UNDERGRADUATE BULLETIN
Color a do School of Mines
2006 –2007

Colorado
School of Mines
2006–2007
Undergraduate Bulletin

To CSM Students:
This Bulletin is for your use as a source of continuing reference. Please save it.
Published by Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401
Address correspondence to: Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401
Main Telephone: 303-273-3000 Toll Free: 1-800-446-9488
Inquiries to Colorado School of Mines should be directed as follows:
Admissions: Bruce Goetz, Director of Admissions, admit@mines.edu
Student Housing: Bob Francisco, Director of Student Life
Financial Aid: Roger Koester, Director of Financial Aid
2
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Contents
Academic Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Geology and Geological Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Section 1–Welcome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Oceanography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Mission and Goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Geophysics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
The Academic Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Liberal Arts and International Studies. . . . . . . . . . . 86
Student Honor Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Mathematical and Computer Sciences. . . . . . . . . . 98
History of CSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering. . . . . . . . 106
Unique Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Mining Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Petroleum Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Accreditation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Bioengineering and Life Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Section 2–Student Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Energy Minor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Materials Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
McBride Honors Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Military Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Student Honors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Physical Education and Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Section 3–Tuition, Fees, Financial
Section 6–Research Centers and Institutes . . 146
Assistance, Housing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Section 7–Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
Tuition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Arthur Lakes Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Academic Computing and Networking . . . . . . . . . 152
Descriptions of Fees and Other Charges . . . . . . . . 15
Copy Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
Housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
CSM Alumni Association. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
Payments and Refunds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Environmental Health and Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Residency Qualifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Green Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
College Opportunity Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
INTERLINK Language Center (ESL) . . . . . . . . . . 153
Financial Aid and Scholarships. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
LAIS Writing Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Financial Aid Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Off-Campus Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Section 4–Living Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Office of International Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Residence Halls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Office of Technology Transfer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Dining Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Women in Science, Engineering and
Mines Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Mathematics (WISEM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Fraternities, Sororities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Public Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Private Rooms, Apartments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Research Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Section 5–Undergraduate Information . . . . . . . 22
Special Programs and Continuing Education
Undergraduate Bulletin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
(SPACE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Admission Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Telecommunications Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Admission Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Directory of the School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Academic Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Policies and Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
Undergraduate Grading System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Affirmative Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
Academic Probation and Suspension. . . . . . . . . . . 28
Unlawful Discrimination Policy and Complaint
Access to Student Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Sexual Harassment Policy and Complaint
Curriculum Changes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Undergraduate Degree Requirements . . . . . . . . . . 32
Personal Relationships Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Undergraduate Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Course Numbering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Student Life. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
The Core Curriculum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Core Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Distributed Core . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Combined Undergraduate/Graduate Programs . . . 37
Chemical Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Chemistry and Geochemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Economics and Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Environmental Science and Engineering . . . . . . . . 68
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
3

Academic Calendar
Fall Semester 2006
Confirmation deadline. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aug. 21, Monday
Faculty Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aug. 21, Monday
Classes start (1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aug. 22, Tuesday
Graduate Students—last day to register without late fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aug. 27, Sunday
Labor Day (Classes held) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sept. 4, Monday
Last day to register, add or drop courses without a “W” (Census Day). . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sept. 6, Wednesday
Fall Break Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oct. 16, Monday
Midterm grades due . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oct. 16, Monday
Last day to withdraw from a course—Continuing students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oct. 31, Tuesday
Priority Registration Spring Semester . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nov. 13-17, Monday–Friday
Thanksgiving Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nov. 23 –Nov. 26, Thursday–Sunday
Last day to withdraw from a course—New students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 1, Friday
Classes end. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 7, Thursday
Dead Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 8, Friday
Graduating students’ lowest possible grades due . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 12, Tuesday
Final exams. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 9, 11-14 , Saturday, Monday–Thursday
Semester ends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 15, Friday
Midyear Degree Convocation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 15, Friday
Final grades due. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 18, Monday
Winter Recess . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 16 –Jan. 9, Saturday–Tuesday
Spring Semester 2007
Confirmation deadline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jan. 9, Tuesday
Classes start (1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jan. 10, Wednesday
Grad Students—last day to register without late fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jan. 14, Sunday
Last day to register, add or drop courses without a “W” (Census Day) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jan. 25, Thursday
Midterms grades due. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 5, Monday
Spring Break. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 10-18, Saturday–Sunday
Last day to withdraw from a course . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 28, Tuesday
All students except new students & 2nd semester freshmen
E-Days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 5-7, Thursday–Saturday
Priority Registration, Field, Summer and Fall Term. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 9-13, Monday–Friday
Last day to withdraw from a course—new students & 2nd semester freshmen . . . . . . . . . . April 27, Friday
Classes end. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 3, Thursday
Dead Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 4, Friday
Graduating students’ lower possible grades due . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 8, Tuesday
Final exams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 5, May 6-10 Saturday, Monday–Thursday
Semester ends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 11, Friday
Commencement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 11, Friday
Final grades due . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 14, Monday
Field/Summer Sessions 2007
First Field Term First Day of Class, Registration (1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 14, Monday
Last day to register, add or drop courses without a “W”—Field Term (Census Day) . . . . . . May 18, Friday
Memorial Day (Holiday—No classes held). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 28, Monday
Last day to withdraw from First Field Term. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 8, Friday
First Field Term ends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 22, Friday
Field Term grades due . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 25, Monday
Summer School First Day of Class, Registration (1). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 18, Monday
Last day to register, add or drop courses without a “W”—Summer School . . . . . . . . . . . . June 26, Tuesday
(Census Day)
Independence Day (Holiday—No classes held) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 4, Wednesday
Second Field Term begins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 9, Monday
Last day to register, add or drop courses without a “W”—Second Field Term . . . . . . . . . . . July 13, Friday
Last day to withdraw from Summer School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 13, Friday
Last day to withdraw from Second Field Term . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . August 3, Friday
Summer School ends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aug. 10, Friday
Summer School grades due . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aug. 13, Monday
Second Field Term ends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aug. 17, Friday
Second Field Term grades due . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aug. 20, Monday
(1) Petition for changes in tuition classification due in the Registrar’s office for this term.
4
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Section 1 – Welcome
Mission and Goals
The Colorado School of Mines is consequently committed
Colorado School of Mines is a public research university
to serving the people of Colorado, the nation, and the global
devoted to engineering and applied science related to
community by promoting stewardship of the Earth upon
resources. It is one of the leading institutions in the nation
which all life and development depend. (Colorado School of
and the world in these areas. It has the highest admission
Mines Board of Trustees, 2000)
standards of any university in Colorado and among the high-
The Academic Environment
est of any public university in the U.S. CSM has dedicated
We strive to fulfill this educational mission through our
itself to responsible stewardship of the earth and its resources.
undergraduate curriculum and in an environment of commit-
It is one of a very few institutions in the world having broad
ment and partnership among students and faculty. The com-
expertise in resource exploration, extraction, production and
mitment is directed at learning, academic success and
utilization which can be brought to bear on the world’s press-
professional growth, it is achieved through persistent intel-
ing resource-related environmental problems. As such, it
lectual study and discourse, and it is enabled by professional
occupies a unique position among the world’s institutions of
courtesy, responsibility and conduct. The partnership invokes
higher education.
expectations for both students and faculty. Students should
The school’s role and mission has remained constant and
expect access to high quality faculty and to appropriate aca-
is written in the Colorado statutes as: The Colorado School of
demic guidance and counseling; they should expect access to
Mines shall be a specialized baccalaureate and graduate re-
a high quality curriculum and instructional programs; they
search institution with high admission standards. The Colo-
should expect to graduate within four years if they follow the
rado School of Mines shall have a unique mission in energy,
prescribed programs successfully; and they should expect to
mineral, and materials science and engineering and associ-
be respected as individuals in all facets of campus activity
ated engineering and science fields. The school shall be the
and should expect responsive and tactful interaction in their
primary institution of higher education offering energy, min-
learning endeavors. Faculty should expect participation and
eral and materials science and mineral engineering degrees
dedication from students, including attendance, attentiveness,
at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. (Colorado re-
punctuality and demonstrable contribution of effort in the
vised Statutes, Section 23-41-105)
learning process; and they should expect respectful interac-
Throughout the school’s history, the translation of its mis-
tion in a spirit of free inquiry and orderly discipline. We be-
sion into educational programs has been influenced by the
lieve that these commitments and expectations establish the
needs of society. Those needs are now focused more clearly
academic culture upon which all learning is founded.
than ever before. We believe that the world faces a crisis in
CSM offers the bachelor of science degree in Chemical
balancing resource availability with environmental protection
Engineering, Chemistry, Economics, Engineering, Engi-
and that CSM and its programs are central to the solution to
neering Physics, Geological Engineering, Geophysical
that crisis. Therefore the school’s mission is elaborated upon
Engineering, Mathematical and Computer Sciences, Metal-
as follows:
lurgical and Material Engineering, Mining Engineering, and
Colorado School of Mines is dedicated to educating stu-
Petroleum Engineering. A pervasive institutional goal for all
dents and professionals in the applied sciences, engineering,
of these programs is articulated in the Profile of the Colorado
and associated fields related to
School of Mines Graduate:
uthe discovery and recovery of the Earth’s resources,
uAll CSM graduates must have depth in an area of special-
utheir conversion to materials and energy,
ization, enhanced by hands-on experiential learning, and
utheir utilization in advanced processes and products,
breadth in allied fields. They must have the knowledge and
and
skills to be able to recognize, define and solve problems
uthe economic and social systems necessary to ensure
by applying sound scientific and engineering principles.
their prudent and provident use in a sustainable global
These attributes uniquely distinguish our graduates to bet-
society.
ter function in increasingly competitive and diverse techni-
cal professional environments.
This mission will be achieved by the creation, integration,
and exchange of knowledge in engineering, the natural sci-
uGraduates must have the skills to communicate informa-
ences, the social sciences, the humanities, business and their
tion, concepts and ideas effectively orally, in writing, and
union to create processes and products to enhance the qual-
graphically. They must be skilled in the retrieval, interpre-
ity of life of the world’s inhabitants.
tation and development of technical information by various
means, including the use of computer-aided techniques.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
5

uGraduates should have the flexibility to adjust to the ever
History of CSM
changing professional environment and appreciate diverse
In 1865, only six years after gold and silver were discov-
approaches to understanding and solving society’s prob-
ered in the Colorado Territory, the fledgling mining industry
lems. They should have the creativity, resourcefulness, re-
was in trouble. The nuggets had been picked out of streams
ceptivity and breadth of interests to think critically about a
and the rich veins had been worked. New methods of explo-
wide range of cross-disciplinary issues. They should be pre-
ration, mining and recovery were needed. A number of men
pared to assume leadership roles and possess the skills and
with names like Loveland, Berthoud, Arthur Lakes, George
attitudes which promote teamwork and cooperation and to
West and the Episcopal Bishop Randall proposed a school of
continue their own growth through life-long learning.
mines. In 1874 the Territorial Legislature passed an appropri-
uGraduates should be capable of working effectively in an
ation of $5,000 and commissioned W.A.H. Loveland and a
international environment, and be able to succeed in an in-
Board of Trustees to found the Territorial School of Mines in
creasingly interdependent world where borders between
or near Golden. Governor Routt signed the Bill on February
cultures and economies are becoming less distinct. They
9, 1874. With the achievement of statehood in 1876, the
should appreciate the traditions and languages of other cul-
Colorado School of Mines was constitutionally established.
tures, and value diversity in their own society.
The first diploma was awarded in 1882.
uGraduates should exhibit ethical behavior and integrity.
As CSM grew, its mission expanded. From a rather narrow
They should also demonstrate perseverance and have pride
initial focus on nonfuel minerals, it developed programs as
in accomplishment. They should assume a responsibility to
well in petroleum production and refining. More recently it
enhance their professions through service and leadership
has expanded into the fields of materials science and engi-
and should be responsible citizens who serve society, par-
neering, energy and environmental engineering, and eco-
ticularly through stewardship of the environment.
nomics as well as a broader range of engineering and applied
Student Honor Code
science disciplines. CSM sees its mission as education and
research in engineering and applied science with a special
Preamble: The students of Colorado School of Mines
focus on the earth science disciplines in the context of re-
(Mines) have adopted the following Student Honor Code
sponsible stewardship of the earth and its resources.
(Code) in order to establish a high standard of student behav-
ior at Mines. The Code may only be amended through a stu-
CSM has always had an international reputation in re-
dent referendum supported by a majority vote of the Mines
source fields. Graduates have come from nearly every nation
student body. Mines students shall be involved in the en-
in the world and alumni can be found in nearly every nation.
forcement of the Code through their participation in the Stu-
The student body was predominantly white male for many
dent Judicial Panel.
years, reflecting the demographics of the industries it served.
Code: Mines students believe it is our responsibility to pro-
The School gave one of the early engineering degrees for
mote and maintain high ethical standards in order to ensure
women to Florence Caldwell in 1897 but there were many
our safety, welfare, and enjoyment of a successful learning
subsequent years when there were no female students. This has
environment. Each of us, under this Code, shall assume re-
changed and today approximately 23% of the overall student
sponsibility for our behavior in the area of academic integrity.
body are women and 14% of the undergraduates are under-
represented minorities, thanks to strong recruiting efforts and
As a Mines student, I am expected to adhere to the highest
the opening up of traditionally white male industries.
standards of academic excellence and personal integrity
regarding my schoolwork, exams, academic projects, and
Unique Programs
research endeavors. I will act honestly, responsibly, and
Colorado School of Mines is an institution of engineering
above all, with honor and integrity in all aspects of my aca-
and applied science with a special focus in Earth, Energy,
demic endeavors at Mines. I will not misrepresent the work
Environment and Materials. As such, it has unique programs
of others as my own, nor will I give or receive unauthorized
in many fields. This is the only institution in the world, for
assistance in the performance of academic coursework. I will
example, that offers doctoral programs in all five of the
conduct myself in an ethical manner in my use of the library,
major earth science disciplines: Geology and Geological En-
computing center, and all other school facilities and resources.
gineering, Geophysics, Geochemistry, Mining Engineering
By practicing these principles, I will strive to uphold the
and Petroleum Engineering. It has one of the few Metallurgi-
principles of integrity and academic excellence at Mines. I
cal and Materials Engineering programs in the country that
will not participate in or tolerate any form of discrimination
still focuses on the complete materials cycle from mineral
or mistreatment of another individual.
processing to finished advanced materials.
6
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

In addition to these traditional programs which define the
Accreditation
institutional focus, the school is pioneering programs in inter-
Colorado School of Mines is accredited through the doc-
disciplinary areas. One of the most successful of these is the
toral degree by the Higher Learning Commission (HLC) of
Engineering Division program, which currently claims more
the North Central Association, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite
than one-third of the undergraduate majors. This program
2400, Chicago, Illinois 60602-2504 – telephone (312) 263-
combines civil, electrical, environmental and mechanical
0456. The Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Ac-
engineering in a nontraditional curriculum that is accredited
creditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET),
by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accred-
111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 –
itation Board for Engineering and Technology, 111 Market
telephone (410) 347-7700, accredits undergraduate degree
Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 – telephone
programs in Chemical Engineering, Engineering, Engineer-
(410) 347-7700. Another, at the graduate level, is the Master
ing Physics, Geological Engineering, Geophysical Engineer-
of International Political Economy of Resources. Such pro-
ing, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Mining
grams serve as models at CSM.
Engineering and Petroleum Engineering. The American
While many of the programs at CSM are firmly grounded
Chemical Society has approved the degree program in the
in tradition, they are all experiencing continual evolution and
Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry.
innovation. Recent successes in integrating aspects of the
Administration
curriculum have spurred similar activity in other areas such
as the geosciences. There, through the medium of computer
General management of the School is vested by State
visualization, geophysicists and geologists are in the process
statute in a Board of Trustees, consisting of seven members
of creating a new emerging discipline. A similar development
appointed by the governor. A non-voting student member is
is occurring in geo-engineering through the integration of
elected annually by the student body. Financial support
aspects of civil engineering, geology and mining. CSM has
comes from student tuition and fees and from the State
played a leadership role in this kind of innovation over the
through annual appropriations. These funds are augmented
last decade. Many degree programs offer CSM undergradu-
by government and privately sponsored research, private gift
ate students the opportunity to begin work on a Graduate
support from alumni, corporations, foundations and other
Certificate, Professional Master’s Degree, or Master’s De-
friends.
gree while completing the requirements for their Bachelor’s
Degree. These combined Bachelors-Masters programs have
been created by CSM faculty in those situations where they
have deemed it academically advantageous to treat BS and
MS degree programs as a continuous and integrated process.
These are accelerated programs that can be valuable in fields
of engineering and applied science where advanced educa-
tion in technology and/or management provides the opportu-
nity to be on a fast track for advancement to leadership
positions. These programs also can be valuable for students
who want to get a head start on graduate education.
Location
Golden, Colorado has been the home for CSM since its in-
ception. Located 20 minutes west of Denver, this community
of 15,000 is located in the foothills of the Rockies. Skiing is
an hour away to the west. Golden is a unique community that
serves as home to CSM, the Coors Brewing Company, the
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, a major U.S. Geo-
logical Survey facility that also contains the National Earth-
quake Center, and the seat of Jefferson County. Golden once
served as the territorial capital of Colorado.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
7

Section 2- Student Life
Facilities
materials for checkout, and is home to CSM’s Engineers
Student Center
Choosing Health Options (ECHO), promoting wise and
The Ben H. Parker Student Center has recently undergone
healthy decision making regarding students’ use of alcohol
a four million dollar renovation and addition. The building
and other drugs.
contains the offices for the Vice President of Student Life and
Counseling: Experienced, professional counselors offer
Dean of Students, the Director of Student Life, Housing,
assistance in a variety of areas. Personal counseling for
Conferences Reservation Office, Student Activities and
stress management, relationship issues, wellness education
Greek Advisor, ASCSM Offices, and Student Groups. The
and/or improved self image are a few of the areas often
Student Center also contains the student dining hall, the
requested. Gender issues, personal security, and compati-
I-Club, a food court, game room, bookstore, and student
bility with roommates are also popular interactive presenta-
lounges and TV room. There are also a number of meeting
tions. SDAS works closely with other student life depart-
rooms and banquet facilities in the Student Center. Another
ments to address other issues.
addition was completed during the summer of 2001 which
Academic Services: The staff often conducts workshops
contains meeting rooms and banquet facilities as well as the
in areas of interest to college students, such as time manage-
Admissions, Financial Aid and Registrar’s Offices, Career
ment, learning skills, test taking, preparing for finals and
Services, International Student Services, the Cashier’s Office,
college adjustment. Advising on individual learning skills is
and Student Development and Academic Support Services.
also available.
Services
Tutoring and Academic Excellence Workshops: Free
Academic Advising
walk-in tutoring is available to all CSM students for most
Freshmen are advised under the Freshman Mentor
freshmen and sophomore courses. Tutoring in some upper
Program, designed
division courses is available. Weekly academic excellence
uto ease the transition from high school or work to college,
workshops in introductory calculus, chemistry, and physics
uto provide quality academic advising,
are provided as well.
uto provide a resource/contact person for critical periods
International Student Affairs
during the freshman year, and
International student advising and international student
uto give students an opportunity to get to know a cam-
services are the responsibility of International Student and
pus professional.
Scholar Services, located in the Student Center. The Inter-
Each mentor, who is a member of the faculty or profes-
national Student and Scholar Services Office coordinates the
sional staff, advises approximately 10 students. Undecided
Host Family Program. Orientation programs for new inter-
transfer students are advised by the Admissions Office dur-
national students are held at the beginning of each semester.
ing their first year. Upper class students and transfer students
Visas and work permits are processed through the Inter-
who have declared a major are advised by an advisor in their
national Student Advisor at the International Student and
option department.
Scholar Services Office.
Questions concerning work in a particular course should
Office of International Programs/Study Abroad
be discussed with the course instructor. General academic
The Office of International Programs (OIP), a program in
program scheduling and planning questions can be answered
Academic Affairs located in Stratton Hall, room 109, devel-
by the student’s advisor or mentor. The advisor’s or mentor’s
ops international opportunities for students and faculty at
signature is required on the early registration form filed by
CSM, including study abroad programs. For information
every student. A student meets with the mentor or advisor
about the international activities of OIP, see p. 111.
before registration. An advising hold is placed on the student
Identification Cards (BLASTER CARD)
before registration until the student’s advisor clears the
Blaster cards are made in the Student Life Office in the
advising hold.
Parker Student Center, and all new students must have a card
Office for Student Development and Academic
made as soon as possible after they enroll. Each semester
Services
the Student Activities Office issues validation stickers for
The Student Development and Academic Services Office
student ID’s, and students can replace lost, stolen, or dam-
(SDAS), located in the Student Center, serves as the per-
aged Blaster Cards for a small fee.
sonal, academic and career counseling center. Through its
The Blaster Card can be used as a debit card to make
various services, the center acts as a comprehensive resource
purchases from all campus vending machines, at all campus
for the personal growth and life skills development of our
food service facilities, at the campus bookstore, to use any
students. SDAS houses a library of over 300 books and other
campus laundry facility as well as any campus copying
8
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

machine, to check material out of the CSM Library and to
personal job search advice. A small library of directories and
make purchases at the campus residence halls and may be
other job search materials is available for check-out. Many
required to attend various CSM campus activities.
workshops are offered throughout the year on job search
Please visit the website at http://www.is.mines.edu/
topics, and video-taped practice interviewing is available.
BlasterCard for more information.
The Career Center sponsors a Career Day each fall and
Student Health Center
spring to allow students to explore career options with
The Student Health Center, located at 17th and Elm, pro-
exhibiting employers. A Shadowing Program is available for
vides primary health care to CSM students and their spouses.
students who wish to visit a local professional in order to
Students pay a $45 fee each semester which entitles them to
clarify career goals. For students undecided about which
unlimited visits with a physician or nurse as well as pre-
engineer or science career to pursue, career counseling is
scription and over the counter medications. The health center
provided.
also provides wellness education, immunizations, allergy
The Cooperative Education Program is available to stu-
shots, flu shots, nutrition counseling and information regard-
dents who have completed three semesters at CSM (two for
ing a wide range of health concerns. Staff members are also
transfer students). It is an academic program which offers 3
available to provide health-promotion events for students
hours of credit in the major for engineering work experience,
groups and residence hall program. The Students Health
awarded on the basis of a term paper written following the
Center is open Monday through Friday 8-12 and 1-4:45 P.M.
CO-OP term. The type of credit awarded depends on the
It is staffed by RN’s throughout the day. Physicians coverage
decision of the department, but in most cases is additive
is provided by family practice physicians who are on site for
credit. CO-OP terms usually extend from May to December,
two hours daily and on-call at all times.
or from January to August, and usually take a student off
Dental services are also provided at the Student Health
campus full time. Part-time CO-OP is also possible if a stu-
Center. These services are provided by a dentist who has
dent is working 20 hours per week for several semesters.
scheduled hours two days per week four hours per day.
Students must register for CO-OP while on the job (a no
Basic services such as x-rays, cleanings, fillings and extrac-
credit, no fee class), and must write learning objectives and
tions are available.
sign informal contracts with their company’s representative
to ensure the educational component of the work experience.
To be eligible for care, students must be enrolled in four or
more hours; have paid the Health Center fee if they are part
Full-time, part-time, summer and CO-OP jobs are publi-
time and have a completed Health History Form on file at the
cized in the Career Center as well as on bulletin boards
Health Center. Supervised by Vice President and Dean of
around the campus. Students are often contacted by the
Student Life. Phone: (303) 273-3381; FAX: (303) 279-3155.
Career Center regarding specific opportunities, and resumes
are sent by the Center directly to employers. CSM graduates
Motor Vehicles Parking
are eligible for the services of the Career Center for 18
All students are permitted to bring motor vehicles on
months after graduation. Information on starting salaries,
campus but they must be registered with CSM Public Safety.
summer salaries, job search success rates, and other topics is
Regulations for parking may be obtained from CSM Public
collected and available through the Center.
Safety. Some parking space is restricted, and this must be
observed.
Standards, Codes of Conduct
Every fall, each student is supplied with a Student
Career Center (Placement and Cooperative
Handbook that lists all School regulations governing con-
Education)
duct, including discrimination, alcoholic beverages, drugs,
The Career Center assists and advises students in their
academic dishonesty, and distribution of literature, as well as
search for engineering-related employment. Each year indus-
the process for filing a complaint. Anyone having additional
try and government representatives visit the campus to inter-
questions concerning these regulations should contact the
view students and explain employment opportunities. Fall is
Dean of Students.
the major recruiting season for both summer and full-time
positions, but interviews take place in the spring as well.
Student Publications
Students must be registered with the Career Center in order
Two student publications are published at CSM by the
to interview, which is accomplished by submitting resumes
Associated Students of CSM. Opportunities abound for
and signing a card giving the Center permission to dissemi-
students wishing to participate on the staffs.
nate student materials.
The Oredigger is the student newspaper, published weekly
A Career Manual is available to students to help in resume
during the school year. It contains news, features, sports,
writing, interviewing and off-campus job search. Staff mem-
letters and editorials of interest to students, faculty, and the
bers offer individual critiques of resumes and letters, and
Golden community.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
9

