven oscillators, motion
functions. Transforms; computer algebra. Prerequisite:
under a central force, two-particle collisions and scattering,
MACS347. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
motion in non- inertial reference frames and dynamics of
rigid bodies. Prerequisite: PHGN200/210. Co-requisite:
PHGN419. PRINCIPLES OF SOLAR ENERGY
MACS347. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
SYSTEMS(II) Theory and techniques of insolation
measurement. Absorptive and radiative properties of
PHGN361. INTERMEDIATE ELECTROMAGNETISM
surfaces. Optical properties of materials and surfaces.
(II) Theory and application of the following: static electric
Principles of photovoltaic devices. Optics of collector
and magnetic fields in free space, dielectric materials, and
systems. Solar energy conversion techniques: heating and
magnetic materials; steady currents; scalar and vector
cooling of buildings, solar thermal (power and process
potentials; Gauss’ law and Laplace’s equation applied to
heat), wind energy, ocean thermal, and photovoltaic.
boundary value problems; Ampere’s and Faraday’s laws.
Prerequisite: PHGN300/310 and MACS315.
Prerequisite: PHGN200/210 and MACS347. 3 hours
lecture; 3 semester hours.
PHGN420. QUANTUM MECHANICS (I) Schroedinger
equation, uncertainty, change of representation, one-
PHGN384. APPARATUS DESIGN (S) Introduction to the
dimensional problems, axioms for state vectors and
design of engineering physics apparatus. Concentrated
operators, matrix mechanics, uncertainty relations, time-
individual participation in the design of machined and
independent perturbation theory, time-dependent perturba-
fabricated system components, vacuum systems, electronics
tions, harmonic oscillator, angular momentum. Prerequisite:
and computer interfacing systems. Supplementary lectures
PHGN325 and PHGN350. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
on safety and laboratory techniques. Visits to regional
hours.
research facilities and industrial plants. Prerequisite:
PHGN300/310, DCGN381 and PHGN217 or EGGN250. 6-
PHGN421. ATOMIC PHYSICS (II) A study of the
fundamental particles of matter, atomic structure, and
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Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

spectra. Application of the Schroedinger equation to
analysis of scaling, efficiency, errors, and stability, as well as
hydrogen-like atoms. Prerequisite: PHGN325. 3 hours
a survey of numerical algorithms and packages for analyzing
lecture; 3 semester hours.
algebraic, differential, and matrix systems. The numerical
methods are introduced and developed in the analysis of
PHGN422. NUCLEAR PHYSICS (II) Introduction to
advanced physics problems taken from classical physics,
subatomic (particle and nuclear) phenomena. Characteriza-
astrophysics, electromagnetism, solid state and nuclear
tion and systematics of particle and nuclear states; symme-
physics. Prerequisites: Introductory-level knowledge of C,
tries; introduction and systematics of the electromagnetic,
Fortran or Basic; MACS347. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
weak, and strong interactions; systematics of radioactivity;
hours.
liquid drop and shell models; nuclear technology. Prerequi-
site: PHGN325. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PHGN460. PLASMA PHYSICS Review of Maxwell’s
equations; charged-particle orbit in given electromagnetic
PHGN423. DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION (I) Review
fields; macroscopic behavior of plasma, distribution
of basic physical principles; types of power generation
functions; diffusion theory; kinetic equations of plasma;
treated include fission, fusion, magnetohydrodynamic,
plasma oscillations and waves, conductivity, magnetohydro-
thermoelectric, thermionic, fuel cells, photovoltaic,
dynamics, stability theory; Alven waves, plasma confine-
electrohydrodynamic piezoelectrics. Prerequisite:
ment. Prerequisite: PHGN300/310. 3 hours lecture; 3
PHGN300/310. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
semester hours. Offered on sufficient demand.
PHGN424. ASTROPHYSICS (I) A survey of fundamental
PHGN462. ADVANCED ELECTROMAGNETISM (I)
aspects of astrophysical phenomena, concentrating on
Continuation of PHGN361. The solution of boundary value
measurements of basic stellar properties such as distance,
problems in curvilinear coordinates; solutions to the wave
luminosity, spectral classification, mass, and radii. Simple
equation including plane waves, refraction, interference and
models of stellar structure evolution and the associated
polarization; waves in bounded regions, radiation from
nuclear processes as sources of energy and nucleosythesis.
charges and simple antennas; relativistic electrodynamics.
Introduction to cosmology and physics of standard big-bang
Prerequisite: PHGN361. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
models. Prerequisite: PHGN325. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
hours.
PHGN471. SENIOR DESIGN (I) A two semester program
covering the full spectrum of experimental design, drawing
PHGN435/CRGN435. INTERDISCIPLINARY MICRO-
on all of the student’s previous course work. At the
ELECTRONICS PROCESSING LABORATORY (I)
beginning of the first semester, the student selects a research
Application of science and engineering principles to the
project in consultation with the course coordinator and the
fabrication and testing of microelectronic devices. Emphasis
faculty supervisor. The objectives of the project are given to
on specific unit operations and the interrelation among
the student in broad outline form. The student then designs
processing steps. Prerequisites: Senior standing in PHGN,
the entire project, including any or all of the following
CRGN, MTGN, or EGGN. Consent of instructor. Due to lab
elements as appropriate: literature search, specialized
space the enrollment is limited to 20 students. 1.5 hours
apparatus, block-diagram electronics, computer data
lecture, 4 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
acquisition and/or analysis, sample materials, and measure-
PHGN440/MLGN502. SOLID STATE PHYSICS (I) An
ment and/or analysis sequences. The course culminates in a
elementary study of the properties of solids including
senior thesis. Supplementary lectures are given on tech-
crystalline structure and its determination, lattice vibrations,
niques of physics research and experimental design.
electrons in metals, and semiconductors. (Graduate students
Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326.
in physics may register only for PHGN440.) Prerequisite:
1 hour lecture, 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
PH325. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PHGN472. SENIOR DESIGN (II) Continuation of
PHGN441/MLGN522. SOLID STATE PHYSICS APPLI-
PHGN471. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326.
CATIONS AND PHENOMENA (II) Continuation of
1 hour lecture, 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
PHGN440/MLGN502 with an emphasis on applications of
PHGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS (I, II) Pilot course or special
the principles of solid state physics to practical properties of
topics course. Prerequisites: Consent of department. Credit
materials including: optical properties, superconductivity,
to be determined by instructor, maximum of 6 credit hours.
dielectric properties, magnetism, noncrystalline structure,
and interfaces. (Graduate students in physics may register
PHGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
only for PHGN441.) Prerequisite: PHGN440/MLGN502, or
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
equivalent by instructor’s permission. 3 hours lecture; 3
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
semester hours.
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
PHGN450. COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS (I) Introduction
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
to numerical methods for analyzing advanced physics
problems. Topics covered include finite element methods,
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
127

Section 7 - Centers and Institutes
Advanced Coatings and Surface
lurgy branch of materials science and engineering. Objec-
Engineering Laboratory
tives of ASPPRC are to perform research of direct benefit to
the users and producers of steels, to educate graduate
The Advanced Coating and Surface Engineering
students within the context of research programs of major
Laboratory (ACSEL) is a multi-disciplinary laboratory that
theoretical and practical interest to the steel-using and steel-
serves as a focal point for industry- driven research and
producing industries, and to develop a forum to stimulate
education in advanced thin films and coating systems,
advances in the processing, quality and application of steel.
surface engineering, tribology and electronic and semicon-
ductor materials. The laboratory is supported by an
Research programs consist of several projects, each of
industrial consortium that holds semi-annual meetings
which is a graduate student thesis. Small groups of students
designed to maximize interaction between participants,
and faculty are involved in each of the research programs.
evaluate the research conducted by graduate students and
Sponsor representatives are encouraged to participate on the
faculty, and provide direction and guidance for future
graduate student committees.
activities. ACSEL provides opportunities for CSM faculty
The Center was established with a five-year grant of
and graduate students to visit and work in sponsor facilities,
$575,000 from the National Science Foundation, and is now
participate in technical meetings with sponsors, and for
self-sufficient, primarily as a result of industry support.
CSM graduates to gain employment with sponsors.
Center for Combustion and
Advanced Control of Energy and
Environmental Research
Power Systems
The Center for Combustion and Environmental Research
The Advanced Control of Energy and Power Systems
(CCER) is an interdisciplinary research and educational unit
Center (ACEPS), based in the Engineering Division,
specializing in the chemistry and physics of exothermic
features a unique partnership consisting of industry, the
reacting flows. Specific research projects are varied, but
National Science Foundation (NSF), the Department of
they fall into five core areas: detailed combustion chemical
Energy (DOE), the Electric Power Research Institute
kinetic modeling and experiment; combustion flow-field
(EPRI), Colorado School of Mines (CSM) and Purdue
modeling and experiment; combustion spray and aerosol
University. The mission of ACEPS is to conduct fundamen-
modeling and experiment; optical sensing techniques in
tal research and applied research supporting the technical
combustion; and combustion emissions remediation.
advancement of the electric utility industry, their customers,
Collaborative projects involve CSM’s Engineering
and component suppliers in the field of electric power
Division and Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining
systems with special emphasis on the advanced/intelligent
Department, and often include faculty and students from
control and power quality in the generation, transmission,
other universities. Interaction with federal and industrial
distribution, and utilization stages; using such research as a
sponsors not only helps to guide the Center’s program, but
means of advancing graduate education.
offers students opportunities after graduation.
Center research projects focus on the development of an
Center for Commercial Applications of
intelligent energy system that will employ advanced power
electronics, enhanced computer and communications
Combustion in Space
systems, new smart sensor and actuators, and smart
The Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion
interactive utility/customer interface systems. Examples
in Space (CCACS) is a NASA/Industry/ University space
include: electric vehicles and their impact on power quality,
commercialization center based at the Colorado School of
localized and adaptive monitoring systems for transmission
Mines. The mission of the Center is to assist industry in
and distribution networks, and intelligent automatic
developing commercial products by conducting combustion
generation control for transient loads.
research which takes advantage of the unique properties of
Advanced Steel Processing and
space.
Products Research Center
The Center operates under the auspices of NASA’s
Office of Space Access and Technology (OSAT), whose
The Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research
mission is to provide access to space for commercial
Center (ASPPRC) at Colorado School of Mines was
research and development activities by private industry. The
established in 1984. The Center is a unique partnership
focus of CCACS is on products and processes in which
between industry, the National Science Foundation (NSF),
combustion plays a key role and which can benefit from
and Colorado School of Mines, and is devoted to building
knowledge to be gained through experiments conducted in
excellence in research and education in the ferrous metal-
128
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

space. Examples include combustors, fire suppression and
Involving over twenty students and faculty from five
safety, combustion synthesis of advanced materials and
departments, the center provides a unique combination of
sensors and controls. The Center involves faculty and
expertise that has enabled CSM to achieve international
students from the departments of Chemical Engineering,
prominence in the area of solids. CSM participants interact
Economics and Business, Engineering, Metallurgical and
on an on-going basis with sponsors, including frequent
Materials Engineering, and Physics. For further information,
visits to their facilities. For students, this interaction often
contact CCACS Director F.D. Schowengerdt, Physics
continues beyond graduation, with opportunities for
Department, CSM, (303) 384-2091.
employment at sponsoring industries.
Center for Environmental Risk
Center for Robotics and Intelligent
Assessment
Systems
The mission of the Center for Environmental Risk
The Center for Robotics and Intelligent Systems (CRIS)
Assessment (CERA) at CSM is to unify and enhance
focuses on the study and application of advanced engineer-
environmental risk assessment research and educational
ing and computer science research in neural networks,
activities at CSM. By bringing diverse, inter-disciplinary
robotics, sensor/actuator development and artificial
expertise to bear on problems in environmental risk
intelligence, to problems in environment, energy, natural
assessment, CERA facilitates the development of signifi-
resources, materials, transportation, information, communi-
cantly improved, scientifically-based approaches for
cations and medicine. CRIS concentrates on problems
estimating human and ecological risks and for using the
which are not amenable to traditional solutions within a
results of such assessments. Education and research
single discipline, but rather require a multi-disciplinary
programs within CERA integrate faculty and students from
systems approach to integrate technologies. The systems
the departments of Chemical Engineering and Petroleum
require closed loop controllers that incorporate artificial
Refining, Environmental Sciences and Engineering,
intelligence and machine learning techniques to reason
Chemistry and Geochemistry, Economics and Business, and
autonomously or in cooperation with a human supervisor.
Geology and Geological Engineering.
Established in 1994, CRIS includes faculty from the
Center for Intelligent Biomedical
departments of Engineering, Mathematical and Computer
Devices and Musculoskeletal
Science, Geophysics, Metallurgical and Materials Engineer-
ing, and Environmental Science and Engineering. Research
Systems
is sponsored by industry, federal agencies, state agencies,
The multi-institutional Center for Intelligent Biomedical
and joint government-industry initiatives. Interaction with
Devices and Musculoskeletal systems (IBDMS) integrates
industry enables CRIS to identify technical needs that
programs and expertise from CSM, Rose Musculoskeletal
require research, to cooperatively develop solutions, and to
Research Laboratory, University of Colorado Health
generate innovative mechanisms for the technology transfer.
Sciences Center and the Colorado VA Research Center,
Enthusiastic and motivated students are encouraged to join
Established CSM as a National Science Foundation
CRIS for education and research in the area of robotics and
Industry/University Cooperative Research Center, IBDMS is
intelligent systems.
also supported by industry and State organizations.
Center for Solar and Electronic
With its Industrial Advisory Board, IBDMS seeks to
Materials
establish educational programs and long-term basic and
applied research efforts that improve U.S. technology.
The Center for Solar and Electronic Materials (CSEM)
IBDMS focuses the work of diverse engineering, materials
was established in 1995 to focus, support, and extend
and medicine disciplines. Its graduates are a new generation
growing activity in the area of electronic materials for solar
of students with an integrated engineering and medicine
and related applications. CSEM facilitates interdisciplinary
systems view, with increasing opportunities available in the
collaborations across the CSM campus; fosters interactions
biotechnology industry.
with national laboratories, industries, public utilities, and
other universities; and serves to guide and strengthen the
Center for Research on Hydrates and
electronic materials curriculum.
Other Solids
CSEM draws from expertise in the departments of
The Center for Research on Hydrates and Other Solids is
Physics, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Chemical
sponsored by a consortium of fifteen industrial and
and Petroleum Engineering, Chemistry and Geochemistry,
government entities. The center focuses on research and
and from the Division of Engineering. The largest research
education involving solids in hydrocarbon and aqueous
activity is directed at the photovoltaic industry. CSEM also
fluids which affect exploration, production and processing
supports research in thin film materials, polymeric devices,
of gas and oil.
electrophotography, encapsulants, electronic materials
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
129