The literary magazine, High Grade, is published each
The American Indian Science and Engineering Society
semester. Contributions of poetry, short stories, drawings, and
(AISES) chapter was established at the Colorado School
photographs are encouraged from students, faculty and staff.
of Mines in 1992. It is a peer support group for Native
A Board of Student Publications acts in an advisory capacity
American students pursuing science and engineering
to the publications staffs and makes recommendations on
careers. Its main goal is to help the students get through
matters of policy. The Public Affairs Department staff mem-
college so they can then use those new skills to create a
bers serve as daily advisors to the staffs of the Oredigger and
better life for themselves and other Native Americans.
Prospector. The Division of Liberal Arts and International
Asian Students Association (ASA) - This is a branch of the
Studies provides similar service to the High Grade.
Minority Engineering Program which acknowledges the
Veterans Counseling
Asian heritage by involvement in various school activities,
The Registrar’s Office provides veterans counseling serv-
social activities, and activities with the other Minority
ices for students attending the School and using educational
Engineering chapters. ASA allows students with an Asian
benefits from the Veterans Administration.
heritage or students interested in Asian heritage to assem-
Tutoring
ble and voice shared interests and associate in organized
Individual tutoring in most courses is available through
group activities which include attending Nuggets games,
the Office for Student Development and Academic Services.
bowling, ice skating and numerous other activities.
This office also sponsors group tutoring sessions and Aca-
National Society of Black Engineers - NSBE is a non-
demic Excellence Workshops which are open to all interested
profit organization managed by students. It was founded
CSM students. For more information about services and eli-
to promote the recruitment, retention and successful
gibility requirements, contact the Student Development and
graduation of Black and other under-represented groups
Academic Services office.
in the field of engineering. NSBE operates through a
Office of Women in Science, Engineering and
university-based structure coordinated through regional
zones, and administered by the National Executive
Mathematics (WISEM)
Board. The local chapters, which are the center of NSBE
The WISEM office in Academic Affairs is located in 300
activity, create and conduct projects in the areas of pre-
Guggenheim Hall. The mission of WISEM is to enhance
college student interaction, university academic support
opportunities for women in science and engineering careers,
mechanisms and career guidance programs. “We instill
to increase retention of women at CSM, and to promote equi-
pride and add value to our members which causes them
ty and diversity in higher education. The office sponsors pro-
to want to give back to NSBE in order to produce a con-
grams for women students and faculty and produces the
tinuum of success.”
Chevron Lecture Series. For further information, contact:
Debra K. Lasich, Executive Director of Women in Science,
Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE) -
Engineering and Mathematics, Colorado School of Mines,
SHPE is a non-profit organization that exists for the
1500 Illinois, Golden, CO 80401-1869, or call (303) 273-
advancement of Hispanic engineering (sciences) students
3097.
to become professional engineers and scientists, to increase
the number of Hispanics entering into the field of engi-
Minority Engineering Program
neering, and to develop and implement programs benefit-
The Minority Engineering Program is located at 1112
ing Hispanics seeking to become engineers and scientists.
18th Street. The MEP meets the needs of minority students
Anyone interested in joining may do so. SHPE is a nation-
by providing various student services, summer programs,
al organization with student and professional chapters in
recruitment, academic/retention programs (academic advis-
nearly 100 cities across the country. The organization is
ing, academic excellence workshops, counseling, tutoring
divided into five regions representing 76 student chapters.
and peer study groups), professional/career development
The SHPE organization is governed by a National Board
(leadership workshops, career development, time manage-
of Directors which includes representatives from all
ment, study skills and national conferences), community
regions including two student representatives.
outreach and cultural and social activities.
Activities
Working through student professional societies—American
Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES), Asian
The Office of Student Activities coordinates the various
Student Association (ASA), National Society of Black
activities and student organizations on the Mines campus.
Engineers (NSBE), and Society of Hispanic Professional
Student government, professional societies, living groups,
Engineers (SHPE)— the Office of Minority Engineering
honor societies, interest groups and special events add a
Program is a center for minority student activities, and a place
balance to the academic side of the CSM community.
for students to become a community of scholars with common
Participants take part in management training, responsibility,
goals and objectives in a comfortable learning environment.
and leadership development. To obtain an up to date listing
10
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

of the recognized campus organizations or more information
Winter Carnival, sponsored by Blue Key, is an all-school
about any of these organizations, contact the Student
ski day held each year at one of the nearby ski slopes.
Activities office.
Living Groups
Student Government
Residence Hall Association (RHA) is a student-run organ-
Associated Students of CSM (ASCSM), is sanctioned by
ization developed to coordinate and plan activities for stu-
the Board of Trustees of the School. The purpose of
dents living in the Residence Halls. Its membership is repre-
ASCSM is, in part, to advance the interest and promote
sented by students from each hall floor. Officers are elected
the welfare of CSM and all of the students and to foster
each fall for that academic year.
and maintain harmony among those connected with or
Social Fraternities, Sororities
interested in the School, including students, alumni,
There are seven national fraternities and three national
faculty, trustees and friends.
sororities active on the CSM campus. Fraternities and
Through funds collected as student fees, ASCSM strives
Sororities offer the unique opportunity of leadership, service
to ensure a full social and academic life for all students
to one’s community, and fellowship. Greeks are proud of the
with its organizations, publications, and special events. As
number of campus leaders, athletes and scholars that come
the representative governing body of the students ASCSM
from their ranks. Additionally, the Greek social life provides
provides leadership and a strong voice for the student
a complement to the scholastic programs at Mines. Colorado
body, enforces policies enacted by the student body,
School of Mines chapters are
works to integrate the various campus organizations, and
Alpha Phi
promotes the ideals and traditions of the School.
Alpha Tau Omega
The Graduate Student Association was formed in 1991
Beta Theta Pi
and is recognized by CSM through the student govern-
Kappa Sigma
ment as the representative voice of the graduate student
Phi Gamma Delta
body. GSA’s primary goal is to improve the quality of
Pi Beta Phi
graduate education and offer academic support for gradu-
Sigma Alpha Epsilon
ate students.
Sigma Kappa
Sigma Nu
The Mines Activity Council serves ASCSM as the campus
Sigma Phi Epsilon
special events board. The majority of all student campus
events are planned by the MAC committees. These com-
Honor Societies
mittees are: Friday Afternoon Club (FAC), which pro-
Honor societies recognize the outstanding achievements of
vides comedians and other performing artists to the cam-
their members in the areas of scholarship, leadership, and
pus on most Fridays throughout the academic year;
service. Each of the CSM honor societies recognize different
Special Events which coordinates events such as the
achievements in our students. The Colorado School of Mines
annual Back to School Bashes, Discount Sport Nights at
honor societies, and their representative areas, are as follows:
Rockies or Avalanche Games, and one time specialty
Alpha Phi Omega - Service
entertainment; and E-Days and Homecoming.
Alpha Sigma Mu - Metals
Special Events
Blue Key - Service, Scholarship, Activities
Kappa Mu Epsilon. - Mathematics
Engineers' Days festivities are held each spring. The
Order of Omega
three day affair is organized entirely by students. Contests
Pi Epsilon Tau - Petroleum Engineering
are held in drilling, hand-spiking, mucking, oil-field
Tau Beta Pi - Engineering
olympics, and softball, just to name a few. Additional events
include a huge fireworks display, the awarding of scholar-
Interest Organizations
ships to outstanding Colorado high school seniors and an
Interest organizations meet the special and unique needs
Engineers’ Day concert.
of the CSM student body by providing co-curricular activi-
Homecoming weekend is one of the high points of the
ties in specific areas. These organizations are:
entire year’s activities. Events include a football rally and
Amnesty International
game, campus decorations, election of Homecoming queen
Anime Club
and beast, parade, burro race, and other contests.
Association of Geoscience Students (AGS)
Ballroom Dance
International Day is planned and conducted by the
Band
International Council. It includes exhibits and programs
Bioengineering Club
designed to further the cause of understanding among the
Campus Crusade for Christ
countries of the world. The international dinner and enter-
Capoeira Clubs
tainment have come to be one of the campus social events of
Choir
the year.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
11

CSM Ambassadors
Society of American Military Engineers (SAME)
Earthworks
Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE)
Fellowship of Christian Athletes
Society of Economics and Business
Fellowship of Christian Cowboys
Society of Economic Geologists (SEG)
High Grade
Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE)
Math Club
Society of Mining Engineers (SME)
Mines Little Theatre
Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE)
Non Traditional Students
Society of Physics Students (SPS)
Oredigger
Society of Student Geophysicists (SSG)
Prospector
Society of Women Engineers (SWE)
Students for Creative Anachronism
The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society of AIME
International Student Organizations
Recreational Organizations
The International Student Organizations provide the
The recreation organizations provide the opportunity, for
opportunity to experience a little piece of a different culture
students with similar interests to participate as a group in
while here at Mines, in addition to assisting the students
these recreational activities. Most of the recreational organi-
from that culture adjust to the Mines campus. These organi-
zations compete on both the local and regional levels at tour-
zations are:
naments throughout the year. These clubs are:
Chinese Student Association
Bicycle Club
International Student Organization
Bridge Club
Japanese Student Association
Caving Club
Kuwaiti Student Association
Cheerleading
Middle Eastern Student Association
Ice Hockey Club
Muslim Student Association
Kayak Club
Omani Student Association
Kendo Club
Taiwanese Student Association
Lacrosse Club
Professional Societies
Men’s Volleyball
Professional Societies are generally student chapters of the
Outdoor Club
national professional societies. As a student chapter, the pro-
Racquetball Club
fessional societies offer a chance for additional professional
Rugby Club
development outside the classroom through guest speakers,
Shooting Club
trips, and interactive discussions about the current activities
Ski Club/Team
in the profession. Additionally, many of the organizations
Tae Kwon Do Club
offer internship, fellowship and scholarship opportunities.
Ultimate Frisbee
The Colorado School of Mines chapters are as follows:
Water Polo Club
American Association of Drilling Engineers (AADE)
Willie Wonka Boarders
American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Women’s Soccer
American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE)
Outdoor Recreation Program
American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical & Petroleum
The Outdoor Recreation Program is housed at the Mines
Engineers (AIME)
Park Community Center. The Program teaches classes in
American Institute of Professional Geologists (AIPG)
outdoor activities; rents mountain bikes, climbing gear,
American Ceramic Society (Am. Cer. Soc.)
backpacking and other equipment; and sponsors day and
American Chemical Society
weekend activities such as camping, snowshoeing, rock
American Indian Science & Engineering Society (AISES)
climbing, and mountaineering.
American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
Student Honors
American Society of Metals (ASM International)
Awards are presented each year to members of the gradu-
American Welding Society
ating class and others in recognition of students who have
Asian Student Association (ASA)
maintained a superior scholastic record, who have distin-
Association of Engineering Geologists (AEG)
guished themselves in school activities, and who have done
Association of General Contractors (AGC)
exceptional work in a particular subject.
Institute of Electrical & Electronic Engineers (IEEE)
Robert F. Aldredge Memorial Award. A cash award, pre-
National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE)
sented in geophysics for the highest scholastic average in
geophysics courses.
12
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

American Institute of Chemists Award. A one year
Cecil H. Green Award. A gold medal given to the graduat-
membership, presented in chemistry and chemical engi-
ing senior in geophysical engineering, who in the opinion
neering for demonstrated scholastic achievement, leader-
of the Department of Geophysics, has the highest attain-
ship, ability, and character.
ment in the combination of scholastic achievement, per-
Robert A. Baxter Award. A cash award, given for meritori-
sonality, and integrity.
ous work in chemistry.
The Neal J. Harr Memorial Outstanding Student Award.
Charles N. Bell, 1906, Award. A Brunton transit is awarded
Provided by the Rocky Mountain Association of Geol-
for completing the course in mining to the student demon-
ogists, the award and rock hammer suitably engraved, pre-
strating the most progress in school work during each year.
sented in geology for scholastic excellence in the study of
geology with the aim of encouraging future endeavors in
The Brunton Award in Geology. A Brunton transit is
the earth sciences.
awarded in recognition of highest scholastic achievement
and interest in and enthusiasm for the science of geology.
Harrison L. Hays, ’31, Award. A cash award presented in
chemical and petroleum-refining for demonstrating by
Hon. D. W. Brunton Award. A Brunton transit, provided for
scholarship, personality, and integrity of character, the
by Mr. Brunton, is awarded for meritorious work in mining.
general potentialities of a successful industrial career.
The Leo Borasio Memorial Award. A plaque and cash
John C. Hollister Award. A cash award is presented to the
award presented each year to the outstanding junior in the
most deserving student in Geophysics and is not based
McBride Honors Program. Mr. Borasio was a 1950 gradu-
solely on academic performance.
ate of the School of Mines.
Robert M. Hutchinson Award for Excellence in Geological
Clark B. Carpenter Award. A cash award given to the
Mapping. An engraved Brunton Compass given in recog-
graduating senior in mining or metallurgy who, in the
nition of this phase of Geological Engineering.
opinion of the seniors in mining and metallurgy and the
professors in charge of the respective departments, is the
Henry W. Kaanta Award. A cash award and plaque is pre-
most deserving of this award.
sented to a graduating senior majoring in extractive metal-
lurgy or mineral processing for the outstanding paper
Clark B. Carpenter Research Award. A cash award pre-
written on a laboratory procedure or experimental process.
sented in honor of Professor Clark B. Carpenter to a stu-
dent or students, undergraduate or graduate, selected by the
Maryanna Bell Kafadar Humanities Award. The award is
Department of Metallurgical Engineering on the basis of
for the graduating senior who has excelled in the
scholastic ability and accomplishment. This award derives
Humanities.
from an endowment by Leslie E. Wilson, E.M., 1927.
Alan Kissock, 1912, Award. A cash award is presented in
Mary and Charles Cavanaugh Memorial Award. A cash
metallurgy for best demonstrating the capability for
award given in metallurgy based on scholarship, profes-
creativity and the ability to express it in writing.
sional activity, and participation in school activities.
George C. Marshall Award. A certificate, an official biog-
Colorado Engineering Council Award. A silver medal pre-
raphy of General Marshall and an expense paid trip to the
sented for excellence in scholarship, high integrity, and
National Security Conference sponsored by the Marshall
general engineering ability.
Foundation, is presented to the most outstanding ROTC
cadet who demonstrates those leadership and scholastic
Distinguished Military Graduate. Designated by the
qualities which epitomized the career of General Marshall.
ROTC professor of military science for graduating seniors
who possess outstanding qualities of leadership and high
Metallurgical Engineering Faculty Award. An engraved
moral character, and who have exhibited a definite apti-
desk set is presented from time to time by the faculty of
tude for and interest in military service.
the department to a graduating senior who, by participa-
tion in and contribution to campus life, and by academic
Dwight D. “Ike” Eisenhower Award. Provided for by Mr.
achievement, has demonstrated those characteristics of a
and Mrs. R. B. Ike Downing, $150 and a medal with
well-rounded graduate to which CSM aspires.
plaque is awarded to the outstanding ROTC cadet com-
missioned each year, based on demonstrated exemplary
Evan Elliot Morse Memorial Award. A cash award is pre-
leadership within the Corps of Cadets and academic
sented annually to a student in physics who, in the opinion
excellence in military science.
of the Physics Department faculty, has shown exceptional
competence in a research project.
Prof. Everett Award. A cash award presented to an out-
standing senior in mathematics through the generosity of
Old Timers’ Club Award. A suitable gift is presented to a
Frank Ausanka, ’42.
graduating senior who, in the opinion of the Department of
Mining Engineering, has shown high academic standing in
coal mining engineering and potential in the coal industry.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
13

Outstanding Graduating Senior Awards. A suitably
President’s Senior Scholar Athlete Award. A plaque pre-
engraved plaque is presented by each degree-granting
sented to the graduating senior who has the highest aca-
department to its outstanding graduating senior.
demic average and who lettered in a sport in the senior
H. Fleet Parsons Award. A cash award presented for out-
year.
standing service to the School through leadership in stu-
Ryan Sayers Memorial Award. Presented to a graduating
dent government.
senior in Engineering Physics and/or Mathematical and
Maxwell C. Pellish, 1924, Academic Achievement Award.
Computer Sciences in recognition of outstanding academ-
A suitably engraved plaque presented to the graduating
ic achievement and performance of significant research as
senior with the highest cumulative grade point average
an undergraduate.
who has had a minimum of 6 semesters at CSM.
William D. Waltman, 1899, Award. Provided for by Mr.
The Thomas Philipose Outstanding Senior Award. A
Waltman, a cash award and suitably engraved plaque is
plaque and cash award, presented to a senior in the
presented to the graduating senior whose conduct and
McBride Honors Program in Public Affairs for Engineers
scholarship have been most nearly perfect and who has
whose scholarship, character, and personality best exem-
most nearly approached the recognized characteristics of
plify the ideals of the program as determined by the
an American gentleman or lady during the recipient’s
Committee of tutors.
entire collegiate career.
Physics Faculty Distinguished Graduate Award. Presented
H.G. Washburn Award. A copy of De Re Metallica by
from time to time by the faculty of the department to
Agricola is awarded in mining engineering for good
graduating engineering physics seniors with exceptionally
scholastic record and active participation in athletics.
high academic achievement in physics.
Charles Parker Wedgeforth Memorial Award. Presented
George R. Pickett Memorial Award. A cash award pre-
to the most deserving and popular graduating senior.
sented to a graduating senior on the basis of demonstrated
interests and accomplishments in the study of borehole
geophysics.
14
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Section 3 - Tuition, Fees,
Financial Assistance, Housing
Tuition and fees are established by the Board of Trustees
Miscellaneous
of the Colorado School of Mines following the annual budget
New Student Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $40.00
process and action by the Colorado General Assembly and
(exempt from refund policy)
Governor.
New International Stu. Orient . . . . . . . . . . $75.00
Undergraduate Tuition
(exempt from refund policy)
Chem Lab Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $30.00
The official tuition and approved charges for the 2006-
Graduation (Bachelors) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $100.00
2007 academic year will be available prior to the start of the
Student Health Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . $660.00
2006-2007 academic year located at
http://www.is.mines.edu/budget/budget_current/tuition_rates.pdf
Military Science
Fees
Lab Fee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $175.00
Regular Semester (Fall/Spring)
Descriptions of Fees and Other
During a regular semester, students taking less than 4
Charges
credit hours are not required to pay student fees, except for
The following mandatory, non-waivable fees are charged
the Technology Fee. Any such student wishing to take part in
by the Colorado School of Mines to all students enrolled for
student activities and receive student privileges may do so by
4.0 semester hours or more:
paying full semester fees. All students carrying 4 or more
Health Center Fee - Revenues support physician/medical
credit hours must pay full student fees as follows:
services to students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $45.00/term
Health Center* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $45.00
Associated Students Fee - Revenues support student organizations/
Associated Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75.70
events/activities; e.g., newspaper, homecoming, E-days
Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49.00
Expenditures must be approved by ASCSM . . . . . . . $75.70/term
Student Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192.00
Athletics Fee - Revenues support intercollegiate athletics and
entitle student entrance to all CSM scheduled events and
Student Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.00
use of the facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $49.00/term
Technology Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60.00
Student Assistance Fee - Funds safety awareness programs,
Recreation Center**. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55.00
training seminars for abuse issues, campus lighting, and
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $491.70
parking facility maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15.00/term
*A health insurance program is also available. Health insurance is a
Student Services Fee - Revenues support bond indebtedness
and other student services; e.g., Career Center, Student
mandatory fee unless the student can prove coverage through another
Development Center, Student Activities, Student Life, and
plan.
services provided in Student Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $192.00/term
**Fee will increase to $85.00 for the spring semester.
Technology Fee - Funds technology infrastructure and equipment
Summer Session
for maximum student use. The School matches the student fee
revenues dollar for dollar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.00/term
Academic Courses
Recreation Center Fee - Revenues help pay for new
Health Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $22.50
recreation center. Fee passed in student election
Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24.50
in March 2002. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $55.00/term
Student Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96.00
Beginning Spring 2007. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $85.00/term
Technology Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.00
The following mandatory, waivable fee is charged by the
Student Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.50
Colorado School of Mines to all degree seeking students,
Recreation Center (summer 2007). . . . . . . . 42.50
regardless of full-time or part-time student status:
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $223.00
Student Health Insurance - Revenues contribute to a self-insurance
Field Term Courses
fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $660.00
On-campus:
Health Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.00
The following are established fees that are case dependent.
Student Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72.00
Late Insurance Waiver Fee - Revenues provide funds for the
Technology Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.00
administration of the health insurance program . . . . . . . . . $60.00
Rec. Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32.00
Chemistry Lab Fee - Revenues provide a contingency against
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $151.00
breakage of laboratory equipment; e.g., test tubes, beakers,
etc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $30.00/course
Off-campus: Arrangements and payment for transportation, food,
Field Camp Fee - Revenues support the instructional activities/
lodging, and other expenses must be made with the department con-
services provided during Field session
cerned. (Geology Department camping fee is $350.)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $100.00 - $800.00 depending on Dept
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
15

Military Science Lab Fee - Revenues support the instructional
Housing
activities of the Military Science Department. . . . $175.00 ROTC
NOTE: Room and board charges are established by the
New Student Orientation Fee - Revenues support the new student
orientation program provided to freshmen and transfer students
Board of Trustees (BOT) and are subject to change. Payment
at the start of the Fall and Spring semesters. This fee is exempt
of room and board charges fall under the same guidelines as
from refund policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $40.00
payment of tuition and fees. Rates below are in effect for the
New International Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $75.00
2006-2007 Academic year. Included is a “flexible” meal plan
On-line Course Fee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $40.00/credit hour
which guarantees students a designated number of meals per
Summer Orientation Fee - Revenues support the Explore CSM
week and gives them between $50.00 - $175.00 to spend as
programs provided to freshmen students and their parents
they wish on additional meals or any of the other food service
during the summer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $55.00
establishments. For more information, please contact the Stu-
Transcript Fee - Revenues support the cost of providing transcripts.
dent Life Office at (303) 273-3350.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.00/copy
Add/Drop Charge - Revenues offset the cost of processing
Rates for 2006-2007 (per year)
Add/Drop registration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4.00 each
Residence Halls (Students must choose a meal plan)
Late Payment Penalty - Revenues offset billing costs for late
Morgan/Thomas/Bradford/Randall Halls
payments . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5% per month of outstanding balance
Double Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,695
Credit Card Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0% of charge
Single Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,375
Housing Application Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $50.00
Double Room as Single. . . . . . . . . . . . $4,700
Damage Deposit, (Housing) (Freshmen housing exempt) -
Revenues are used to repair or replace damaged items/rooms
WeaverTowers
in CSM housing units. Mines Pk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $400.00
Double Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,935
Bike Locker Rental - Revenues go to provide and maintain locker
Single Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,580
facilities for residence hall student bicycles . . . . . . . . $50.00/sem
Double Room as Single. . . . . . . . . . . . $4,945
Residence Hall Room Charge - Revenues support maintenance,
“E” Room, Single . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,930
improvements and residence hall administration
Residence Hall Association Fee . . . . $50 included above
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . See Housing Rates in next section
Meal Plan Charges - Revenues provide meals and maintain cafete-
Residence Halls at Mines Park (freshmen only)
ria equipment for the students on meal plans
Double occupancy room . . . . . . . . . . . $3,900
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . See Meal Plans in next section
Single occupancy room . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,585
Residence Hall Association Fee - Revenues support social activities
Sigma Nu House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,800
for the residence hall students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $50.00/year
Housing and Rental Fees - Rental fees for housing rentals go to
FIJI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,160
maintain the rental properties, pay utility charges, and maintain
Alpha Phi Sorority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,930
and improve properties . . . . . . See Housing Rates in next section
Tuition Paid-Out - CSM has advanced tuition to another school.
Pi Phi Sorority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,930
Charges are reimbursement request for those advances. Only for
Sigma Kappa Sorority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,930
sponsored students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paid by sponsor
Books/Supplies Fee - Advances made to or on behalf of the student.
All CSM owned Fraternity and Sorority
Charges are reimbursement only. Only for sponsored students
Houses—Summer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $50/week
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paid by sponsor
Resident Meal Plans
Computer Usage Fees - Revenues assist in providing research
Marble. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,290 (per year)
computing services. . . . . . . . . . . . . $500.00/term Paid by sponsor
19 meals/week + $50 Munch Money/semester
Refunds or Advances - These charges are reimbursement requests
for funds advanced to or on behalf of the student. Funds
Quartz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,290 (per year)
received replace those advances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N/A
15 meals/week + $100 Munch Money/semester
Payments - CSM must repay to the bank any student funds for
Granite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,290 (per year)
which a student becomes ineligible. Funds collected from the
150 meals/semester + $175 Munch Money/semester
student replace those payments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N/A
Topaz (Mines Park Resident Only)
Grants and Scholarships (Recalled) When students become
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,290 (per year)
ineligible for grant, loan or scholarship money which they
125 meals/semester + $250 Munch Money/semester
have received, the recall of those funds are reflected . . . . . . . N/A
Return Check - The amount of a student’s check which has been
Field Session (Six weeks)
returned for insufficient funds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N/A
Double Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $350
Single Room. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $610
Returned Check Charge - Revenues offset bank fees for returned
checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.00
Summer Session (Eight weeks)
In all instances, the costs to collect these fees are not
Double Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $455
reimbursed to the Student Receivables Office. The Colorado
Single Room. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $725
School of Mines does not automatically assess any optional
Field Sessions and Summer Session Meal Plans
fees or charges.
Gold Card (declining balance). . Any Amount
16
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Mines Park*
Financial Responsibility
Family Housing
It is important for students to recognize their financial
1 Bedroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $650/month
responsibilities when registering for classes at the school. If
2 Bedroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $750/month
students do not fulfill their financial obligations by published
Apartment Housing
deadlines:
1 Bedroom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $650
P Late payment penalties will accrue on any outstanding
2 Bedroom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $878
balance.
3 Bedroom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,170
P Transcripts will not be issued.
*Tenant pays gas and electricity only
P Past due accounts will be turned over to Colorado
CSM pays water/sewer/public electric. Tenant pays
Central Collection Services in accordance with Colo-
$18.50/month per phone line (optional).
rado law.
P Collection costs will be added to a students account.
Residence Hall Application
P The student’s delinquency may be reported to national
Information and application for residence hall space is
credit bureaus.
included in the packet offering admission to the student.
Late Payment Penalties
Students desiring accommodations are requested to forward
A penalty will be assessed against a student if payment is
their inquiries at the earliest possible date.
not received in full by the official day of registration. The
The submission of a room application does not in itself
penalty is described in the schedule of courses for each
constitute a residence hall reservation. A residence hall con-
semester. If payment is not completed by the sixth week of
tract will be mailed to the student to be signed by the student
class, the student may be officially withdrawn from classes.
and his or her parents and returned to the Residence Life
Students will be responsible for all collection costs.
Office. Only upon receipt and written acknowledgement of
the residence hall contract by the Residence Life Office will
Encumbrances
the student be assured of a room reservation.
A student will not be permitted to register for future
classes, graduate, or secure an official transcript of his/her
Rooms and roommates are assigned in accordance with
academic record while indebted in any way to CSM. Stu-
student preference insofar as possible, with earlier applica-
dents will be responsible for payment of all reasonable costs
tions receiving priority.
of collection.
Advance Deposits
Refunds
An advance deposit of $50 made payable to Colorado
Refunds for tuition and fees are made according to the follow-
School of Mines must accompany each application received.
ing policy:
This deposit will be refunded in full (or in part if there are
charges against the room) when the student leaves the resi-
P The amount of tuition and fee assessments is based pri-
dence hall.
marily on each student’s enrolled courses. In the event a
student withdraws from a course or courses, assessments
If a student wishes to cancel a residence hall reservation,
will be adjusted as follows:
$25 of the deposit will be refunded if notice of the cancella-
P If the withdrawal is made prior to the end of the add/drop
tion is received in writing by the Residence Life Office on or
period for the term of enrollment, as determined by the
before May 1 of the current year.
Registrar, tuition and fees will be adjusted to the new
Contracts are issued for the full academic year and no can-
course level without penalty.
cellation will be accepted after May 1, except for those who
P If the withdrawal from a course or courses is made after
decide not to attend CSM. Those contracts separately issued
the add/drop period, and the student does not officially
only for entering students second semester may be cancelled
withdraw from school, no adjustment in charges will be
no later than December 15. After that date no cancellation will
made.
be accepted except for those who decide not to attend CSM.
P If the withdrawal from courses is made after the add/drop
Payments and Refunds
period, and the student withdraws from school, tuition
and fee assessments will be reduced according to the fol-
Payment Information
lowing schedule:
A student is expected to complete the registration process,
P Within the 7 calendar days following the end of the
including the payment of tuition and fees, room and board,
add/drop period, 60 percent reduction in charges.
before attending class. Students can mail their payment to:
P Within the next following 7 calendar days, a 40 percent
Cashier
reduction in charges.
1600 Maple Street
P Within the next following 7 calendar days, a 20 percent
Colorado School of Mines
reduction in charges.
Golden, CO 80401-1887
P After that period, no reduction of charges will be made.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
17

PLEASE NOTE: Students receiving federal financial aid
from Colorado. Please check Colorado Revised Statutes
under the Title IV programs or Colorado financial aid programs
1973, 23-7-103(2)(m)(II) for exact provisions. In a case
may have a different refund determined as required by federal or
where a court has appointed a guardian or granted custody,
Colorado law or regulations.
it shall be required that the court certify that the primary
The schedule above applies to the Fall and Spring semesters.
purpose of such appointment was not to qualify the minor
The time periods for the Summer sessions - Field and Summer -
for resident tuition status.
will be adjusted in proportion to the reduced number of days in
Nonresident Students
these semesters.
To become a resident of Colorado for tuition classification
Room and board refunds are pro-rated to the date of checkout
under state statutes, a student must be domiciled in Colorado
from the Residence Hall. Arrangements must be made with the
for one year or more immediately preceding the first day of
Housing Office. Student health insurance charges are not refund-
class for the semester for which such classification is sought.
able. The insurance remains in effect for the entire semester.
A person must be emancipated before domicile can be estab-
lished separate from the domicile of the parents. Emancipa-
PLEASE NOTE: Students receiving federal financial aid
tion for tuition purposes takes place automatically when a
under the Title IV programs may have a different refund deter-
person turns 22 years of age or marries.
mined as required by federal law or regulations.
State of Colorado Residency
The establishment of domicile for tuition purposes has two
inseparable elements: (1) a permanent place of habitation in
Qualifications
Colorado and (2) intent to remain in Colorado with no intent
A student is classified as a resident or nonresident for tuition
to be domiciled elsewhere. The twelve-month waiting period
purposes at the time admission is granted. The classification is
does not begin until both elements exist. Documentation of
based upon information furnished by the student. The student
the following is part of the petitioning process to document
who, due to subsequent events, becomes eligible for resident tu-
physical presence: copies of rental arrangements, rent re-
ition must make formal application to the Registrar for a change
ceipts, copy of warranty deed if petitioner owns the personal
of status.
residence property and verification of dates of employment.
A student who willfully gives wrong information to evade
Documentation of the following is part of the petitioning
payment of nonresident tuition shall be subject to serious disci-
process to document intent: Colorado drivers license, motor
plinary action. The final decision regarding tuition status rests
vehicle registration (as governed by Colorado Statute), voter
with the Tuition Appeals Committee of Colorado School of
registration, payment of Colorado state income taxes, owner-
Mines.
ship of residential real estate property in the state (particularly
if the petitioner resides in the home), any other factor peculiar
Resident Students
to the individual which tends to establish the necessary intent
A person whose legal residence is permanently established
to make Colorado one’s permanent place of habitation.
in Colorado may continue to be classified as a resident stu-
dent so long as such residence is maintained even though cir-
Nonresident students wishing to obtain further information
cumstances may require extended absences from the state.
on the establishment of residency or to apply for resident
status should contact the Registrar’s Office. The “Petition for
Qualification for resident tuition requires both (1) proof of
In-State Tuition Classification” is due in the Registrar’s
adoption of the state as a fixed and permanent home, demon-
Office by the first day of classes of the term the student is
strating physical presence within the state at the time of such
requesting resident status.
adoption, together with the intention of making Colorado the
true home; and (2) living within the state for 12 consecutive
College Opportunity Fund
months immediately prior to the first day of classes for any
The College Opportunity Fund provides State financial
given term.
support to eligible students for higher education. It was cre-
These requirements must be met by one of the following:
ated by an Act of the Colorado State Legislature and signed
(a) the father, mother, or guardian of the student if an
into law by Governor Owens in May 2004.
unemancipated minor, or (b) the student if married or over
What does it mean? In the past, the State gave money di-
22, or (c) the emancipated minor.
rectly to the colleges. Now, if you authorize use of the
The home of the unemancipated minor is assumed to be
stipend for any given term, the college you are attending will
that of the parents, or if there is a legal guardian of the
receive the funding, and you will see it appear as a credit on
student, that of such guardian. If the parents are separated
your tuition bill.
or divorced and either separated or divorced parent meet the
Who is eligible? Undergraduate students who are eligible
Colorado residency requirements, the minor also will be
for in-state tuition, and who apply for COF, are admitted to
considered a resident. Statutes provide for continued resi-
and enrolled in an eligible institution of higher education,
dent status, in certain cases, following parents’ moving
and who authorize the institution to collect the funds on their
behalf. Once enrolled at the Colorado School of Mines, the
18
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

student must authorize the School to collect these funds from
the Perkins Student Loan, or the Stafford Student Loan.
the state on the student's behalf. Once authorized, the School
Supplemental student loans may also be offered through
will continue to collect these funds on the student's behalf
private bank loan programs.
unless and until the student chooses to revoke the authoriza-
tion.
The Alumni Association of CSM administers a loan pro-
gram designed to assist juniors and seniors who have ex-
How much is the stipend? It will vary. The amount will be
hausted their other sources of funds. These are short term
determined each year by the Colorado Legislature. Currently,
loans which require repayment within three years after grad-
it is estimated to be approximately $86 per credit hour for the
uation, and have been made available through the contribu-
academic year 2006-2007.
tions of CSM alumni.
For additional information please refer to:
Merit-based assistance is offered to recognize students
Colorado School of Mines website:
who have special talents or achievements. Academic awards
http://www.mines.edu/admin/cof/
to new students are made on the basis of their high school
Colorado Commission on Higher Education's website:
records, SAT or ACT test scores, academic interests, and
http://www.state.co.us/cche/
extracurricular activities. Continuing students receive schol-
arships based on their academic performance at CSM, partic-
The College Opportunity Fund website:
ularly in their major field of study, and on financial need.
https://cof.college-access.net/cofapp/
Alumni Association Grants are awarded to students who
Financial Aid and Scholarships
are children of alumni who have been active in the CSM
Undergraduate Student Financial Assistance
Alumni Association for the two years prior to the student’s
The role of the CSM Financial Assistance Program is to
enrollment. The one-year grants carry a value of $1,000. The
enable students to enroll and complete their educations, re-
students may also receive a senior award, based on their aca-
gardless of their financial circumstances. In fulfilling this
demic scholarship, and the availability of funds.
role, the Office of Financial Aid administered over $28
Engineers’ Day Scholarships are available to Colorado
million in total assistance in 2005-2006, including over
residents. Based on high school records, an essay, and other
$10.2 million in grants and scholarships. Additional infor-
information, a CSM Student Government committee selects
mation may be found at the CSM financial aid web site,
students for these four-year awards.
www.finaid.mines.edu.
Athletic scholarships may be awarded to promising stu-
Applying for Assistance
dent-athletes in seventeen men’s and women’s sports. The
The CSM Application for Admission serves as the appli-
scholarships are renewable for up to three years, based on the
cation for CSM merit-based scholarships for new students
recommendation of the Athletics Department.
(the Athletic and Military Science Departments have their
own application procedures for their scholarships). Continu-
Army ROTC scholarships are available from CSM and
ing students may be recommended by their major department
the U.S. Army for outstanding young men and women who
for scholarships designated for students from that depart-
are interested in a military career. The one, two, three, and
ment. To apply for need-based CSM, federal and Colorado
four-year scholarships can provide up to full tuition and fees,
assistance, students should complete the Free Application for
a book allowance, and a monthly stipend for personal ex-
Federal Student Aid.
penses. The CSM Military Science Department assists stu-
dents in applying for these scholarships.
After the student’s and family’s financial circumstances
are reviewed, a financial aid award is sent to the student.
U.S. Navy Scholarships through the Civil Engineering
New students are sent an award letter beginning in late
Program, Nuclear Power Officer Program, and Baccalaureate
March, and continuing students are notified in mid May.
Degree Completion Program are also available to CSM stu-
dents. The local Navy Recruiting District Office provides in-
Types of Financial Assistance
formation about these scholarships.
Need-based assistance will typically include grants, part-
U.S. Air Force ROTC Scholarships are available from
time employment, and student loans. Grants are provided by
CSM and the U.S. Air Force. The three and four year schol-
CSM, by the State of Colorado (Colorado State Grants), and
arships can provide up to full tuition, fees, a book allowance,
by the federal government (Pell Grants and Supplemental
and a stipend. Further information is available through the
Educational Opportunity Grants).
Department of Aerospace Studies at the University of Col-
Work Study funds also come from CSM, Colorado and
orado Boulder (the official home base for the CSM detach-
the federal government. Students work between 8 and 10
ment).
hours a week, and typically earn between $500 to $1,500 to
In addition to scholarships through CSM, many students
help pay for books, travel, and other personal expenses.
receive scholarships from their hometown civic, religious or
Student Loans may be offered from two federal programs:
other organizations. All students are urged to contact organi-
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
19

zations with which they or their parents are affiliated to inves-
least 12 credits with a minimum 2.000 grade average. If this is
tigate such scholarships. The Financial Aid Office reserves
not done, their eligibility will be terminated until such time as
the right, unless otherwise instructed by the student, to release
they return to satisfactory standing. In addition, if students to-
the student’s information to scholarship providers for the pur-
tally withdraw from CSM, or receive grades of F in all of their
pose of assisting students in obtaining scholarships.
courses, their future financial aid eligibility will be terminated.
Financial Aid Policies
Students receiving all F’s for a semester will have their financial
assistance retroactively terminated unless they can prove class
General
attendance. Financial aid eligibility termination may be appealed
CSM students requesting or receiving financial assistance
to the Director of Financial Aid on the basis of extenuating or
sponsored by the U.S. Government, the State of Colorado, or
special circumstances having negatively affected the student’s
the Colorado School of Mines are required to report to the
academic performance.
CSM Financial Aid Office all financial assistance offered or
received from all sources including CSM immediately upon
Study Abroad
receipt or notification of such assistance. For the purpose of
Students who will be studying abroad through a program
this paragraph, “financial assistance” shall include, but not be
sponsored by CSM may apply for all forms of financial assis-
limited to, grants, scholarships, fellowships, or loans funded
tance as if they were registered for and attending classes at CSM.
by public or private sources, as well as all income not consid-
Financial assistance will be based on the student’s actual ex-
ered taxable income by the Internal Revenue Service. Upon
penses for the program of study abroad.
receipt of this information, CSM shall evaluate, and may ad-
For additional information about Study Abroad opportunities,
just any financial assistance provided to the student from
contact the Office of International Programs, Stratton 109; (303)
CSM, Colorado, or federal funds. No student shall receive
384-2121.
financial assistance from CSM if such student’s total assis-
Refunds
tance from all sources exceeds the total cost of the student’s
If students completely withdraw from all of their classes dur-
education at CSM. For the purpose of this paragraph, the
ing a semester, they may be eligible for a refund (a reduction in
“total cost of education” shall be defined to include the cost
tuition and fees, and room or board if they live on campus, and a
of tuition, fees, books, room and board, necessary travel, and
return of funds to the financial aid programs from which the stu-
reasonable personal expenses.
dent is receiving assistance). If a student is receiving federal or
Funds for the Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental
Colorado assistance, there will be no refund given after the date
Educational Opportunity Grant, Federal College Work-Study
on which students have completed at least 60% of the semester.
Program, Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Stafford Loan, and
The refund will be calculated as required by Federal law or regu-
Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students are provided
lation, or by the method described in the section on “Payments
in whole or part by appropriations of the United States Con-
and Refunds,” using the method that will provide the largest re-
gress. The Colorado General Assembly provides funds for
duction in charges for the student. For the purposes of this pol-
the Colorado Grant, Colorado Leveraging Educational Assis-
icy, the official withdrawal date is the date as specified on the
tance Program, Colorado Merit Scholarship, Colorado Ath-
withdrawal form by the student. If the student withdraws unoffi-
letic Scholarship, and Colorado Work-Study programs. These
cially by leaving campus without completing the check-out pro-
programs are all subject to renewed funding each year.
cedure, the official withdrawal date will be the last date on
Satisfactory Academic Progress
which the student’s class attendance can be verified.
CSM students receiving scholarships must make satisfactory
academic progress as specified in the rules and regulations for
each individual scholarship.
Students receiving assistance from federal, Colorado or need-
based CSM funds must make satisfactory academic progress to-
ward their degree. Satisfactory progress is defined as
successfully completing a minimum of 12 credits each semester
with a minimum 2.000 grade average. Students who register
part-time must successfully complete all of the credits for which
they register with a minimum 2.000 grade average. If students
are deficient in either the credit hour or grade average measure,
they will receive a one semester probationary period during
which they must return to satisfactory standing by completing at
20
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Section 4 - Living Facilities
Residence Halls
Mines Park
Colorado School of Mines has five residence halls for men
The Mines Park apartment complex is located west of the
and women. The traditional style includes Bradford, Randall,
6th Avenue and 19th Street intersection on 55 acres owned
Morgan, and Thomas Halls with primarily double bedrooms
by CSM. The complex houses some freshmen, upper class
and a bathroom on each floor. There are a limited number of
and graduate students, and families. Residents must be full-
single rooms available. Weaver Towers features seven or
time students.
eight person suites with each suite containing both single and
Units are complete with refrigerators, stoves, dishwashers,
double bedrooms, a living/study room and two bathrooms.
cable television and campus phone lines and T-1 connections
Each Residence Hall complex houses mailboxes, lounge
to the campus network system. There are two community
areas, TV room, and coin operated washers and dryers. Each
centers which contain laundry facilities, recreational/study
occupant has a wardrobe or closet, storage drawers, mirror, a
space, and a convenience store.
study desk and chair, and a wall bookshelf. All rooms are
equipped with data connections, cable TV (basic) service, a
Rates are as follows:
phone (campus, with optional voice mail), and upgraded
Mines Park Family Housing
electrical systems. The student is responsible for damage to
1 bedroom
$650/mo
the room or furnishings. Colorado School of Mines assumes
2 bedroom
$750/mo
no responsibility for loss or theft of personal belongings. Liv-
Mines Park Apartment Housing
ing in the CSM Residence Halls is convenient, comfortable,
1 bedroom
$650/mo
and provides the best opportunity for students to take advan-
2 bedroom
$878/mo
tage of the student activities offered on campus.
3 bedroom
$1,170/mo
Dining Facilities
For an application to any of the campus housing options,
Colorado School of Mines operates a dining hall in the
please contact the Housing Office at (303) 273-3350 or visit
Ben H. Parker Student Center. Under the provisions for the
the Student Life office in the Ben Parker Student Center,
operation of the residence halls, students who live in the resi-
Room 218.
dence halls are required to board in the School dining hall.
Breakfast, lunch and dinner are served Monday through Fri-
Fraternities, Sororities
day, lunch and dinner on Saturday and brunch and dinner on
A student who is a member of one of the national Greek
Sunday. Students not living in a residence hall may purchase
organizations on campus is eligible to live in Fraternity or
any one of several meal plans which best meets their individ-
Sorority housing. Most of the organizations have their own
ual needs. No meals are served during breaks (Thanksgiving,
houses, and provide room and board to members living in the
Christmas and Spring Break).
house. All full time, undergraduate students are eligible to
join these organizations. For information, contact the Student
Activities office or the individual organization.
Private Rooms, Apartments
Many single students live in private homes in Golden.
Colorado School of Mines participates in no contractual
obligations between students and Golden citizens who rent
rooms to them. Rents in rooming houses generally range
from $400 to $450 a month. Housing is also available in the
community of Golden, where apartment rental ranges from
$575 to $1,050 a month.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
21

Section 5 -
Undergraduate Information
Undergraduate Bulletin
2. An applicant should rank in the upper one-third of their
It is the responsibility of the student to become informed
graduating class. Consideration will be given to appli-
and to observe all regulations and procedures required by the
cants below this level on evidence of strong motivation,
program the student is pursuing. Ignorance of a rule does not
superior test scores, and recommendation from principal
constitute a basis for waiving that rule. The Undergraduate
or counselor.
Bulletin, current at the time of the student’s most recent ad-
3. The following 16 units of secondary school work must be
mission, gives the academic requirements the student must
completed upon graduation from high school:
meet to graduate. However, a student can change to the re-
Algebra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
quirements in a later catalog published while the student is
Geometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
enrolled as an undergraduate. Changes to administrative poli-
Advanced Mathematics (including Trigonometry) . . . . . . 1
cies and procedures become effective for all students as soon
English. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
as the campus community is notified of the changes. The Un-
History or Social Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
dergraduate Bulletin is available to students in both print and
Academic Elective. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
electronic forms. Print bulletins are updated annually. Elec-
Laboratory Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
tronic versions of the Undergraduate Bulletin may be up-
dated more frequently to reflect changes approved by, and
One unit of laboratory science must be either chemistry or
communicated to, the campus community. As such, students
physics. The second and third units may be chemistry,
are encouraged to refer to the most recently available elec-
physics, zoology, botany, geology, etc. with laboratory.
tronic version of the Undergraduate Bulletin. This version is
Both physics and chemistry are recommended for two of
available at the CSM website. The electronic version of the
the three required units. General Science is not acceptable
Undergraduate Bulletin is considered the official version of
as a science unit, however it is acceptable as an academic
this document. In case of disagreement between the elec-
elective unit.
tronic and print versions, the electronic version will take
4. The 3 units of academic electives (social studies, mathe-
precedence.
matics, English, science, or foreign language) must be ac-
Admission Requirements
ceptable to the applicant’s high school to meet graduation
requirements. For applicants submitting GED Equivalency
Colorado School of Mines admits students who have
Diplomas, these units may be completed by the GED test.
demonstrated the ability to do classroom and laboratory work
and profit from our programs. The decision to admit a stu-
5. Applicants from the United States and Canada are required
dent is based on his or her ability to earn a degree at CSM.
to submit the scores of either the Scholastic Aptitude Test
Criteria considered in evaluating students include (1) pattern
(SAT) of the College Entrance Examination Board or the
of course work in high school or college, (2) grades earned in
American College Test (ACT) battery. Applications for
those courses, (3) rank in class, (4) ACT or SAT test scores,
either the SAT or ACT may be obtained from the high
and (5) other available test scores. No single criterion for ad-
school counselors, or by writing to Educational Testing
mission is used; however, the most important factor is the
Service, P.O. Box 592, Princeton, NJ 08541 for the SAT;
academic record in high school or college.
or to the American College Testing Program, P.O. Box
168, Iowa City, IA 52243 for the ACT. You may also
The admission requirements below are minimum require-
register online at www.collegeboard.com (SAT) and
ments which may change after a catalog has been printed.
www.act.org (ACT).
The Board of Trustees, CSM’s governing board, reserves the
right to deviate from published admission requirements. In
Transfer Students
such cases, changes in admission policy would be widely
An applicant to CSM is considered to be a transfer student
publicized.
if he or she has enrolled in coursework at another college
Freshmen
after graduating from high school. The minimum admissions
requirements for all transfer students are as follows:
The minimum admission requirements for all high school
graduates who have not attended a college or university are
1. Students transferring from another college or university
as follows:
must have completed the same high school course require-
ments as entering freshmen. A transcript of the applicant’s
1. An applicant must be a graduate of an accredited high
school.
22
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

high school record is required. ACT or SAT test scores are
3. If a TOEFL exam score indicates that the applicant will be
not required if the student has completed a minimum of 30
handicapped academically, as a condition for admission
credit hours of college credit.
the applicant may be required to enroll in the INTERLINK
2. Applicants must present official college transcripts from
Language program until the required proficiency is
all colleges attended. Applicants should have an overall
achieved. The INTERLINK Language program at Col-
2.75 (C+) grade point average or better. Students present-
orado School of Mines offers intensive English language
ing a lower GPA will be given careful consideration and
instruction and skills development for academic success.
acted on individually.
See the detailed description of INTERLINK in Section 8
of this Bulletin.
3. An applicant who cannot re-enroll at the institution from
which he or she wishes to transfer because of scholastic
Nondegree Students
record or other reason will be evaluated on a case-by-case
A nondegree student is one who has not applied to pursue
basis.
a degree program at CSM but wishes to take courses regu-
larly offered on campus. Such students may take any course
4. Completed or “in progress” college courses - which meet
for which they have the prerequisites as listed in the CSM
CSM graduation requirements - are eligible for transfer
Bulletin or have the permission of the instructor. Transcripts
credit if the grade earned is a “C” or better.
or evidence of the prerequisites are required. An applicant for
Former Students
admission to the undergraduate school who does not meet
The minimum admission requirements for those students
admission requirements may not fulfill deficiencies through
who have previously attended CSM are as follows:
this means. Exception to this rule can be made only by the
1. Any student who has attended another college or univer-
Director of Enrollment Management. A maximum of 12
sity since last enrolling at CSM must apply for admission
hours of nondegree credit from Colorado School of Mines
as a transfer student.
may be transferred to an undergraduate degree program.
2. Any student who did not complete the semester immedi-
Admission Procedures
ately preceding the beginning of the period for which he or
All Applicants
she wishes to enroll must be re-admitted to CSM by the
Documents received by CSM in connection with appli-
Admissions Office.
cations for admission or transfer of credit will not be dupli-
3. A former student, returning after a period of suspension,
cated, returned to the applicant, or forwarded to any agency
must apply for admission to the Admissions Office and
or any other institution.
must furnish an approval for such re-enrollment from the
A $45.00 non-refundable application fee is required from
Readmissions Committee of Colorado School of Mines.
all applicants.
Appropriate forms to apply for admission may be obtained
Applications for undergraduate study cannot be accepted
from the Admissions Office.
later than 21 days prior to the date of registration confirma-
International Students
tion for any academic semester or summer session. Admis-
The minimum admission requirements for those students
sion for any semester or term may close whenever CSM’s
who are not citizens of the United States or Canada are as
budgeted number of students has been met.
follows:
High School Graduates
1. Students from outside the United States and Canada must
Colorado high school applicants should obtain applications
meet the specified unit requirements in secondary educa-
from their high school counselor or principal or write the
tion for entering freshmen, or for students entering after
Admissions Office. Out-of-state applicants should write the
having completed some college education. Students from
Admissions Office, Colorado School of Mines, 1600 Maple
countries using the English system of examinations must
Street, Golden, CO 80401, for application forms. Applicants
have earned First Class or First Division rank on their
can apply online at www.mines.edu.
most recent examination to be eligible for admission.
A student may apply for admission any time after com-
2. The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is
pleting the 11th grade. The application will be evaluated
required of all international students whose native language
upon receipt of the completed application form, a high school
is not English. Information and application forms for this
transcript showing courses completed, courses remaining to
test, which is given four times each year all over the
be completed, ranking in class, other pertinent data, and SAT
world, may be obtained from the College Entrance
or ACT test scores. In some cases, the grades or marks re-
Examination Board, P.O. Box 592, Princeton, NJ 08541,
ceived in courses taken during the first half of the senior year
U.S.A. Or online at www.toefl.org.
may be required. Applicants who meet freshman admission
requirements are admitted subject to completion of all en-
trance requirements and high school graduation.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
23

Transfer Students
Course work completed for select subjects under the Inter-
Guaranteed Transfer
national Baccalaureate Program in high school may be ac-
Colorado School of Mines is a signatory to the Colorado
cepted for college credit provided that the International
Statewide Engineering Articulation Agreement, which can be
Baccalaureate Program Exam grade is a 5, 6, or 7 on selected
viewed at www.state.co.us/cche. Beginning with admissions
standard and higher level exams. In some cases, departmental
in 2003–2004, this agreement determines transferability of
approval is required before credit is granted. More informa-
coursework for engineering students in the State of Colorado.
tion on which subjects are accepted can be found on the web
All students transferring into CSM under the terms of the
at www.mines.edu
statewide agreement are strongly encouraged to be advised
Declaration of Option (Major)
by the CSM Admissions Office on their planned course of
The curriculum during the first two semesters at CSM is
study. Credits earned more than 10 years previously will not
the same for everyone; therefore, students are not required to
transfer.
choose a major before the end of the freshman year. All stu-
Additionally, Colorado School of Mines has formal trans-
dents must have declared a major by the beginning of the
fer agreements with Red Rocks Community College
junior year.
(RRCC), www.rrcc.cccoes.edu/transfer/csm.htm, and Front
Medical Record
Range Community College (FRCC), www.FrontRange.edu.
A health history prepared by the student, a medical exami-
Students are encouraged to contact the Admissions Office at
nation performed by the student’s physician and an updated
either institution for additional information.
immunization record completed by the student and the physi-
Transfer by Review
cian, nurse or health authority comprise the medical record.
Undergraduate students at another college or university
A medical record is required for full time students entering
who wish to transfer to CSM should request an application
CSM for the first time, or following an absence of more than
for admission from the Admissions Office or apply online at
12 calendar months.
www.mines.edu.
The medical record will be sent to the student after ac-
A transfer student should apply for admission at the begin-
ceptance for admission. The medical record must be updated
ning of the final quarter or semester of attendance at his or
and completed and then returned to the Student Health Cen-
her present college. The application will be evaluated upon
ter before permission to enroll is granted. Proof of immunity
receipt of the completed application form, high school tran-
consists of an official Certificate of Immunization signed by
script, transcripts from each university or college attended,
a physician, nurse, or public health official which documents
and a list of courses in progress. The Admissions Office will
measles, mumps and rubella immunity. The Certificate must
then notify the student of his or her admission status. Admis-
specify the type of vaccine and the dates (month, day, year)
sion is subject to satisfactory completion of current courses
of administration or written evidence of laboratory tests
in progress and submission of a final transcript.
showing immunity to measles, mumps and rubella.
Advanced Placement and International
The completed medical record is confidential and will be
Baccalaureate
kept in the Student Health Center. The record will not be re-
Course work completed for select subjects under the Ad-
leased unless the student signs a written release.
vanced Placement Program in a high school may be accepted
Veterans
for college credit provided that the Advanced Placement Pro-
Colorado School of Mines is approved by the Colorado
gram Test grade is either 5 (highest honors) or 4 (honors).
State Approving Agency for Veteran Benefits under chapters
For a score of three (creditable) on the test, credit may or
30, 31, 32, 35, and 1606. Undergraduates must register for
may not be given subject to a study of the A.P. test and re-
and maintain 12 credit hours, and graduate students must
lated materials, placement test data, high school record, and
register for and maintain 10 credit hours of graduate work in
other test scores available. No credit will be given if the test
any semester to be certified as a full- time student for full-
grade is 2 (pass) or 1 (fail).
time benefits. Any hours taken under the full-time category
In special cases, advanced placement may be granted for
will decrease the benefits to 3/4 time, 1/2 time, or tuition
course work not completed under the College Entrance
payment only.
Examination Board Program. Students wishing such credit
All changes in hours, addresses, marital status, or depend-
may demonstrate competence by writing the Advanced Place-
ents are to be reported to the Veterans Certifying Officer as
ment Examination on the subject. Information can be secured
soon as possible so that overpayment or under payment may
from the College Entrance Examination Board, P.O. Box 592,
be avoided. Veterans must see the Veteran’s Certifying Offi-
Princeton, NJ 08541. More information on which subjects are
cer each semester to be certified for any benefits for which
accepted can be found on the web at www.mines.edu
they may be eligible. In order for veterans to continue to re-
ceive benefits, they must make satisfactory progress as de-
fined by Colorado School of Mines.
24
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Academic Regulations
approval, upon return, of the department head of the appro-
Deficiencies
priate course, the department head of the student’s option,
The curricula at Colorado School of Mines have been es-
and the Registrar.
pecially designed so that the course work flows naturally
In all cases, requests for transfer credit are processed by
from course to course and year to year. Thus, it is important
the Registrar. Credits must be submitted on an official tran-
that deficiencies in lower numbered courses be scheduled in
script from an accredited institution. Only courses with
preference to more advanced work.
grades of “C” or better will be accepted.
Prerequisites
Course Withdrawals, Additions and Drops
It is the responsibility of each student to make certain that
Courses may be added or dropped without fee or penalty
the proper prerequisites for all courses have been met. Regis-
during the first 11 school days of a regular academic term
tration in a course without the necessary prerequisite may re-
(first 4 school days of a 6-week field course or the first 6
sult in dismissal from the class or a grade of F (Failed) in the
school days of the 8-week summer term).
course.
Continuing students may withdraw from any course after
Remediation
the eleventh day of classes through the tenth week for any
The Colorado Commission on Higher Education specifies
reason with a grade of W. After the tenth week, no with-
a remedial programs policy in which any first-time freshmen
drawals are permitted except in cases of withdrawal from
admitted to public institutions of higher education in Colo-
school or for extenuating circumstances under the auspices of
rado with ACT (or equivalent) scores of less than 18 in read-
the Office of Academic Affairs and the Office of the Regis-
ing or English, or less than 19 in mathematics, are required
trar. A grade of F will be given in courses which are with-
to participate in remedial studies. At the Colorado School of
drawn from after the deadline without approval.
Mines, these remedial studies will be conducted through re-
Freshmen in their first and second semesters and transfer
quired tutoring in Nature and Human Values for reading and
students in their first semester are permitted to withdraw
writing, and Calculus for Scientists and Engineers I for
from courses with no grade penalty through the Friday prior
mathematics, and the consequent achievement of a grade of
to the last week of classes.
C or better.
All adds/drops are initiated in the Registrar’s Office. To
Transfer Credit
withdraw from a course (with a “W”) a student must obtain
New Transfer Students
the appropriate form from the Registrar’s office, have it ini-
Upon matriculation, a transfer student will receive the
tialed by the instructor and signed by the student’s advisor/
prescribed academic credit for courses taken at another
mentor to indicate acknowledgment of the student’s action,
institution if these courses are listed in a current articulation
and return it to the Registrar’s Office by close of business on
agreement and transfer guide between CSM and that institu-
the last day that a withdrawal is authorized. Acknowledg-
tion. Credits earned more than 10 years in advance of admis-
ment (by initials) by the division/department is required in
sion will not transfer. When an articulation agreement does
only 2 cases: 1. when a course is added after the 11th day
not exist with another institution, the transfer student may re-
of the semester and 2. when the Registrar has approved, for
ceive credit for a course taken at another institution, subject
extenuating circumstances, a withdrawal after the last date
to review by the appropriate CSM department head or desig-
specified (a “late withdrawal”). Approval of a late with-
nate to ensure course equivalency.
drawal can be given by the Registrar acting on behalf of the
Continuing Students
Office of Academic Affairs in accordance with CSM’s refund
Students who are currently enrolled at CSM may transfer
policy, and in compliance with federal regulations.
credit in required courses only in extenuating circumstances,
A $4.00 fee will be charged for any change in class sched-
upon the advance approval of the Registrar, the department
ule after the first 11 days of class, except in cases beyond the
head of the appropriate course, and the department head of
student’s control or withdrawal from school. All adds/drops
the student’s option. Upon return, credit will be received sub-
are initiated in the Registrar’s Office.
ject to review by the Registrar. Physics courses are subject to
Independent Study
post-approval from the department. Forms for this purpose
For each semester credit hour awarded for independent
are available in the Registrar’s Office, and the process is re-
study a student is expected to invest approximately 25 hours
viewed periodically by the Office of the Executive Vice Pres-
of effort in the educational activity involved. To register for
ident for Academic Affairs (EVPAA).
independent study, a student should get from the Registrar’s
Returning Students
Office the form provided for that purpose, have it completed
Students who have matriculated at CSM, withdrawn, ap-
by the instructor involved and the appropriate department/
plied for readmission and wish to transfer in credit taken at
division head, and return it to the Registrar’s Office.
an institution while they were absent from CSM, must obtain
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
25