processing, and systems issues associated with electronic
Industrial collaborations which provide equipment,
materials and devices.
materials and services.
Graduate students in materials science and the above-
Research experience at industrial plants or national
mentioned departments can pursue research on center-
laboratories.
related projects. Undergraduates are involved through
Professional experience and exposure before nationally
engineering design courses and summer research. Close
recognized organizations through student presenta-
proximity to the National Renewable Energy Lab and
tions of university research.
several local photovoltaic companies provides a unique
Direct involvement in national welding and materials
opportunity for students to work with industry and govern-
professional societies.
ment labs as they attempt to solve real world problems.
Colorado Advanced Materials Institute
External contacts also provide guidance in targeting the
With its mission to coordinate and foster research in
educational curriculum toward the needs of the electronic
materials science and engineering leading to economic
materials industry.
development, CAMI was established in 1984 by the state of
Center for Wave Phenomena
Colorado at CSM. It functions as a consortium of the state’s
With sponsorship for its research by 36 companies in the
research universities (CSM, CU, CSU, DU and UCCS), and
worldwide oil exploration industry, this interdisciplinary
private industry.
program, including faculty and students from the Math-
CAMI is one of the four major technology areas funded
ematical and Computer Sciences and Geophysics Depart-
by the State’s science and technology agency, the Colorado
ments, is engaged in a coordinated and integrated program
Advanced Technology Institute (CATI), whose mission is to
of research in inverse problems and problems of seismic
establish Colorado as an acknowledged world leader in
data processing and interpretation. Its methods have
selected technologies. In concert with this goal, CAMI has
applications to seismic exploration, mapping of the seabed,
competitively awarded more than $400,000 in seed grants to
ocean sound-speed profiling, and nondestructive testing and
researchers in Colorado. These seed grants enable investiga-
evaluation, among other areas. Extensive use is made of
tors to develop subsequent proposals for full funding from
analytical techniques, especially asymptotic methods and
federal and industry sources, thus leveraging CAMI’s
computational techniques. Methodology is developed
investment.
through computer implementation, based on the philosophy
To stimulate effective technology transfer and promote
that the ultimate test of an inverse method is its application
strong industry/university partnership, CAMI sponsors a
to field or experimental data. Thus, the group starts from a
matching grant program directed at joint academic-industry
physical problem, develops a mathematical model that
research. Participation from the small business segment is
adequately represents the physics, derives an approximate
represented on the CAMI board by the director of the
solution technique, generates a computer code to implement
Jefferson County Business and Innovation Centers, the
the method, tests on synthetic data, and, finally, tests on
Colorado Center for Technology Transfer and by manage-
field data.
ment representatives from various small firms in the
Center for Welding, Joining and
materials community.
Coatings Research
Colorado Center for Advanced
The Center for Welding , Joining and Coatings Research
Ceramics
(CWJCR) is an integral part of the Department of Metallur-
The Colorado Center for Advanced Ceramics (CCAC) is
gical and Materials Engineering. The goal of CWJCR is to
laying the foundation for exciting technological develop-
promote education and research, and to advance understand-
ments in advanced ceramics. Established at CSM in April
ing of the metallurgical aspects of welding, joining and
1988, the Center is dedicated to excellence in research and
coating processes. The Center’s current activities include:
graduate education in high technology ceramic materials. A
education, research, conferences, short courses, seminars,
collaborative industry-university venture, the goal of the
information source and transfer, and industrial consortia.
Center is to translate scientific advancements in ceramics
The Center for Welding, Joining and Coatings Research
into new and improved ceramic fabrication processes and
assists the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
ceramic materials. The close coupling between the univer-
Department by providing numerous opportunities which
sity and industry within the Center, ensures the transfer of
directly contribute to the student’s professional growth.
concepts into the industrial sector. Participation of industrial
Some of these opportunities include:
members representing raw material produced ceramic
Direct involvement in the projects which constitute the
manufacturers, and users of ceramic materials promotes the
Center’s research program.
rapid transition of new ideas into industrial practice. Each
Interaction with internationally recognized visiting
project involves research leading to a graduate thesis of a
scholars.
student. Current research activities involve ceramic powder
130
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

processing, the electronic properties of bulk and thin film
research, development and testing of new methods and
ceramics, ceramic-metal composites, and high temperature
equipment, thus facilitating the rapid application of
synthesis of new ceramic materials and fibers.
economically feasible new technologies.
Colorado Institute for Fuels and High-
Current research projects are being conducted through-
Altitude Engine Research
out the world in the areas of tunnel, raise and shaft boring,
rock mechanics, micro-seismic detection, machine instru-
The Colorado Institute for Fuels and High Altitude
mentation and robotics, rock fragmentation and drilling,
Engine Research (CIFER) is an interdisciplinary research
materials handling systems, innovative mining methods, and
institute involving faculty and students from several
mine design and economics analysis relating to energy and
academic departments at the Colorado School of Mines.
non-fuel minerals development and production. EMI has
CIFER was formed to assist industry, State and Federal
been a pioneer in the development of special applications
governments in developing and implementing clean air
software and hardware systems and has amassed extensive
policy for the benefit of the U.S. and particularly for high
databases and specialized computer programs. Outreach
altitude communities through the development of newer,
activities for the Institute include the offering of short
cleaner burning fuels and the technology to properly use
courses to the industry, and sponsorship and participation in
fuels.
major international conferences in tunneling, shaft drilling,
The overall objective of CIFER is to enhance air quality
raise boring and mine mechanization.
through research, development and education in relation to
The full-time team at EMI consists of scientists,
heavy-duty mobile sources through its specific strengths in
engineers, and support staff. Graduate students pursue their
fuels science, catalysis, materials, combustion science and
thesis work on Institute projects, while undergraduate
analytical chemistry.
students are employed in research.
CIFER manages two laboratory facilities: The Heavy
Institute for Energy Resource Studies
Duty Laboratory, located at the Denver Regional Transpor-
tation District facility, performs complete emissions and
The mission of the Institute for Energy Resource Studies
performance analyses of transit buses and large trucks; and
is to conduct authoritative geologic and engineering
The CSM Fuels Laboratory, which operates on the CSM
evaluations of energy resources on a national and worldwide
campus. Additional laboratory capabilities are available to
basis. Current research emphasis is on applied studies of
CIFER through CSM member academic departments.
natural gas and oil from conventional and nonconventional
reservoirs.
Energy and Minerals Field Institute
One research arm of the Institute is the Potential Gas
The Energy and Minerals Field Institute is an educa-
Agency. Sponsored primarily by the American Gas
tional activity serving Colorado School of Mines students
Association, the Agency guides the work of the Potential
and external audiences. The goal of the Institute is to
Gas Committee, which consists of volunteers members from
provide better understanding of complex regional issues
industry, government, and academic institutions who
surrounding development of western energy and mineral
estimate the size and location of the nation’s natural gas
resources by providing firsthand experience that cannot be
resource base. Other research sponsors include the U.S.
duplicated in the classroom. The Institute conducts a six-day
Department of Energy, and the Gas Research Institute.
interdisciplinary program for educators, the media,
Cooperating entities include industry, government and
government officials, industry, and the financial community.
research organizations, and projects include faculty and
A six-day program is also conducted for Washington
students in various CSM departments.
congressional aides and agency personnel. The Institute also
hosts conferences and seminars throughout the year dealing
Institute for Resource and
with issues specific to western resources development.
Environmental Geosciences (IREG)
Students involved in Institute programs are afforded a
The Institute for Resource and Environmental Geo-
unique opportunity to learn about the technological,
sciences (IREG) was established to advance interdiscipli-
economic, environmental, and policy aspects of resource
nary earth science research. Its board of directors is
development.
comprised of the heads of the Departments of Engineering,
Excavation Engineering and Earth
Geology and Geological Engineering, Geophysics, Math
Mechanics Institute
and Computer Science, Mineral Economics and Petroleum
Engineering. IREG’s mission is to stimulate innovation and
The Excavation Engineering and Earth Mechanics
support initiatives in integrated, multidisciplinary research
Institute (EMI), established in 1974, combines education
and education of earth scientists and engineers for resource
and research for the development of improved excavation
exploration and production, geo-engineering and applied
technology. By emphasizing a joint effort among research,
environmental geo-sciences.
academic, and industrial concerns, EMI contributes to the
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
131

IREG conducts interdisciplinary energy and environmen-
organization specializing in applied studies of petroleum
tal restoration research projects for industry and govern-
reservoirs. The center integrates disciplines from within the
ment. Areas of expertise include: integrated geology,
Departments of Chemistry and Geochemistry, Geology and
geophysics, environmental science and petroleum engineer-
Geological Engineering, and Petroleum Engineering.
ing; geohydrologic modeling; subsurface characterization;
PEPC offers students and faculty the opportunity to
fate and transport; risk assessment; groundwater contamina-
participate in research areas including: improved techniques
tion and containment; remediation technologies testing;
for exploration, drilling, completion, stimulation and
geostatistics/modeling/neural networks. Current projects
reservoir evaluation techniques; characterization of
include site characterization, development of test beds to
stratigraphic architecture and flow behavior of petroleum
test proposed in situ remediation technologies, studying
reservoirs at multiple scales; evaluation of petroleum
foam diversion in fracturing, stratigraphic inversion at the
reserves and resources on a national and worldwide basis;
Brent/Mesa Verde field, and development of geoscience
and development and application of educational techniques
inversion methods.
to integrate the petroleum disciplines.
International Ground Water Modeling
Reservoir Characterization Project
Center
The Reservoir Characterization Project (RCP) works on
The International Ground Water Modeling Center
the forefront of new multicomponent 3-D seismic technol-
(IGWMC) is an information, education, and research center
ogy in the optimization of reservoir development. Multi-
for ground-water modeling established at Holcomb
component seismic data are recorded, processed and
Research Institute in 1978, and relocated to the Colorado
interpreted to increase the fidelity of seismic data to define
School of Mines in 1991. Its mission is to provide an
structural and stratigraphic variations in the subsurface.
international focal point for ground-water professionals,
Application of the new integrated reservoir technologies
managers, and educators in advancing the use of quality-
leads to enhanced recovery of hydrocarbons from reservoirs.
assured computer models in ground-water resource
The RCP consortium was established in 1985 and
protection and management. IGWMC operates a clearing-
includes 30 national and international companies. Faculty
house for ground-water modeling software; organizes
and students from the departments of Geophysics, Geology
conferences, short courses and seminars; provides technical
and Geological Engineering, and Petroleum Engineering are
advice and assistance related to ground-water. In support of
provided the opportunity to work closely with industrial
its information and training activities, IGWMC conducts a
contacts in areas both educational and research.
program of applied research and development in ground-
water modeling. Topics covered in this program include
W.J. Kroll Institute for Extractive
quality assurance in modeling, modeling screening and
Metallurgy
testing, evaluation of model use and model needs, software
A grant from the late W.J. Kroll enabled the establish-
development and improvement, and model review studies.
ment of an Institute for Extractive Metallurgy in the
CSM students are involved with IGWMC activities at the
Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering. The
graduate as well as undergraduate levels. Students from
Institute promotes studies and research in the production
various CSM departments are employed to assist with
and refining of metals, and processing of waste and
computer programming, model testing, program documenta-
hazardous materials, particularly mineral processing,
tion, user support, and multidisciplinary research activities.
pyrometallurgy, hydrometallurgy, electrometallurgy and the
Petroleum Exploration and
application of these areas to the development and research
of environmentally acceptable methods of extraction of
Production Center
metals. Scholarships, fellowships, conferences, visiting
The Petroleum Exploration and Production Center
lecturers, and research grants are available through this
(PEPC) is an interdisciplinary educational and research
organization.
132
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Section 8 - Services
Computing and Networking
OIP is located in 109 Stratton Hall. For more specific
Computing Center
information about study abroad and other international
The Computing Center, which is housed on the second
programs, contact OIP at 384-2121.
floor of the Green Center, provides computing and network-
LAIS Writing Center
ing services to meet instructional and research needs and to
support the academic mission of the Colorado School of
The LAIS Writing Center, located in room 263 of the
Mines. Computer accounts and services are available to
Green Center (phone: 273-3085) is a teaching facility
registered students and current faculty members and staff.
providing all CSM students, faculty, and staff with an
opportunity to enhance their writing abilities. The LAIS
Information about services including activation of new
Writing Center faculty are experienced technical writers and
accounts and the hours during which the Computing Center
professional writing instructors. The Center assists students
is open is available in a brochure which may be picked up at
with all their writing needs, from course assignments, to
the Front Desk in Room 231 (303-273-3431) and on the
scholarship applications, proposals, letters and resumes.
Computing Center’s web page at http://www.mines.edu-
This service is free to CSM students and includes one-to-
Academic/computer/. Problem reports can be made at the
one tutoring and online resources provided in a computer-
Front Desk or emailed to trouble@mines.edu.
ized, electronic classroom.
The campus network provides access to campus
Environmental Health and Safety
computing resources and to the Internet, including email
and the World Wide Web. Centrally managed resources
The Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) Department
include Unix systems which are available 24 hours per day
is located in Chauvenet Hall. Five full-time employees in
except for occasional maintenance.
the EHS Department provide a wide variety of services to
students staff and faculty members. Functions of the EHS
Workrooms in the Computing Center contain networked
Department include: hazardous waste collection and
PCs and workstations. Also available are printers, scanners,
disposal; chemical procurement and distribution; assessment
and digitizers. Aacademic departments which support
of air and water quality; fire safety; general industrial safety;
specialized applications manage access to computer labs in
industrial hygiene; health physics; and recycling. The staff
their buildings. The Arthur Lakes Library has a computer
of the EHS Department is ready to respond to requests for
cluster on the main floor of the building. Network access is
information and services from parents and students. Please
also provided in residence halls and Mines Park for students
call us at 303 273-3316. We work for you!
who bring their own computers to campus and modem pools
provide access to the network for off-campus residents.
Arthur Lakes Library
It is important for all users of the Colorado School of
Arthur Lakes Library is a regional information center for
Mines computing resources to observe the CSM Policies for
engineering, energy, minerals and materials science, and
Resource Usage (available on the web page or at the Front
associated engineering and science fields. The library
Desk) and all legal and ethical guidelines for use of those
provides educational and research resources to support and
services.
enhance the academic mission of CSM. The library staff is
committed to excellence in supporting the information needs
Office of International Programs
of the CSM community and providing access to information
The Office of International Programs (OIP) fosters and
for library users.
facilitates international education, research and outreach at
The library collections include more than 500,000
CSM. OIP is administered by the Office of Academic
volumes; approximately 1800 serial titles; over 200,000
Affairs.
maps; archival materials on western mining history and
The office works with the departments and divisions of
mineral fields; and several special collections. The library is
the School to: (1) help develop and facilitate study abroad
a selective U.S. and Colorado state depository with over
opportunities for CSM undergraduates and serve as an
600,000 government publications, including selected NTIS
informational and advising resource for them; (2) assist in
publications.
attracting new international students to CSM, (3) serve as an
Access to CSM collections is provided by an online
information resource for faculty and scholars of the CSM
public access catalog and computerized circulation system.
community, promoting faculty exchanges and the pursuit of
Students and faculty also have access to catalogs of other
collaborative international research activities; (4) foster
libraries and various information databases through the
international outreach and technology transfer programs; (5)
online system. Terminal access is availabie in the libraryor
facilitate arrangements for official international visitors to
from any networked computer on campus, including those
CSM; and in general, (6) help promote the internationaliza-
in networked CSM residential facilities. Dialup and Internet
tion of CSM’s curricular programs and activities.
access are available from on or off-campus. The library’s
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
133

web page can be found at http://www.mines.edu/Academic/
faculty, staff and students in initiating and responding to
library.
media. The news and information staff produce articles on
Reference resources include specialized printed indexes
faculty, research, staff and student activities for both internal
and several hundred on-line databases. Reference librarians
and external audiences for use in print and broadcast media.
provide instruction and personal help as needed, conduct
To obtain news coverage of an activity or event, call the
library research sessions for classes, and provide telephone
Public Affairs office as far in advance as possible.
reference service and computer-aided research services.
The department produces Mines Today, a magazine
In addition to material that can be checked out from the
published quarterly for the campus community and friends
CSM library and other associated Colorado libraries,
of the school. CSM Update is also published by this
interlibrary loan service provides for efficient use of
department and is distributed to faculty and staff on campus
materials from regional and world-wide libraries.
every month during the school year and once each summer.
Research Development and Services
To ensure quality and consistency, all publications are
required to adhere to guidelines which can be obtained from
The Office of Research Development (ORD), under the
the Office of Public Affairs. Public Affairs advises CSM
Dean of Graduate Studies and Research, coordinates
departments on the selection of vendors for writing, editing,
research for the Colorado School of Mines, and promotes
design, photography, production, printing, and distribution.
research development with industry and government
agencies. The research support assists the educational
Public Affairs maintains World Wide Web pages at
program through support of students, faculty, equipment and
www.mines.edu/All_about/public/. Included on these pages
research expenses. The Office of Research Services (ORS)
are the CSM Experts Database and official CSM press
provides administrative support for matters concerning
releases.
research opportunities, proposal preparation, research
Copy Center
personnel, payroll, procurement, and contract compliance.
Located on the first floor of Guggenheim Hall, the Copy
In general, ORS is the School’s principal liaison in
Center offers on-line binding, printed tabs, and halftones.
contractual matters and assists the faculty in the legal and
Printing can be done on all paper sizes from odd-sized
administrative aspects of the contract research and grant
originals. Some of the other services offered are GBC and
program.
Velo Binding, folding, sorting and collating, reduction and
Green Center
enlargement, two sided copying, and color copying. We
Completed in 1971, the Cecil H. and Ida Green Graduate
have a variety of paper colors, special resume paper and
and Professional Center is named in honor of Dr. and Mrs.
CSM watermark for thesis copying. These services are
Green, major contributors to the funding of the building.
available to students, faculty, and staff. The Copy Center
campus extension is 3202.
Bunker Memorial Auditorium, which seats 1,386, has a
large stage that may be used for lectures, concerts, drama
Special Programs and Continuing
productions, or for any occasion when a large attendance is
Education (SPACE)
expected.
The mission of the SPACE Office is to provide opportu-
Friedhoff Hall contains a dance floor and an informal
nities for practicing engineers and other professionals to
stage. Approximately 700 persons can be accommodated at
augment and upgrade their technical skills as well as to
tables for banquets or dinners. Auditorium seating can be
remain abreast of recent developments in their fields of
arranged for up to 550 people.
interest. These educational opportunities are provided
Petroleum Hall and Metals Hall are lecture rooms seating
through short courses, special programs, web-based courses,
130 and 330, respectively. Each room has audio visual
and professional outreach programs. Short courses, offered
equipment. In addition, the Green Center houses the
on the CSM campus and throughout the world, provide
modern Computing Center, the Department of Geophysics
concentrated instruction in specialized areas and are taught
and the Center for Geoscience Computing.
by faculty members, consultants, or other highly trained
professionals. Special programs consist of symposia,
Public Affairs
conferences, and meetings for selected audiences. The
The Public Affairs Department encompasses three areas
Professional Outreach Program provides educational
— media relations, community relations and publications.
opportunities for those individuals who have not applied to
The department keeps the news media and general public
pursue a degree program at CSM, but who wish to take
informed about happenings within the CSM community.
regularly scheduled courses on the CSM campus. A number
The President has delegated to Public Affairs the
of web-based courses are available on-line and customized
responsibility of speaking for the institution in the day-to-
programs have been developed for corporations and
day conduct of business. Public Affairs personnel also assist
government agencies throughout the world. The SPACE
134
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