Off-Campus Study
his/her academic record, except If a student registered as NC
A student must enroll in an official CSM course for any
fails to satisfy all conditions, no record of this registration in
period of off-campus, course-related study, whether U.S. or
the course will be made. The assignment of the grade symbol
foreign, including faculty-led short courses, study abroad, or
is based on the level of performance, and represents the ex-
any off-campus trip sponsored by CSM or led by a CSM fac-
tent of the student’s demonstrated mastery of the material
ulty member. The registration must occur in the same term
listed in the course outline and achievement of the stated
that the off-campus study takes place. In addition, the stu-
course objectives.
dent must complete the necessary release, waiver, and emer-
A
Excellent
gency contact forms, transfer credit pre-approvals, and
B
Good
FERPA release, and provide adequate proof of current health
C
Satisfactory
insurance prior to departure. For additional information con-
D
Poor (lowest passing)
cerning study abroad requirements, contact the Office of In-
F
Failed
ternational Programs at (303) 384-2121; for other
S
Satisfactory, C or better, used at mid-term
information, contact the Registrar’s Office.
U
Unsatisfactory, below C, used at mid-term
Absenteeism
WI
Involuntarily Withdrawn
Class attendance is required of all undergraduates unless
W
Withdrew, No Penalty
the student is representing the School in an authorized activ-
T
Transfer Credit
ity, in which case the student will be allowed to make up any
PRG
In Progress
work missed. Students who miss academic work (including
PRU
In Progress Unsatisfactory
but not limited to exams, homework, labs) while participat-
INC
Incomplete
ing in school sponsored activities must either be given the
NC
Not for Credit
opportunity to make up this work in a reasonable period of
Z
Grade not yet submitted
time or be excused from such work. It is the responsibility of
M
Thesis Completed
the student to initiate arrangements for such work. Proof of
Undergraduate students enrolled in graduate-level courses
illness may be required before makeup of missed work is
(500-level) are graded using the graduate grading system.
permitted. Excessive absence may result in a failing grade in
See the CSM Graduate Bulletin for a description of the grad-
the course. Determination of excessive absence is a depart-
ing system used in graduate-level courses.
mental prerogative.
Incomplete Grade
The Office of the Dean of Students, if properly informed,
If a student, because of illness or other reasonable excuse,
will send a notice of excused absence of three days or more
fails to complete a course, a grade of INC (Incomplete) is
to faculty members for (1) an absence because of illness or
given. The grade INC indicates deficiency in quantity of
injury for which documentation will be required; (2) an
work and is temporary.
absence because of a death in the immediate family, i.e., a
spouse, child, parent, grandparent, or sibling. For excused
A GRADE OF INC MUST BE REMOVED NOT
absences students must be provided the opportunity to make
LATER THAN THE FIRST FOUR WEEKS OF THE
up all missed work.
FIRST SEMESTER OF ATTENDANCE FOLLOWING
THAT IN WHICH IT WAS RECEIVED. Upon failure to
Withdrawal from School
remove an INC within the time specified, it shall be changed
A student may officially withdraw from CSM by process-
to an F (failed) by the Registrar.
ing a Withdrawal from School form available in the Student
Development Office. Completion of the form through the
Progress Grade
Student Development Office prior to the last day of sched-
The progress grade (PRG) is used primarily for multi-se-
uled classes for that term will result in W’s being assigned to
mester courses, such as thesis or certain special project
courses in progress. Failure to officially withdraw will result
courses which are spread over two terms. The progress grade
in the grades of courses in progress being recorded as F’s.
will be awarded in MACS111, MACS112, and PHGN100 to
Leaving school without having paid tuition and fees will re-
students completing the course for the FIRST time who
sult in a hold being placed against the transcript. Either of
would otherwise have received a grade of “D” (an enrollment
these actions would make future enrollment at CSM or an-
with a grade of “W” is not considered a completion). Subse-
other college more difficult.
quent to receiving a grade of “PRG,” a student must receive a
grade of “D” or higher to move on to the next course in a se-
Undergraduate Grading System
quence. The progress grade carries earned hours. However, it
Grades
does not affect quality points or quality hours (gpa), nor is it
When a student registers in an undergraduate course (400-
sufficient to meet degree requirements.
level and lower), one of the following grades will appear on
26
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Forgiveness of “F” Grade
a grade appeal, the Faculty Affairs Committee will place the
When a student completing MACS111 or MACS112 or
burden of proof on the student. For a grade to be revised by
PHGN100 for the FIRST time receives an “F” in the course but
the Faculty Affairs Committee, the student must demonstrate
subsequently receives a grade of “D” or higher in that course,
that the grading decision was unfair by documenting that one
the “F” received for the first completion will be changed to a
or more of the following conditions applied:
“W”. If the student receives a “PRG” grade (see above), an “F”
1. The grading decision was based on something other than
in any subsequent semester will not be forgiven.
course performance, unless the grade was a result of
The table below outlines different scenarios associated with
penalty for academic dishonesty.
this policy. A “W” is not considered a completion and will not
2. The grading decision was based on standards that were un-
affect the actions below, regardless of when a “W” is received.
reasonably different from those applied to other students in
the same section of that course.
1st
2nd
3rd
3. The grading decision was based on standards that differed
Completion Completion Completion
Action Taken
substantially and unreasonably from those previously
No grades are
articulated by the instructor.
PRG
D or better
___
changed; student
To appeal a grade, the student should proceed as follows:
can move on
1. The student should prepare a written appeal of the grade
No grades are
received in the course. This appeal must clearly define the
PRG
F
D or better changed; student
basis for the appeal and must present all relevant evidence
can move on
supporting the student’s case.
F is changed to
2. After preparing the written appeal, the student should
F
D or better
___
a W; student can
deliver this appeal to the course instructor and attempt to
move on
resolve the issue directly with the instructor. Written grade
First F is changed
appeals must be delivered to the instructor no later than 10
F
F
D or better
to a W; student
business days after the start of the regular (fall or spring)
can move on
semester immediately following the semester in which the
contested grade was received. In the event that the course
NC Grade
instructor is unavailable because of leave, illness, sabbati-
A student may for special reasons, with the instructor’s
cal, retirement, or resignation from the university, the
permission, register in a course on the basis of NC (Not for
course coordinator (first) or the Department Head/Division
Credit). To have the grade NC appear on his/her transcript,
Director (second) shall represent the instructor.
the student must enroll at registration time as a NC student in
3. If after discussion with the instructor, the student is still
the course and comply with all conditions stipulated by the
dissatisfied, he or she can proceed with the appeal by sub-
course instructor, except that if a student registered as NC
mitting three copies of the written appeal plus three copies
fails to satisfy all conditions, no record of this registration in
of a summary of the instructor/student meetings held in
the course will be made.
connection with the previous step to the President of the
Grade Appeal Process
Faculty Senate. These must be submitted to the President
CSM faculty have the responsibility, and sole authority
of the Faculty Senate no later than 25 business days after
for, assigning grades. As instructors, this responsibility in-
the start of the semester immediately following the semes-
cludes clearly stating the instructional objectives of a course,
ter in which the contested grade was received. The Presi-
defining how grades will be assigned in a way that is consis-
dent of the Faculty Senate will forward the student’s
tent with these objectives, and then assigning grades. It is the
appeal and supporting documents to the Faculty Affairs
student’s responsibility to understand the grading criteria and
Committee, and the course instructor’s Department
then maintain the standards of academic performance estab-
Head/Division Director.
lished for each course in which he or she is enrolled.
4. The Faculty Affairs Committee will request a response to
If a student believes he or she has been unfairly graded,
the appeal from the instructor. On the basis of its review of
the student may appeal this decision first to the instructor of
the student’s appeal, the instructor’s response, and any other
the course, and if the appeal is denied, to the Faculty Affairs
information deemed pertinent to the grade appeal, the Fac-
Committee of the Faculty Senate. The Faculty Affairs Com-
ulty Affairs Committee will determine whether the grade
mittee is the faculty body authorized to review and modify
should be revised. The decision rendered will be either:
course grades, in appropriate circumstances. Any decision
1) the original grading decision is upheld, or 2) sufficient
made by the Faculty Affairs Committee is final. In evaluating
evidence exists to indicate a grade has been assigned un-
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
27

fairly. In this latter case, the Faculty Affairs Committee will
Overall Grade-Point Average
assign the student a new grade for the course. The Commit-
The overall grade-point average includes all attempts of
tee’s decision is final. The Committee’s written decision and
courses taken at Colorado School of Mines. The minimum
supporting documentation will be delivered to the President
overall grade-point average required to earn a Mines under-
of the Faculty Senate, the office of the EVPAA, the student,
graduate degree is a 2.000.
the instructor, and the instructor’s Department Head/Division
Director no later than 15 business days following the Senate’s
Option (Major) Grade-Point Average
receipt of the grade appeal.
The grade-point average calculated for the option (major)
includes all attempts at courses completed in the major de-
The schedule, but not the process, outlined above may be
partment at Colorado School of Mines. In some cases, addi-
modified upon mutual agreement of the student, the course
tional courses outside of the major department are also
instructor, and the Faculty Affairs Committee
included in the major gpa calculation. The minimum major
Quality Hours and Quality Points
grade-point average required to earn a Mines undergraduate
For graduation a student must successfully complete a cer-
degree is a 2.000. For specifics concerning your major gpa,
tain number of required semester hours and must maintain
reference your online degree audit or contact your major de-
grades at a satisfactory level. The system for expressing the
partment.
quality of a student’s work is based on quality points and
Honor Roll and Dean’s List
quality hours. The grade A represents four quality points,
To be placed on the academic honor roll, a student must
B three, C two, D one, F none. The number of quality points
complete at least 14 semester hours with a 3.0-3.499 grade
earned in any course is the number of semester hours as-
point for the semester, have no grade below C, and no incom-
signed to that course multiplied by the numerical value of the
plete grade. Those students satisfying the above criteria with
grade received. The quality hours earned are the number of
a semester grade-point average of 3.5 or above are placed on
semester hours in which grades of A, B, C, D, or F are
the Dean’s List.
awarded. To compute a grade-point average, the number of
cumulative quality hours is divided into the cumulative qual-
Graduation Awards
ity points earned. Grades of W, WI, INC, PRG, PRU, or NC
Graduation awards are determined by the student's cumu-
are not counted in quality hours.
lative academic record at the end of the preceding semester.
For example, the overall gpa earned at the end of the fall
Transfer Credit
term determines the awarding of high honors for the pur-
Transfer credit earned at another institution will have a T
poses of May commencement. Students achieving a cumula-
grade assigned but no grade points will be recorded on the
tive grade-point average of 3.5 or above at the end of the
student’s permanent record. Calculation of the grade-point
preceding term will have "High Honors" inscribed on the
average will be made from the courses completed at Colo-
metal diploma as well as the official transcript.
rado School of Mines by the transfer student.
Metal diplomas for undergraduates are ordered well before
Semester Hours
the commencement ceremony and cannot include grade cal-
The number of times a class meets during a week (for lec-
culations for the term of completion (spring term in the
ture, recitation, or laboratory) determines the number of se-
above example). Students achieving a cumulative grade-
mester hours assigned to that course. Class sessions are
point average of 3.5 or above only at the end of their under-
normally 50 minutes long and represent one hour of credit
graduate career will have "High Honors" listed on the official
for each hour meeting. Two to four hours of laboratory work
transcript. The student may choose to order an additional
per week are equivalent to 1-semester hour of credit. For the
metal diploma at the student's own expense from the Regis-
average student, each hour of lecture and recitation requires
trar's Office.
at least two hours of preparation. No full-time undergraduate
student may enroll for more than 19 credit hours in one se-
Good Standing
mester. Physical education, advanced ROTC and Honors
A student is in good standing at CSM when he or she is
Program in Public Affairs courses are excepted. However,
enrolled in class(es) and is not on either academic or discipli-
upon written recommendation of the faculty advisor, the bet-
nary probation. Provisional probation does not affect a stu-
ter students may be given permission by the Associate Vice
dent’s being in good standing.
President of Academic Affairs and the Registrar to take addi-
Academic Probation and Suspension
tional hours.
Probation
Grade-Point Averages
A student whose cumulative grade-point average falls
Grade-Point Averages shall be specified, recorded, re-
below the minimum requirements specified (see table below)
ported, and used to three figures following the decimal point
will be placed on probation for the following semester. A stu-
for any and all purposes to which said averages may apply.
dent on probation is subject to the following restrictions:
1. may not register for more than 15 credit hours
28
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

2. may be required to withdraw from intercollegiate athletics
A student who intends to appear in person before the
3. may not run for, or accept appointment to, any campus of-
Readmissions Committee must register in the Dean of Stu-
fice or committee chairmanship. A student who is placed on
dents Office in person or by letter. Between regular meetings
probation while holding a position involving significant re-
of the Committee, in cases where extensive travel would be
sponsibility and commitment may be required to resign
required to appear in person, a student may petition in writ-
after consultation with the Dean of Students or the Presi-
ing to the Committee, through the Dean of Students.
dent of Associated Students. A student will be removed
Appearing before the Readmissions Committee by letter
from probation when the cumulative grade-point average is
rather than in person will be permitted only in cases of ex-
brought up to the minimum, as specified in the table below.
treme hardship. Such cases will include travel from a great
When a part-time degree undergraduate has attempted a
distance, e.g. overseas, or travel from a distance which re-
total of 12 quality hours of credit with a cumulative grade
quires leaving a permanent job. Appearing by letter will not
point average of less than 2.0, the student will be placed on
be permitted for continuing students in January.
academic probation by the Dean of Students. Should students
The Readmissions Committee meets immediately before
not earn a 2.0 grade-point average for the next semester of at-
classes start and the first day of classes. Students applying
tendance, they will be subject to suspension.
for readmission must appear at those times except under con-
Suspension
ditions beyond the control of the student. Such conditions in-
A student on probation who fails to meet both the last se-
clude a committee appointment load extending beyond the
mester grade period requirements and the cumulative grade-
first day of classes, delay in producing notice of suspension
point average given in the table below will be placed on
or weather conditions closing highways and airports.
suspension. A student who meets the last semester grade
All applications for readmission after a minimum period
period requirement but fails to achieve the required cumula-
away from school, and all appeals of suspension or dismissal,
tive grade-point average will remain on probation.
must include a written statement of the case to be made for
Total
Required
readmission.
Quality
Cumulative
Last Semester
A student who, after being suspended and readmitted
Hours
G.P. Average
G.P. Average
twice, again fails to meet the required academic standards
0-18.5
1.7
—
shall be automatically dismissed. The Readmissions Com-
19-36.5
1.8
2.0
mittee will hear a single appeal of automatic dismissal. The
37-54.5
1.8
2.0
appeal will only be heard after demonstration of substantial
55-72.5
1.9
2.1
73-90.5
1.9
2.1
and significant changes. A period of time sufficient to
91-110.5
2.0
2.2
demonstrate such a charge usually elapses prior to the stu-
111-130.5
2.0
2.2
dent attempting to schedule this hearing. The decision of the
131-150.5
2.0
2.3
Committee on that single appeal will be final and no further
A freshman or transfer student who fails to make a grade-
appeal will be permitted.
point average of 1.5 during the first grade period will be
Readmission by the Committee does not guarantee that
placed on suspension.
there is space available to enroll. A student must process the
Suspension becomes effective immediately when it is
necessary papers with the Admissions Office prior to seeing
imposed. Readmission after suspension requires written
the Committee.
approval from the Readmissions Committee. While a one
Notification
semester suspension period is normally the case, exceptions
Notice of probation, suspension, or dismissal will be mailed
may be granted, particularly in the case of first-semester
to each student who fails to meet catalog requirements.
freshmen and new transfer students.
Repeated Failure
No student who is on suspension may enroll in any regular
A student who twice fails a required course at Colorado
academic semester without the written approval of the Re-
School of Mines and is not subject to academic suspension
admissions Committee. However, a student on suspension
will automatically be placed on “Special Hold” status with
may enroll in a summer session (field camp, academic ses-
the Registrar, regardless of the student’s cumulative or se-
sion, or both) with the permission of the Dean of Students.
mester GPA. The student must meet with the Readmissions
Students on suspension who have been given permission to
Committee and receive written permission before being
enroll in a summer session by the Dean may not enroll in
allowed to register. Transfer credit from another school will
any subsequent term at CSM without the written permission
not be accepted for a twice-failed course.
of the Readmissions Committee. Readmissions Committee
meetings are held prior to the beginning of each regular
Access to Student Records
semester and at the end of the spring term.
Students at the Colorado School of Mines are protected by
the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
29

(FERPA), as amended. This Act was designed to protect the
dean to arrange a mutually satisfactory time for review. This
privacy of education records, to establish the right of students
time will be as soon as practical but is not to be later than 45
to inspect and review their education records, and to provide
days from receipt of the request. The record will be reviewed
guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data
in the presence of the dean or designated representative. If
through informal and formal hearings. Students also have the
the record involves a list including other students, steps will
right to file complaints with the FERPA office concerning
be taken to preclude the viewing of the other student name
alleged failures by the institution to comply with the Act.
and information.
Copies of local policy can be found in the Registrar’s Office.
Challenge of the Record. If the student wishes to chal-
Contact information for FERPA complaints is:
lenge any part of the record, the appropriate dean will be so
Family Policy Compliance Office
notified in writing. The dean may then (l) remove and de-
U.S. Department of Education
stroy the disputed document, or (2) inform the student that it
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
is his decision that the document represents a necessary part
Washington, D. C. 20202-4605
of the record; and, if the student wishes to appeal, (3) con-
Directory Information. The School maintains lists of in-
vene a meeting of the student and the document originator
formation which may be considered directory information as
(if reasonably available) in the presence of the Executive
defined by the regulations. This information includes name,
Vice President for Academic Affairs as mediator, whose
current and permanent addresses and phone numbers, date of
decision will be final.
birth, major field of study, dates of attendance, part or full-
Destruction of Records. Records may be destroyed at any
time status, degrees awarded, last school attended, participa-
time by the responsible official if not otherwise precluded by
tion in officially recognized activities and sports, class, and
law except that no record may be destroyed between the
academic honors. Students who desire that this information
dates of access request and the viewing of the record. If dur-
not be printed or released must so inform the Registrar before
ing the viewing of the record any item is in dispute, it may
the end of the first two weeks of the fall semester for which
not be destroyed.
the student is registered. Information will be withheld for the
Access to Records by Other Parties. Colorado School of
entire academic year unless the student changes this request.
Mines will not permit access to student records by persons
The student’s signature is required to make any changes for
outside the School except as follows:
the current academic year. The request must be renewed each
fall term for the upcoming year. The following student
1. In the case of open record information as specified in the
records are maintained by Colorado School of Mines at the
section under Directory Information.
various offices listed below:
2. To those people specifically designated by the student.
1. General Records: Undergraduate-Registrar; Graduate-
Examples would include request for transcript to be sent
Graduate Dean
to graduate school or prospective employer.
2. Transcript of Grades: Registrar
3. Information required by a state or federal agency for the
purpose of establishing eligibility for financial aid.
3. Computer Grade Lists: Registrar
4. Accreditation agencies during their on-campus review.
4. Encumbrance List: Controller and Registrar
5. In compliance with a judicial order or lawfully issued sub-
5. Academic Probation/Suspension List: Undergraduate-
poena after the student has been notified of the intended
Dean of Students; Graduate-Graduate Dean
compliance.
6. Advisor File: Academic Advisor
6. Any institutional information for statistical purposes which
7. Option/Advisor/Enrolled/ Minority/Foreign List: Regis-
is not identifiable with a particular student.
trar, Dean of Students, and Graduate Dean
7. In compliance with any applicable statue now in effect or
8. Externally Generated SAT/GRE Score Lists: Undergrad-
later enacted. Each individual record (general, transcript,
uate-Registrar; Graduate-Graduate Dean
advisor, and medical) will include a log of those persons
9. Financial Aid File: Financial Aid (closed records)
not employed by Colorado School of Mines who have
requested or obtained access to the student record and the
10. Medical History File: School Physician (closed records)
legitimate interest that the person has in making the request.
Student Access to Records. The undergraduate student
wishing access to a record will make written request to the
General Information
Dean of Students. The graduate student will make a similar
Academic Calendar
request to the Dean of the Graduate School. This request will
The academic year is based on the early semester system.
include the student’s name, date of request and type of record
The first semester begins in late August and closes in mid-
to be reviewed. It will be the responsibility of the student’s
December; the second semester begins in mid January and
closes in mid May.
30
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Classification of Students
student must receive the approval of the Registrar, the heads
Degree seeking undergraduates are classified as follows
of departments of the two courses, the head of the student’s
according to semester credit hours earned:
option department. There will be a periodic review by the
Freshmen
0 to 29.9 semester credit hours
Office of the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs.
Sophomore
30 to 59.9 semester credit hours
Forms for this purpose are available in the Registrar’s Office.
Junior
60 to 89.9 semester credit hours
Change of Bulletin
Senior
90 or more semester credit hours
It is assumed that each student will graduate under the
Part-Time Degree Students
requirements of the bulletin in effect at the time of most re-
A part-time degree student may enroll in any course for
cent admission. However, it is possible to change to any sub-
which he or she has the prerequisites or the permission of the
sequent bulletin in effect while the student is enrolled in a
department. Part-time degree students will be subject to all rules
regular semester.
and regulations of Colorado School of Mines, but they may not:
To change bulletins, a form obtained from the Registrar’s
1. Live in student housing;
Office is presented for approval to the head of the student’s
2. Receive financial help in the form of School-sponsored
option department. Upon receipt of approval, the form must
scholarships or grants;
be returned to the Registrar’s Office.
3. Participate in any School-recognized activity unless fees
Students’ Use of English
are paid;
All Mines students are expected to show professional
facility in the use of the English language.
4. Take advantage of activities provided by student fees
unless such fees are paid.
English skills are emphasized, but not taught exclusively,
in most of the humanities and social sciences courses and
Course work completed by a part-time degree student who
EPICS as well as in option courses in junior and senior years.
subsequently changes to full-time status will be accepted as
Students are required to write reports, make oral presenta-
meeting degree requirements.
tions, and generally demonstrate their facility in the English
Seniors in Graduate Courses
language while enrolled in their courses.
With the consent of the student’s department/division and
The LAIS Writing Center is available to assist students
the Dean of Graduate Studies, a qualified senior may enroll
with their writing. For additional information, contact the
in 500-level courses without being a registered graduate stu-
LAIS Division, Stratton 301; 303-273-3750.
dent. At least a 2.5 GPA is required. The necessary forms
for attending these courses are available in the Registrar’s
Summer Session
Office. Seniors may not enroll in 600-level courses. Credits
The summer session is divided into two independent units:
in 500-level courses earned by seniors may be applied
a period not to exceed 6 weeks for required field and labora-
toward an advanced degree at CSM only if:
tory courses and an 8-week on-campus summer school dur-
ing which some regular school year courses are offered.
1. The student gains admission to the Graduate School.
Dead Week
2. The student’s graduate committee agrees that these credits
All final examinations will take place during the exami-
are a reasonable part of his graduate program.
nations week specified in the Academic Calendar. With the
3. The student provides proof that the courses in question
possible exception of laboratory examinations, no other
were not counted toward those required for the Bachelor’s
examinations will be given during the week preceding
Degree.
examinations week (Dead Week).
4. Graduate courses applied to a graduate degree may not
Dead Day
count toward eligibility for undergraduate financial aid.
No academic meetings, examinations or activities may
This may only be done if a student has been admitted to a
take place on the Friday immediately preceding final exams
Combined BS/MS degree program and has received the
for the fall and spring terms.
appropriate prior approvals.
Final Examination Policy
Undergraduate students enrolled in graduate-level courses
Final examinations are scheduled by the Registrar. With
(500-level) are graded using the graduate grading system.
the exception of courses requiring a common time, all finals
See the CSM Graduate Bulletin for a description of the grad-
will be scheduled on the basis of the day and the hour the
ing system used in graduate-level courses.
course is offered.
Course Substitution
In general, all final examinations will be given only during
To substitute credit for one course in place of another course
the stated final examination period and are to appear on the
required as part of the approved curricula in the catalog, a
Registrar's schedule. Faculty policy adopted in January 1976
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
31

provides that no exams may be given during the week pre-
4. A minimum of 19 hours in humanities and social sciences
ceding examinations week (dead week), with the possible ex-
courses.
ception of laboratory exams. The scheduling by an
5. The recommendation of their degree-granting department/
individual faculty member of a final exam during dead week
division to the faculty.
is to be avoided because it tends to hinder the students'
timely completion of other course work and interfere with
6. The certification by the Registrar that all required aca-
the schedules of other instructors. Faculty members should
demic work is satisfactorily completed.
not override this policy, even it the students in the class vote
7. The recommendation of the faculty and approval of the
to do so.
Board of Trustees.
Full-time Enrollment
Seniors must submit an Application to Graduate two se-
Full-time enrollment for certification for Veterans Bene-
mesters prior to the anticipated date of graduation. Applica-
fits, athletics, loans, most financial aid, etc. is 12 credit hours
tions are available in the Registrar’s Office.
per semester for the fall and spring semesters. Full-time
The Registrar’s Office provides the service of doing pre-
enrollment for field session is 6 credit hours, and full-time
liminary degree audits. Ultimately, however, it is the respon-
enrollment for summer session is 6 credit hours.
sibility of students to monitor the progress of their degrees.
Curriculum Changes
It is also the student’s responsibility to contact the Registrar’s
The Board of Trustees of the Colorado School of Mines
Office when there appears to be a discrepancy between the
reserves the right to change any course of study or any part
degree audit and the student’s records.
of the curriculum in keeping with educational and scientific
All graduating students must officially check out of
developments. Nothing in this catalog or the registration of
School. Checkout cards, available in the Dean’s Office, must
any student shall be considered as a contract between Colo-
be completed and returned one week prior to the expected
rado School of Mines and the student.
date of completion of degree requirements.
Undergraduate Degree Requirements
No students, graduate or undergraduate, will receive diplo-
Bachelor of Science Degree
mas until they have complied with all the rules and regula-
Upon completion of the requirements and upon being rec-
tions of Colorado School of Mines and settled all accounts
ommended for graduation by the faculty, and approved by
with the School. Transcript of grades and other records will
the Board of Trustees, the undergraduate receives one of the
not be provided for any student or graduate who has an un-
following degrees:
settled obligation of any kind to the School.
Bachelor of Science (Chemical Engineering)
Multiple Degrees. A student wishing to complete Bache-
Bachelor of Science (Chemistry)
lor of Science degrees in more than one degree program must
Bachelor of Science (Economics)
receive permission from the heads of the appropriate depart-
Bachelor of Science (Engineering)
ments to become a multiple degree candidate. The following
Bachelor of Science (Engineering Physics)
requirements must be met by the candidate in order to obtain
Bachelor of Science (Geological Engineering)
multiple degrees:
Bachelor of Science (Geophysical Engineering)
1. All requirements of each degree program must be met.
Bachelor of Science (Mathematical and Computer Sciences)
2. Any course which is required in more than one degree need be
Bachelor of Science (Metallurgical & Materials Engineering)
taken only once.
Bachelor of Science (Mining Engineering)
Bachelor of Science (Petroleum Engineering)
3. A course required in one degree program may be used as a
technical elective in another, if it satisfies the restrictions of
Graduation Requirements
the elective.
To qualify for a Bachelor of Science degree from Colo-
4. Different catalogs may be used, one for each degree program.
rado School of Mines, all candidates must satisfy the follow-
ing requirements:
5. No course substitutions are permitted in order to circumvent
courses required in one of the degree programs, or reduce the
1. A minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.000 for
number of courses taken. However, in the case of overlap of
all academic work completed in residence.
course content between required courses in the degree pro-
2. A minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.000 for
grams, a more advanced course may be substituted for one of
courses in the candidate’s major.
the required courses upon approval of the head of each depart-
3. A minimum of 30 hours credit in 300 and 400 series tech-
ment concerned, and the Registrar on behalf of the office of
nical courses in residence, at least 15 of which are to be
Academic Affairs. The course substitution form can be ob-
taken in the senior year.
tained in the Registrar’s Office.
32
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Undergraduate Programs In Design, 6 semester hours in Design Engineering Practices
Introductory Course Sequence.
All programs are designed to fulfill the expectations of the
In Systems, 7 semester hours in Earth and Environmental
Profile of the Colorado School of Mines Graduate in accor-
Systems (4), and Human Systems (3).
dance with the mission and goals of the School, as intro-
duced on page 5. To enable this, the curriculum is made up of
In Humanities and the Social Sciences, 10 semester hours:
a common core, eleven undergraduate degree granting pro-
Nature and Human Values (4), Principles of Economics (3),
grams, and a variety of support and special programs. Each
Human Systems (3) (also partially meets Systems require-
degree granting program has an additional set of goals which
ment)), and a restricted cluster of 9 semester hours in H&SS
focus on the technical and professional expectations of that
electives. Note that the Human Systems course is inclusive
program. The common core and the degree granting pro-
in both the Humanities and Social Sciences and the Systems
grams are coupled through course sequences in mathematics
core segments. Note that the economics requirement can be
and the basic sciences, in specialty topics in science and/or
satisfied by taking the Microeconomics/Macroeconomics
engineering, in humanities and the social sciences, and in
sequence (EBGN311 & EBGN312) instead of taking Prin-
design. Further linkage is achieved through a core course
ciples of Economics. This option is recommended for stu-
sequence which addresses system interactions among phe-
dents considering a major or minor in economics.
nomena in the natural world, the engineered world, and the
In Physical Education, Four separate semesters including
human world.
PAGN101 and PAGN102 totaling a minimum of 2 credit
Through the alignment of the curriculum to these institu-
hours.
tional goals and to the additional degree-granting program
In Freshman Orientation and Success, 0.5 semester hours.
goals, all engineering programs are positioned for accredita-
Free electives, minimum 9 hours, are included within each
tion by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technol-
degree granting program. With the exception of the restric-
ogy, and science programs are positioned for approval by
tions mentioned below, the choice of free elective courses
their relevant societies, in particular the American Chemical
to satisfy degree requirements is unlimited. The restric-
Society for the Chemistry program.
tions are:
Course Numbering
1. The choice must not be in conflict with any Graduation
Numbering of Courses:
Requirements (p. 33).
Course numbering is based on the content of material pre-
2. Free electives to satisfy degree requirements may not ex-
sented in courses.
ceed three semester hours in concert band, chorus, studio
Course Numbering:
art, and physical education and athletics.
100–199
Freshman level
Lower division
The Freshman Year
200–299
Sophomore level Lower division
Freshmen in all programs normally take the same subjects,
300–399
Junior level
Upper division
as listed below:
400–499
Senior level
Upper division
500–699
Graduate level
Fall Semester
subject code** and course number
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Over 700
Graduate Research or Thesis level
CHGN121 Principles of Chemistry I
3
3
4
Student Life
MACS111 Calculus for Scientists & Engn’rs I
4
4
CSM101. FRESHMAN SUCCESS SEMINAR is a “college
SYGN101* Earth and Environmental Systems
3
3
4
adjustment” course, taught in small groups, designed to assist
LAIS100* Nature and Human Values
4
4
CSM101 Freshman Success Seminar
0.5
0.5
students with the transition from high school to CSM.
PAGN101 Physical Education I
0.5
0.5
Emphasis is placed on appreciation of the value of a Mines
Total
17
education, and the techniques and University resources that
Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
will allow freshmen to develop to their fullest potential at
CHGN124 Principles of Chemistry I
3
3
CSM. 8 meetings during semester; 0.5 semester hours.
CHGN126 Quantitative Chem. Measurements
3
1
The Core Curriculum
MACS112 Calculus for Scientists & Engn’rs II 4
4
Core requirements for graduation include the following:
EPIC151* Design I
2
3
3
PHGN100 Physics I
3.5
3
4.5
In Mathematics and the Basic Sciences, 12 semester hours
PAGN102 Physical Education II
2
0.5
in Calculus for Scientists and Engineers and 3 semester
Total
16
hours in Differential Equations (2 semester hours in Dif-
* For scheduling purposes, registration in combinations of
ferential Equations for Geological Engineering majors);
SYGN101, LAIS100 and EPIC151 will vary between the fall
8 semester hours in the Principles of Chemistry; and
and spring semesters. In come cases the combinations may
9 semester hours in Physics.
include taking EBGN201 in the freshman instead of the soph-
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
33

omore year, whereupon one of the * courses is shifted to the
upper-division courses and to develop some of the key skills
sophomore year. Students admitted with acceptable advanced
of the professional engineer: the ability to solve complex,
placement credits will be registered in accordance with their
open-ended problems; the ability to self-educate; and the
advanced placement status.
ability to communicate effectively.
** Key to Subject Codes
An award-winning program, EPICS replaces the traditional
ChEN Chemical Engineering
core courses in introductory computing skills, graphics, and
CHGC Geochemistry
technical communication. Whenever possible, instruction in
CHGN Chemistry
these subjects is “hands-on” and experiential, with the in-
DCGN Core Science and Engineering Fundamentals
structor serving primarily as mentor rather than lecturer.
EBGN Economics and Business
Problem-solving skills are developed through “projects,”
EGES Engineering Systems (Engineering)
open-ended problems, which the students solve in teams.
EGGN Engineering
Starting with simple case studies, the projects grow in length
EPIC
EPICS
and complexity to a final, full-semester project submitted by
ESGN Environmental Science and Engineering
an external client. The projects require extensive library
GEGN Geological Engineering
research and self-education in appropriate technical areas;
GEGX Geochemical Exploration (Geology)
they also require students to consider non-technical con-
GEOC Oceanography (Geology)
straints (economic, ethical, political, societal) in arriving at
GEOL Geology
their solutions.
GOGN Geo-Engineering (Mining)
GPGN Geophysical Engineering
Written and oral communications are studied and practiced
HNRS Honors Program
as an integral part of the project work. Graphics and comput-
LAIS
Liberal Arts & International Studies
ing skills are integrated with projects wherever possible.
LICM Communication
Among the topics studied by students in EPICS are: use
LIFL
Foreign Languages
of the computer as a problem-solving tool, and the use of
LIMU Band; Choir
word-processing, graphics, spreadsheet and CAD packages;
MACS Mathematical & Computer Sciences
3-D visualization; audience analysis and the preparation of
MNGN Mining Engineering
a variety of technical documents; oral communication in
MSGN Military Science
the staff format; interpersonal skills in group work; project
MTGN Metallurgical & Materials Engr’ng
management.
PAGN Physical Education and Athletics
The EPICS program is required of all undergraduates.
PEGN Petroleum Engineering
PHGN Physics
Division of Liberal Arts and International Studies (LAIS)
SYGN Core sequence in Systems
Writing Center
Located in room 311 Stratton Hall (phone: 303-273-3085),
The Sophomore Year
the LAIS Writing Center is a teaching facility providing all
Requirements for the sophomore year are listed within
CSM students with an opportunity to enhance their writing
each degree granting program. Continuing requirements for
proficiency. The LAIS Writing Center faculty are experi-
satisfying the core are met in the sophomore, junior and
enced technical and professional writing instructors. The
senior years. It is advantageous, but not essential, that stu-
Center assists writers with all their writing needs, from
dents select one of the eleven undergraduate degree programs
course assignments to scholarship applications, proposals,
early in the sophomore year.
letters and resumes. This service is free to CSM students
Curriculum Changes
and includes one-to-one tutoring and online resources (at
In accordance with the statement on Curriculum Changes
http://www.mines.edu/Academic/lais/wc/writingcenter.html).
on page 33, the Colorado School of Mines makes improve-
Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC)
ments in its curriculum from time to time. To confirm that
To support the institutional goal of developing professional
they are progressing according to the requirements of the
communication skills, required writing and communication-
curriculum, students should consult their academic advisors
intensive courses are designated in both the core and in the
on a regular basis and should carefully consult any Bulletin
degree-granting programs. The Campus Writing Program,
Addenda that may be published.
housed in LAIS, supports the WAC program.
Special Programs
In addition to disciplinary writing experience, students
EPICS (Engineering Practices Introductory Course
also obtain writing experience outside their disciplines as
Sequence)
courses in the Division of Liberal Arts and International
EPICS is a two-semester sequence of courses for freshman
Studies are virtually all writing intensive. Writing-intensive
and sophomores, designed to prepare students for their
courses within the various degree-granting programs are
34
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

designated with (WI) in Section 6 of this Bulletin,
impose higher minimum grades for inclusion of the course in
Description of Courses.
the minor/ASI. In these cases, the program specified mini-
The Guy T. McBride, Jr. Honors Program in Public
mum course grades take precedence. For additional informa-
Affairs for Engineers
tion on program-specific minimum course grade
The McBride Honors Program offers a 24-semester-hour
requirements, refer to the appropriate program section of this
program of seminars and off-campus activities that has the
Bulletin.
primary goal of providing a select number of students the
As a minimum, to be awarded a minor/ASI, CSM requires
opportunity to cross the boundaries of their technical exper-
students obtain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher in all
tise and to gain the sensitivity to prove, project, and test the
minor/ASI courses. All attempts at required minor/ASI
moral and social implications of their future professional
courses are used in computing this minor/ASI GPA. Some
judgments and activities, not only for the particular organiza-
programs offering minors/ASIs may, however, require a
tions with which they will be involved, but also for the nation
higher minimum cumulative GPA. In these cases, the pro-
and the world. To achieve this goal, the Program seeks to
gram specified GPA takes precedence. For additional infor-
bring themes from the humanities and the social sciences into
mation on program specific GPA requirements, refer to the
the engineering curriculum to develop in students habits of
appropriate section of this Bulletin.
thought necessary for effective management, social responsi-
Students may not request more than half of the required
bility, and enlightened leadership.
courses for the minor or ASI be completed through transfer
This program leads to a certificate and a Minor in the
credit, including AP, IB and CLEP. Some minor/ASI pro-
McBride Honors Program in Public Affairs for Engineers.
grams, however, have been established in collaboration with
Bioengineering and Life Sciences (BELS)
other institutions through formal articulation agreements and
Nine CSM departments and divisions have combined
these may allow transfer credit exceeding this limit. For ad-
resources to offer a Minor Program and an Area of Special
ditional information on program specific transfer credit lim-
Interest (ASI) in Bioengineering and Life Sciences (BELS).
its, refer to the appropriate section of this Bulletin.
The BELS minor and the ASI are flexible, requiring only one
A Minor Program/Area of Special Interest declaration
common core course (BELS/ESGN301, General Biology I).
(which can be found in the Registrar's Office) should be sub-
The rest of the courses can be chosen, in consultation with a
mitted for approval prior to the student's completion of half
BELS program advisor, from a broad list of electives, allow-
of the hours proposed to constitute the program, or at the
ing students to concentrate their learning in areas such as
time of application for graduation - whichever comes first.
Biomedical Engineering, Biomaterials, Environmental Bio-
Once the declaration form is submitted to the Registrar's Of-
technology, Biophysics or Pre-Medical studies. Interested
fice, the student deciding not to complete the minor must of-
students should consult with the office of Dr. Joel Bach,
ficially drop the minor by notifying the Registrar's Office in
Brown Building 314A, 303-384-2161, jmbach@mines.edu.
writing. Should minor requirements not be complete at the
Minor Program/Area of Special Interest
time of graduation, the minor program will not be awarded.
Established Minor Programs/Areas of Special Interest
Minors are not added after the BS degree is posted. Comple-
(ASI) are offered by all of the undergraduate degree-granting
tion of the minor will be recorded on the student's official
departments as well as the Division of Environmental Sci-
transcript.
ence and Engineering, the Division of Liberal Arts and Inter-
Please see the Department for specific course require-
national Studies, and the Military Science Department.
ments. For questions concerning changes in the sequence of
A MINOR PROGRAM of study consists of a minimum of
minor courses after the declaration form is submitted, contact
18 credit hours of a logical sequence of courses. With the
the Registrar's Office for assistance.
exception of the McBride Honors minor, only three of these
Study Abroad
hours may be taken in the student's degree-granting depart-
Students wishing to pursue study abroad opportunities
ment and no more than three of these hours may be at the
should contact the Office of International Programs (OIP),
100- or 200-level.
listed under the Services section of this Bulletin, p.156.
An AREA OF SPECIAL INTEREST consists of a mini-
Colorado School of Mines encourages students to include an
mum of 12 credit hours of a logical sequence of courses.
international study/work experience in their undergraduate
Only three of these hours may be at the 100- or 200-level and
education. CSM maintains student exchange programs with
no more than three of these hours may be specifically re-
engineering universities in South America, Europe, Australia,
quired for the degree program in which the student is gradu-
Africa, and Asia. Courses successfully passed abroad can be
ating.
substituted for their equivalent course at CSM. Overall GPA
is not affected by courses taken abroad. In addition, study
As a minimum, CSM requires that any course used to ful-
abroad can be arranged on an individual basis at universities
fill a minor/ASI requirement be completed with a passing
throughout the world.
grade. Some programs offering minors/ASIs may, however,
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
35

Financial aid and selected scholarships and grants can be
progress reports. The course emphasizes oral presentations
used to finance approved study abroad programs. The OIP
and builds on written communications techniques introduced
has developed a resource center for study abroad information
in Design (EPICS) I. In addition, these sections provide in-
in its office, 109 Stratton Hall, phone 303-384-2121. Students
struction and practice in team interactions (learning styles,
are invited to use the resource materials and meet with staff
conflict resolution), project management (case studies, semi-
to discuss overseas study opportunities.
nars), and policy (multiple clients, product outcome, and im-
Core Areas
pact). Prerequisite: EPIC151. 4 semester hours.
Systems
Design
SYGN101. EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS
Engineering Practices Introductory Course
(I, II, S) Fundamental concepts concerning the nature, com-
Sequence (EPICS)
position and evolution of the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmos-
ROBERT D. KNECHT, Design (EPICS) Program Director and
phere and biosphere of the earth integrating the basic sciences
CEPR Research Professor
of chemistry, physics, biology and mathematics. Understand-
Freshman Year
ing of anthropological interactions with the natural systems,
EPIC151. Design (EPICS) I introduces a design process that
and related discussions on cycling of energy and mass, global
includes open-ended problem solving and teamwork inte-
warming, natural hazards, land use, mitigation of environ-
grated with the use of computer software as tools to solve
mental problems such as toxic waste disposal, exploitation and
engineering problems. Computer applications emphasize
conservation of energy, mineral and agricultural resources,
graphical visualization and production of clear and coherent
proper use of water resources, biodiversity and construction.
graphical images, charts, and drawings. Teams assess engi-
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
neering ethics, group dynamics and time management with
SYGN200. HUMAN SYSTEMS (I, II) This is a pilot
respect to decision-making. The course emphasizes written
course in the CSM core curriculum that articulates with
technical communications and introduces oral presentations.
LAIS100: Nature and Human Values and with the other
3 semester hours.
systems courses. Human Systems is an interdisciplinary
Sophomore Year
historical examination of key systems created by humans -
EPIC251. Design (EPICS) II builds on the design process in-
namely, political, economic, social, and cultural institutions -
troduced in Design (EPICS) I, which focuses on open-ended
as they have evolved worldwide from the inception of the
problem solving in which students integrate teamwork and
modern era (ca. 1500) to the present. This course embodies
communications with the use of computer software as tools
an elaboration of these human systems as introduced in their
to solve engineering problems. Computer applications empha-
environmental context in Nature and Human Values and will
size information acquisition and processing based on know-
reference themes and issues explored therein. It also demon-
ing what new information is necessary to solve a problem
strates the cross-disciplinary applicability of the “systems”
and where to find the information efficiently. Teams analyze
concept. Assignments will give students continued practice
team dynamics through weekly team meetings and progress
in writing. Prerequisite: LAIS100. 3 semester hours.
reports. The course emphasizes oral presentations and builds
SYGN201. ENGINEERED EARTH SYSTEMS (I) An
on written communications techniques introduced in Design
introduction to Engineered Earth Systems. Aspects of appro-
(EPICS) I. Design (EPICS) II is also offered during the first
priate earth systems and engineering practices in geological,
summer field session in a three-week format. Prerequisite:
geophysical, mining and petroleum engineering. Emphasis
EPIC151. 3 semester hours.
on complex interactions and feedback loops within and
EPIC252. Leadership Design (EPICS) can be taken in lieu of
among natural and engineered systems. A case histories
EPIC251. Leadership Design (EPICS) II builds on the design
format provides an introduction to earth engineering fields.
process introduced in Design (EPICS) I, which focuses on
2 hours lecture/seminar, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
open-ended problem solving in which students integrate
SYGN202. ENGINEERED MATERIALS SYSTEMS (I, II)
skills in teamwork, communications, and computer software
Introduction to the structure, properties, and processing of
to solve engineering problems. This section, however, pre-
materials. The historical role that engineered and natural
sents projects, which require strategic planning and commu-
materials have made on the advance of civilization. Engi-
nity interaction to expose design students to the challenges
neered materials and their life cycles through processing,
and responsibilities of leadership. Computer applications
use, disposal and recycle. The impact that engineered mate-
emphasize information acquisition and processing based on
rials have on selected systems to show the breadth of prop-
knowing what new information is necessary to solve a prob-
erties that are important and how they can be controlled by
lem and where to find the information efficiently. Students
proper material processing. Recent trends in materials devel-
analyze team dynamics through weekly meetings and
opment mimicking natural materials in the context of the
36
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

structure and functionality of materials in living systems.
DCGN381. INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS,
Prerequisites or concurrent: CHGN124, MACS112,
ELECTRONICS AND POWER (I, II, S) This course pro-
PHGN100. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
vides an engineering science analysis of electrical circuits.
SYGN203. NATURAL AND ENGINEERED ENVIRON-
The following topics are included: DC and single- and three-
MENTAL SYSTEMS Introduction to natural and engi-
phase AC circuit analysis, current and charge relationships.
neered environmental systems analysis. environmental deci-
Ohm’s Law, resistors, inductors, capacitors, equivalent
sion making, sustainable development, industrial ecology,
resistance and impedance, Kirchoff’s Laws, Thevenin and
pollution prevention, and environmental life cycle assess-
Norton equivalent circuits, superposition and source trans-
ment. The basic concepts of material balances, energy bal-
formation, power and energy, maximum power transfer, first
ances, chemical equilibrium and kinetics and structure and
order transient response, algebra of complex numbers, pha-
function of biological systems will be used to analyze envi-
sor representation, time domain and frequency domain con-
ronmental systems. Case studies in sustainable development,
cepts, effective and rms vales, complex power, apparent
industrial ecology, pollution prevention and life cycle assess-
power, power factor, balanced delta and wye line and phase
ment will be covered. The goal of this course is to develop
currents, filters, resonance, diodes, EM work, moving charge
problem-solving skills associated with the analysis of envi-
in an electric field, relationship between EM voltage and
ronmental systems. Prerequisites: CHGN124 or concurrent;
work, Faraday’s and Ampere’s Laws, magnetic reluctance
MACS112 or concurrent; PHGN100; SYGN101. 3 hours
and ideal transformers. Prerequisite: PHGN200. 3 hours lec-
lecture; 3 semester hours.
ture; 3 semester hours.
Distributed Core
Combined Undergraduate/
DCGN209. INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL THERMO-
DYNAMICS (I, II, S) Introduction to the fundamental
Graduate Degree Programs
principles of classical thermodynamics, with particular empha-
A. Overview
sis on chemical and phase equilibria. Volume-temperature-
Many degree programs offer CSM undergraduate students
pressure relationships for solids, liquids, and gases; ideal and
the opportunity to begin work on a Graduate Certificate, Pro-
non-ideal gases. Introduction to kinetic-molecular theory of
fessional Master’s Degree, or Master’s Degree while com-
ideal gases and the Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions. Work,
pleting the requirements for their Bachelor’s Degree. These
heat, and application of the First Law to closed systems,
combined Bachelor’s-Master’s programs have been created
including chemical reactions. Entropy and the Second and
by CSM faculty in those situations where they have deemed
Third Laws; Gibbs Free Energy. Chemical equilibrium and
it academically advantageous to treat BS and MS degree pro-
the equilibrium constant; introduction to activities & fugacities.
grams as a continuous and integrated process. These acceler-
One- and two-component phase diagrams; Gibbs Phase
ated programs can be valuable in fields of engineering and
Rule. Prerequisites: CHGN121, CHGN124, MACS111,
applied science where advanced education in technology
MACS112, PHGN100. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and/or management provides the opportunity to be on a fast
Students with credit in DCGN210 may not also receive cred-
track for advancement to leadership positions. These pro-
it in DCGN209.
grams also can be valuable for students who want to get a
DCGN210. INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING THER-
head start on graduate education.
MODYNAMICS (I, II) Introduction to the fundamental
The combined programs at CSM offer several advantages
principles of classical engineering thermodynamics. Appli-
to students who choose to enroll in them:
cation of mass and energy balances to closed and open sys-
tems including systems undergoing transient processes.
1. Students can earn a graduate degree in their undergraduate
Entropy generation and the second law of thermodynamics
major or in a field that complements their undergraduate
for closed and open systems. Introduction to phase equilibri-
major.
um and chemical reaction equilibria. Ideal solution behavior.
2. Students who plan to go directly into industry leave CSM
Prerequisites: CHGN121, CHGN124, MACS111, MACS112,
with additional specialized knowledge and skills which
PHGN100. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Students with
may allow them to enter their career path at a higher level
credit in DCGN209 may not also receive credit in DCGN210.
and advance more rapidly. Alternatively, students planning
DCGN241. STATICS (I, II, S) Forces, moments, couples,
on attending graduate school can get a head start on their
equilibrium, centroids and second moments of areas, vol-
graduate education.
umes and masses, hydrostatics, friction, virtual work.
3. Students can plan their undergraduate electives to satisfy
Applications of vector algebra to structures. Prerequisite:
prerequisites, thus ensuring adequate preparation for their
Credit or concurrent enrollment in PHGN100, MACS112,
graduate program.
EPIC151 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
37

4. Early assignment of graduate advisors permits students to
grams. These students may enroll in both undergraduate and
plan optimum course selection and scheduling in order to
graduate courses (see section D below), may have access to
complete their graduate program quickly.
departmental assistance available through both programs,
5. Early acceptance into a Combined Degree Program lead-
and may be eligible for undergraduate financial aid as deter-
ing to a Graduate Certificate, Professional Master’s Degree,
mined by the Office of Financial Aid. Upon completion of
or Non-Thesis Master’s Degree assures students of auto-
their undergraduate degree requirements, a Combined Degree
matic acceptance into full graduate status if they maintain
Program student is considered enrolled full-time in his/her
good standing while in early-acceptance status.
graduate program. Once having done so, the student is no
longer eligible for undergraduate financial aid, but may now
6. In many cases, students will be able to complete both
be eligible for graduate financial aid. To complete their grad-
Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees in five years of total
uate degree, each Combined Degree Program student must
enrollment at CSM.
register as a graduate student for at least one semester.
Certain graduate programs may allow Combined Program
Once fully admitted into a graduate program, under-
students to fulfill part of the requirements of their graduate
graduate Combined Degree Program students must maintain
degree by including up to six hours of specified course credits
good standing in the Combined Degree Program by main-
which also were used in fulfilling the requirements of their
taining a minimum semester GPA of 3.0 in all courses taken.
undergraduate degree. Those courses must meet all require-
Students not meeting this requirement are deemed to be mak-
ments for graduate credit, and their grades are included in calcu-
ing unsatisfactory academic progress in the Combined De-
lating the graduate GPA. Check the departmental section of the
gree Program. Students for whom this is the case are subject
Bulletin to determine which programs provide this opportunity.
to probation and, if occurring over two semesters, subject to
B. Admission Process
discretionary dismissal from the graduate portion of their
A student interested in applying into a graduate degree
program as defined in the Unsatisfactory Academic Perfor-
program as a Combined Degree Program student should first
mance section of the Graduate Bulletin.
contact the department or division hosting the graduate de-
Upon completion of the undergraduate degree requirements,
gree program into which he/she wishes to apply. Initial in-
Combined Degree Program students are subject to all require-
quiries may be made at any time, but initial contacts made
ments (e.g., course requirements, departmental approval of
soon after completion of the first semester, Sophomore year
transfer credits, research credits, minimum GPA, etc.) appro-
are recommended. Following this initial inquiry, departments/
priate to the graduate program in which they are enrolled.
divisions will provide initial counseling on degree applica-
tion procedures, admissions standards and degree completion
D. Enrolling in Graduate Courses as a Senior in a
requirements.
Combined Program
As described in the Undergraduate Bulletin, seniors may
Admission into a graduate degree program as a Combined
enroll in 500-level courses. In addition, undergraduate
Degree Program student can occur as early as the first semes-
seniors who have been granted admission through the Com-
ter, Junior year, and must be granted no later than the end of
bined Degree Program into thesis-based MS degree programs
registration, last semester Senior year. Once admitted into a
may, with graduate advisor approval, register for 700-level
graduate degree program, students may enroll in 500-level
research credits appropriate to Master’s-level degree programs.
courses and apply these directly to their graduate degree. To
With this single exception, while a Combined Degree Program
apply, students must submit the standard graduate application
student is still completing his/her undergraduate degree, all
package for the graduate portion of their Combined Degree
of the conditions described in this Bulletin for undergraduate
Program. Upon admission into a graduate degree program,
enrollment in graduate-level courses apply. 700-level research
students are assigned graduate advisors. Prior to registration
credits are always applied to a student’s graduate degree
for the next semester, students and their graduate advisors
program. If an undergraduate Combined Degree Program
should meet and plan a strategy for completing both the un-
student would like to enroll in a 500-level course and apply
dergraduate and graduate programs as efficiently as possible.
this course to his/her graduate degree, he/she must notify the
Until their undergraduate degree requirements are completed,
Registrar of the intent to do so prior to enrolling in the
students continue to have undergraduate advisors in the home
course. The Registrar will forward this information to the
department or division of their Bachelor’s Degrees.
Office of Financial Aid for appropriate action. If prior con-
C. Requirements
sent is not received, all 500-level graduate courses taken as
Combined Degree Program students are considered under-
an undergraduate Combined Degree Program student will be
graduate students until such time as they complete their
applied to the student’s undergraduate degree transcript.
undergraduate degree requirements. Combined Degree Pro-
gram students who are still considered undergraduates by this
definition have all of the privileges and are subject to all
expectations of both their undergraduate and graduate pro-
38
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Chemical Engineering
as fluid mechanics, heat and mass transport, thermodynamics
and reaction kinetics, and chemical process control are at the
JAMES F. ELY, Professor and Head of Department
heart of the chemical engineering curriculum at CSM. In ad-
ANTHONY M. DEAN,W.K. Coors Distinguished Professor
dition, it is becoming increasingly important for chemical
JOHN R. DORGAN, Professor
engineers to understand how microscopic, molecular-level
DAVID W. M. MARR, Professor
properties can influence the macroscopic behavior of materials
J. THOMAS MCKINNON, Professor
RONALD L. MILLER, Professor
and chemical systems. This somewhat unique focus is first
E. DENDY SLOAN,Weaver Distinguished Professor
introduced at CSM through the physical and organic chem-
J. DOUGLAS WAY, Professor
istry sequences, and the theme is continued and developed
ANDREW M. HERRING, Associate Professor
within the chemical engineering curriculum via a senior-level
CAROLYN A. KOH, Associate Professor
capstone course in molecular perspectives. Our undergraduate
COLIN A. WOLDEN, Associate Professor
program at CSM is exemplified by intensive integration of
DAVID T. WU, Associate Professor (also Chemistry)
computer-aided molecular simulation and computer-aided
SUMIT AGARWAL, Assistant Professor
process modeling in the curriculum, and by our unique ap-
MATTHEW W. LIBERATORE, Assistant Professor
proach to teaching of the unit operations laboratory sequence.
TRACY Q. GARDNER, Lecturer
The unit operations lab course is offered only in the summer
JOHN M. PERSICHETTI, Lecturer
ROBERT J. EVANS, Research Professor
as a six-week intensive “field session”. Here, the fundamen-
ROBERT D. KNECHT, Research Professor, Director of EPICS
tals of heat, mass, and momentum transport and applied
ANGEL ABBUD-MADRID, Research Associate Professor
thermodynamics are reviewed in a practical, applications-
HANS HEINRICH-CARSTENSEN, Research Associate Professor
oriented setting. The important subjects of teamwork, critical
SERGEI KISELEV, Research Associate Professor
thinking, and oral and written technical communications
KELLY T. MILLER, Research Associate Professor
skills are also stressed in this course.
EDWARD P. RIEDEL, Research Associate Professor
GLENN MURRAY, Research Assistant Professor
Facilities for the study of chemical engineering at the Col-
JOHN OAKEY, Research Assistant Professor
orado School of Mines are among the best in the nation. Our
WAYNE ROMONCHUK, Research Assistant Professor
modern in-house computer network supports over 50 work-
EUN-JAE SHIN, Research Assistant Professor
stations, and is anchored by an IBM SP-2 parallel supercom-
BERTHE STEMPFER, Research Assistant Professor
puter. Specialized undergraduate laboratory facilities exist for
PAUL M. THOEN, Research Assistant Professor
the study of polymer properties, and for reaction engineering
ROBERT M. BALDWIN, Professor Emeritus
and unit operations. In 1992, the department moved into a
ANNETTE L. BUNGE, Professor Emeritus
new $11 million facility which included both new classroom
JAMES H. GARY, Professor Emeritus
and office space, as well as high quality laboratories for un-
JOHN O. GOLDEN, Professor Emeritus
dergraduate and graduate research. Our honors undergraduate
ARTHUR J. KIDNAY, Professor Emeritus
VICTOR F. YESAVAGE, Professor Emeritus
research program is open to highly qualified students, and
provides our undergraduates with the opportunity to carry out
Program Description
independent research, or to join a graduate research team.
The field of chemical engineering is extremely broad, and
This program has been highly successful and Mines under-
encompasses all technologies and industries where chemical
graduate chemical engineering students have won several na-
processing is utilized in any form. Students with baccalaureate
tional competitions and awards based on research conducted
(B.S.) chemical engineering degrees from CSM can find
while pursuing their baccalaureate degree.
employment in many and diverse fields, including: advanced
The program leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in
materials synthesis and processing, product and process re-
Chemical Engineering is accredited by the Engineering Ac-
search and development, food and pharmaceutical processing
creditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engi-
and synthesis, biochemical and biomedical materials and
neering and Technology, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050,
products, microelectronics manufacture, petroleum and
Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, telephone (410) 347-7700.
petrochemical processing, and process and product design.
Program Educational Objectives (Bachelor of
The practice of chemical engineering draws from the
Science in Chemical Engineering)
fundamentals of chemistry, mathematics, and physics. Ac-
In addition to contributing toward achieving the educa-
cordingly, undergraduate students must initially complete a
tional objectives described in the CSM Graduate Profile and
program of study that stresses these three basic fields of sci-
the ABET Accreditation Criteria, the Chemical engineering
ence. Chemical engineering coursework blends these three
Program at CSM has established the following program edu-
disciplines into a series of engineering fundamentals relating
cational objectives:
to how materials are produced and processed both in the lab-
oratory and in large industrial-scale facilities. Courses such
u Instill in our students a high-quality basic education in
chemical engineering fundamentals;
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
39