Office also provides a wide array of courses for K-12
Telecommunications Center
teachers through the Teacher Enhancement Program. A
The Telecommunications Center is located at the west
separate bulletin lists the educational programs offered by
end of the Plant Facilities building, and provides telephone
the SPACE Office.
and voicemail service to the campus, residence halls, and
Colorado School of Mines Alumni
Mines Park housing areas. The Telecommunications Center
Association
also publishes a CSM Campus Directory available anytime
to staff, faculty and students on the Web: (mines.edu/
(CSMAA) The Mines Alumni Association has served the
directory/csm_only/).
Colorado School of Mines and its alumni since 1985.
Services and benefits of membership include:
Local telephone service is provided as part of the
housing rates. The Telecommunications Center provides
Publications include Mines Magazine six times each year
maintenance for telephone lines and services.
and an annual directory of all Mines alumni; Career
Services, counseling, resume review, and job placement
Voicemail service is provided as an optional service by
services; Section activities providing a connection to
subscription. The fee is $22.50 per semester, and subscrip-
campus and other Mines alumni around the world; Connec-
tion cards are available in the Housing Office or in the
tions to Mines through newsletters, and invitations to local
Telecommunications Center. The voicemail fee is non-
and annual alumni meetings, reunions, golf tournament, and
refundable, except in the case of departure from the campus
other special events; customized alumni Merchandise
(refunded at a decreased, monthly prorated rate).
through the Miner’s Pick; Awards, both the opportunity to
The Telecommunications Center rpovides long distance
nominate fellow alumni and be nominated; CSM Library
services for the Residence Halls and Mines Park housing
privileges to Colorado residents; and an assortment of other
areas through individual account codes. Long distance rates
member benefits.
for domestic calling are 0.10 per minute 24 hours a day,
Benefits for the Colorado School of Mines and current
seven days a week. International rates are available on
students are student grants; the Student Financial Assistance
request from the Telecommunications Center. Accounts are
Program; recognition banquets for graduating seniors/
issued at the beginning of the fall semester, or by request at
graduate students; maintenance of alumni records; alumni
any time. Monthly long distance charges are assessed to
volunteer assistance in student recruiting; and programs
student accounts each month and invoices are mailed
enabling alumni input in School programming.
directly to students at their campus address. Questions and
requests for information for the above services should be
For further information call 303/273-3295, fax 303/
directed to the Telecommunications Center (303) 273-3000
273-3583, or write Mines Alumni Association, P.O. Box
or 1-800-446-9488.
1410, Golden, CO 80402-1410.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
135

Directory of the School
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
HAROLD R. CHEUVRONT, 1976-84, 1985-B.S., M.A.,
West Virginia University; Ph.D., University of Northern
JOHN K. COORS 16000 Table Mountain Parkway, Golden,
Colorado; Vice President for Student Life and Dean of
CO 80403
Students
FRANK ERISMAN Holme Roberts & Owen, 1700 Lincoln
ROBERT G. MOORE, 1995 -B.S., Northern Arizona
St., Suite 4100 Denver, CO 80203
University; M.P.A., University of Colorado; Vice President
HUGH W. EVANS 768 Rockway Place Boulder, CO 80303
for Business Affairs
KAREN OSTRANDER-KRUG Krug & Sobel, 621
STEPHEN P. POUGNET, 1995-B.A., Michigan State
Seventeenth St., Suite 777, Denver, CO 80293
University; Vice President for Institutional Advancement
F. STEVEN MOONEY Thompson Creek Metals Co., 945
PHILLIP R. ROMIG, 1969-B.S., University of Notre Dame;
W. Kenyon Ave. Englewood, CO 80110
M.S., Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Dean of the Office
DAVID D. POWELL, JR. Holland & Hart, LLP 555
of Graduate Studies and Research, and Professor of
Seventeenth St., Suite 3200 Denver, CO 80202
Geophysics
DAVID. J. WAGNER David Wagner & Associates, P.C.,
NIGEL T. MIDDLETON, 1990-B.Sc., Ph.D., University of
8400 E. Prentice Ave., Englewood, CO 80111
the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg; Associate Vice President
for Academic Affairs; Associate Professor of Engineering,
KIMBERLY KLOPPEL Student Representative
P.E., S. Africa
EMERITUS VOTING MEMBERS OF BOT
JAMES P. ALLEN, 1986-B.A., University of Colorado;
Ms. Sally Vance Allen
Manager of Software Implementation
Mr. Leo N. Bradley
LINDA J. BALDWIN, 1994-B.S., Iowa State University;
Mr. Joseph Coors, Sr.
Continuing Education Program Coordinator
Mr. Joseph Coors, Jr.
GARY L. BAUGHMAN, 1984-B.S.Ch.E., Ohio University;
Mr. William K. Coors
M.S., Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Director of Special
Mr. Kenneth R. Fenwick
Programs and Continuing Education and Associate
Mr. Jack Grynberg
Research Professor
Mr. Don K. Henderson
Mr. Anthony L. Joseph
DAVID G. BEAUSANG, 1993-B.S., Colorado State
Mr. J. Robert Maytag
University; Computing Support Specialist
Mr. Terry P. McNulty
JUDI A. BONACQUISTI, 1997-B.S., Colorado State
Mr. Donald E. Miller
University; Assistant Director of the Minority Engineering
Mr. Randy L. Parcel
Program
Mr. D. Monte Pascoe
Mr. John A. Reeves, Sr.
BARBARA A. BOSCHE, 1998-Director of Grants and
Mr. Fred R. Schwartzberg
Research Development
Mr. Ted P. Stockmar
HEATHER A. BOYD, 1990-B.S., Montana State Univer-
Mr. Charles E. Stott, Jr.
sity; Director of Residence Life
Dr. John W Vanderwilt*
Mr. J. N. Warren
STEVEN L. BRIDGEMAN, 1995-B.S., Colorado State
Mr. James C. Wilson
University; Controller
Mr. Russell L. Wood
ERLING A. BROSTUEN, 1994-B.A., University of North
Dakota; Continuing Education Program Coordinator and
ADMINISTRATION
Director of the Energy and Minerals Field Institute
THEODORE A. BICKART, 1998-B.E.S., M.S.E., D.Engr.,
The Johns Hopkins University; President and Professor of
RONALD L. BRUMMETT, 1993-B.A., Metropolitan State
Engineering
College; M.A., University of Northern Colorado; M.B.A.,
University of Colorado Denver; Director of CSM Career
JOHN U. TREFNY, 1977-B.A., Fordham College; Ph.D.,
Center and the Office for Student Development and
Rutgers University; Vice President for Academic Affairs and
Academic Services
Dean of Faculty, Professor of Physics
136
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

TIMOTHY W. CAKE, 1994-B.S., Colorado State Univer-
MELVIN L. KIRK, 1995-B.S., M.A., University of
sity; M.S., Regis University; Director of Plant Facilities
Northern Colorado; Student Development Center Counselor
G. MATTNEY COLE, 1982-B.S., Texas Christian Univer-
ROGER A. KOESTER, 1989-B.A., Grinnell College;
sity; Ph.D., Florida State University; Continuing Education
M.B.A., Drake University; Director of Financial Aid
Program Coordinator
KATHLEEN LAMB, 1986-94, 1995 B.A., Harvard
KATHLEEN CONNOR, 1996-Director of Outdoor
University; B.A., Metropolitan State College; Computer
Recreation
Support Specialist
JEFFRY D. CUSTARD, 1993-B.S., Colorado State
DEBBY PAGE LANE, 1993-A.A.S. Front Range Commu-
University; M.L.I.S., University of Texas Austin; Comput-
nity College; B.S., Metropolitan State College; M.P.A.,
ing Support Specialist
University of Colorado Denver; Director of Human
HILLE L. DAIS, 1999-B.A., M.A., University of Minne-
Resources
sota; B.S., Metropolitan State College of Denver; Associate
DAVID LARUE, 1998-Computer Support Specialist
Vice President for Business Affairs
DEBRA K. LASICH, 1999-B.S., Kearney State College;
MARY C. DALE, 1984-B.A., Southwestern College; M.A.,
M.A., University of Nebraska; Interim Director of the
University of Denver; Assistant for Collaborative Informa-
Women in Science, Engineering, and Mathematics
tion Development and Support
(WISEM) Program
MARY DAVIS, 1998-B.S., Metropolitan State College;
LINDA LAU, 1998-Advising Coordinator
M.Ed., University of Colorado; Associate Director of
EDWARD R. LIBERATORE, 1991-B.A., Georgetown
Financial Aid
University; J.D., Washington College of Law; Director of
THERESE DEEGAN-YOUNG, 1987-B.A., St. Louis
Legal Services
University; M.A., University of Colorado; Student Develop-
CAIRN A. LINDLOFF, 1994-B.S., University of Nevada at
ment Center Counselor
Reno; M.Ed., University of South Carolina; Director of
JACK M. DeLONG, 1998-Museum Collections Manager
Student Activities and Greek Advisor
TRICIA DOUTHIT, 1998-B.S., Colorado School of Mines;
ROBERT A. MacPHERSON, 1988-B.S., United States
Assistant Director of Admissions
Naval Academy; Director of Environmental Health and
RHONDA L. DVORNAK, 1994-B.S., Colorado School of
Safety
Mines; Continuing Education Program Coordinator
A. EDWARD MANTZ, 1994-B.S., Colorado School of
MELODY A. FRANCISCO, 1988-89, 1991-B.S., Montana
Mines; Director of Green Center
State University; Continuing Education Program Coordina-
JULIAN MARTINEZ, 1993-B.S.E.E., University of Texas
tor
El Paso; Minority Engineering Program Director
ROBERT A. FRANCISCO, 1988-B.S., Montana State
VIRGINIA A. MAST, 1977-B.A., Middlebury College;
University; Director of Student Life
Curator of the Geology Museum
GEORGE FUNKEY, 1991-M.S., Michigan Technological
LEAH K. McNEILL, 1997-B.A., University of Mississippi;
University; Director of Information Services
M.A. University of South Carolina; Director of Public
LISA GOBERIS, 1998-B.S., University of Northern
Relations
Colorado; Assistant Director of the Student Center
MARY MITTAG-MILLER, 1998-Director of ORS
BRUCE P. GOETZ, 1980-84, 1987- B.A., Norwich
STEPHANIE K. POMPONIO, 1999-B.A., University of
University; M.S., M.B.A., Florida Institute of Technology;
Northern Colorado; Internship Development Coordinator
Associate Director of Admissions
JAMES L. PROUD, 1994-B.S., University of Wisconsin,
R. MICHAEL HAVILAND, 1995-B.A., Athenaeum of
Whitewater; M.A., California State Polytechnic University;
Ohio; M.P.A., University of Pittsburgh; Ed.D., University of
Continuing Education Program Coordinator
Massachusetts; Executive Director, Office of International
SUSAN K. PURCELL, 1994-B.S., St. Bonaventure
Programs
University; M.A., University of Colorado; Continuing
JOHN P. JORDAN, 1996-B.S., University of Idaho; M.S.,
Education Program Coordinator
Montana College of Mineral Science and Technology;
CAROLYN L. REED, 1980-Assistant to the President
Instructor and Experimental Mine Manager
MARIAN E. ROHRER, R,N, 1998-Director, Student Health
Center
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
137

SYDNEY SANDROCK, 1995-Assistant to the Vice
NORMAN BLEISTEIN, B.S., Brooklyn College; M.S.,
President for Business Affairs
Ph.D., New York University; Professor of Mathematical and
Computer Sciences
SANDRA M. SCHMITZER, 1995-B.A., Michigan State
University; Director of Materials Management
ARDEL J. BOES, B.A., St. Ambrose College; M.S., Ph.D.,
Purdue University; Professor of Mathematical and
WILLIAM R. SHARP, 1979-E.M., M.S., Colorado School
Computer Sciences
of Mines; Research Development Officer
AUSTIN R. BROWN, B.A., Grinnell College; M.A., Ph.D.,
SUSAN A. SMITH, 1995-B.S., Oklahoma State University;
Yale University; Emeritus Professor of Mathematical and
M.A., University of Tulsa; Registrar
Computer Sciences
RUTH A. STREVELER, 1994-B.A., Indiana University;
JAMES T. BROWN, B.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado;
M.S., Ohio State University; Ph.D., University of Hawaii
Emeritus Professor of Physics
Manoa; Academic Achievement Coordinator for Student
Support Services
W. REX BULL, B.Sc., App. Diploma in Mineral Dressing,
Leeds University; Ph.D., University of Queensland;
JANE R. TAYLOR, 1997-B.A., Augusta College; Director
Emeritus Professor of Metallurgical and Materials Engineer-
of Marketing Communications
ing
CAROL L. WARD, 1993-B.S., Ohio State University;
JERROLD J. BURNETT, A.S. in E.E., Arlington State
M.A., Denver University; Computer Support Engineer
College; B.A., Texas A&M University; M.S., Texas A&I
LOUISE WILDEMAN, 1998-B.A., Smith College; M.A.,
College; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma; Emeritus Professor
University of Wisconsin; Assistant Director of Career
of Physics, P.E.
Planning and Placement
BETTY J. CANNON, B.A., M.A., University of Alabama;
DEREK J. WILSON, 1982-B.S., University of Montana;
Ph.D., University of Colorado; Emeritus Associate
Director of the Computing Center
Professor of Liberal Arts and International Studies
A. WILLIAM YOUNG, 1974-B.S., North Carolina State
W. JOHN CIESLEWICZ, B.A., St. Francis College; M.A.,
University; M.S., University of Denver; Director of
M.S., University of Colorado; Emeritus Associate Professor
Enrollment Management and Assistant Vice President for
of Slavic Studies and Foreign Languages
Student Life
RICHARD H. DeVOTO, A.B., Dartmouth College; M.Sc.,
EDWARD A. ZITT, 1991-Manager of Financial Computing
Thayer School of Engineering Dartmouth College; D.Sc.,
Colorado School of Mines; Emeritus Professor of Geology,
EMERITI
P.E.
GEORGE S. ANSELL, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Rensselaer
DONALD I. DICKINSON, B.A., Colorado State Univer-
Polytechnic Institute; Emeritus President and Professor of
sity; M.A., University of New Mexico; Emeritus Professor
Metallurgical Engineering, P.E.
of Liberal Arts and International Studies
GUY T. McBRIDE, JR. B.S., University of Texas; D.Sc.,
J. PATRICK DYER, B.P.E., Purdue University; Emeritus
Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Emeritus President,
Associate Professor of Physical Education and Athletics
P.E.
WILTON E. ECKLEY, A.B., Mount Union College; M.A.,
JOHN F. ABEL, JR. E.M., M.Sc., E.Sc., Colorado School
The Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., Case Western
of Mines; Emeritus Professor of Mining Engineering
Reserve University; Emeritus Professor of Liberal Arts and
R. BRUCE ALLISON, B.S., State University of New York
International Studies
at Cortland; M.S., State University of New York at Albany;
KENNETH W. EDWARDS, B.S., University of Michigan;
Emeritus Professor of Physical Education and Athletics
M.A., Dartmouth College; Ph.D., University of Colorado;
WILLIAM R. ASTLE, B.A., State University of New York
Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
at New Paltz; M.A., Columbia University; M.A., University
JOSEPH J. FINNEY, B.S., United States Merchant Marine
of Illinois; Emeritus Professor of Mathematical and
Academy; M.S., University of New Mexico; Ph.D.,
Computer Sciences
University of Wisconsin; Emeritus Professor of Geology
HENRY A. BABCOCK, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of
EDWARD G. FISHER, B.S., M.A., University of Illinois;
Colorado; Emeritus Professor of Civil Engineering, P.E.
Emeritus Professor of English
RAMON E. BISQUE, B.S., St. Norbert’s College; M.S.
DAVID E. FLETCHER, B.S., M.A., Colorado College;
Chemistry, M.S. Geology, Ph.D., Iowa State College;
M.S.B.A., Ph.D., University of Denver; Emeritus Professor
Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
of Economics and Business
138
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