u Develop the skills required to apply these fundamentals
1. Unit Operations Laboratory (ChEN312 and 313)
to the synthesis, analysis, and evaluation of chemical
2. Reaction Engineering (ChEN418)
engineering processes and systems; and
3. Process Dynamics and Control (ChEN403)
uFoster personal development to ensure a lifetime of pro-
4. Chemical Engineering Design (ChEN402)
fessional success and an appreciation of the ethical and
5. Chemical Engineering Technical Electives (one at
societal responsibilities of a chemical engineer.
400 level)
Combined Baccalaureate/Masters Degree Program
C. Chemical Engineering Elective Tracks
The Chemical Engineering Department offers the opportu-
Students in chemical engineering may elect to structure
nity to begin work on a Master of Science (with thesis) while
free electives into a formal Minor program of study (18 hours
completing the requirements of the Bachelor’s degree. These
of coursework), an Area of Special Interest (12 hours) or a
combined BS/MS degrees are designed to allow undergradu-
Specialty Track in Chemical Engineering (9 hours). Minors
ates engaged in research to apply their experience to an ad-
and ASIs can be developed by the student in a variety of
vanced degree. An advantage of the combined BS/MS
different areas and programs as approved by the student’s
program is that students may apply 2 classes (6 credit hours)
advisor and the Heads of the relevant sponsoring academic
to both their BS and MS degrees. These two classes must be
programs. Specialty tracks in chemical engineering are avail-
chemical engineering elective courses at the 400-level or
able in the following areas:
higher. The remaining MS curriculum consists of the four
Microelectronics
core graduate courses (ChEN507, ChEN509, ChEN516, and
Bio Engineering and Life Sciences
ChEN518) and 18 thesis credits. It is expected that a student
Polymers and Materials
would be able to complete both degrees in 5–51/2 years. To
Molecular Modeling
take advantage of the combined, program students should be
Environmental
engaged in research and taking graduate coursework during
Energy
their senior year. For that reason students are expected to
Business and Economics
apply to the program by the end of their junior year. Students
must have a GPA greater than 3.0 to be considered for the
Details on recommended courses for each of these tracks
program. Interested students are encouraged to get more in-
can be obtained from the student’s academic advisor.
formation from their advisor and/or the current faculty mem-
Requirements (Chemical Engineering)
ber in charge of Graduate Affairs.
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Curriculum
MACS213 Calculus for Scientists &
Engn’rs III
4
4
The chemical engineering curriculum is structured accord-
PHGN200 Physics II
3.5
3
4.5
ing to the goals outlined above. Accordingly, the program of
DCGN210 Introduction to Thermodynamics
3
3
study is organized to include 3 semesters of science and gen-
CHGN221 Organic Chemistry I
3
3
eral engineering fundamentals followed by 5 semesters of
CHGN223 Organic Chemistry Lab I
3
1
chemical engineering fundamentals and applications. An op-
PAGN201 Physical Education III
2
0.5
tional ‘track’ system is introduced at the junior year which al-
Total
16
lows students to structure free electives into one of several
Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
specialty applications areas. Courses in the chemical engi-
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
neering portion of the curriculum may be categorized accord-
EBGN201 Principles of Economics
3
3
ing to the following general system.
ChEN201 Mass and Energy Balances
3
3
ChEN202 Chemical Process Principles Lab
1
1
A. Chemical Engineering Fundamentals
CHGN222 Organic Chemistry II
3
3
The following courses represent the basic knowledge com-
EPIC251 Design II
2
3
3
ponent of the chemical engineering curriculum at CSM.
PAGN202 Physical Education IV
2
0.5
1. Mass and Energy Balances (ChEN201)
Total
16.5
2. Fluid Mechanics (ChEN307)
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
3. Heat Transfer (ChEN308)
CHGN351 Physical Chemistry I
3
3
4
4. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (ChEN357)
ChEN307 Fluid Mechanics
3
3
5. Mass Transfer (ChEN375)
ChEN357 Chemical. Eng. Thermodynamics
3
3
ChEN358 Chemical. Eng. Thermodynamics Lab
3
1
6. Transport Phenomena (ChEN430)
SYGN200 Human Systems
3
3
B. Chemical Engineering Applications
Elective*
3
3
The following courses are applications-oriented courses
Total
17
that build on the student’s basic knowledge of science and
engineering fundamentals:
40
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Junior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
of common process building blocks including pumps, heat
CHGN353 Physical Chemistry II
3
3
4
exchangers, chemical reactors, and separators. Prerequisites:
ChEN375 Chemical Eng. Mass Transfer
3
3
Concurrent enrollment in DCGN 210 or consent of instruc-
ChEN308 Chemical Eng. Heat Transfer
3
3
tor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Elective I
3
3
Elective*
3
3
Junior Year
Total
16
ChEN307. FLUID MECHANICS Theory and application of
Summer Field Session
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
momentum transport and fluid flow in chemical engineering.
ChEN312/313 Unit Operations Laboratory
6
6
Fundamentals of microscopic phenomena and application to
Total
6
macroscopic systems. Relevant aspects of computer-aided
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
process simulation. Prerequisite: ChEN201, MACS315.
ChEN418 Reaction Engineering
3
3
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ChEN430 Transport Phenomena
3
3
ChEN308. HEAT TRANSFER Theory and applications
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Elective II
3
3
of energy transport: conduction, convection and radiation.
Electives*
6
6
Fundamentals of microscopic phenomena and application to
Total
15
macroscopic systems. Relevant aspects of computer-aided
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
process simulation. Prerequisite: ChEN201, ChEN307,
ChEN402 Chemical Engineering Design
3
3
MACS315, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture;
ChEN403 Process Dynamics and Control
3
3
3 semester hours.
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Elective III
3
3
ChEN421 Engineering Economics
3
3
ChEN312/313. UNIT OPERATIONS LABORATORY
Elective*
3
3
Field Session (WI) Principles of mass, energy, and momentum
Total
15
transport as applied to laboratory-scale processing equipment.
Degree total
134.5
Written and oral communications skills. Aspects of group
*Two of the electives must be Chemical Engineering courses, one at
dynamics, teamwork, and critical thinking. Prerequisite:
the 400 level.
ChEN201, ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN357, ChEN375
6 hours lab; 6 semester hours.
Description of Courses
ChEN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION Cooperative
Sophomore Year
work/education experience involving employment of a chem-
ChEN200. COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN CHEMI-
ical engineering nature in an internship spanning at least one
CAL ENGINEERING Fundamentals of computer program-
academic semester. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 1 to 3
ming as applied to the solution of chemical engineering
semester hours.
problems. Introduction to Visual Basic, computational meth-
ChEN350. HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
ods and algorithm development. Prerequisite: MACS112 or
Scholarly research of an independent nature. Prerequisite:
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
junior standing, consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
ChEN201. MATERIAL AND ENERGY BALANCES Intro-
ChEN351. HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
duction to the principles of conservation of mass and energy.
Scholarly research of an independent nature. Prerequisite:
Applications to chemical processing systems. Relevant as-
junior standing, consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
pects of computer-aided process simulation. Prerequisite:
ChEN357. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THERMODY-
MACS315 (corequisite), DCGN210 or DCGN209 or consent
NAMICS Fundamentals of thermodynamics for application
of instructor. Corequisite ChEN202. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
to chemical engineering processes and systems. Phase and
mester hours.
reaction equilibria. Relevant aspects of computer-aided
ChEN202. CHEMICAL PROCESS PRINCIPLES LABORA-
process simulation. Integrated laboratory experiments. Pre-
TORY Laboratory measurements dealing with the first and
requisite: DCGN210 or DCGN209, ChEN201, MACS315, or
second laws of thermodynamics, calculation and analysis of
consent of instructor. Corequisite: ChEN358. 3 hours lecture;
experimental results, professional report writing. Introduc-
3 semester hours.
tion to computer-aided process simulation. Prerequisites:
ChEN358. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THERMODY-
DCGN210 or DCGN209; corequisites: ChEN201, MACS315
NAMICS LABORATORY Laboratory measurement, calcu-
or consent of instructor. 3 hours laboratory; 1 credit hour.
lation and analysis of physical properties, phase equilibria
ChEN250. INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL ENGINEER-
and reaction equilibria and their application to chemical engi-
ING ANALYSIS AND DESIGN. Introduction to chemical
neering. Relevant aspects of computer-aided simulation. Pre-
process industries and how analysis and design concepts
requisites: DCGN210 or DCGN209, ChEN201, MACS315,
guide the development of new processes and products. Use
or consent of instructor. Corequisite: ChEN357. 3 hours labo-
of simple mathematical models to describe the performance
ratory; 1 semester hour.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
41

ChEN375. MASS TRANSFER Fundamentals of stage-wise
ChEN416. POLYMER ENGINEERING AND TECH-
and diffusional mass transport with applications to chemical
NOLOGY Polymer fluid mechanics, polymer rheological
engineering systems and processes. Relevant aspects of
response, and polymer shape forming. Definition and
computer-aided process simulation. Prerequisite: ChEN201,
measurement of material properties. Interrelationships
ChEN357, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semes-
between response functions and correlation of data and
ter hours.
material response. Theoretical approaches for prediction of
ChEN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEER-
polymer properties. Processing operations for polymeric
ING Topical courses in chemical engineering of special inter-
materials; melt and flow instabilities. Prerequisite: ChEN307,
est. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 1 to 6 semester hours.
MACS315, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semes-
ter hours.
ChEN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY Individual research or
special problem projects. Topics, content, and credit hours to
ChEN418. REACTION ENGINEERING (WI) Applications
be agreed upon by student and supervising faculty member.
of the fundamentals of thermodynamics, physical chemistry,
Prerequisite: consent of instructor and department head, sub-
and organic chemistry to the engineering of reactive processes.
mission of “Independent Study” form to CSM Registrar. 1 to
Reactor design; acquisition and analysis of rate data; hetero-
6 semester hours.
geneous catalysis. Relevant aspects of computer-aided
process simulation. Prerequisite: ChEN201, ChEN307,
Senior Year
ChEN308, ChEN357, MACS315, CHGN221, CHGN351,
ChEN402. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN (WI)
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Advanced computer-aided process simulation and process
optimization. Prerequisite: ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN357,
ChEN420. MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN CHEMICAL
ChEN375, or consent of instructor. Co-requisite: ChEN418,
ENGINEERING Formulation and solution of chemical engi-
ChEN421. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
neering problems using exact analytical solution methods.
Set-up and solution of ordinary and partial differential equa-
ChEN403. PROCESS DYNAMICS AND CONTROL
tions for typical chemical engineering systems and transport
Mathematical modeling and analysis of transient systems.
processes. Prerequisite: MACS315, ChEN201, ChEN307,
Applications of control theory to response of dynamic
ChEN308, ChEN375, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lec-
chemical engineering systems and processes. Prerequisite:
ture; 3 semester hours.
ChEN201, ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN375, MACS315, or
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ChEN421. ENGINEERING ECONOMICS Economic
analysis of engineering processes and systems. Interest,
ChEN408. NATURAL GAS PROCESSING Application of
annuity, present value, depreciation, cost accounting, invest-
chemical engineering principles to the processing of natural
ment accounting and financing of engineering enterprises
gas. Emphasis on using thermodynamics and mass transfer
along with taxation, market evaluation and break-even
operations to analyze existing plants. Relevant aspects of
analysis. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture;
computer-aided process simulation. Prerequisites:
3 semester hours.
CHGN221, ChEN201, ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN357,
ChEN375, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semes-
ChEN430. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA Theory and chem-
ter hours.
ical engineering applications of momentum, heat, and mass
transport. Set up and solution of problems involving equa-
ChEN409. PETROLEUM PROCESSES Application of
tions of motion and energy. Prerequisite: ChEN307,
chemical engineering principles to petroleum refining.
ChEN308, ChEN357, ChEN375, MACS315, or consent of
Thermodynamics and reaction engineering of complex
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
hydrocarbon systems. Relevant aspects of computer-aided
process simulation for complex mixtures. Prerequisite:
ChEN435/PHGN435. INTERDISCIPLINARY MICRO-
CHGN221, ChEN201, ChEN357, ChEN375, or consent of
ELECTRONICS PROCESSING LABORATORY (II)
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Application of science and engineering principles to the
design, fabrication, and testing of microelectronic devices.
ChEN415/CHGN430/MLGN530. POLYMER SCIENCE
Emphasis on specific unit operations and the interrelation
AND TECHNOLOGY Chemistry and thermodynamics of
among processing steps. Prerequisites: Senior standing in
polymers and polymer solutions. Reaction engineering of
PHGN, ChEN, MTGN, or EGGN. Consent of instructor. Due
polymerization. Characterization techniques based on solu-
to lab space the enrollment is limited to 20 students. 1.5
tion properties. Materials science of polymers in varying
hours lecture, 4 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
physical states. Processing operations for polymeric materi-
als and use in separations. Prerequisite: CHGN221,
MACS315, ChEN357, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lec-
ture; 3 semester hours.
42
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

ChEN440. MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVES IN CHEMI-
Chemistry and
CAL ENGINEERING Applications of statistical and
quantum mechanics to understanding and prediction of
Geochemistry
equilibrium and transport properties and processes. Relations
between microscopic properties of materials and systems to
PAUL W. JAGODZINSKI, Professor
macroscopic behavior. Prerequisite: ChEN307, ChEN308,
DANIEL M. KNAUSS, Professor
ChEN357, ChEN375, CHGN351 and 353, CHGN221 and
DONALD L. MACALADY, Professor
PATRICK MACCARTHY, Professor
222, MACS315, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture;
KENT J. VOORHEES, Professor
3 semester hours
SCOTT W. COWLEY, Associate Professor
ChEN450. HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
MARK E. EBERHART, Associate Professor
Scholarly research of an independent nature. Prerequisite:
KEVIN W. MANDERNACK, Associate Professor (also Geology &
senior standing, consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
Geological Engineering)
JAMES F. RANVILLE, Associate Professor
ChEN451. HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
E. CRAIG SIMMONS, Associate Professor
Scholarly research of an independent nature. Prerequisite:
BETTINA M. VOELKER, Associate Professor
senior standing, consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
KIM R. WILLIAMS, Associate Professor
ChEN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEER-
DAVID T. WU, Associate Professor (also Chemical Engineering)
ING Topical courses in chemical engineering of special inter-
STEPHEN G. BOYES, Assistant Professor
STEVEN F. DEC, Lecturer
est. Prerequisite: consent of instructor; 1 to 6 semester hours.
BRAD J. HERRICK, Lecturer
ChEN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY Individual research or
RAMON E. BISQUE, Professor Emeritus
special problem projects. Topics, content, and credit hours to
STEPHEN R. DANIEL, Professor Emeritus
be agreed upon by student and supervising faculty member.
DEAN W. DICKERHOOF, Professor Emeritus
Prerequisite: consent of instructor and department head, sub-
KENNETH W. EDWARDS, Professor Emeritus
mission of “Independent Study” form to CSM Registrar. 1 to
GEORGE H. KENNEDY, Professor Emeritus
RONALD W. KLUSMAN, Professor Emeritus
6 semester hours.
DONALD LANGMUIR, Professor Emeritus
GEORGE B. LUCAS, Professor Emeritus
MICHAEL J. PAVELICH, Professor Emeritus
MAYNARD SLAUGHTER, Professor Emeritus
THOMAS R. WILDEMAN, Professor Emeritus
JOHN T. WILLIAMS, Professor Emeritus
ROBERT D. WITTERS, Professor Emeritus
CHARLES W. STARKS, Associate Professor Emeritus
Program Description
Chemistry provides fundamental knowledge critical to
satisfying many of society’s needs: feeding and clothing and
housing the world’s people, finding and using sources of
energy, improving health care, ensuring national security, and
protecting the environment. The programs of the Chemistry
and Geochemistry Department are designed to educate pro-
fessionals for the varied career opportunities this central sci-
entific discipline affords. The curricula are therefore founded
in rigorous fundamental science complemented by applica-
tion of these principles to the minerals, energy, materials, or
environmental fields. For example, a specific B.S. curricular
track emphasizing environmental chemistry is offered along
with a more flexible track which can be tailored to optimize
preparation consistent with students’ career goals. Those as-
piring to enter Ph.D. programs in chemistry are encouraged
to include undergraduate research beyond the minimum
required among their elective hours. Others interested in in-
dustrial chemistry choose area of special interest courses in
chemical engineering or metallurgy, for example. A signifi-
cant number of students complete degrees in both chemistry
and chemical engineering as an excellent preparation for in-
dustrial careers.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
43

The instructional and research laboratories located in
erties, acid-base theories, main-group element chem-
Coolbaugh Hall contain extensive instrumentation for: gas
istry, coordination chemistry, term symbols, ligand
chromatography (GC), high-performance liquid chromatog-
field theory, spectra and magnetism of complexes,
raphy (HPLC), ion chromatography (IC), supercritical-fluid
organometallic chemistry.
chromatography (SFC), inductively-coupled-plasma-atomic
u Organic chemistry - bonding and structure, structure-
emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) field-flow fractionation
physical property relationships, reactivity-structure re-
(FFF), mass spectrometry (MS, GC/MS, GC/MS/MS, PY/MS,
lationships, reaction mechanisms (nucleophilic and
PY/GC/MS, SFC/MS, MALDI-TOF), nuclear magnetic
electrophilic substitution, addition, elimination, radical
resonance spectrometry (solids and liquids), infrared spectro-
reactions, rearrangements, redox reactions, photochem-
photometry (FTIR), visible-ultraviolet spectrophotometry,
ical reactions, and metal-mediated reactions), chemical
microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), and
kinetics, catalysis, major classes of compounds and
thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).
their reactions, design of synthetic pathways.
Program Educational Objectives (Bachelor of
u Physical chemistry - thermodynamics (energy, enthalpy,
Science in Chemistry)
entropy, equilibrium constants, free energy, chemical
In addition to contributing toward achieving the educa-
potential, non-ideal systems, standard states, activity,
tional objectives described in the CSM Graduate Profile and
phase rule, phase equilibria, phase diagrams), electro-
the ABET Accreditation Criteria, the B.S. curricula in chem-
chemistry, kinetic theory (Maxwell-Boltzmann distri-
istry are designed to:
bution, collision frequency, effusion, heat capacity,
u Impart mastery of chemistry fundamentals;
equipartition of energy), kinetics (microscopic re-
u Develop ability to apply chemistry fundamentals in
versibility, relaxation processes, mechanisms and rate
solving open-ended problems;
laws, collision and absolute rate theories), quantum
u Impart knowledge of and ability to use modern tools of
mechanics (Schroedinger equations, operators and
chemical analysis and synthesis;
matrix elements, particle-in-a-box, simple harmonic
u Develop ability to locate and use pertinent information
oscillator, rigid rotor, angular momentum, hydrogen
from the chemical literature;
atom, hydrogen wave functions, spin, Pauli principle,
u Develop ability to interpret and use experimental data
LCAO method), spectroscopy (dipole selection rules,
for chemical systems;
rotational spectra, term symbols, atomic and molecular
u Develop ability to effectively communicate in both
electronic spectra, magnetic spectroscopy, Raman spec-
written and oral formats;
troscopy, multiphoton selection rules, lasers), statistical
u Prepare students for entry to and success in profes-
thermodynamics (ensembles, partition functions, Ein-
sional careers;
stein crystals, Debye crystals), group theory, surface
u Prepare students for entry to and success in graduate
chemistry, X-ray crystallography, electron diffraction,
programs; and
dielectric constants, dipole moments.
u Prepare students for responsible contribution to society.
Laboratory and communication skills
Curriculum
u Analytical methods - gravimetry, titrimetry, sample
The B.S. chemistry curricula, in addition to the strong
dissolution, fusion, quantitative spectrophotometry,
basis provided by the common core, contain three compo-
GC, HPLC, GC/MS, potentiometry, AA, ICP-AES
nents: chemistry fundamentals, laboratory and communica-
u Synthesis techniques - batch reactor assembly, inert-
tion skills, and applications courses.
atmosphere manipulations, vacuum line methods,
Chemistry fundamentals
high-temperature methods, high-pressure methods,
u Analytical chemistry - sampling, method selection,
distillation, recrystallization, extraction, sublimation,
statistical data analysis, error sources, interferences,
chromatographic purification, product identification
theory of operation of analytical instruments (atomic
u Physical measurements - refractometry, viscometry,
and molecular spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, mag-
colligative properties, FTIR, NMR
netic resonance spectrometry, chromatography and
u Information retrieval - Chemical Abstracts, CA on-line,
other separation methods, electroanalytical methods,
CA registry numbers, Beilstein, Gmelin, handbooks,
and thermal methods), calibration, standardization,
organic syntheses, organic reactions, inorganic syntheses,
stoichiometry of analysis, equilibrium and kinetics
primary sources, ACS Style Guide
principles in analysis.
u Reporting - lab notebook, experiment and research re-
u Inorganic chemistry - atomic structure and periodicity,
ports, technical oral reports
crystal lattice structure, molecular geometry and bond-
ing (VSEPR, Lewis structures, VB and MO theory,
u Communication - scientific reviews, seminar presenta-
bond energies and lengths), metals structure and prop-
tions
44
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Applications
Junior-Senior Year Summer Field Session
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
u Area of special interest courses - application of chem-
CHGN490 Synthesis & Characterization
18
6
istry fundamentals in another discipline; e.g. chemical
Total
6
engineering, environmental science, materials science
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
u Internship - summer or semester experience in an in-
CHGN495 Research
9
3
Area of Special Interest Elective (chm**)
3
3
dustrial or governmental organization working on real-
ESGN Area of Special Interest (env**)
6
6
world problems
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective II
3
3
u Undergraduate research-open-ended problem solving in
CHGN401 Theoretical Inorganic Chem. (chm**) 3
3
the context of a research project
Free elective (chm**)
3
3
Total
15
Degree Requirements (Chemistry)
**specialty restrictions
The B.S. curricula in chemistry are outlined below. The
restrictions specific to the environmental chemistry track are
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
labeled (env) while those specific to the other track are labeled
CHGN495 Undergraduate Research
6
2
(chm); those common to both tracks bear no label. In the envi-
CHGN410 Surface Chemistry (env**)
3
3
Area of Special Interest Elective (chm**)
3
3
ronmental track the area of special interest must be in Environ-
ESGN Area of Special Interest (env**)
3
3
mental Science and Engineering (ESGN) (see page 55).
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective III
3
3
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
CHGN403 Environmental Chemistry (env**)
3
3
MACS213 Calculus for Scientists & Engn’rs III 4
4
Free elective (chm**)
3
3
PHGN200 Physics II
3.5
3
4.5
Free elective
3
3
DCGN209 Introduction to Thermodynamics
3
3
Total
14
CHGN221 Organic Chemistry I
3
3
Degree Total
137.5
CHGN223 Organic Chemistry I Lab
3
1
PAGN201 Physical Education III
2
0.5
# Possible electives that will be recommended to students are:
Total
16
SYGN202; SYGN203; ChEN201; PHGN300; EBGN305,
EBGN306, EBGN310, EBGN311, EBGN312; ESGN201/BELS301;
Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
ESGN353; GEOL201, 210, 212; MNGN210; PEGN102; CHGN462
CHGN222 Organic Chemistry II
3
3
CHGN224 Organic Chemistry II Lab
3
1
Chemistry Minor and ASI Programs
Technical Elective#
3
3
No specific course sequences are suggested for students
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
wishing to include chemistry minors or areas of special inter-
CHGN335 Instrumental Analysis
3
3
est in their programs. Rather, those students should consult
CHGN201 Thermodynamics Laboratory
3
1
with the CHGC department head (or designated faculty
EPIC251 Design II
2
3
3
member) to design appropriate sequences.
PAGN202 Physical Education IV
2
0.5
Total
17.5
Description of Courses
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
CHGN111. INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY (S) Introduc-
SYGN200 Human Systems
3
3
tory college chemistry. Elementary atomic structure and the
CHGN428 Biochemistry
3
3
periodic chart, chemical bonding, properties of common ele-
CHGN336 Analytical Chemistry
3
3
ments and their compounds, and stoichiometry of chemical
CHGN337 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory
3
1
reactions. Must not be used for elective credit. 3 hours lec-
CHGN351 Physical Chemistry I
3
3
4
ture and recitation; 3 semester hours.
Area of Special Interest Elective (chm**)
3
3
ESGN - Environmental Elective (env**)
3
3
CHGN121. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I (I, II) Study
Total
17
of matter and energy based on atomic structure, correlation
**specialty restrictions
of properties of elements with position in periodic chart,
chemical bonding, geometry of molecules, phase changes,
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
CHGN353 Physical Chemistry II
3
3
4
stoichiometry, solution chemistry, gas laws, and thermo-
CHGN341 Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry
3
3
chemistry. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours. Ap-
CHGN323 Qualitative Organic Analysis
1
3
2
proved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer.
CHGN395 Introduction to Undergraduate
Equivalency for GT-SC1.
Research
3
1
CHGN124. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II (I, II, S)
EBGN201 Principles of Economics
3
3
Continuation of CHGN121 concentrating on chemical kinetics,
Area of Special Interest Elective (chm**)
3
3
Free elective
3
3
thermodynamics, electrochemistry, organic nomenclature,
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Elective I
3
3
and chemical equilibrium (acid- base, solubility, complexa-
Total
19
tion, and redox). Prerequisite: Credit in CHGN121. 3 hours
lecture; 3 semester hours.
**specialty restrictions
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
45

CHGN126. QUANTITATIVE CHEMICAL MEASURE-
CHGN323. QUALITATIVE ORGANIC ANALYSIS (II)
MENTS (I, II, S) Experiments emphasizing quantitative
Identification, separation and purification of organic com-
chemical measurements. Prerequisite: Credit in or concurrent
pounds including use of modern physical and instrumental
enrollment in CHGN124. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
methods. Prerequisite: CHGN222, CHGN224. 1 hour lec-
CHGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (I, II) Pilot
ture; 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
CHGN335. INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS (II) Principles
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is
of AAS, AES, Visible-UV, IR, NMR, XRF, XRD, XPS, elec-
offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable
tron, and mass spectroscopy; gas and liquid chromatography;
credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
data interpretation. Prerequisite: DCGN209, MACS112.
CHGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
CHGN336. ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY (I) Theory and
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
techniques of gravimetry, titrimetry (acid-base, complexo-
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Indepen-
metric, redox, precipitation), electrochemical analysis, chem-
dent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
ical separations; statistical evaluation of data. Prerequisite:
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
DCGN209, CHGN335. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CHGN201. CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS LABORA-
CHGN337. ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY LABORA-
TORY (II) Experiments in determining enthalpy, entropy,
TORY (I) (WI) Laboratory exercises emphasizing sample
free energy, equilibrium constants, reaction rates, colligative
preparation and instrumental methods of analysis. Prerequi-
properties. Prerequisites DCGN209 or concurrent enroll-
site: CHGN335, CHGN336 or concurrent enrollment.
ment. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
CHGN221. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (I) Structure, prop-
CHGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (I, II, S) Super-
erties, and reactions of the important classes of organic com-
vised, full-time, chemistry-related employment for a continu-
pounds, introduction to reaction mechanisms. Prerequisites:
ous six-month period (or its equivalent) in which specific
CHGN124, CHGN126. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
educational objectives are achieved. Prerequisite: Second
CHGN223. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY
semester sophomore status and a cumulative grade-point
(I,II) Laboratory exercises including purification techniques,
average of at least 2.00. 0 to 3 semester hours. Cooperative
synthesis, and characterization. Experiments are designed to
Education credit does not count toward graduation except
support concepts presented in the CHGN221. Students are
under special conditions.
introduced to Green Chemistry principles and methods of
CHGN341. DESCRIPTIVE INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (II)
synthesis and the use of computational software. Prerequi-
The chemistry of the elements and periodic trends in reac-
sites: CHGN221 or concurrent enrollment. 3 hours labora-
tivity discussed in relation to the preparation and use of
tory, 1 semester hour.
inorganic chemicals in industry and the environment. Pre-
CHGN222. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (II) Continuation of
requisite: CHGN222, DCGN209. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
CHGN221. Prerequisites: CHGN221, CHGN223 or concur-
hours.
rent enrollment. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CHGN351. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A MOLECULAR
CHGN224. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY
PERSPECTIVE I (I) A study of chemical systems from a
(II) Laboratory exercises using more advanced synthesis
molecular physical chemistry perspective. Includes an intro-
techniques. Experiments are designed to support concepts
duction to quantum mechanics, atoms and molecules, spec-
presented in CHGN222. Prerequisites: CHGN221,
troscopy, bonding and symmetry, and an introduction to
CHGN223, and CHGN222 or concurrent enrollment. 3 hours
modern computational chemistry. Prerequisite: CHGN124,
laboratory, 1 semester hour.
DCGN209, MACS315, PHGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours
laboratory; 4 semester hours.
CHGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (I, II) Pilot
course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
CHGN353. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A MOLECULAR
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is
PERSPECTIVE II (II) A continuation of CHGN351. Includes
offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable
statistical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, chemical reac-
credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
tion mechanisms, electrochemistry, and selected additional
topics. Prerequisite: CHGN351. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab-
CHGN299. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
oratory; 4 semester hours.
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
CHGN395. INTRODUCTION TO UNDERGRADUATE
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Indepen-
RESEARCH (I, II, S) (WI) Introduction to Undergraduate
dent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
Research is designed to prepare students to pursue their
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
senior research projects prior to enrollment in CHGN495
46
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