S. DALE FOREMAN, B.S., Texas Technological College;
ABDELWAHID IBRAHIM, B.S., University of Cairo;
M.S., Ph.D., University of Colorado; Emeritus Professor of
M.S., University of Kansas; Ph.D., Michigan State
Civil Engineering, P.E.
University; Emeritus Associate Professor of Geophysics
JAMES H. GARY B.S., M.S., Virginia Polytechnic
GEORGE W. JOHNSON, B.A., University of Illinois;
Institute; Ph.D., University of Florida; Emeritus Professor of
M.A., University of Chicago; Emeritus Professor of English
Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining, P.E.
JAMES G. JOHNSTONE, Geol.E., Colorado School of
DONALD W. GENTRY, B.S., University of Illinois; M.S.,
Mines; M.S., Purdue University; (Professional Engineer);
University of Nevada; Ph.D., University of Arizona;
Emeritus Professor of Civil Engineering
Professor of Mining Engineering, P.E.
THOMAS A. KELLY, B.S., C.E., University of Colorado;
JOHN O. GOLDEN, B.E., M.S., Vanderbilt University;
Emeritus Professor of Basic Engineering, P.E.
Ph.D., Iowa State University; Emeriti Professor of Chemical
GEORGE H. KENNEDY, B.S., University of Oregon; M.S.,
Engineering and Petroleum Refining, P.E.
Ph.D., Oregon State University; Emeritus Professor of
THOMAS L. T. GROSE, B.S., M.S., University of
Chemistry and Geochemistry
Washington; Ph.D., Stanford University; Emeritus Professor
ARTHUR J. KIDNAY, P.R.E., D.Sc., Colorado School of
of Geology
Mines; M.S., University of Colorado; Emeritus Professor of
C. RICHARD GROVES, B.S., M.S., Purdue University;
Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining, P.E.
Emeritus Professor of Engineering
R. EDWARD KNIGHT. B.S., University of Tulsa; M.A.,
RAYMOND R. GUTZMAN, A.B., Fort Hays State College;
University of Denver; Emeritus Professor of Engineering
M.S., State University of Iowa; Emeritus Professor of
GEORGE KRAUSS, B.S., Lehigh University; M.S., Sc.D.,
Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Professor of
FRANK A. HADSELL, B.S., M.S., University of Wyoming;
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, P.E.
D.Sc., Colorado School of Mines; Emeritus Professor of
DONALD LANGMUIR, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Harvard
Geophysics
University; Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and Geochem-
FRANK G. HAGIN, B.A., Bethany Nazarene College;
istry and Emeritus Professor of Environmental Science &
M.A., Southern Methodist University; Ph.D., University of
Engineering
Colorado; Emeritus Professor of Mathematical and
WILLIAM B. LAW, B.Sc., University of Nevada; Ph.D.,
Computer Sciences
Ohio State University; Emeritus Associate Professor of
JOHN W. HANCOCK, A.B., Colorado State College;
Physics
Emeritus Professor of Physical Education and Athletics
FRED R. LEFFLER, B.S.E.E., University of Denver; M.S.,
ROBERT C. HANSEN, E.M., Colorado School of Mines;
Ph.D., Oregon State University; Emeritus Professor of
M.S.M.E., Bradley University; Ph.D., University of Illinois;
Engineering, P.E.
Emeritus Professor of Engineering, P.E.
V. ALLEN LONG, A.B., McPherson College; A.M.,
JOHN D. HAUN, A.B., Berea College; M.A., Ph.D.,
University of Nebraska; Ph.D., University of Colorado;
University of Wyoming; Emeritus Professor of Geology,
Emeritus Professor of Physics
P.E.
GEORGE B. LUCAS, B.S., Tulane University; Ph.D., Iowa
T. GRAHAM HEREFORD, 1980-B.A., Ph.D. University of
State University; Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and
Virginia; Emeritus Professor of Liberal Arts and Interna-
Geochemistry
tional Studies
MAURICE W. MAJOR, B.A., Denison University; Ph.D.,
JOHN A. HOGAN, B.S., University of Cincinnati; M.A.,
Columbia University; Emeritus Professor of Geophysics
Lehigh University; Professor of Liberal Arts and Interna-
DONALD C.B. MARSH, B.S., M.S., University of
tional Studies
Arizona; Ph.D., University of Colorado; Emeritus Professor
WILLIAM A. HUSTRULID, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University
of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
of Minnesota; Emeritus Professor of Mining Engineering
SCOTT J. MARSHALL, B.S., University of Denver;
RICHARD W. HUTCHINSON, B.Sc., University of
Emeritus Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, P.E.
Western Ontario; M.Sc., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin;
JAMES W. MARTIN, B.S., Michigan College of Mining
Charles Franklin Fogarty Professor in Economic Geology;
and Technology; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Emeritus
Emeritus Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
Professor of Engineering, P.E.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
139

JEAN P. MATHER, B.S.C., M.B.A., University of Denver;
MIKLOS D. G. SALAMON, Dipl.Eng., Polytechnical
M.A., Princeton University; Emeritus Professor of Mineral
University, Hungary; Ph.D., University of Durham,
Economics
England; Emeritus Professor of Mining Engineering
FRANK S. MATHEWS, B.A., M.A., University of British
MAYNARD SLAUGHTER, B.S., Ohio University; M.A.,
Columbia; Ph.D., Oregon State University; Emeritus
University of Missouri; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh;
Professor of Physics
Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
RUTH A. MAURER, B.S., M.S., Colorado State Univer-
CHARLES W. STARKS, Met.E., M.Met.E, Colorado
sity; Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Emeritus Associate
School of Mines; Emeritus Associate Professor of Chemis-
Professor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
try, P.E.
ROBERT S. McCANDLESS, B.A., Colorado State College;
FRANKLIN J. STERMOLE, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State
Emeritus Professor of Physical Education and Athletics
University; Emeritus Professor of Chemical Engineering
and Petroleum Refining/Mineral Economics, P.E.
MICHAEL B. McGRATH, B.S.M.E., M.S., University of
Notre Dame; Ph.D., University of Colorado; Emeritus
ROBERT J. TAYLOR, BAE School of the Art Institute;
Professor of Engineering
M.A., University of Denver; Emeritus Associate Professor
of Engineering
BILL J. MITCHELL, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of
Oklahoma; Emeritus Professor of Petroleum Engineering
GUY H. TOWLE, Geol.E., Ph.D., Colorado School of
Mines; Emeritus Associate Professor of Geophysics
WILLIAM M. MUELLER, Met. E., M.S., D.Sc., Colorado
School of Mines; Emeritus Vice President for Academic
FUN-DEN WANG, B.S., Taiwan Provincial Cheng-Kung
Affairs and Dean of Faculty and Emeritus Professor of
University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana;
Metallurgical Engineering, P.E.
Emeritus Professor of Mining Engineering
KARL R. NEWMAN, B.S., M.S., University of Michigan;
ROBERT J. WEIMER, B.A., M.A., University of Wyoming;
Ph.D., University of Colorado; Emeritus Professor of
Ph.D., Stanford University; Emeritus Professor of Geologi-
Geology
cal Engineering, P.E.
GABRIEL M. NEUNZERT, B.S., M.Sc., Colorado School
J. EDWARD WHITE, B.A., M.A., University of Texas;
of Mines; (Professional Land Surveyor); Emeritus Associate
Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Emeritus
Professor of Engineering
Professor of Geophysics, P.E.
ROBERT W. PEARSON, P.E., Colorado School of Mines;
WALTER W. WHITMAN, B.E., Ph.D., Cornell University;
Emeritus Associate Professor of Physical Education and
Emeritus Professor of Geophysics
Athletics and Head Soccer Coach
JOHN T. WILLIAMS, B.S., Hamline University; M.S.,
ANTON G. PEGIS, B.A., Western State College; M.A.,
University of Minnesota; Ph.D., Iowa State College;
Ph.D., University of Denver; Emeritus Professor of English
Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
HARRY C. PETERSON, B.S.M.E., Colorado State
ROBERT D. WITTERS, B.A., University of Colorado;
University; M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University; Emeritus
Ph.D., Montana State College; Emeritus Professor of
Professor of Engineering
Chemistry and Geochemistry
ALFRED PETRICK, JR., A.B., B.S., M.S., Columbia
F. RICHARD YEATTS, B.S., The Pennsylvania State
University; M.B.A., University of Denver; Ph.D., University
University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Arizona; Emeritus
of Colorado; Emeritus Professor of Mineral Economics, P.E.
Professor of Physics
THOMAS PHILIPOSE, B.A., M.A., Presidency College-
PROFESSORS
University of Madras; Ph.D., University of Denver;
ROBERT M. BALDWIN, 1975-B.S., M.S., Iowa State
University Emeritus Professor of Liberal Arts and Interna-
University; Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Professor of
tional Studies
Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining and Head of
STEVEN A. PRUESS, B.S., Iowa State University; M.S.,
Department
Ph.D., Purdue University; Professor of Mathematical and
THEODORE A. BICKART, 1998-B.E.S., M.S.E., D.Engr.,
Computer Sciences
The Johns Hopkins University; President and Professor of
ODED RUDAWSKY, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania
Engineering
State University; Emeritus Professor of Mineral Economics
ANNETTE L. BUNGE, 1981-B.S., State University of New
ARTHUR Y. SAKAKURA, B.S., M.S., Massachusetts
York at Buffalo; Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley;
Institute of Technology; Ph.D., University of Colorado;
Professor of Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining
Emeritus Associate Professor of Physics
140
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

F. EDWARD CECIL, 1976-B.S., University of Maryland;
THOMAS L. T. GROSE, 1964-B.S., M.S., University of
M.A., Ph.D., Princeton University; Professor of Physics
Washington; Ph.D., Stanford University; Emeritus Professor
of Geology and Geological Engineering
JIN S. CHUNG, 1980-B.S.E., Seoul National University;
M.S., University of California at Berkeley; Ph.D., Univer-
JOHN P. HAGER, 1965-B.S., Montana School of Mines;
sity of Michigan at Ann Arbor; Professor of Engineering
M.S., Missouri School of Mines; Sc.D., Massachusetts
Institute of Technology; Hazen Research Professor of
REUBEN T. COLLINS, 1994-B.A., University of Northern
Extractive Metallurgy; Professor of Metallurgical and
Iowa; M.S., Ph.D., California Institute of Technology;
Materials Engineering
Professor of Physics
WENDY J. HARRISON, 1988-B.S., Ph.D., University of
CAROL DAHL, 1991-B.A., University of Wisconsin;
Manchester; Professor of Geology and Geological Engineer-
Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Professor of Economics
ing
and Business
WILLY A. M. HEREMAN, 1989-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., State
STEPHEN R. DANIEL, 1966-Min. Eng.- Chem., M.S.,
University of Ghent, Belgium; Professor of Mathematical
Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Professor of Chemistry
and Computer Sciences
and Geochemistry and Head of Department
MURRAY W. HITZMAN, 1996-A.B., Dartmouth College;
THOMAS L. DAVIS, 1980-B.E., University of
M.S., University of Washington; Ph.D., Stanford University;
Saskatchewan; M.Sc., University of Calgary; Ph.D.,
Charles Franklin Fogarty Distinguished Chair in Economic
Colorado School of Mines; Professor of Geophysics
Geology; Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
JOHN A. DeSANTO, 1983-B.S., M.A., Villanova Univer-
NEIL F. HURLEY, 1996-B.S., University of Southern
sity; M.S., Ph.D., University of Michigan; Professor of
California; M.S., University of Wisconsin at Madison;
Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Ph.D., University of Michigan; Charles Boettcher Distin-
DEAN W. DICKERHOOF, 1961-B.S., University of Akron;
guished Chair in Petroleum Geology; Professor of Geology
M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois; Professor of Chemistry
and Geological Engineering
and Geochemistry
TISSA ILLANGASEKARE, 1998-B.Sc., University of
GLEN R. EDWARDS, 1976-Met. Engr., Colorado School
Ceylon, Peradeniya; M. Eng., Asian Instititue of Technol-
of Mines; M.S., University of New Mexico; Ph.D., Stanford
ogy; Ph.D., Colorado State University; Professor and
University; Professor of Metallurgical and Materials
AMAX Distinguished Chair in Environmental Science and
Engineering
Engineering, P.E.
RODERICK G. EGGERT, 1986-A.B., Dartmouth College;
ALEXANDER A. KAUFMAN, 1977-Ph.D., Institute of
M.S., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University; Professor
Physics of the Earth, Moscow; D.T.Sc., Siberian Branch
of Economics and Business and Division Director
Academy; Professor of Geophysics
JAMES F. ELY, 1991-B.S., Butler University; Ph.D.,
MARVIN L. KAY, 1966-E.M., Colorado School of Mines;
Indiana University; Professor of Chemical Engineering and
Professor of Physical Education and Athletics; Head of
Petroleum Refining
Department and Director of Athletics
GRAEME FAIRWEATHER, 1994-B.Sc., Ph.D., University
ROBERT J. KEE, 1996-B.S., University of Idaho; M.S.
of St. Andrews Scotland; Professor of Mathematical and
Stanford University; Ph.D., University of California at
Computer Sciences and Head of Department
Davis; George R. Brown Distinguished Professor of
JOHN R. FANCHI, 1998-B.S. University of Denver; M.S.,
Engineering; Professor of Engineering
University of Mississippi; Ph.D., University of Houston;
ROBERT H. KING, 1981-B.S., University of Utah; M.S.,
Professor of Petroleum Engineering
Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University; Professor of
THOMAS E. FURTAK, 1986-B.S., University of Nebraska;
Engineering
Ph.D., Iowa State University; Professor of Physics
RONALD W. KLUSMAN, 1972-B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Indiana
JOAN P. GOSINK, 1991-B.S., Massachusetts Institute of
University; Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
Technology; M.S., Old Dominion University; Ph.D.,
FRANK V. KOWALSKI, 1980-B.S., University of Puget
University of California - Berkeley; Professor of Engineer-
Sound; Ph.D., Stanford University; Professor of Physics
ing and Division Director
RAGHU KRISHNAPURAM, 1997-B. Tech. Indian
D. VAUGHAN GRIFFITHS, 1994-B.Sc., Ph.D., D.Sc.,
Institute of Technology; M.S., Louisiana State University;
University of Manchester; M.S., University of California
Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon; Professor of Mathematical and
Berkeley; Professor of Engineering, P.E.
Computer Sciences
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
141

KENNETH L. LARNER, 1988-B.S., Colorado School of
UGUR OZBAY, 1998-B.S., Middle East Technical
Mines; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology;
University of Ankara; M.S., Ph.D., University of the
Charles Henry Green Professor of Exploration Geophysics;
Witwatersrand; Professor of Mining Engineering
Professor of Geophysics
LEVENT OZDEMIR, 1977-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Colorado
KEENAN LEE, 1970-B.S., M.S., Louisiana State Univer-
School of Mines; Director of Excavation Engineering and
sity; Ph.D., Stanford University; Professor of Geology and
Earth Mechanics Institute and Professor of Mining
Geological Engineering
Engineering, P.E.
MARK A. LINNE, 1989-B.S., University of Minnesota;
EUL-SOO PANG, 1986-B.A., Marshall University; M.A.,
M.S., Ph.D., Stanford University; Professor of Engineering
Ohio University; Ph.D., University of California at
Berkeley; Professor of Liberal Arts and International
STEPHEN LIU, 1987-B.S., M.S., Universitdade Federal de
Studies
MG, Brazil; Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Professor of
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, CEng, U.K.
MICHAEL J. PAVELICH, 1977-B.S., University of Notre
Dame; Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo;
DONALD L. MACALADY, 1982-B.S., The Pennsylvania
Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
State University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin at
Madison; Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
MAX PEETERS - 1998-M. Sc. Delft University; Western
Atlas Int’l Distinguished Chair in Borehole Geophysics/
PATRICK MacCARTHY, 1976-B.Sc., M.Sc., University
Petrophysics; Professor of Geophysics
College, Galway, Ireland; M.S., Northwestern University;
Ph.D., University of Cincinnati; Professor of Chemistry and
EILEEN P. POETER, 1987-B.S., Lehigh University; M.S.,
Geochemistry
Ph.D., Washington State University; Professor of Geology
and Geological Engineering, P.E.
GERARD P. MARTINS, 1969-B.Sc., University of London;
Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo; Professor
DENNIS W. READEY, 1989-B.S., University of Notre
of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
Dame; Sc.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology;
Herman F. Coors Distinguished Professor of Ceramic
DAVID K. MATLOCK, 1972-B.S., University of Texas at
Engineering; Professor of Metallurgical and Materials
Austin; M.S., Ph.D., Stanford University; Charles F. Fogarty
Engineering
Professor of Metallurgical Engineering sponsored by the
ARMCO Foundation; Professor of Metallurgical and
SAMUEL B. ROMBERGER, 1974-B.S., Ph.D., The
Materials Engineering, P.E.
Pennsylvania State University; Professor of Geology and
Geological Engineering
JAMES A. McNEIL, 1986-B.S., Lafayette College; M.S.,
Ph.D., University of Maryland; Professor of Physics
PHILLIP R. ROMIG, 1969-B.S., University of Notre Dame;
M.S., Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Dean of the Office
RONALD L. MILLER, 1986-B.S., M.S., University of
of Graduate Studies and Research, and Professor of
Wyoming; Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Professor of
Geophysics
Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining
PHILIPPE ROSS, 1998-B.Sc., McGill University; M.Sc.,
CARL MITCHAM, 1999-B.A., M.A., University of
McGill University; Ph.D., University of Waterloo; Professor
Colorado; Ph.D., Fordham University; Professor of Liberal
of Environmental Science and Engineering and Division
Arts and International Studies
Director
JOHN J. MOORE, 1989-B.Sc., University of Surrey,
TIBOR G. ROZGONYI, 1995-B.S., Eger Teachers College,
England; Ph.D., University of Birmingham, England;
Hungary; M.S., Ph.D., Technical University of Miskolc,
Professor of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering and
Hungary; Professor of Mining Engineering and Head of
Head of Department
Department
BARBARA M. OLDS, 1984-B.A., Stanford University;
ARTHUR B. SACKS, 1993-B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A.,
M.A., Ph.D., University of Denver; Professor of Liberal
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Professor of
Arts and International Studies
Liberal Arts and International Studies and Division Director
GARY R. OLHOEFT, 1994-B.S.E.E., M.S.E.E, Massachu-
JOHN A. SCALES, 1992-B.S., University of Delaware;
setts Institute of Technology; Ph.D., University of Toronto;
Ph.D., University of Colorado; Professor of Geophysics
Professor of Geophysics
FRANKLIN D. SCHOWENGERDT, 1973-B.S., M.S.,
DAVID L. OLSON, 1972-B.S., Washington State Univer-
Ph.D., University of Missouri at Rolla; Professor of Physics
sity; Ph.D., Cornell University; John H. Moore Distin-
guished Professor of Physical Metallurgy; Professor of
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, P.E.
142
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

M. SAMI SELIM, 1982-B.S., Alexandria University, Egypt;
JOHN E. WARME, 1979-B.A., Augustana College; Ph.D.,
M.S., Carnegie-Mellon University; M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State
University of California at Los Angeles; Professor of
University; Professor of Chemical Engineering and
Geology and Geological Engineering
Petroleum Refining
RICHARD F. WENDLANDT, 1987-B.A., Dartmouth
RAHMAT A. SHOURESHI, 1994-B.S., Sharif University
College; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University;
of Technology; M.S., Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of
Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
Technology; Gerard August Dobelman Distinguished
RONALD V. WIEDENHOEFT, 1979-B.C.E., Cornell
Professor of Engineering; Professor of Engineering
University; M.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., Colum-
ROGER M. SLATT, 1992-B.A., San Jose State College;
bia University; Professor of Liberal Arts and International
M.S., Ph.D., University of Alaska; Professor of Geology
Studies
and Geological Engineering and Head of Department
THOMAS R. WILDEMAN, 1967-B.S., College of St.
E. DENDY SLOAN, JR., 1976-B.S.Ch.E., M.S., Ph.D.,
Thomas; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Professor of
Clemson University; Weaver Distinguished Professor in
Chemistry and Geochemistry
Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining and
DON L. WILLIAMSON, 1975-B.S., Lamar University;
Professor of Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining,
M.S., Ph.D., University of Washington; Professor of Physics
P.E.
and Head of Department
JOSEPH D. SNEED, 1980-B.A., Rice University; M.S.,
ROBERT E. D. WOOLSEY, 1969-B.S., M.S., Ph.D.,
University of Illinois; Ph.D., Stanford University; Professor
University of Texas at Austin; Professor of Economics and
of Liberal Arts and International Studies
Business
JOHN G. SPEER, 1997-B.S., Lehigh University; Ph.D.,
BAKI YARAR, 1980-B.Sc., M.Sc., Middle East Technical
Oxford University; Professor of Metallurgical and Materials
University, Ankara; Ph.D., University of London; Professor
Engineering
of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
JOHN E. TILTON, 1985-B.A., Princeton University; M.A.,
VICTOR F. YESAVAGE, 1973-B.Ch.E., The Cooper
Ph.D., Yale University; Coulter Professor of Mineral
Union; M.S.E., Ph.D., University of Michigan; Professor of
Economics; Professor of Economics and Business
Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining
JOHN U. TREFNY, 1977-B.A., Fordham College; Ph.D.,
Rutgers University; Vice President for Academic Affairs and
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS
Dean of Faculty, Professor of Physics
BARBARA B. BATH, 1989-B.A., M.A., University of
Kansas; Ph.D., American University; Associate Professor of
ILYA D. TSVANKIN, 1992-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Moscow
Mathematical and Computer Sciences
State University; Professor of Geophysics
JEAN L. BELL, 1983-B.A., Swarthmore College; M.S.,
A. KEITH TURNER, 1972-B.Sc., Queen’s University,
Ph.D., University of Colorado; Associate Professor of
Kingston, Ontario; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D.,
Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Purdue University; Professor of Geology and Geological
Engineering, P.E.
JOHN R. BERGER, 1994-B.S., M. S., Ph.D., University of
Maryland; Associate Professor of Engineering
CHESTER J. VAN TYNE, 1988-B.A., B.S., M.S., Ph.D.,
Lehigh University; FIERF Professor and Professor of
BERNARD BIALECKI, 1995-M.S., University of Warsaw,
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, P.E., PA
Poland; Ph.D., University of Utah; Associate Professor of
Mathematical and Computer Sciences
CRAIG W. VAN KIRK, 1978-B.S., M.S., University of
Southern California; Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines;
THOMAS M. BOYD, 1993-B.S., M.S., Virginia Polytech-
Professor of Petroleum Engineering and Head of Depart-
nic Institute and State University; Ph.D., Columbia
ment, P.E.
University; Associate Professor of Geophysics
KENT J. VOORHEES, 1978-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Utah State
RICHARD L. CHRISTIANSEN, 1990-B.S.Ch.E., Univer-
University; Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
sity of Utah; Ph.D.Ch.E., University of Wisconsin;
Associate Professor of Petroleum Engineering
JUNPING WANG, 1999-B.S., Hebei Teacher’s University,
Shijiazhuang, China; M.S., Institute of Systems Science,
L. GRAHAM CLOSS, 1978-A.B., Colgate University;
Academia Sinica, Beijing; M.S., Ph.D., University of
M.S., University of Vermont; Ph.D., Queen’s University,
Chicago; Professor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Kingston, Ontario; Associate Professor of Geology and
Geological Engineering, P.E.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
143

RONALD R. H. COHEN, 1985-B.A., Temple University;
PETER HARTLEY, 1974-B.A., M.A., University of
Ph.D., University of Virginia; Associate Professor of
Colorado; Ph.D., University of New Mexico; Associate
Environmental Science and Engineering
Professor of Liberal Arts and International Studies
JOHN A. CORDES, 1977-B.A., J.D., M.A., University of
JERRY D. HIGGINS, 1986-B.S., Southwest Missouri State
Iowa; Ph.D., Colorado State University; Associate Professor
University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Missouri at Rolla;
of Economics and Business, Director, Institute for Global
Associate Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
Resources Policy and Management
GREGORY S. HOLDEN, 1978-B.S., University of
SCOTT W. COWLEY, 1979-B.S., M.S., Utah State
Redlands; M.S., Washington State University; Ph.D.,
University; Ph.D., Southern Illinois University; Associate
University of Wyoming; Associate Professor of Geology
Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
and Geological Engineering
TIMOTHY A. CROSS, 1984-B.A., Oberlin College; M.S.,
BRUCE D. HONEYMAN, 1992-B.S., M.S., Ph.D, Stanford
University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of Southern
University; Associate Professor of Environmental Science
California; Associate Professor of Geology and Geological
and Engineering
Engineering
MATTHEW J. HREBAR, III, 1976-B.S., The Pennsylvania
JOHN B. CURTIS, 1990-B.A., M.S., Miami University;
State University; M.S., University of Arizona; Ph.D.,
Ph.D., The Ohio State University; Associate Professor of
Colorado School of Mines; Associate Professor of Mining
Geology and Geological Engineering
Engineering
KADRI DAGDELEN, 1992-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Colorado
JOHN D. HUMPHREY, 1991-B.S., University of Vermont;
School of Mines; Associate Professor of Mining Engineer-
M.S., Ph.D., Brown University; Associate Professor of
ing
Geology and Geological Engineering
GRAHAM A. DAVIS, 1993-B.S., Queens University;
KENNETH E. KOLM, 1984-B.S., Lehigh University; M.S.,
M.B.A., University of Cape Town; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania
Ph.D., University of Wyoming; Associate Professor of
State University; Associate Professor of Economics and
Environmental Science and Engineering
Business
YAOGUO LI, 1999-B.S., Wuhan College of Geology,
MAARTEN V. DeHOOP, 1997-B.Sc., M.Sc., State
China; Ph.D., University of British Columbia; Associate
University of Utrecht; Ph.D., Delft University of Technol-
Professor of Geophysics
ogy; Associate Professor of Mathematical and Computer
MARK T. LUSK, 1994-B.S., United States Naval Academy;
Science
M.S., Colorado State University; Ph.D., California Institute
JOHN R. DORGAN, 1992-B.S., University of Massachu-
of Technology; Associate Professor of Engineering
setts Amherst; Ph.D., University of California Berkeley;
WADE E. MARTIN, 1989-B.S., Southern Oregon State
Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering and Petroleum
College; Ph.D., University of New Mexico; Associate
Refining
Professor of Economics and Business
MARK EBERHART, 1998 - B.S., M.S. University of
J. THOMAS McKINNON, 1991-B.S., Cornell University;
Colorado; Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology;
Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Associate
Associate Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
Professor of Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining
JOHN C. EMERICK, 1980-B.S., University of Washington;
NIGEL T. MIDDLETON, 1990-B.Sc., Ph.D., University of
M.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado; Associate Professor of
the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg; Associate Vice President
Environmental Science and Engineering
for Academic Affairs; Associate Professor of Engineering,
LINDA A. FIGUEROA, 1990-B.S., University of Southern
P.E., S. Africa
California; M.S., Ph.D., University of Colorado; Associate
BRAJENDRA MISHRA, 1997-B. Tech. Indian Institute of
Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering, P.E.,
Technology; M.S., Ph.D., University of Minnesota;
CA
Associate Professor of Metallurgical and Materials
ROBERT H. FROST, 1977-Met.E. Ph.D., Colorado School
Engineering
of Mines; S.M.,M.E., Massachusetts Institute of Technol-
DAVID R. MUNOZ, 1986-B.S.M.E., University of New
ogy; Associate Professor of Metallurgical and Materials
Mexico; M.S.M.E., Ph.D., Purdue University; Associate
Engineering
Professor of Engineering
RAMONA M. GRAVES, 1982-B.S., Kearney State College;
GRAHAM G. W. MUSTOE, 1987-B.S., M.Sc., University
Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Associate Professor of
of Aston; Ph.D., University College Swansea; Associate
Petroleum Engineering
Professor of Engineering
144
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