(Undergraduate Research). Students will attend lectures and
CHGN428. INTRODUCTORY BIOCHEMISTRY (I) Intro-
research presentations, the student, in consultation with their
ductory study of the major molecules of biochemistry-amino
research advisor, will select a research area, perform litera-
acids, proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, lipids, and saccha-
ture research, design a research project and prepare a re-
rides- their structure, chemistry, biological function, and
search proposal. Prerequisites: Completion of the chemistry
biosynthesis. Stresses bioenergetics and the cell as a bio-
curriculum through the Fall semester of the junior year or
logical unit of organization. Discussion of classical genetics,
permission of the department head. Credit: 1 semester hour.
molecular genetics, and protein synthesis. Prerequisite:
CHGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (I, II) Pilot
CHGN221 or permission of instructor. 3 hours lecture;
course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
3 semester hours.
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is
CHGN430/MLGN530. INTRODUCTION TO POLYMER
offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable
SCIENCE (I) An introduction to the chemistry and physics
credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
of macromolecules. Topics include the properties and statis-
CHGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
tics of polymer solutions, measurements of molecular
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
weights, molecular weight distributions, properties of bulk
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
polymers, mechanisms of polymer formation, and properties
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Indepen-
of thermosets and thermoplasts including elastomers. Pre-
dent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
requisite: CHGN221 or permission of instructor. 3 hour
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
lecture, 3 semester hours.
CHGN401. THEORETICAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (II)
CHGN462. MICROBIOLOGY AND THE ENVIRON-
Periodic properties of the elements. Bonding in ionic and
MENT This course will cover the basic fundamentals of
metallic crystals. Acid-base theories. Inorganic stereochem-
microbiology, such as structure and function of procaryotic
istry. Nonaqueous solvents. Coordination chemistry and
versus eucaryotic cells; viruses; classification of micro-
ligand field theory. Prerequisite: CHGN341 or consent of
organisms; microbial metabolism, energetics, genetics,
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
growth and diversity, microbial interactions with plants, ani-
mals, and other microbes. Additional topics covered will in-
CHGN402. BONDING THEORY AND SYMMETRY (II)
clude various aspects of environmental microbiology such as
Introduction to valence bond and molecular orbital theories,
global biogeochemical cycles, bioleaching, bioremediation,
symmetry; introduction to group theory; applications of
and wastewater treatment. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
group theory and symmetry concepts to molecular orbital and
3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours. Offered in alternate years.
ligand field theories. Prerequisite: CHGN341 or consent of
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CHGN475. COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY (II) This
class provides a survey of techniques of computational chem-
CHGN/ESGN403. INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMEN-
istry, including quantum mechanics (both Hartree-Fock and
TAL CHEMISTRY (II) Processes by which natural and
density functional approaches) and molecular dynamics. Em-
anthropogenic chemicals interact, react and are transformed
phasis is given to the integration of these techniques with ex-
and redistributed in various environmental compartments.
perimental programs of molecular design and development.
Air, soil and aqueous (fresh and saline surface and ground-
Prerequisites: CHGN351, CHGN401. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
waters) environments are covered, along with specialized
mester hours.
environments such as waste treatment facilities and the upper
atmosphere. Prerequisites: SYGN101, DCGN209,
CHGN490. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION
CHGN222. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(WI) Advanced methods of organic and inorganic synthesis;
high-temperature, high-pressure, inert-atmosphere, vacuum-
CHGN410/MLGN510. SURFACE CHEMISTRY (II) Intro-
line, and electrolytic methods. Prerequisites: CHGN323,
duction to colloid systems, capillarity, surface tension and
CHGN341. 6-week summer field session; 6 semester hours.
contact angle, adsorption from solution, micelles and micro-
emulsions, the solid/gas interface, surface analytical tech-
CHGN495. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (I, II, S) (WI)
niques, van der Waal forces, electrical properties and colloid
Individual research project under direction of a member of
stability, some specific colloid systems (clays, foams and
the Departmental faculty. Prerequisites: selection of a re-
emulsions). Students enrolled for graduate credit in MLGN510
search topic and advisor, preparation and approval of a re-
must complete a special project. Prerequisite: DCGN209 or
search proposal, completion of chemistry curriculum through
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
the junior year or permission of the department head. Vari-
able credit; 1 to 5 credit hours.
CHGN422. POLYMER CHEMISTRY LABORATORY (I)
Prerequisites: CHGN221, CHGN223. 3 hours lab; 1 semester
hour.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
47

CHGN497. INTERNSHIP (I, II, S) Individual internship ex-
Economics and Business
perience with an industrial, academic, or governmental host
supervised by a Departmental faculty member. Prerequisites:
RODERICK G. EGGERT, Professor and Division Director
Completion of chemistry curriculum through the junior year
JOHN T. CUDDINGTON, William J. Coulter Professor
or permission of the department head. Variable credit; 1 to 6
CAROL A. DAHL, Professor
credit hours.
GRAHAM A. DAVIS, Professor
MICHAEL R. WALLS, Professor
CHGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (I, II) Pilot
ALEXANDRA M. NEWMAN, Associate Professor
course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
EDWARD J. BALISTRERI, Assistant Professor
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is
CIGDEM Z. GURGUR, Assistant Professor
offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable
MICHAEL B. HEELEY, Assistant Professor
credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
IRINA KHINDANOVA, Assistant Professor
YADVIGA V. SEMIKOLENOVA, Assistant Professor
CHGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
JOHN M. STERMOLE, Lecturer
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
ANN DOZORETZ, Instructor
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
FRANKLIN J. STERMOLE, Professor Emeritus
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Indepen-
JOHN E. TILTON, University Emeritus Professor
dent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
ROBERT E. D. WOOLSEY, Professor Emeritus
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Program Description
The economy is becoming increasingly global and de-
pendent on advanced technology. In such a world, private
companies and public organizations need leaders and man-
agers who understand economics and business, as well as
science and technology.
Programs in the Division of Economics and Business are
designed to bridge the gap that often exists between econo-
mists and managers, on the one hand, and engineers and sci-
entists, on the other. All CSM undergraduate students are
introduced to economic principles in a required course, and
many pursue additional course work in minor programs or
elective courses. The courses introduce undergraduate stu-
dents to economic and business principles so that they will
understand the economic and business environments, both
national and global, in which they will work and live.
In keeping with the mission of the Colorado School of
Mines, the Division of Economics and Business offers a
Bachelor of Science in Economics. Most economics degrees
at other universities are awarded as a Bachelor of Arts, with a
strong liberal arts component. Our degree, the only one of its
kind in Colorado, is grounded in mathematics, engineering
and the sciences. We graduate technologically literate econo-
mists with quantitative economics and business skills that
give them a competitive advantage in today’s economy.
Economics majors have a range of career options follow-
ing their undergraduate studies. Some pursue graduate de-
grees in economics, business, or law. Others begin careers as
managers, economic advisors, and financial officers in busi-
ness or government, often in organizations that deal with en-
gineering, applied science, and advanced technology.
Program Educational Objectives (Bachelor of
Science in Economics)
In addition to contributing toward achieving the educa-
tional objectives described in the CSM Graduate Profile and
the ABET Accreditation Criteria, the educational objectives
48Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

of the undergraduate program in economics and business are: Junior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
To provide students with a strong foundation in economic
EBGN321 Engineering Economics
3
3
EBGN409 Math Econ. or
theory and analytical techniques, taking advantage of the
EBGN455 Lin. Prog.**
3
3
mathematical and quantitative abilities of CSM under-
EBGN Elective II
3
3
graduate students; and
LAIS Restricted Elective I
3
3
To prepare students for the work force, especially in
LAIS H&SS Cluster Elective II
3
3
organizations in CSM’s areas of traditional strength
Free Elective
3
3
(engineering, applied science, mathematics and computer
Total
18
science), and for graduate school, especially in economics,
Summer Field Session
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
business, and law.
EBGN402 Field Session
3
3
Total
3
Curriculum
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Within the major, students can choose a special concentration
EBGN Elective II
3
3
in Global Business or Technology. If students do not choose one
EBGN Elective III
3
3
of these options, they will complete the (default) Economics and
LAIS Restricted Elective II
3
3
Business option. All economics majors take forty-five percent of
LAIS H&SS Cluster Elective III
3
3
their courses in math, science, and engineering, including the
Free Elective
3
3
same core required of all CSM undergraduates. Students take
Total
15
another forty percent of their courses in economics, business,
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
and the humanities and social sciences more generally. The re-
EBGN Elective IV
3
3
maining fifteen percent of the course work can come from any
LAIS Restricted Elective III
3
3
field. Many students complete minor programs in a technical
Free Electives
9
9
field, such as computer science, engineering, geology, or envi-
Total
15
ronmental science. A number of students pursue double majors.
Degree Total
135.5
To complete the economics major, students must take 39
*Students who complete the EBGN311/312 sequence are not re-
hours of 300 and 400 level economics and business courses.
quired to take EBGN201. For students pursuing a major in econom-
Of these, 18 hours must be at the 400 level. At least 30 of the
ics, EBGN201 is not a substitute for either EBGN311 or EBGN312.
required 39 hours must be taken in residence in the home de-
**Students must take either EBGN409 or EBGN455.
partment. For students participating in an approved foreign
Technology Option
study program, up to 19 hours of the 30 hours in residence
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
requirement may be taken abroad.
Same courses as in default option above.
Total
18
Degree Requirements in Economics
Economics and Business Option (default)
Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Same courses as in default option above.
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Total
15.5
EBGN311 Principles of Microeconomics*
3
3
PHGN200 Physics II
3.5
3
4.5
Junior Year Fall Semester lec. lab. sem.hrs.
MACS213 Calc. for Scientists & Engineers III 4
4
EBGN325 Operations Research
3
3
MACS323 Probability and Statistics
3
3
EBGN390 Econometrics
3
3
EPICS251 or EPICS252 Design II
2
3
3
EBGN411 Intermediate Microeconomics
3
3
PAGN201 Physical Education III
2
0.5
EBGN412 Intermediate Macroeconomics
3
3
Total
18
MACS332 Linear Algebra
3
3
LAIS H&SS Cluster Elective I
3
3
Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Total
18
EBGN312 Principles of Macroeconomics*
3
3
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
SYGN200 Human Systems
3
3
EBGN321 Engineering Economics
3
3
PAGN202 Physical Education IV
2
0.5
EBGN409 Math Econ or
Free Electives
6
6
EBGN455 Lin. Prog.**
3
3
Total
15.5
EBGN Technology Elective I
3
3
Technology Elective I
3
3
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
LAIS H&SS Cluster Elective II
3
3
EBGN325 Operations Research Methods
3
3
Free Elective
3
3
EBGN390 Econometrics
3
3
Total
18
EBGN411 Intermediate Microeconomics
3
3
EBGN412 Intermediate Macroeconomics
3
3
Summer Field Session
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
MACS332 Linear Algebra
3
3
EBGN402 Field Session
3
3
LAIS H&SS Cluster Elective I
3
3
Total
3
Total
18
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
49

Senior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Electives for the Economics Major Listed by
EBGN Technology Elective II
3
3
Specialization
EBGN Technology Elective III
3
3
Economics and Business Specialization (default)
LAIS Technology Elective II
3
3
Economics and Business specialization students take 12
LAIS H&SS Cluster Elective III
3
3
hours from the following list of EBGN electives, of which at
Free Electives
3
3
least 3 hours must be a 400-level course that has EBGN411
Total
15
and/or EBGN412 as prerequisites.
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
EBGN Technology Elective IV
3
3
EBGN304 Personal Finance
LAIS Technology Elective III
3
3
EBGN305 Financial Accounting
Free Electives
9
9
EBGN306 Managerial Accounting
Total
15
EBGN310 Environmental and Resource Economics
EBGN314 Principles of Management
Degree Total
135.5
EBGN315 Business Strategy
** Students must take either EBGN409 or EBGN455.
EBGN320 Economics and Technology
Global Business Option
EBGN330 Energy Economics
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
EBGN342 Economic Development
Same courses as in default option above.
EBGN345 Principles of Corporate Finance
Total
18
EBGN401 History of Economic Thought
EBGN409 Mathematical Economics†
Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
EBGN441 International Trade
Same courses as in default option above.
EBGN445 International Business Finance
Total
15.5
EBGN455 Linear Programming†
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
EBGN495 Economic Forecasting
EBGN325 Operations Research
3
3
EBGN5XX††
EBGN390 Econometrics
3
3
†Only counts if not taken as part of the EBGN core.
EBGN411 Intermediate Microeconomics
3
3
EBGN412 Intermediate Macroeconomics
3
3
††Seniors with at least a 2.50 cumulative GPA may take a 500-level
MACS332 Linear Algebra
3
3
course with the consent of their department and the Dean of
LAIS H&SS Cluster Elective I
3
3
Graduate Studies.
Total
18
Economics and Business specialization students take 9
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
hours from the following list of LAIS restricted electives.
EBGN321 Engineering Economics
3
3
Courses used to satisfy the H&SS cluster requirements can-
EBGN409 Math Econ or
not be double counted.
EBGN 455 Lin. Prog.**
3
3
EBGN Global Business Elective II
3
3
LICM301 Professional Oral Communication
LIFL Foreign Language I*
3
3
LICM306 Selected Topics in Written Communication
LAIS H&SS Cluster Elective II
3
3
LAIS285 Introduction to Law and Legal Systems
Free Elective
3
3
LAIS335 International Political Economy of Latin America
Total
18
LAIS337 International Political Economy of Asia
LAIS339 International Political Economy of the Middle East
Summer Field Session
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
LAIS341 International Political Economy of Africa
EBGN402 Field Session
6
3
LAIS345 International Political Economy
Total
3
LAIS435 Latin American Development
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
LAIS436 Hemispheric Integration in the Americas
EBGN Global Business Elective II
3
3
LAIS437 Asian Development
EBGN Global Business Elective III
3
3
LAIS441 African Development
LAIS Global Business Elective I
3
3
LAIS442 Natural Resources and War in Africa
LIFL Foreign Language II*
3
3
LAIS446 Globalization
LAIS H&SS Cluster Elective III
3
3
LAIS447 Global Corporations
Total
15
LAIS448 Global Environmental Issues
LAIS452 Corruption and Development
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
LAIS470 Technology and Gender Issues
EBGN Global Business Elective IV
3
3
LAIS485 Constitutional Law and Politics
LAIS Global Business Elective II
3
3
LAIS486 Science and Technology Policy
Free Electives
9
9
LAIS487 Environmental Politics and Policy
Total
15
LAIS488 Water Politics and Policy
Degree Total
135.5
Technology Specialization
*Must be in same language.
Technology specialization students take 12 hours from the
**Students must take either EBGN409 or EBGN455.
following list of EBGN courses, of which 3 hours must be
50
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Economics and Technology, and at least 3 hours must be a
LAIS436 Hemispheric Integration in the Americas
400-level course that has EBGN411 and/or EBGN412 as pre-
LAIS437 Asian Development
requisites.
LAIS441 African Development
LAIS442 Natural Resources and War in Africa
EBGN314 Principles of Management
LAIS447 Global Corporations
EBGN315 Business Strategy
LAIS448 Global Environmental Issues
EBGN320 Economics and Technology
LAIS452 Corruption and Development
EBGN409 Mathematical Economics†
EBGN455 Linear Programming†
Minor Program
EBGN495 Economic Forecasting
The minor in Economics requires that students complete 6
EBGN5XX††
economics courses, for a total of 18 credit hours. Minors are
†Only counts if not taken as part of the EBGN core.
required to take Principles of Microeconomics (EBGN311)
††Seniors with at least a 2.50 cumulative GPA may take a 500-level
and Principles of Macroeconomics (EBGN312). Students
course with the consent of their department and the Dean of Gradu-
who complete the EBGN311/312 sequence are not required
ate Studies.
to take EBGN201 to satisfy their CSM core curriculum re-
Technology specialization students take 9 hours from the
quirement. If a student has already taken EBGN201 in addi-
following list of LAIS courses. Courses used to satisfy the
tion to EBGN311 and EBGN312, he/she should choose 3
H&SS cluster requirements cannot be double counted.
additional courses from the lists below. If a student has not
taken EBGN201, he/she should choose 4 additional courses
LICM301 Professional Oral Communication
from the lists below. Students can choose courses from either
LICM306 Selected Topics in Written Communication
the economics focus or the business focus list (or both). Re-
LAIS371 History of Technology
LAIS470 Technology and Gender Issues
gardless of their course selection, the minor remains “Eco-
LAIS476 Technology and International Development
nomics and Business.” Economics courses taken as part of
LAIS486 Science and Technology Policy
the Humanities and Social Sciences cluster electives can be
Global Business Specialization
counted toward the minor.
Global Business specialization students take 12 hours from
Area of Special Interest
the following list of EBGN courses, of which at least 3 hours
The area of special interest in Economics and Business re-
must be a 400-level course that has EBGN411 and/or
quires that students complete either Principles of Economics
EBGN412 as prerequisites.
(EBGN201) and 3 other courses in economics and business
EBGN305 Financial Accounting
chosen from the lists below, for a total of 12 credit hours, or
EBGN306 Managerial Accounting
Principles of Microeconomics (EBGN311), Principles of
EBGN314 Principles of Management
Macroeconomics (EBGN312) and 2 other courses chosen
EBGN315 Business Strategy
from the lists below, for a total of 12 credit hours. Students
EBGN342 Economic Development
who complete the EBGN311/312 sequence are not required
EBGN345 Principles of Corporate Finance
to take EBGN201 to satisfy their core curriculum require-
EBGN409 Mathematical Economics†
ment. Economics courses taken as part of the Humanities and
EBGN455 Linear Programming†
EBGN441 International Trade
Social Sciences cluster electives can be counted toward the
EBGN445 International Business Finance
area of special interest.
EBGN495 Economic Forecasting
Economics Focus
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
EBGN5XX††
EBGN310 Environmental and Resource Econ.
3
3
†Only counts if not taken as part of the EBGN core.
EBGN315 Business Strategy
3
3
EBGN320 Economics and Technology
3
3
††Seniors with at least a 2.50 cumulative GPA may take a 500-level
EBGN330 Energy Economics
3
3
course with the consent of their department and the Dean of
EBGN342 Economic Development
3
3
Graduate Studies.
EBGN390 Econometrics
3
3
Global Business specialization students take 6 hours from
EBGN401 History of Economic Thought
3
3
the following list of LAIS courses. Courses used to satisfy
EBGN409 Mathematical Economics
3
3
the H&SS cluster requirements cannot be double counted.
EBGN411 Intermediate Microeconomics
3
3
EBGN412 Intermediate Macroeconomics
3
3
LICM301 Professional Oral Communication
EBGN441 International Economics
3
3
LICM306 Selected Topics in Written Communication
EBGN495 Economic Forecasting
3
3
LAIS285 Introduction to Law and Legal Systems
LAIS335 International Political Economy of Latin America
Business Focus
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
LAIS337 International Political Economy of Asia
EBGN304 Personal Finance
3
3
LAIS339 International Political Economy of the Middle East
EBGN305 Financial Accounting
3
3
LAIS341 International Political Economy of Africa
EBGN306 Managerial Accounting
3
3
LAIS345 International Political Economy
EBGN314 Principles of Management
3
3
LAIS435 Latin American Development
EBGN321 Engineering Economics
3
3
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
51

EBGN325 Operations Research
3
3
EBGN305. FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (I, II) Survey and
EBGN345 Corporate Finance
3
3
evaluation of balance sheets and income and expense state-
EBGN445 International Business Finance
3
3
ments, origin and purpose. Evaluation of depreciation, deple-
EBGN455 Linear Programming
3
3
tion, and reserve methods for tax and internal management
Description of Courses
purposes. Cash flow analysis in relation to planning and
Freshman Year
decision making. Inventory methods and cost controls related
EBGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS AND
to dynamics of production and processing. 3 hours lecture;
BUSINESS (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course.
3 semester hours.
Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and
EBGN306. MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (II) Intro-
student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequi-
duction to cost concepts and principles of management ac-
site: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
counting including cost accounting. The course focuses on
EBGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
activities that create value for customers and owners of a
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
company and demonstrates how to generate cost-accounting
member. A student and instructor agree on a subject matter,
information to be used in management decision making. Pre-
content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study”
requisite: EBGN305. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Vari-
EBGN310. ENVIRONMENTAL AND RESOURCE ECO-
able credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
NOMICS (I) (WI) Application of microeconomic theory
Sophomore Year
to topics in environmental and resource economics. Topics
EBGN201. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS (I, II) The
include analysis of pollution control, benefit/cost analysis in
basic social and economic institutions of market capitalism.
decision-making and the associated problems of measuring
Contemporary economic issues. Business organization. Price
benefits and costs, non-renewable resource extraction,
theory and market structure. Economic analysis of public
measures of resource scarcity, renewable resource manage-
policies. Discussion of inflation, unemployment, monetary
ment, environmental justice, sustainability, and the analysis
policy and fiscal policy. Students may elect to satisfy the
of environmental regulations and resource policies. Prerequi-
economics core requirement by taking both EBGN311 and
site: EBGN201 or EBGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
EBGN312 instead of this course. Students considering a
hours.
major in economics are advised to take the EBGN311/312
EBGN311. MICROECONOMICS (I, II, S) How markets for
sequence instead of EBGN201. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
goods and services work. Economic behavior of consumers,
hours.
businesses, and government. Market structure and pricing.
EBGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS AND
Efficiency and equity. Public policies. Students may satisfy
BUSINESS (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course.
the economics core requirement by taking the EBGN311/312
Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and
sequence instead of EBGN201. Students considering a major
student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequi-
in economics are advised to skip EBGN201 and begin with
site: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
the EBGN311/312 sequence. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
hours.
EBGN299. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
EBGN312. MACROECONOMICS (I, II, S) Analysis of
member. A student and instructor agree on a subject matter,
gross domestic output and cyclical variability, plus the gen-
content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study”
eral level of prices and employment. The relationship be-
form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Vari-
tween output and financial markets that affects the level of
able credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
economic activity. Evaluation of government institutions and
policy options for stabilization and growth. International
Junior Year
trade and balance of payments. Students may satisfy the
EBGN304. PERSONAL FINANCE (S) The management of
economics core requirement by taking the EBGN311/312
household and personal finances. Overview of financial con-
sequence instead of EBGN201. Students considering a major
cepts with special emphasis on their application to issues
in economics are advised to skip EBGN201 and begin with the
faced by individuals and households: budget management,
EBGN311/312 sequence. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
taxes, savings, housing and other major acquisitions, borrow-
ing, insurance, investments, meeting retirement goals, and
EBGN314. PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (II)
estate planning. Survey of principles and techniques for the
Introduction of underlying principles, fundamentals, and
management of a household’s assets and liabilities. Study of
knowledge required of the manager in a complex, modern
financial institutions and their relationship to households,
organization. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
along with a discussion of financial instruments commonly
held by individuals and families. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
hours.
52
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

EBGN315. BUSINESS STRATEGY (II) An introduction to
EBGN345. PRINCIPLES OF CORPORATE FINANCE (II)
game theory and industrial organization (IO) principles at a
Introduction to corporate finance, financial management, and
practical and applied level. Topics include economies of scale
financial markets. Time value of money and discounted cash
and scope, the economics of the make-versus-buy decision,
flow valuation, risk and returns, interest rates, bond and stock
market structure and entry, dynamic pricing rivalry, strategic
valuation, capital budgeting and financing decisions. Intro-
positioning, and the economics of organizational design. Pre-
duction to financial engineering and financial risk manage-
requisite: EBGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ment, derivatives, and hedging with derivatives. Prerequisite:
EBGN320. ECONOMICS AND TECHNOLOGY (II) The
EBGN305. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
theoretical, empirical and policy aspects of the economics
EBGN390. ECONOMETRICS (I) (WI) Introduction to
of technology and technological change. Topics include the
econometrics, including ordinary least-squares and single-
economics of research and development, inventions and
equation models; two-stage least-squares and multiple-equa-
patenting, the Internet, e-commerce, and incentives for effi-
tion models; specification error, serial correlation,
cient implementation of technology. Prerequisite: EBGN311.
heteroskedasticity, and other problems; distributive-lag mod-
EBGN312 is recommended but not required. 3 hours lecture;
els and other extensions, hypothesis testing and forecasting
3 semester hours.
applications. Prerequisites: EBGN311 and MACS323. 3
EBGN321/CHEN421. ENGINEERING ECONOMICS (II)
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Time value of money concepts of present worth, future
EBGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS AND
worth, annual worth, rate of return and break-even analysis
BUSINESS (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course.
applied to after-tax economic analysis of mineral, petroleum
Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and
and general investments. Related topics on proper handling
student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequi-
of (1) inflation and escalation, (2) leverage (borrowed money),
site: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
(3) risk adjustment of analysis using expected value con-
EBGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
cepts, (4) mutually exclusive alternative analysis and service
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
producing alternatives. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
member. A student and instructor agree on a subject matter,
EBGN325. OPERATIONS RESEARCH (I) This survey
content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study”
course introduces fundamental operations research techniques
form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Vari-
in the optimization areas of linear programming, network
able credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
models (i.e., maximum flow, shortest part, and minimum cost
Senior Year
flow), integer programming, and nonlinear programming.
EBGN401. HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT (II)
Stochastic (probabilistic) topics include queuing theory and
Study of the evolution of economic thinking since the 18th
simulation. Inventory models are discussed as time permits.
century. Topics include Adam Smith and the Classical
The emphasis in this applications course is on problem
School, Karl Marx and Socialism, Alfred Marshall and the
formulation and obtaining solutions using Excel Software.
Neoclassical School, John Maynard Keynes and the Keyne-
Prerequisite: Junior Standing, MACS112. 3 hours lecture;
sian School, and Milton Friedman and the New Classicism.
3 semester hours.
Prerequisites: EBGN311 and EBGN312. 3 hours lecture;
EBGN330. ENERGY ECONOMICS (I) Study of economic
3 semester hours.
theories of optimal resource extraction, market power, mar-
EBGN402. FIELD SESSION (S) (WI) An applied course
ket failure, regulation, deregulation, technological change
for students majoring in economics. The field session may
and resource scarcity. Economic tools used to analyze OPEC,
consist of either participation in a computer simulation or an
energy mergers, natural gas price controls and deregulation,
independent research project under the supervision of a fac-
electric utility restructuring, energy taxes, environmental im-
ulty member. In the computer simulation, students work as
pacts of energy use, government R&D programs, and other
part of the senior executive team of a company and are re-
energy topics. Prerequisite: EBGN201 or EBGN311. 3 hours
sponsible for developing and executing a strategy for their
lecture; 3 semester hours.
company with on-going decisions on everything from new
EBGN342. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (II) (WI)
product development, to marketing, to finance and account-
Theories of development and underdevelopment. Sectoral
ing. Prerequisites: EBGN411 and EBGN412; or permission
development policies and industrialization. The special prob-
of the instructor. 3 semester hours.
lems and opportunities created by an extensive mineral endow-
EBGN409. MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS (II) Applica-
ment, including the Dutch disease and the resource-curse
tion of mathematical tools to economic problems. Coverage
argument. The effect of value-added processing and export
of mathematics needed to read published economic literature
diversification on development. Prerequisite: EBGN311.
and to do graduate study in economics. Topics from differen-
3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
tial and integral calculus, matrix algebra, differential equa-
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
53