WILLIAM C. NAVIDI, 1996-B.A., New College; M.A.,
ERIK S. VAN VLECK, 1993-B.S. University of Kansas;
Michigan State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of
M.S., University of Colorado Boulder; Ph.D., Georgia
California at Berkeley; Associate Professor of Mathematical
Institute of Technology; Associate Professor of Mathemati-
and Computer Sciences
cal and Computer Sciences
ERIC P. NELSON, 1981-B.S., California State University at
MICHAEL R. WALLS, 1992-B.S., Western Kentucky
Northridge; M.A., Rice University; M.Phil., Ph.D.,
University; M.B.A., Ph.D., The University of Texas at
Columbia University; Associate Professor of Geology and
Austin; Associate Professor of Economics and Business
Geological Engineering
J. DOUGLAS WAY, 1994-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of
KARL R. NELSON, 1974-Geol.E., M.S., Colorado School
Colorado; Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering and
of Mines; Ph.D., University of Colorado; (Professional
Petroleum Refining
Engineer); Associate Professor of Engineering, P.E.
KAREN B. WILEY, 1981-B.A., Mills College; M.A.,
KATHLEEN H. OCHS, 1980-B.A., University of Oregon;
Ph.D., University of Colorado; Associate Professor of
M.A.T., Wesleyan University; M.A., Ph.D., University of
Liberal Arts and International Studies
Toronto; Associate Professor of Liberal Arts and Interna-
DAVID M. WOOD, 1989-B.A., Princeton University; M.S.,
tional Studies
Ph.D., Cornell University; Associate Professor of Physics
TIMOTHY R. OHNO, 1992-B.S., University of Alberta;
XINDONG WU, 1998-B.Eng., M.Eng. Hefei University of
Ph.D., University of Maryland; Associate Professor of
Technology; Ph.D. Edinburgh University; Associate
Physics
Professor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
ERDAL OZKAN, 1998-B.S., M.Sc. Istanbul Technical
University; Ph.D. University of Tulsa; Associate Professor
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS
of Petroleum Engineering
DIANNE AHMANN, 1999-B.A., Harvard College; Ph.D.,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Assistant Professor
LAURA J. PANG, 1985-B.A., University of Colorado;
of Environmental Science and Engineering
M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University; Associate Professor of
Liberal Arts and International Studies
HUSSEIN AMERY, 1997-B.A., University of Calgary;
M.A., Wilfrid Laurier University; Ph.D., McMaster
TERENCE E. PARKER, 1994-B.S., M.S., Stanford
University; Assistant Professor of Liberal Arts and Interna-
University; Ph.D., University of California Berkeley;
tional Studies
Associate Professor of Engineering
TRACY KAY CAMP, 1998-B.A. Kalamazoo College; M.S.
IVAR E. REIMANIS, 1994-B.S., Cornell University; M.S.,
Michigan State University; Ph.D. College of William and
University of California Berkeley; Ph.D., University of
Mary; Assistant Professor of Mathematical and Computer
California Santa Barbara; Associate Professor of Metallurgi-
Sciences
cal and Materials Engineering
JANIS M. CAREY, 1998-B.A., Princeton University; M.S.,
ROBERT SIEGRIST, 1997-B.S., M.S., Ph.D. University of
University of California, Davis; Ph.D., University of
Wisconsin; Associate Professor of Environmental Science
California, Berkeley; Assistant Professor of Economics and
and Engineering, P.E., WI
Business
E. CRAIG SIMMONS, 1977-B.S., University of Kansas;
NEVIS E. COOK, JR., 1992-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University
M.S., Ph.D., State University of New York at Stony Brook;
of Colorado Boulder; Assistant Professor of Environmental
Associate Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
Science and Engineering, P.E.
CATHERINE A. SKOKAN, 1982-B.S., M.S., Ph.D.,
CHRISTIAN DEBRUNNER, 1996-B.S., M.S., and Ph.D.,
Colorado School of Mines; Associate Professor of Engi-
University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign; Assistant
neering
Professor of Engineering
ROBERT S. THOMPSON, 1982-P.E., Colorado School of
JEAN-PIERRE DELPLANQUE, 1998-Diploma,
Mines; M.B.A., University of Houston; Associate Professor
ENSEEIHT France; M.Sc., National Polytechnic Institute of
of Petroleum Engineering, P.E.
Toulouse France; M.Sc., University of California Irvine;
STEVEN W. THOMPSON, 1989-B.S., Ph.D., The
Ph.D., University of California Irvine; Assistant Professor
Pennsylvania State University; Associate Professor of
of Engineering
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
CHARLES G. DURFEE, III, 1999-B.S., Yale University;
ROBERT G. UNDERWOOD, 1978-B.S., University of
Ph.D., University of Maryland; Assistant Professor of
North Carolina; Ph.D., University of Virginia; Associate
Physics
Professor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
145

JON H. EGGERT, 1996-B.S. Montana State University;
Assistant Professor of Metallurgical and Materials Engineer-
M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University; Assistant Professor of
ing
Physics
MANAVENDRA MISRA, 1993-B.Tech., Indian Institute of
ALFRED W. EUSTES III, 1996-B.S., Louisiana Tech
Technology; Ph.D., University of Southern California;
University; M.S., University of Colorado at Boulder; Ph.D.,
Assistant Professor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Colorado School of Mines; Assistant Professor of Petroleum
BARBARA MOSKAL, 1999-B.S., Duquesne University;
Engineering, P.E.
M.S., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Assistant Professor of
DAVID R. FROSSARD, 1995-B.A., Virginia Common-
Mathematical and Computer Sciences
wealth University; M.A., Ph.D., University of California,
JOHN A. PALMER, 1996-B.S., Brigham Young University;
Irvine; Assistant Professor of Liberal Arts and International
M.E., Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Assistant
Studies
Professor of Engineering
UWE GREIFE, 1999-M.S., University of Munster; Ph.D.,
LAXMINARAYAN L. RAJA, 1999-B.A., Indian Institute of
University of Bochum; Assistant Professor of Physics
Technology; M.S., Texas A&M University; Ph.D., Univer-
WILLIAM A. HOFF, 1994-B.S., Illinois Institute of
sity of Texas at Austin; Assistant Professor of Engineering
Technology; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois-Champaign/
DOUGLAS E. SMITH, 1999-B.S., Illinois College; B.S.,
Urbana; Assistant Professor of Engineering
Washington University; M.S., State University of New
MARIET A. HOFSTEE, 1995-Drs., Ph.D., University of
York; Ph.D., University of Illinois; Assistant Professor of
Groningen, the Netherlands; Assistant Professor of Physics
Engineering
ELENA KATOK, 1997-B.S., University of California,
JOHN P. H. STEELE, 1988-B.S., New Mexico State
Berkeley; M.B.S., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University;
University; M.S., Ph.D., University of New Mexico;
Assistant Professor of Economics and Business
Assistant Professor of Engineering, P.E.
SHEKHAR JAYNANTHI, 1999-B.T., Institute of Technol-
PETER W. SUTTER, 1998-M.S., Ph.D., Swiss Federal
ogy - Banaras Hindu University; M.S., Southern Illinois
Institute of Technology; Assistant Professor of Physics
University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Assistant
LUIS TENORIO, 1997-B.A., University of California,
Professor of Economics and Business
Santa Cruz; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley;
PANOS. D. KIOUSIS, 1999-Ph.D., Louisiana State
Assistant Professor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
University; Assistant Professor of Engineering
TYRONE VINCENT, 1998-B.S. University of Arizona;
DANIEL M. KNAUSS, 1996-B.S., The Pennsylvania State
M.S., Ph.D. University of Michigan; Assistant Professor of
University; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State
Engineering
University; Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Geochem-
KIM R. WILLIAMS, 1997-B.Sc., McGill University; Ph.D.,
istry
Michigan State University; Assistant Professor of Chemistry
MARK E. KUCHTA, 1999-B.S., M.A., Colorado School of
and Geochemistry
Mines; Ph.D., Lulea University of Technology, Sweden;
COLIN WOLDEN, 1997-B.S., University of Minnesota;
Assistant Professor of Mining Engineering
M.S., Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
NING LU, 1997-B.S. Wuhan University of Technology;
Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering and Petroleum
M.S., Ph.D. John Hopkins University; Assistant Professor
Refining
of Engineering
DAVID TAI-WEI WU, 1996-A.B., Harvard University;
KEVIN W. MANDERNACK, 1996-B.S., University of
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Assistant
Wisconsin Madison; Ph.D., University of California San
Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry/Chemical
Diego; Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
Engineering and Petroleum Refining
DAVID W.M. MARR, 1995-B.S., University of California,
RAY RUICHONG ZHANG, 1997-B.S., M.S., Tongji
Berkeley; M.S., Ph.D., Stanford University; Assistant
University; Ph.D., Florida Atlantic University; Assistant
Professor of Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining
Professor of Engineering
JOHN E. McCRAY, 1998-B.S., West Virginia University;
SENIOR LECTURERS
M.S., Clemson University; Ph.D., University of Arizona;
HUGH KING, 1993-B.S., Iowa State University; M.S., New
Assistant Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
York University; M.D., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D.,
KELLY T. MILLER, 1996-B.S., Massachusetts Institute of
University of Colorado; Senior Lecturer of Mathematical
Technology; Ph.D., University of California Santa Barbara;
and Computer Sciences
146
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

LECTURERS
FRANK KOHLENSTEIN, 1998-B.S., Florida State
CATHERINE FLYNN, 1997-B.A., M.A., Western State
University; M.S., Montana State University; Head Soccer
College; Lecturerer of Liberal arts and International Studies
Coach
JON LEYDENS, 1997-B.A., M.A., Colorado State
DAN R. LEWIS, 1992-B.S., California State University;
University; Director of Writing Center, and Lecturer of
Head Wrestling Coach
Liberal Arts and International Studies
BENITO A. TELESCA, 1998-B.S., Hunter College; M.E.,
SUZANNE NORTHCOTE, 1994-B.A., M.A., Hunter
Hardin-Simmons University; Adjunct Instructor and
College; Lecturer of Liberal Arts and International Studies
Intramural Club Sports Director
NATHAN PALMER, 1996-B.S., Colorado School of Mines,
VERSIE L. WALLACE, JR., 1988-B.S., M.S., Northwest-
M.S., Northwestern University; Lecturer of Physics
ern Oklahoma State University; Head Football Coach
TERRI E. WOODINGTON, 1999-B.S., James Madison
LIBRARY FACULTY
University; M.S., Texas A&M University; Lecturer of
ROBERT K. SORGENFREI, 1991-B.A., University of
Mathematical and Computer Sciences
California; M.L.S., University of Arizona; Librarian
INSTRUCTORS
JOANNE V. LERUD, 1989-B.S.G.E., M.S., University of
CANDACE S. AMMERMAN, 1983-B.S., Colorado School
North Dakota; M.A., University of Denver; Librarian and
of Mines; Instructor of Engineering
Director of Library
BRUCE MEEVES, 1999-B.S., Montana State University;
JANICE K. CHRISTOPHER, 1994-B.A., University of
M.S., Washington State University; Instructor of Physics
Wyoming; M..A., State University of New York Buffalo;
M.L.I.S., University of Texas Austin; Assistant Librarian
VICTOR L. DOPERALSKI, 1998-B.S. Kansas State
University; M.S. Kansas State University; Instructor and
LISA DUNN, 1991-B.S., University of Wisconsin-Superior;
Head Women’s Basketball Coach
M.A., Washington University; M.L.S., Indiana University;
Associate Librarian
COACHES
GITA PASSFIELD, 1996-B.A., University of Colorado,
MICHELE L. HARRIS, 1995-B.S., M.A., Adams State
Boulder; M.L.I.S., University of Denver; Assistant Librarian
College; Head Volleyball Coach
LISA B. STOMBERG, 1994-B.A., University of New
TIMOTHY J. HARRISON, 1998-B.A., University of
Mexico; M.S., University of North Carolina; Assistant
California at Santa Barbara; M.A., Saint Mary’s College;
Librarian
Head Men’s Basketball Coach
CHRISTOPHER J. J. THIRY, 1995-B.A., M.I.L.S.,
JAMES S. JULIANA, 1998-B.A., M.A., University of
University of Michigan; Assistant Librarian
Northern Colorado; Adjunct Instructor and Assistant
CHRISTOPHER HOOPER-LANE B.S., M.A., University
Football Coach
of Wisconsin, Madison
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
147

Appendix
Affirmative Action
participating in any manner in an investigation, proceeding,
hearing, or lawsuit involving unlawful discrimination; or
Colorado School of Mines has instituted an affirmative
action plan, which is available for perusal in numerous CSM
C. The Human Resources Director or the Director of
offices including the Library, the Dean of Students’ Office,
Legal Services, if either of them deem it to be in the best
and the Office of Human Resources.
interest of CSM to do so.
Any person feeling that a violation of the following
IV.. Informal Complaint Resolution Process
policies has occurred should promptly refer the matter to the
At the written request of an individual who has come
Office of Personnel and Affirmative Action, located in
forward with a complaint alleging unlawful discrimination,
Guggenheim Hall (2nd floor), for investigation.
hereinafter the “Complainant,” the Human Resources
Colorado School of Mines
Director shall assist in an attempt to resolve the complaint in
an informal manner. The informal unlawful discrimination
Unlawful Discrimination Policy and
complaint resolution process shall consist of an informal
Complaint Procedure
discussion between the Complainant and the individual or a
I. Statement of Authority and Purpose
representative of the entity accused of unlawful discrimina-
tion, hereinafter the “Respondent.” The Human Resources
This policy is promulgated by the Board of Trustees
Director shall act as a mediator during this process, which
pursuant to the authority conferred upon it by §23-41-
shall be calculated to bring the complaint to the attention of
104(1), C.R.S. (1998) in order to set forth a policy concern-
the Respondent and elicit the voluntary cooperation of the
ing unlawful discrimination at CSM. This policy shall
Respondent in settling the matter. By attempting to resolve
supersede any previously promulgated CSM policy which is
the unlawful discrimination complaint in an informal
in conflict herewith.
manner pursuant to the terms of this section, the Complain-
II. Unlawful Discrimination Policy
ant shall not waive any rights to subsequently pursue the
Attendance and employment at CSM are based solely on
complaint through the formal complaint procedure set forth
merit and fairness. Discrimination on the basis of age,
below.
gender, race, ethnicity, religion, national origin, disability,
V.. Formal Complaint Procedure
and Vietnam-era or disabled veteran status is prohibited. No
A. Purpose
discrimination in admission, application of academic
standards, financial aid, scholastic awards, promotion,
The purpose of the formal unlawful discrimination
salary, benefits, transfers, reductions in force, terminations,
complaint procedure is to provide a formal mechanism for
re-employment, professional development, or conditions of
the prompt and fair internal resolution of complaints
employment shall be permitted. The remainder of this
alleging unlawful discrimination. The procedure outlined
policy shall contain a complaint procedure outlining a
below shall be the exclusive forum for the internal resolu-
method for reporting alleged violations of this policy and a
tion of such complaints at CSM.
review mechanism for the impartial determination of the
B. Where to file a Complaint
merits of complaints alleging unlawful discrimination.
All complaints by non-students alleging unlawful
III. Persons Who May File an Unlawful
discrimination or retaliation shall be filed in writing at the
Discrimination Complaint
Office of Human Resources located on the second floor of
Guggenheim Hall. Complaints by students alleging
An unlawful discrimination complaint may be filed by
unlawful discrimination or retaliation may be submitted to
any individual described in one of the categories below:
the Human Resources Office, the Student Development
A. Any member of the CSM community, including
Center, the Dean of Students, any faculty member, or any
classified staff, exempt employees, and students as well as
Resident Assistant. Any recipient of such a student
any applicant for employment or admission, who believes
complaint shall promptly forward the complaint to the
that he or she has been discriminated against by CSM, a
Director of Human Resources for handling in accordance
branch of CSM, or another member of the CSM community
with the provisions set forth below.
on account of age, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, national
C. Time Limits
origin, disability, or Vietnam-era or disabled veteran status;
All complaints alleging unlawful discrimination or
B. Any person who believes that he or she has been
retaliation must be filed within ninety days from the date
threatened with or subjected to duress or retaliation by
upon which the incident, occurrence, or other action alleged
CSM, a branch of CSM, or a member of the CSM commu-
to constitute unlawful discrimination or retaliation occurred.
nity as a result of (1) opposing any unlawful discriminatory
However, if the alleged discrimination or retaliation is of a
practice; (2) filing a complaint hereunder; (3) representing a
continuing nature, a complaint may be filed at any time.
Complainant hereunder; or (4) testifying, assisting, or
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D. Contents of Complaint
Director shall provide the Complainant with a copy of the
A complaint alleging unlawful discrimination or
response as soon as practicable. If the response contains a
retaliation must be signed by the Complainant and set forth
denial of one or more of the allegations contained in the
specific factual matters believed to constitute unlawful
complaint, the process shall proceed with the selection of a
discrimination or retaliation. The complaint shall name as
hearing panel as set forth in subsection D below. If no
Respondent the individual or entity whom the Complainant
timely response is received, or if the response admits the
believes to have committed, participated in, or encouraged
allegations in their entirety, the matter shall be submitted to
the discrimination or retaliation. The complaint shall also
the President, who shall then issue a decision in accordance
include a brief statement describing the relief requested by
with subsection IX.D below.
the Complainant.
D. Selection of Hearing Panel
E. Fulfillment of Complaint Prerequisites
An initial hearing panel of ten individuals shall be
As soon as practicable after receipt of a complaint, the
selected at random in the following manner. Five initial
Human Resources Director shall submit the complaint to the
panel members shall be selected from the CSM group of
Director of Legal Services, who shall examine it and
which the Complainant is a member, i.e., classified staff,
determine if the prerequisites outlined above have been
exempt employees, undergraduate students, or graduate
fulfilled. If the prerequisites have not been fulfilled, the
students, and the five remaining initial panel members shall
Director of Legal Services shall inform the Complainant of
be selected from the CSM group of which the Respondent is
the specifics of such determination in writing. Unless the
a member. The Complainant and the Respondent shall each
time limitations set forth above have lapsed prior to the
disqualify two of the initial panel members. The disqualifi-
initial filing of the complaint, the Complainant shall have
cations exercised by the parties shall proceed in an alternate
the opportunity to correct any deficiencies and re-file the
fashion beginning with the Complainant. Of the remaining
complaint. If the prerequisites have been fulfilled, the
initial panel members, the one chosen last shall serve as an
complaint will be handled as set forth below.
alternate hearing panel member. The other five initial panel
members shall constitute the hearing panel for the appeal.
F. Choice of Remedies
Prospective panel members may be excused on account of
No Complainant shall be permitted to simultaneously file
conflict of interest, health, or unavoidable absence from
an unlawful discrimination claim under the CSM Unlawful
campus. An excused initial panel member shall be replaced
Discrimination Policy and Complaint Procedure and a
by another initial panel member chosen in a random
sexual harassment claim under the CSM Sexual Harassment
drawing prior to the exercise of any disqualifications by
Policy and Complaint Procedure against the same individual
either party.
arising out of an identical set of facts. In such a situation, a
Complainant shall be entitled to file his or her claim under
E. Selection of Chief Panel Member
either, but not both, of the above-mentioned policies.
After a hearing panel has been chosen, the panel
members shall elect a chief panel member from their number
VI. Pre-Hearing Procedures
who shall preside throughout the remainder of the case.
A. Notification to Proceed
As soon as practicable after a determination has been
1. Authority of Chief Panel Member
made that the complaint is sufficient pursuant to subsection
The chief panel member shall have the authority to (a)
V.E above, the Director of Legal Services shall inform the
issue orders to compel discovery; (b) make rulings on
Director of Human Resources of that fact and the Director
evidentiary objections; and (c) issue any other orders
of Human Resources shall proceed with the notifications
necessary to control the conduct of the hearing and prohibit
specified in subsection B below.
abusive treatment of witnesses, including removal of
B. Acknowledgment of Complaint and Notification of
disruptive individuals from the hearing room.
Respondent
2. Role of Alternate Hearing Panel Member
As soon as practicable, the Director of Human Resources
The alternate hearing panel member shall observe, but
shall send a letter to the Complainant acknowledging receipt
not actively participate in, all of the proceedings in the case
of the complaint. At the same time, the Director shall
and be prepared to substitute for a panel member who
provide the Respondent with a copy of the complaint and
becomes unavailable during any stage of the case due to
notify the Respondent in writing of the requirements set
death, illness, or emergency.
forth in subsection C below.
F. Setting of Hearing Date
C. Response to Complaint
After a chief panel member has been chosen, a hearing
Within ten days from the date of receipt of a copy of the
date shall be set with reasonable consideration given to the
complaint, the Respondent shall file with the Director of
schedules of the participants. The chief panel member shall
Human Resources a response in which the allegations
set a date for the hearing, which shall occur no more than
contained in the complaint are admitted or denied. The
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1999-2000
149

ninety days after the date upon which the formal complaint
hearing panel and provide a copy to the opposing party no
was filed with the Director of Human Resources. Once set,
later than five days prior to the hearing date. If the hearing
the hearing date may be rescheduled only with the concur-
date is rescheduled, these time limits shall apply to the
rence of the Complainant, the Respondent, and the hearing
rescheduled hearing date.
panel.
C. Limitations Imposed by Pre-Hearing Statements
G. Participation of Attorneys
Neither party shall make an argument during the hearing
Either party may engage the services of an attorney to
which is inconsistent with the arguments set forth in the
assist in document preparation or case preparation.
summary of the argument section of his or her pre-hearing
However, an attorney may not enter an appearance or
statement. Neither party shall introduce any witnesses or
formally participate in the case on behalf of either party.
exhibits at the hearing which are not listed in his or her pre-
H. Legal Advice for Hearing Panel
hearing statement. All exhibits listed in the pre-hearing
statements shall be deemed genuine and admissible unless
If the hearing panel desires legal advice at any time
successfully challenged prior to the hearing.
during the case, the chief panel member shall request such
advice from the Director of Legal Services. The Director
D. List of Hearing Issues
shall provide the requested advice unless he or she is
After examining the pre-hearing statements of both
actively involved in the case on behalf of one of the parties.
parties, the hearing panel shall prepare a list of issues to be
In such event, the chief panel member shall request the
resolved through the hearing and distribute such list to the
desired legal advice from the Assistant Attorney General
parties no later than two days prior to the hearing date. The
assigned to CSM, whose name and telephone number shall
panel may list issues contained in the pre-hearing statement
be provided to the chief panel member by the Director.
of either party or relevant issues not contained in the pre-
I. Pre-Hearing Discovery
hearing statement of either party. However, since the
jurisdiction of the hearing panel is limited to hearing claims
Informal discovery, or the exchange between the parties
of unlawful discrimination, only issues directly related to
of information relevant to the case, is encouraged. If the
the Complainant’s claim of unlawful discrimination may be
parties cannot resolve such issues informally, either party
placed on the list of issues. The list of issues generated
may request the chief panel member up to ten days prior to
pursuant to this subparagraph shall be binding upon the
the hearing date to enter an order compelling discovery
subsequent hearing and shall form the standard against
upon a showing of the relevance of the requested informa-
which all relevancy arguments shall be weighed.
tion and the necessity of such information to case prepara-
tion. The other party may oppose such request by showing
E. Amendments to Pre-Hearing Statements
that the requested information is irrelevant, unnecessary to
Up to two days prior to the hearing date, either party may
the requesting party’s case preparation, or privileged
request the chief panel member to permit amendments to his
according to law.
or her pre-hearing statement upon a showing of good cause
VII. Pre-Hearing Statements
and lack of prejudice to the opposing party. Any party filing
an amended pre-hearing statement shall provide a copy
A. Contents of Pre-Hearing Statements
thereof to the opposing party no later than the filing
Each party shall file a pre-hearing statement containing
deadline imposed by the order granting leave to amend.
the following components:
VIII. Hearing Procedures
1. Summary of the Argument: A concise statement
A. Burden and Standard of Proof
summarizing the case from the position of the submitting
party;
The Complainant shall bear the burden of proof
throughout the case. The standard of proof which the
2. List of Issues: A list of the issues which the submit-
Complainant must meet to sustain the burden of proof shall
ting party wishes the hearing panel to resolve;
be the preponderance of the evidence standard. The
3. List of Witnesses: A list of witnesses to be presented
preponderance of the evidence standard shall be deemed met
at the hearing along with a summary of the anticipated
if the panel believes that it is more likely than not that the
testimony of each witness; and
facts at issue occurred. The facts at issue shall include all
4. Photocopies of Exhibits: Photocopies of each exhibit
facts which are required to be proven by the party bearing
to be presented at the hearing.
the burden of proof in order for such party to prevail.
B. Deadlines for Pre-Hearing Statements
B. Order of Presentation
The Complainant shall file a pre-hearing statement with
Since the Complainant bears the burden of proof, that
the hearing panel and provide a copy to the opposing party
party shall present his or her case first. After the Complain-
no later than ten days prior to the hearing date. The
ant has finished, the Respondent shall present his or her
Respondent shall file a pre-hearing statement with the
case.
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C. Outline of Hearing
2. Findings of Fact: A list of the relevant facts found by
The hearing shall proceed according to the following
the hearing panel upon which the recommendation is based;
general outline:
3. Legal Conclusions: A list of the legal conclusions of
1. Complainant’s Opening Statement
the hearing panel upon which the determination of the issue
of unlawful discrimination is based; and
2. Respondent’s Opening Statement (unless reserved) 3.
Complainant’s Case
4. Recommended Action: A statement regarding the
relief for the Complainant, if any, that is being recom-
4. Respondent’s Opening Statement (if reserved)
mended by the hearing panel.
5. Respondent’s Case
C. Issuance of Recommendation
6. Complaint’s Rebuttal Case (unless waived)
The recommendation of the hearing panel shall be issued
7. Respondent’s Rebuttal Case (only if Complainant
to the parties and delivered to the President along with the
presents a rebuttal case and unless waived)
case file within fifteen days after the conclusion of the
8. Complainant’s Closing Argument
hearing.
9. Respondent’s Closing Argument
D. Decision of President
The President shall examine the case file, consider the
10. Complainant’s Rebuttal Argument (unless waived)
recommendation of the hearing panel, and issue a final
D. Inapplicability of Strict Evidentiary Rules
written decision in the matter. The President shall possess
Strict legal evidentiary rules shall not apply during the
the authority to affirm, reverse, or modify the recommenda-
hearing. The chief panel member shall rule on the admissi-
tion of the hearing panel or to remand the matter to the
bility of disputed evidence with primary consideration given
panel for further proceedings or consideration. In the
to the relevance, reliability, and probative value of proffered
decision, the President may provide appropriate relief to the
evidence.
Complainant and may impose appropriate disciplinary
E. Witness Examination Procedure
action upon the Respondent. The decision of the President
shall be delivered to the parties and the hearing panel within
Each witness shall be directly examined by the party on
fifteen days from the date of the President’s receipt of the
whose behalf the witness has appeared to testify. Upon the
recommendation and case file from the hearing panel, unless
conclusion of the direct examination of each witness, the
the President is unavailable for a significant amount of time
opposing party shall be permitted the right of cross-
during this period.
examination. The chief panel member may permit re-direct
and re-cross examination. However, an identical examina-
E. Presidential Unavailability
tion procedure shall be utilized for all witnesses testifying in
The term “unavailable,” as utilized in this subsection and
a given hearing. Hearing panel members may interject
subsection X.D above, shall be defined to mean out of town,
questions at any time during the direct, cross, re-direct, or
medically incapacitated, or engaged in important CSM
re-cross examinations.
business to the extent that sufficient time cannot be devoted
IX. Post-Hearing Procedure
to decision making hereunder. If the President is unavail-
able for a significant period of time during the decision
A. Recommendation of the Hearing Panel
making period, a letter shall be sent to the parties advising
Within a reasonable time after the conclusion of the
them of that fact as well as the anticipated date of presiden-
hearing, the hearing panel shall confer among themselves
tial availability. In such event, the decision shall be due
and vote upon a recommended course of action. The panel
fifteen days from the date upon which the President
members holding a majority point of view shall designate
becomes available. The President shall be the sole judge of
one of their number to write a recommendation reflecting
presidential unavailability hereunder.
their opinion. The panel members holding a minority point
of view, if any, may issue a dissenting recommendation in a
F. Appeal of Presidential Decision
similar fashion.
There shall be no internal appeal from the final decision
of the President. A party aggrieved by the decision of the
B. Contents of Recommendation
President may file a complaint with the appropriate equal
The recommendation of the hearing panel shall include
opportunity enforcement agency or pursue other available
the following components:
legal remedies.
1. Statement Regarding Burden of Proof: A statement
Promulgated by the CSM Board of Trustees on March
regarding whether or not the hearing panel believes that the
13, 1992. Amended by the CSM Board of Trustees on June
burden of proof borne by the Complainant has been
10, 1999.
sustained;
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
151

Colorado School Of Mines
sion of the concept of sexual harassment is a factor in the
Sexual Harassment Policy and
offense, the Perpetrator can also be required to attend a
sexual harassment seminar or workshop.
Complaint Procedure
III. Persons Who May File a Complaint
I. Statement of Authority and Purpose
A sexual harassment complaint may be filed by an
This policy is promulgated by the Board of Trustees
individual described in one of the categories below:
pursuant to the authority conferred upon it by §23-41-
104(1), C.R.S. (1988 Repl. Vol.) in order to set forth a
A. Any person who believes that he or she has been
policy concerning sexual harassment at CSM. This policy
sexually harassed by a member of the CSM community,
shall supersede any previously promulgated CSM policy
including classified staff, exempt employees, and students;
which is in conflict herewith.
B. Any person who believes that he or she has been
II. Sexual Harassment Policy
threatened with or subjected to duress or retaliation by a
member of the CSM community as a result of (1) opposing
A. Definition of Sexual Harassment
any perceived sexual harassment; (2) filing a complaint
Sexual harassment consists of unwelcome sexual
hereunder; (3) representing a Complainant hereunder; or (4)
advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or
testifying, assisting, or participating in any manner in an
physical conduct of a sexual nature when (1) submission to
investigation, proceeding, hearing, or lawsuit involving
such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or
sexual harassment; or
condition of an individual’s employment or scholastic
endeavors; (2) submission to or rejection of such conduct by
C.The Human Resources Director or the Director of
an individual is used as the basis for employment or
Legal Services, if either of them deem it to be in the best
academic decisions affecting the individual; or (3) such
interest of CSM to do so.
conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfer-
IV.. Informal Complaint Resolution Process
ing with an individual’s work or school performance, or
At the request of an individual who has come forward
creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working or
with a sexual harassment complaint, hereinafter the
studying environment.
“Complainant,” the Director of Human Resources shall
B. Policy Statement
assist in an attempt to resolve the complaint in an informal
CSM wishes to foster an environment for its students
manner. Although verbal requests to proceed with the
and employees which is free from all forms of sexual
informal complaint resolution process will be honored,
harassment, sexual intimidation, and sexual exploitation.
complainants are strongly encouraged to put such requests
Accordingly, CSM will not tolerate sexual harassment and
in writing. The informal sexual harassment complaint
will take all necessary measures to deter such misconduct
resolution process shall consist of an informal discussion
and discipline violators of this policy with appropriate
between the Complainant and the individual accused of
sanctions. Furthermore, retaliation in any form against an
sexual harassment, hereinafter the “Respondent.” The
individual for reporting sexual harassment or cooperating in
Director of Human Resources shall act as a mediator during
a sexual harassment investigation is strictly prohibited. Such
this process, which shall be calculated to bring the com-
retaliation shall be dealt with as a separate instance of sexual
plaint to the attention of the Respondent and elicit the
harassment. The remainder of this policy shall contain a
voluntary cooperation of the Respondent in settling the
complaint procedure outlining a method for reporting
matter. By attempting to resolve the sexual harassment
alleged violations of this policy and a review mechanism for
complaint in an informal manner pursuant to the terms of
the impartial determination of the merits of complaints
this section, the Complainant shall not waive any rights to
alleging sexual harassment.
subsequently pursue the complaint through the formal
sexual harassment complaint procedure set forth below.
C. Sanctions for Sexual Harassment
Appropriate sanctions may be imposed upon an
V. Formal Complaint Procedure
employee or student who has sexually harassed another. The
A. Purpose
term Perpetrator shall be utilized herein to refer to such a
The purpose of the formal sexual harassment complaint
person. The sanctions may include one or more of the
procedure is to provide a formal mechanism for the prompt
following: verbal reprimand and warning, written reprimand
and fair internal resolution of complaints alleging sexual
and warning, student probation, suspension from registra-
harassment. The procedure outlined below shall be the
tion, monetary fine, suspension without pay, expulsion, or
exclusive forum for the internal resolution of sexual
termination. In determining appropriate sanctions for the
harassment complaints at CSM.
offense, the decision maker shall consider the severity of the
B. Where to file a Complaint
offense, aggravating and mitigating factors, and the
All complaints by non-students alleging sexual harass-
Perpetrator’s previous history of sexual harassment offenses.
ment or retaliation shall be lodged with the Human
If the decision maker concludes that a lack of comprehen-
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Undergraduate Bulletin
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Resources Office located on the second floor of
vice president in whose area the Respondent is employed or
Guggenheim Hall. Complaints by students alleging sexual
enrolled, and, if applicable, the Respondent’s immediate
harassment or retaliation may be submitted to the Human
supervisor. However, if the President is the Respondent, the
Resources Office, the Student Development Center, the
term CSM Management Personnel shall refer to the Board
Dean of Students, any faculty member, or any Resident
of Trustees, and if the Respondent is a vice president, the
Assistant. Any recipient of a student sexual harassment or
term “CSM Management Personnel” shall refer to the
retaliation complaint shall promptly forward such complaint
President.
to the Director of Human Resources for handling in
H. Acknowledgment of Complaint and Notification of
accordance with the provisions set forth below.
Respondent
C. Time Limits
As soon as practicable after being informed of the
A complaint may be lodged at any time, but CSM
complaint pursuant to subsection V.G above, the vice
strongly encourages individuals who feel they have been
president shall send a letter to the Complainant acknowledg-
victims of sexual harassment to come forward as soon as
ing receipt of the complaint. At the same time, the vice
possible after the occurrence of the incident, event, or other
president shall notify the Respondent of the complaint in
action alleged to constitute sexual harassment or retaliation.
writing, and if the complaint has been reduced to writing,
the vice president shall provide the Respondent with a copy
D. Contents of Complaint
thereof. If the President is the Respondent, the President of
Although a verbal sexual harassment complaint will be
the Board of Trustees shall perform the above duties. If the
investigated, complainants are strongly encouraged to
Respondent is a vice president, the President shall perform
submit sexual harassment complaints in writing. Written
these duties.
complaints must be signed and must set forth specific
factual matters believed to constitute sexual harassment or
I. Investigation Authorization Form
retaliation. The Complaint shall name as Respondent each
Unless the complaint is initiated by the Director of Legal
individual whom the Complainant believes to have
Services or the Director of Human Resources pursuant to
committed, participated in, or encouraged the sexual
subsection III.C above, the Complainant shall be required to
harassment or retaliation. The complaint shall also include
execute a Sexual Harassment Complaint Investigation
a brief statement describing the relief requested by the
Authorization Form prior to any investigation of the
Complainant.
complaint.
E. Fulfillment of Complaint Prerequisites
J. Investigation of Complaint
As soon as practicable after receipt of the complaint, the
The Director of Legal Services and the Director of
Director of Human Resources shall submit the complaint to
Human Resources shall jointly investigate the complaint by
the Director of Legal Services, who shall determine if the
examining relevant documents, if any, and interviewing
prerequisites outlined above have been fulfilled. If the
witnesses and other individuals designated by either party.
prerequisites have not been fulfilled, the Director of Legal
The investigators will strive to conduct the investigation in a
Services shall inform the Complainant of the specifics of
discrete and expeditious manner with due regard to
such determination in writing. The Complainant shall have
thoroughness and fairness to both parties.
the opportunity to correct any deficiencies and re-file the
K. Confidentiality of Investigative Materials
complaint. If the prerequisites have been fulfilled, the
All materials and documents prepared or compiled by the
complaint will be handled as set forth below.
investigators during the course of investigating a sexual
F. Choice of Remedies
harassment complaint hereunder shall be kept confidential
No Complainant shall be permitted to simultaneously file
to the fullest extent of the law in order to protect
an unlawful discrimination claim under the CSM Unlawful
interviewees and promote candor.
Discrimination Policy and a sexual harassment claim under
L. Alternate Investigators
the CSM Sexual Harassment Policy against the same
If either the Director of Legal Services or the Director of
individual arising out of an identical set of facts. In such a
Human Resources is the Complainant or the Respondent
situation, a Complainant shall be entitled to file his or her
hereunder, or is otherwise unavailable, the President shall
claim under either of these policies.
appoint an alternate investigator.
G. Notification of CSM Management Personnel
M. Report of Findings and Confidential Recommenda-
As soon as practicable after a determination has been
tion
made that the complaint is sufficient pursuant to subsection
As soon as practicable after the conclusion of the
V.E above, the Director of Legal Services shall notify CSM
investigation, the Director of Legal Services shall prepare
Management Personnel of the complaint and provide them
and submit a report of findings and a confidential recom-
with a copy thereof. For the purpose this policy, the term
mendation to CSM Management Personnel and the Director
CSM Management Personnel shall refer to the President, the
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
153

of Human Resources. The report of findings shall be
serious concern to CSM. Personal relationships which might
provided to the Complainant and Respondent within a
be appropriate in other circumstances always pose inherent
reasonable time following the issuance of a decision
dangers when they occur between an Instructor and a
pursuant to subsection V.N below. The confidential
Student, between a Person in a Position of Trust and a
recommendation shall not be released to the Complainant or
Student, and between a Supervisor and a Subordinate
the Respondent without written authorization from the
Employee. Although both parties to the relationship may
President. The Director of Human Resources shall submit a
have consented at the outset, such relationships are
separate recommendation to CSM Management Personnel
fundamentally asymmetric in nature. It is incumbent upon
which contains a statement of agreement or disagreement
those with authority not to abuse, nor appear to abuse, the
with the findings and recommendation of the Director of
power with which they are entrusted. Accordingly, codes of
Legal Services.
ethics promulgated by most professional regulatory
associations forbid professional-client amorous, romantic, or
N. Resolution of the Complaint
sexual relationships. The relationships prohibited by this
Following consultations with the President, the Director
policy shall be viewed in this context, and Instructors,
of Legal Services, and the Director of Human Resources,
Persons in Positions of Trust, and Supervisors should be
the vice president shall issue a final written decision
aware that any violation of this policy shall result in formal
regarding the complaint. The decision shall be addressed to
disciplinary action against them.
the Complainant and shall contain a statement of whether or
not sexual harassment was found to have occurred, the
III. Definitions
remedies to be provided to the Complainant, if any, and the
For the purposes of this policy, the following definitions
sanctions to be imposed upon the Respondent, if any. At
shall apply:
approximately the same time, the decision shall be commu-
A. Person in a Position of Trust: Any person occupy-
nicated to the Respondent in writing. If sanctions are to be
ing a position of trust with respect to one or more students
imposed upon the Respondent, the vice president shall also
at CSM such that engaging in an amorous, romantic, or
notify the Respondent of that aspect of the decision in
sexual relationship with any student would compromise the
writing. If the President is the Respondent, the President of
ability of the employee to perform his or her duties.
the Board of Trustees shall perform the above duties. If the
Examples of Persons in Positions of Trust at CSM are those
Respondent is a vice president, the President shall perform
employed in the Office of the Registrar, those employed in
these duties.
the Student Life Office, those employed in the Student
O. Appeal of Final Decision
Development Office, those employed in Public Safety,
There shall be no internal appeal from the final decision
resident assistants, and paper graders. The above examples
rendered pursuant to subsection V.N above. A party
are provided for illustrative purposes only and are not
aggrieved by the decision may file a complaint with the
intended to be exhaustive listings or to limit the illustrated
appropriate administrative agency or pursue other available
category in any manner.
legal remedies.
B. Instructor: Any person who teaches at CSM,
Promulgated by the CSM Board of Trustees on March
including academic faculty members, instructional staff, and
13, 1992. Amended by the CSM Board of Trustees on March
graduate students with teaching or tutorial responsibilities.
26, 1998. Amended by the CSM Board of Trustees on June
C. Student: Any person who is pursuing a course of
10, 1999.
study at CSM.
D. Subordinate Employee: Any person employed by
Colorado School of Mines Personal
CSM who is supervised by another employee.
Relationships Policy
E. Supervisor: Any person employed by CSM who
occupies a position of authority over another employee with
I. Statement of Authority and Purpose
regard to hiring, administering discipline, conducting
This policy is promulgated by the Board of Trustees
evaluations, granting salary adjustments, or overseeing task
pursuant to the authority conferred upon it by §23-41-
performance.
104(1), C.R.S. (1988 Repl. Vol.) in order to set forth a
policy concerning certain personal relationships at CSM as
IV. Policy
addressed herein. This policy shall supersede any previously
A. Personal Relations Between Instructors and Students
promulgated CSM policy which is in conflict herewith.
in the Instructional Context
II. Preface
No Instructor shall engage in an amorous, romantic, or
Certain amorous, romantic, or sexual relationships in
sexual relationship, consensual or otherwise, with a Student
which the parties appear to have consented, but where a
who is enrolled in a course being taught by the Instructor, or
definite power differential exists between them, are of
whose academic work is being supervised by the Instructor.
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1999-2000

B. Personal Relationships Between Instructors and
C. Personal Relationships Between Supervisors and
Students Outside the Instructional Context
Subordinate Employees
In a personal relationship between an Instructor and a
No Supervisor shall engage in an amorous, romantic, or
Student for whom the Instructor has no current professional
sexual relationship, consensual or otherwise, with a
responsibility, the Instructor should be sensitive to the
Subordinate Employee who reports, either directly or
constant possibility that he or she may unexpectedly be
indirectly, to the Supervisor or is under the Supervisor’s
placed in a position of responsibility for the instruction or
direct or indirect authority.
evaluation of the Student. This could entail a request to
D. Personal Relationships Between Persons in Positions
write a letter of recommendation for the Student or to serve
of Trust and Students
on an admissions or selection committee involving the
Student. In addition, an awareness should be maintained
No Person in a Position of Trust shall engage in an
that others may speculate that a specific power relationship
amorous, romantic, or sexual relationship, consensual or
exists even when none is present, giving rise to assumptions
otherwise, with a Student.
of inequitable academic or professional advantage of the
(Promulgated by the CSM Board of Trustees on
Student. Even if potential conflict of interest issues can be
February 14, 1992)
resolved, charges of sexual harassment may arise. In such
situations, it is the Instructor who, by virtue of his or her
special responsibility, shall be held accountable for
unprofessional behavior.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
155

Index
A
E
Absenteeism ...................................................................... 27
Economics and Business .......................................... 40, 80
Academic Advising .......................................................... 8
Encumbrances .................................................................. 17
Academic Calendar ................................................... 4, 31
Engineering ................................................................ 42, 82
Academic Probation ........................................................ 29
Engineering Practices Introductory Course Sequence ... 74
Academic Regulations ................................................... 26
Engineers’ Days ............................................................... 11
Access to Student Records .............................................. 30
English as a Second Language .......................................... 8
Accreditation .................................................................... 7
Environmental Health and Safety ................................. 133
Administration ................................................................... 7
Environmental Science and Engineering ................. 48, 87
Admission Procedures ................................................... 25
EPICS .................................................................. 31, 34, 74
Admission Requirements ............................................... 24
F
Advanced Placement ...................................................... 25
Family Housing ................................................................ 23
Affirmative Action ....................................................... 148
Fees ................................................................................... 15
AFROTC; Air Force ROTC ................................... 66,118
Field House ....................................................................... 71
Alumni Association ...................................................... 135
Financial Aid .................................................................... 19
Apartment Housing ........................................................ 23
Financial Aid Policies ...................................................... 22
Area of Special Interest .................................................. 35
Financial Responsibility .................................................. 17
Army ROTC ..................................................................... 65
Foreign Language Policy ............................................... 107
AROTC ......................................................................... 116
Foreign Languages ......................................................... 103
Arthur Lakes Library ................................................... 133
Fraternities ................................................................. 11, 23
B
G
Bachelor of Science Degree .......................................... 31
Geology and Geological Engineering ...................... 49, 89
Brooks Field ................................................................... 71
Geophysics ................................................................. 52, 93
C
Grade Appeal Process ...................................................... 28
Career Center .................................................................... 9
Grade-Point Averages ...................................................... 28
Centers and Institutes ................................................... 128
Grades ............................................................................... 27
Change of Catalog .......................................................... 31
Graduation Awards ........................................................... 29
Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining ..... 35, 75
Graduation Requirements ................................................ 32
Chemistry and Geochemistry .................................. 37, 77
Green Center ................................................................... 134
Codes of Conduct ........................................................... 10
Guy T. McBride, Jr. Honors Program in Public Affairs ....
Communication ............................................................ 105
.......................................................................... 34, 104
Computing and Networking .......................................... 133
Gymnasium ....................................................................... 71
Computing Center .......................................................... 133
H
Copy Center .................................................................. 134
History of CSM .................................................................. 6
Core Curriculum ............................................................. 33
Homecoming .................................................................... 11
Counseling ........................................................................ 8
Honor Roll ........................................................................ 28
Course Withdrawals ....................................................... 26
Honor Societies ................................................................ 12
Curriculum Changes ...................................................... 31
Housing ............................................................................. 16
D
Humanities ........................................................................ 96
Dean’s List ........................................................................ 28
I
Declaration of Option ...................................................... 26
Identification Cards ............................................................ 9
Deficiencies ...................................................................... 26
Incomplete Grade. ............................................................ 27
Dining Facilities ............................................................... 23
Independent Study ............................................................ 27
Directory of the School .................................................. 136
Institutional Goals ............................................................ 32
Distributed Core ............................................................... 75
Intercollegiate Athletics .......................................... 71, 124
INTERLINK ....................................................................... 8
International Day .............................................................. 11
International Student Affairs ............................................. 8
International Student Organizations ............................... 12
International Students ...................................................... 25
Intramural Sports .............................................................. 71
156
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000

L
Q
LAIS Writing Center ....................................... 31, 34, 133
Quality Hours and Quality Points ................................... 28
Late Payment Penalties .................................................... 17
R
Leave of Absence ............................................................. 27
Recreational Organizations .............................................. 12
Liberal Arts and International Studies ..................... 55, 96
Refunds ...................................................................... 17, 22
Living Groups ................................................................... 11
Research Development and Services ............................ 134
M
Residence Halls ................................................................ 23
Materials Science ........................................................... 106
Residency Qualifications ................................................. 18
Mathematical and Computer Sciences ................... 59, 108
S
McBride Honors Program in Public Affairs .......................
Scholarships ...................................................................... 19
.......................................................................... 34, 104
Semester Hours. ................................................................ 28
Medical Record ................................................................ 26
Sexual Harassment Policy ............................................. 152
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering .............. 62, 112
Social Sciences ................................................................. 99
Military Ball ..................................................................... 11
Sororities .................................................................... 11, 23
Military Science ...................................................... 65, 116
Special Programs and Continuing Education (SPACE)134
Mines Park ........................................................................ 23
Student Center .................................................................... 8
Mining Engineering ................................................ 67, 119
Student Development and Academic Services ................. 8
Minor Program ................................................................. 35
Student Government ........................................................ 11
Minority Engineering Program ....................................... 10
Student Health Center ........................................................ 9
Mission and Goals .............................................................. 5
Student Honors ................................................................. 13
Motor Vehicles ................................................................... 9
Student Publications ........................................................ 10
Music ............................................................................... 106
Student Records ................................................................ 30
N
Student/Parent Day ........................................................... 11
Navy ROTC ...................................................................... 65
Study Abroad ........................................................... 22, 35
NC Grade .......................................................................... 28
Suspension ........................................................................ 29
Nondegree Students ......................................................... 25
Systems ...................................................................... 74, 99
O
T
Office of International Programs .............................. 8, 133
Telecommunications Center .......................................... 135
Office of Women in Science, Engineering and Mathematics
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) .......... 25
.................................................................................. 10
Transfer Credit .................................................................. 26
Outdoor Recreation Program ........................................... 13
Transfer Students .............................................................. 24
P
Tuition ............................................................................... 15
Tutoring ............................................................................. 10
Parking .............................................................................. 9
Part-Time Degree Students .............................................. 31
U
Payments and Refunds ..................................................... 17
Undergraduate Degree Requirements ............................. 31
Personal Relationships Policy ....................................... 154
Undergraduate Programs ................................................. 32
Petroleum Engineering ........................................... 68, 121
Unlawful Discrimination Policy .................................... 148
Physical Education and Athletics ........................... 71, 124
Use of English .................................................................. 31
Physics ..................................................................... 72, 125
V
Private Rooms .................................................................. 23
Veterans ............................................................................. 26
Probation ........................................................................... 29
Veterans Counseling ......................................................... 10
Professional Societies ...................................................... 12
Progress Grade. ................................................................ 27
W
Public Affairs .................................................................. 134
Winter Carnival ................................................................ 11
Withdrawal from School .................................................. 18
Writing Across the Curriculum ....................................... 34
Writing Center, LAIS ...................................... 31, 34, 133
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
1999-2000
157