tions, and dynamic programming. Applications are taken
EBGN455. LINEAR PROGRAMMING (I) This course
from mineral, energy, and environmental issues, requiring
addresses the formulation of linear programming models,
both analytical and computer solutions using programs such
examines linear programs in two dimensions, covers standard
as GAMS and MATHEMATICA. Prerequisites: MACS213,
form and other basics essential to understanding the Simplex
EBGN411, EBGN412, MACS332 or MACS348; or permis-
method, the Simplex method itself, duality theory, comple-
sion of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
mentary slackness conditions, and sensitivity analysis. As
EBGN411. INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS (I, II)
time permits, multi-objective programming, an introduction
(WI) A second course in microeconomics. Compared to the
to linear integer programming, and the interior point method
earlier course, this course is more rigorous mathematically
are introduced. Applications of linear programming models
and quantitatively. It also places more emphasis on advanced
discussed in this course include, but are not limited to, the
topics such as game theory, risk and uncertainty, property
areas of manufacturing, finance, energy, mining, transporta-
rights, and external costs and benefits. Prerequisites:
tion and logistics, and the military. Prerequisites: MACS332
EBGN311 and MACS213. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
or MACS348 or EBGN409 or permission of instructor.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EBGN412. INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS (I, II)
(WI) Intermediate macroeconomics provides a foundation
EBGN495. ECONOMIC FORECASTING (II) An introduc-
for analyzing the long-run and short-run effects of fiscal and
tion to the methods employed in business and econometric
monetary policy on aggregate economic performance. Spe-
forecasting. Topics include time series modeling, Box-
cial emphasis on interactions between the foreign sector and
Jenkins models, vector autoregression, cointegration, expo-
the domestic economy. Analytical models are developed
nential smoothing and seasonal adjustments. Covers data
from Classical, Keynesian, and New Classical schools of
collection methods, graphing, model building, model inter-
thought. Prerequisites: EBGN311, EBGN312 and
pretation, and presentation of results. Topics include demand
MACS213. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and sales forecasting, the use of anticipations data, leading
indicators and scenario analysis, business cycle forecasting,
EBGN441. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (II) (WI)
GNP, stock market prices and commodity market prices. In-
Theories and determinants of international trade, including
cludes discussion of links between economic forecasting and
static and dynamic comparative advantage and the gains
government policy. Prerequisites: EBGN390, EBGN411,
from trade. The history of arguments for and against free
EBGN412. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
trade. The political economy of trade policy in both devel-
oping and developed countries. Prerequisite: EBGN411.
EBGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS AND
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
BUSINESS (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course.
Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and
EBGN445. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS FINANCE (II)
student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequi-
An introduction to financial issues of critical importance to
site: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
multinational firms. Overview of international financial
markets, the international monetary system, and foreign-
EBGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
exchange markets. International parity conditions, exchange-
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
rate forecasting, swaps and swap markets. International
member. A student and instructor agree on a subject matter,
investments, foreign-direct investment, corporate strategy,
content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study”
and the international debt crisis. Prerequisites: EBGN305,
form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Vari-
EBGN411, EBGN412. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
able credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
54
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Engineering
The program leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in
Engineering is accredited by the Accreditation Board for En-
TERENCE E. PARKER, Professor and Division Director
gineering and Technology (ABET), 111 Market Place, Suite
WILLIAM A. HOFF, Associate Professor and Assistant Division
1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, telephone (410) 347-
Director
7700.
D. VAUGHAN GRIFFITHS, Professor
ROBERT J. KEE, George R. Brown Distinguished Professor
Program Educational Objectives (Bachelor of
ROBERT H. KING, Professor
Science in Engineering)
KEVIN MOORE, Gerard August Dobelman Chair and Professor
In addition to contributing toward achieving the educa-
NING LU, Professor
tional objectives described in the CSM Graduate Profile and
MARK T. LUSK, Professor (and Physics)
the ABET Accreditation Criteria, the Engineering Program
NIGEL T. MIDDLETON, Professor, Executive Vice President for
Academic Affairs, and Dean of Faculty
at CSM has established the following program education
GRAHAM G. W. MUSTOE, Professor
objectives:
PANKAJ K. (PK) SEN, Professor
u Graduates will understand the design and analysis of
JOEL M. BACH,Associate Professor
engineering systems and the interdisciplinary nature of
JOHN R. BERGER, Associate Professor
engineering.
PANOS D. KIOUSIS, Associate Professor
u Graduates will incorporate an appreciation for issues
MICHAEL MOONEY, Associate Professor
involving earth, energy, materials and environment in
DAVID MUNOZ, Associate Professor
PAUL PAPAS, Associate Professor
their professional practice.
MARCELO GODOY SIMOES, Associate Professor
u Graduates will incorporate non-technical considera-
JOHN P. H. STEELE, Associate Professor
tions (e.g., aesthetic, social, ethical, economic, etc.) in
CATHERINE K. SKOKAN, Associate Professor
their professional practice.
TYRONE VINCENT, Associate Professor
u Graduates will contribute to the needs of society
RAY RUICHONG ZHANG, Associate Professor
through engineering and professional practice, re-
CRISTIAN V. CIOBANU, Assistant Professor
search, or service.
KATHRYN JOHNSON, Clare Boothe Luce Assistant Professor
CARSTEN R. MEHRING, Assistant Professor
Curriculum
ANTHONY J. PETRELLA, Assistant Professor
During their first two years at CSM, students complete a
NEAL SULLIVAN, Assistant Professor
set of core courses that include basic sciences, in order to pro-
MONEESH UPMANYU, Assistant Professor
vide fundamental knowledge about nature and its phenomena,
MANOJA WEISS, Assistant Professor
and engineering sciences, which build on the basic sciences
RICHARD PASSAMANECK, Senior Lecturer
and are focused on applications. Course work in mathematics
SANAA ABDEL-AZIM, Lecturer
is an essential part of the curriculum which gives engineering
RAVEL F. AMMERMAN, Lecturer
students essential tools for modeling, analyzing, and predict-
CARA COAD, Lecturer
JOSEPH P. CROCKER, Lecturer
ing physical phenomena. Physics and chemistry are required
TOM GROVER, Lecturer
in order to provide an appropriate foundation in the physical
CANDACE S. SULZBACH, Lecturer
sciences. The curriculum also includes liberal arts and inter-
ROBERT D. SUTTON, Lecturer
national studies which enrich the educational experience and
HAROLD W. OLSEN, Research Professor
instill a greater understanding of how engineering decision
JOAN P. GOSINK, Emerita Professor
impact human and social affairs.
MICHAEL B. McGRATH, Emeritus Professor
Engineering design course work begins in the freshman
KARL R. NELSON, Emeritus Associate Professor
GABRIEL M. NEUNZERT, Emeritus Associate Professor
year in Engineering Practice Introductory Course Sequence
(EPICS) Design I, and continues through the four-year cur-
Note: Faculty for the environmental engineering specialty are listed
riculum. This experience teaches design methodology and
in the Environmental Science and Engineering section of this Bulletin.
stresses the creative and synthesis aspects of the engineering
Program Description
profession. Systems-oriented courses are also included to
The Division of Engineering offers a design-oriented, inter-
provide experiences with the linkages that occur within the
disciplinary, accredited non-traditional undergraduate program in
environment, human society, and engineered devices.
engineering with specialization in civil, electrical, environmental
Students complete an advanced core that includes electric
or mechanical engineering. The program emphasizes fundamen-
circuits, engineering mechanics, advanced mathematics, ther-
tal engineering principles and requires in-depth understanding
modynamics, economics, engineering design, and additional
within one of the four specialty areas that are offered. Graduates
studies in liberal arts and international topics. In their last
are in a position to take advantage of a broad variety of profes-
two years of study, students must choose a specialty in civil,
sional opportunities, and are well-prepared for an engineering
electrical, environmental or mechanical engineering. Free
career in a world of rapid technological change.
electives (9 credits), at the student’s discretion, can be used
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
55

to obtain an “area of special interest” of at least 12 semester
putational methods and engineering design. Topics such as
hours or a minor of at least 18 semester hours in another de-
computational engineering, machine design, fluid mechanics,
partment or division.
and heat transfer are an important part of the mechanical en-
All students must complete a capstone design course,
gineering program, which also includes control and vibration
stressing the interdisciplinary nature of engineering systems.
theory. The Mechanical Engineering program has close ties
The projects are generated by customer demand, and include
to the metallurgical and materials engineering, physics,
experiential verification to ensure a realistic design experi-
chemical engineering and biological life sciences communi-
ence. Throughout their academic careers, students will bene-
ties on campus, and undergraduates are encouraged to get
fit from interaction with well-qualified faculty who maintain
involved in one of the large number of research programs
research and professional leadership.
conducted by the Mechanical Engineering faculty. Many
students go on to graduate school.
Prospective students should note that this is an integrated,
broad-based and interdisciplinary engineering program.
Students in each of the four specialties will spend consid-
Analysis and design of engineering systems is emphasized
erable time in laboratories. The division is well equipped
with interdisciplinary application for industrial projects,
with basic laboratory equipment, as well as PC-based instru-
structures and processes. For example, our unique Multi-
mentation systems, and the program makes extensive use of
disciplinary Engineering Laboratory sequence promotes life-
computer-based analysis techniques.
long learning skills using state-of-the-art instrumentation
The Division of Engineering is housed in George R.
funded through grants from the Department of Education
Brown Hall. Emphasis on hands-on education is reflected in
Fund for the Improvement of Post-Secondary Education, the
the division’s extensive teaching and research laboratories.
National Science Foundation, the Parsons Foundation,
Interdisciplinary laboratories include the IBM Automated
Chevron, Kennecott Mining, and Fluor Daniel.
Systems Laboratory, the Multidisciplinary Engineering
The Civil Engineering Specialty builds on the multi-
Laboratories, the USGS Soil Mechanics Laboratory, and
disciplinary engineering principles of the core curriculum to
environmental engineering laboratories in Coolbaugh Hall.
focus in Geotechnical and Structural Engineering. Civil Spe-
All students are encouraged to take the Fundamental of
cialty students are also asked to choose three civil elective
Engineering examination before graduation.
courses from a list that includes offerings from other civil-
Degree Requirements in Engineering
oriented departments at CSM such as Geological Engineer-
Civil Specialty
ing and Mining Engineering. These electives give students
Sophomore (Fall)
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
the opportunity for further specialization in, for example,
DCGN241 Statics
3
3
Environmental Engineering or Applied Mechanics. Civil
EBGN201 Principles of Economics
3
3
Specialty students interested in a more research-oriented
MACS213 Calc. for Scientists & Engineers III 4
4
component to their undergraduate curriculum are encouraged
PHGN200 Physics II
3
3
4.5
to take on an Independent Study project with one of the Civil
MACS260 Fortran 95 (or MACS 261)
2
2
Engineering Faculty. These projects can offer a useful insight
PAGN2XX Physical Education
2
0.5
into graduate school.
Total
17
The Electrical Engineering Specialty builds on the engi-
Sophomore (Spring)
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
neering principals of the core curriculum to produce expo-
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
SYGN200 Human Systems
3
3
sure to the fundamentals of electrical engineering. The
EGGN250 MEL I
4.5
1.5
program includes microprocessor-based systems design,
EGGN320 Mechanics of Materials
3
3
electronic devices and systems, communications, signal pro-
EGGN351 Fluid Mechanics
3
3
cessing, electromagnetic fields and waves, digital electronics
EPIC251 Design II
3
1
3
and computer engineering, and control systems.
PAGN2XX Physical Education
2
0.5
The Environmental Engineering Specialty introduces
Total
17
students to the fundamentals of environmental engineering
Sophomore/Junior Field Session
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
including the scientific and regulatory basis of public health
EGGN234 Field Session
3
and environmental protection. Topics covered include envi-
Junior (Fall)
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
ronmental science and regulatory processes, water and waste-
EGGN342 Structural Theory
3
3
water engineering, solid and hazardous waste management,
EGGN361 Soil Mechanics
3
3
and contaminated site remediation.
EGGN363 Soil Mechanics Laboratory
3
1
EGGN315 Dynamics
3
3
The Mechanical Engineering Specialty complements the
EGGN413 Computer Aided Engineering
3
3
core curriculum with courses that provide depth in material
LAIS/EBGN Cluster Elective I
3
3
mechanics and the thermal sciences with emphases in com-
Total
16
56
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Junior (Spring)
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
MACS348 Engineering Mathematics
3
3
LAIS/EBGN H&SS cluster elective I
3
3
EGGN464 Foundation Engineering
3
3
EGGN351 Fluid Mechanics
3
3
DCGN210 Introduction to Thermodynamics
3
3
EGGN385 Electronic Devices & Circuits
3
3
4
EGGN444/445 Design of Steel or
EGGN386 Fundamentals of Engineering
Concrete Structures
3
3
Electromagnetics
3
3
Civil Elective
3
3
EGGN389 Fund. of Electric Machinery
3
3
4
Free Elective
3
3
Total
17
Total
18
Junior-Senior Year Summer Field Session
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Senior (Fall)
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
EGGN334 Field session - Electrical
3
3
MACS323 Probability and Statistics
3
3
Total
3
LAIS/EBGN Cluster Elective II
3
3
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
EGGN350 MEL II
4.5
1.5
LAIS/EBGN H&SS cluster elective II
3
3
EGGN491 Senior Design I
2
3
3
EGGN450 Multi-disc. Eng. Lab. III
3
1
DCGN381 Electrical Circuits , Electronics
EGGN491 Senior Design I
2
3
3
and Power
3
3
EGGN407 Feedback Control Systems
3
3
Civil Elective
3
3
Electrical Elective
6
6
Total
16.5
Total
16
Senior (Spring)
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
LAIS/EBGN Cluster Elective III
3
3
LAIS/EBGN H&SS cluster elective III
3
3
EGGN492 Senior Design II
1
6
3
EGGN492 Senior Design II
1
6
3
Civil Elective
3
3
EGGN Electrical Specialty Elective
3
3
Free Elective
3
3
Free electives
9
9
Free Elective
3
3
Total
18
Free Elective
3
3
Total
18
Degree Total
141
Degree Total
138.50
Environmental Specialty
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Electrical Specialty
DCGN241 Statics
3
3
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
SYGN200
3
3
DCGN241 Statics
3
3
MACS213 Calc. for Scists & Engn’rs III
4
4
SYGN200 Human Systems
3
3
PHGN200 Physics II
3
3
4.5
MACS213 Calc. for Scists & Engn’rs III
4
4
MACS260** Programming
2/3
2
PHGN200 Physics II
3
3
4.5
PAGN2XX Physical Education
2
0.5
MACS261 Computer Programming Concepts (C) 3
3
Total
17
PAGN2XX Physical Education
2
0.5
Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Total
18
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
PAGN2XX Physical Education
2
0.5
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
EGGN320 Mechanics of Materials
3
3
PAGN2XX Physical Education
2
0.5
DCGN381 Elect. Circuits, Elect. & Pwr.
3
3
EBGN201 Principles of Economics
3
3
EGGN250 Multi-disc. Eng. Lab. I
4.5
1.5
EGGN320 Mechanics of Materials
3
3
EPIC251 Design II
3
1
3
DCGN381 Elect. Circuits, Elect. & Pwr.
3
3
EBGN201 Principles of Economics
3
3
EGGN250 Multi-disc. Eng. Lab. I
4.5
1.5
Total
17
EPIC251 Design II
3
1
3
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Total
17
MACS323 Probability & Statistics
3
3
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
MACS348 Engineering Mathematics
3
3
MACS323 Probability & Statistics
3
3
EGGN315 Dynamics
3
3
MACS348 Engineering Mathematics
3
3
EGGN351 Fluid Mechanics
3
3
EGGN371 Engineering Thermodynamics
3
3
EGGN353 Environmental Sci. & Eng. I
3
3
EGGN382 Engineering Circuit Analysis
3
3
EGGN371 Engineering Thermodynamics
3
3
EGGN388 Information Systems Science
3
3
Total
18
EGGN384 Digital Logic
3
3
4
Total
19
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
LAIS/EBGN H&SS cluster elective I
3
3
EGGN350 Multi-disc. Eng. Lab. II
4.5
1.5
EGGN354 Environmental Sci. & Eng. II
3
3
EGGN Environmental Specialty Elective
3
3
Free elective
6
6
Total
16.5
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
57

Junior-Senior Year Summer Field Session
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
EGGN335 Field Session Environmental
3
EGGN450 Multi-disc. Eng. Lab. III
3
1
Total
3
EGGN491 Senior Design I
2
3
3
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
LAIS/EBGN H&SS cluster elective II
3
3
EGGN491 Senior Design I
2
3
3
EGGN471 Heat Transfer
3
3
EGGN Environmental Specialty Elective
6
6
EGGN411 Machine Design
3
3
4
EGGN413 Computer Aided Engineering
3
3
Free elective
3
3
Free elective
3
3
Total
17
Total
15
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
LAIS/EBGN H&SS cluster elective III
3
3
LAIS/EBGN H&SS cluster elective II
3
3
EGGN492 Senior Design II
1
6
3
LAIS/EBGN H&SS cluster elective III
3
3
Mechanical Electives
6
6
EGGN492 Senior Design II
1
6
3
Free elective
6
6
EGGN Environmental Specialty Elective
6
6
Total
18
Free elective
3
3
Degree Total
140.5
Total
18
**Environmental and Mechanical Engineering students may take the
Degree Total
137.5
2-credit MACS260 Fortran or Java Programming or the 3-credit
Mechanical Specialty
MACS261 Programming Concepts in C.
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Engineering Specialty Electives
DCGN241 Statics
3
3
Civil Specialty
SYGN200 Human Systems
3
3
Civil Specialty students are required to take three civil
MACS213 Calc. for Scists & Engn’rs III
4
4
elective courses from the following list. The electives have
PHGN200 Physics II
3
3
4.5
been grouped by themes for convenience only. When choos-
MACS261** Programming
2/3
3
ing their three courses, students can elect for breadth across
PAGN2XX Physical Education
2
0.5
themes or depth within a theme.
Total
18
Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Students must take at least two courses marked (A).
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
Environmental
PAGN2XX Physical Education
2
0.5
EGGN353 (A)Fundamentals of Environmental Science and
SYGN202 Engineered Material Systems
3
3
Engineering I
EGGN320 Mechanics of Materials
3
3
EGGN354 (A)Fundamentals of Environmental Science and
DCGN381 Elect. Circuits, Elect. & Pwr.
3
3
Engineering II
EGGN250 Multi-disc. Eng. Lab. I
4.5
1.5
EGGN451 (A)Hydraulic Problems
EPIC251 Design II
3
1
3
EGGN453 (A)Wastewater Engineering
Total
17
EGGN454 (A)Water Supply Engineering
Summer Field Session
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
EGGN455 (A)Solid and Hazardous Waste Engineering
EGGN235 Field Session - Mechanical
3
EGGN456 (A)Scientific Basis of Environmental Regulations
Total
3
EGGN457 (A)Site Remediation Engineering
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
General
MACS323 Probability & Statistics
3
3
EGGN333 (A)Surveying II
MACS348 Engineering Mathematics
3
3
EGGN407 (A)Feedback control systems
LAIS/EBGN H&SS cluster elective I
3
3
EGGN460 (A)Numerical Methods for Engineers
EGGN315 Dynamics
3
3
EBGN421 (A)Engineering Economics
EGGN371 Engineering Thermodynamics
3
3
EBGN553 (B)Project Management
EGGN388 Information Systems Science
3
3
EGGN399/499 (B)Independent Study (Civil)
Total
18
Geotechnical
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
EGGN465 (A)Unsaturated Soil Mechanics
EBGN201 Principles of Economics
3
3
EGGN448 (A)Advanced Soil Mechanics
EGGN351 Fluid Mechanics
3
3
EGES534 (A)Soil Behavior
EGGN350 Multi-disc. Eng. Lab. II
4.5
1.5
EGES598 (A)Soil dynamics and foundation vibrations
EGGN407 Feedback Control Systems
3
3
MNGN321 (A)Introduction to Rock Mechanics
EGGN413 Computer-Aided Engineering
3
3
MNGN404 (B)Tunneling
EGGN Mechanical Specialty Elective
3
3
MNGN405 (B)Rock Mechanics in Mining
Total
16.5
MNGN406 (B)Design and Support of Underground Excavations
GEGN466 (B)Groundwater Engineering
GEGN468 (B)Engineering Geology and Geotechnics
GEGN473 (B)Site investigation
58Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Mechanics
Mechanical Elective. Students are welcome to petition to
EGGN422 (A)Advanced Mechanics of Materials
have a course approved, and the petition form is provided on
EGGN442 (A)Finite Element Methods For Engineers
the Mechanical Engineering web site. Courses are occasion-
EGGN473 (A)Fluid Mechanics II
ally added to this list with the most updated version main-
EGGN478 (A)Engineering Dynamics
tained on the Mechanical Engineering web site.
Structural
List A
EGGN441 (A)Advanced Structural Analysis
EGGN422 Advanced Mechanics of Materials
EGGN444/445 (A)Steel Design or Concrete Design
EGGN473 Fluid Mechanics II
Graduate courses in EG and elsewhere may occasionally be ap-
EGGN403 Thermodynamics II
proved as civil electives on an ad hoc basis. In order for a course that
EGGN478 Engineering Dynamics
is not listed here to be considered, the student should submit a writ-
List B
ten request in advance to their faculty advisor enclosing a copy of
EGGN389 Fundamentals of Electric Machinery
the course syllabus.
EGGN400 Introduction to Robotics
Electrical Specialty
EGGN420 Biomedical Engineering
Electrical specialty students are required to take three
EGGN425 Musculoskeletal Biomechanics
courses from the following list of electrical technical
EGGN430 Biomedical Instrumentation
electives:*
EGGN442 Finite Element Methods for Engineering
EGGN444 Design of Steel Structures
EGGN430 Biomedical Instrumentation
EGGN460 Numerical Methods for Engineers
EGGN482 Microcomputer Architecture and Interfacing
EBGN321 Engineering Economics
EGGN483 Analog and Digital Communications Systems
ESGN527 Watersheds System Analysis
EGGN484 Power Systems Analysis
MTGN/EGGN390 Materials and Manufacturing Processes
PHGN300 Modern Physics
MTGN445 Mechanical Properties of Materials
EGGN485 Introduction to High Power Electronics
MTGN450 Statistical Control of Materials Processes
PHGN440 Solid State Physics
MTGN464 Forging and Forming
PHGN435 Interdisciplinary Microelectronics Processing Laboratory
MTGN477/475 Welding Metallurgy
*Additional courses are approved special topics with a number
MLGN/MTGN570 Introduction to Biocompatibility of Materials
EGGN398/498 and all graduate courses taught in the Electrical Engi-
PEGN361 Completion Engineering (II)
neering specialty area. Students should consult their faculty advisor
PEGN311 Drilling Engineering Principles
for guidance.
PEGN515 Drilling Engineering Principles
Environmental Specialty
PHGN350 Intermediate Mechanics
All students pursuing the Environmental Specialty are
PEGN435 Microelectronics Processing Laboratory
required to take EGGN/ESGN353 and EGGN/ESGN354.
PHGN440 Solid State Physics
These courses are prerequisites for many 400 level Environ-
Division of Engineering Areas of Special Interest
mental Specialty courses. In addition students are required to
and Minor Programs
take five courses from the following list:
General Requirements
ESGN401 Fundamentals of Ecology
A Minor Program of study must consist of a minimum of
ESGN440 Environmental Pollution: Sources, Characteristics,
18 credit hours of a logical sequence of courses, only three
Transport and Fate
hours of which may be taken at the 100- or 200- level. No
EGGN451 Hydraulic Problems
more than six credit hours of the sequence may be taken in
EGGN/ESGN453 Wastewater Engineering
the student’s degree granting department.
EGGN/ESGN454 Water Supply Engineering
EGGN/ESGN456 Scientific Basis of Environmental Regulations
An Area of Special Interest (ASI) must consist of a mini-
EGGN/ESGN457 Site Remediation Engineering
mum of 12 credit hours of a logical sequence of courses, only
ESGN462 Solid Waste Minimization and Recycling
three hours of which may be taken at the 100- or 200-level.
ESGN463 Pollution Prevention Fundamentals and Practice
No more than three credit hours of the sequence may be
GEGN466 Groundwater Engineering
specifically required by the degree program in which the
Students should consult their faculty advisor for guidance
student is graduating.
on course substitutions
A Minor Program / Area of Special Interest declaration
Mechanical Specialty
(available in the Registrar’s Office) should be submitted for
The list of approved Mechanical Engineering electives
approval prior to the student’s completion of half of the hours
appears below. Students are required to take three of these
proposed to constitute the program. Approvals are required
courses and at least one must be from List A. In addition to
from the Director of the Engineering Division, the student’s
these courses, any graduate course taught by a member of the
advisor, and the Department Head or Division Director in the
Mechanical Engineering faculty will also be counted as a
department or division in which the student is enrolled.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
59

The Humanitarian Engineering Minor (HE) is an alter-
Note: Multidisciplinary Engineering Laboratories I, II and III
native available to engineering students seeking to have a
(EGGN 250, 350 and 450, respectively) may be taken as laboratory
direct impact on meeting the basic needs of humanity. This
supplements to DCGN 381, EGGN351 and EGGN320.
minor program lies at the intersection of society, culture, and
Engineering Specialties Program
technology. Technologically-oriented humanitarian projects
Civil
are intended to provide fundamental needs (food, water,
A twelve (ASI) or eighteen hour (minor) sequence must be
waste treatment, shelter, and power) when these are missing
selected from:
or inadequate for human development, or higher-level needs
EGGN342 Structural Theory
3 sem hrs.
for underserved communities within developed and develop-
EGGN361 Soil Mechanics
3 sem hrs.
ing countries. The Humanitarian Engineering Minor com-
EGGN363 Soil Mechanics Laboratory
1 sem hrs.
bines courses in LAIS with technical courses offered through
EGGN441 Advanced Structural Theory
3 sem hrs.
the Engineering Division or other appropriate applied
EGGN444 Design of Steel Structures
3 sem hrs.
courses offered on the Mines campus (or at other universi-
EGGN445 Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures
3 sem hrs.
ties, subject to Humanitarian Engineering Steering Commit-
EGGN448 Advanced Soil Mechanics
3 sem hrs.
tee approval). Students may also wish to investigate the
EGGN451 Hydraulic Problems
3 sem hrs.
18-credit Minor in Humanitarian Studies and Technology.
EGGN464 Foundations
3 sem hrs.
EGGN333 Surveying II
3 sem hrs.
Programs in the Engineering Division
EGGN354 Fundamentals of Environmental Science
The Engineering Division offers minor and ASI programs
and Engineering II
3 sem hrs.
to meet two sets of audiences. The first is a program in Gen-
EGGN422 Advanced Mechanics of Materials
3 sem hrs.
eral Engineering which is suited to students who are not pur-
EGGN442 Finite Element Methods for Engineers
3 sem hrs.
suing an engineering degree. This program offers foundation
EGGN453 Wastewater Engineering
3 sem hrs.
coursework in engineering which is compatible with many of
EGGN454 Water Supply Engineering
3 sem hrs.
the topics in the Fundamentals of Engineering examination.
EGGN465 Unsaturated Soil Mechanics
3 sem hrs.
EGGN478 Engineering Dynamics
3 sem hrs.
The second is a program in Engineering Specialties which is
EGGN498 Numerical Methods for Engineers
3 sem hrs.
suited to students pursuing an engineering degree, and who
EGGN498 Advanced Soil Mechanics
3 sem hrs.
have therefore completed much of the coursework repre-
EGGN499 Dynamics of Structures and Soils
3 sem hrs.
sented in the General Engineering program. Students may
MNGN321 Introduction to Rock Mechanics
3 sem hrs.
opt to pursue minors or ASIs in civil, electrical, environmen-
GEGN467 Groundwater Engineering
4 sem hrs.
tal or mechanical engineering within the Engineering Spe-
GEGN468 Engineering Geology and Geotechnics
4 sem hrs.
cialties program.
Electrical
Students wishing to enroll in either program must satisfy
A twelve (ASI) or eighteen hour (minor) sequence must
all prerequisite requirements for each course in a chosen se-
be selected from a basic electrical program comprising:*
quence. Students in the sciences or mathematics will there-
DCGN381 Introduction to Electrical Circuits,
fore be better positioned to prerequisite requirements in the
Electronics and Power
3 sem hrs.
General Engineering program, while students in engineering
EGGN382 Engineering Circuit Analysis
3 sem hrs.
disciplines will be better positioned to meet the prerequisite
Additional courses are to be selected from:
requirements for courses in the Engineering Specialties.
EGGN334 Engineering Field Session, Electrical
The courses listed below, constituting each program and
Specialty
3 sem hrs.
the specialty variations, are offered as guidelines for select-
EGGN384 Digital Logic
4 sem hrs.
ing a logical sequence. In cases where students have unique
EGGN385 Electronic Devices and Circuits
4 sem hrs.
backgrounds or interests, these sequences may be adapted ac-
EGGN386 Fundamentals of Engineering
cordingly through consultation with faculty in the Engineer-
Electromagnetics
3 sem hrs.
ing Division.
EGGN388 Information Systems Science
3 sem hrs.
EGGN389 Fundamentals of Electric Machinery
4 sem hrs.
General Engineering Program
EGGN407 Introduction to Feedback Control Systems
3 sem hrs.
A twelve (ASI) or eighteen hour (minor) sequence must
EGGN430 Biomedical Instrumentation
be selected from:
EGGN482 Microcomputer Architecture and Interfacing 4 sem hrs.
DCGN241 Statics
3 sem hrs.
EGGN483 Analog & Digital Communication Systems 4 sem hrs.
EGGN320 Mechanics of Materials
3 sem hrs.
EGGN484 Power Systems Analysis
3 sem hrs.
EGGN351 Fluid Mechanics
3 sem hrs.
EGGN485 Introduction to High Power Electronics
3 sem hrs.
EGGN371 Thermodynamics
3 sem hrs.
*Additional courses are approved special topics with a number
DCGN381 Electrical Circuits, Electronics and Power
3 sem hrs.
EGGN398/498 and all graduate courses taught in the Electrical Engi-
EGGN315 Dynamics
3 sem hrs.
neering specialty area. Students should consult their faculty advisor
EBGN421 Engineering Economics
3 sem hrs.
for guidance
60
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Environmental Science and Engineering Minor
Combined Engineering Physics or Chemistry
and ASI – see Environmental Science and
Baccalaureate and Engineering Systems Masters
Engineering
Degrees
Mechanical
The Division of Engineering in collaboration with the
A twelve (ASI) or eighteen hour (minor) sequence must be
Departments of Physics and Chemistry offers five-year
selected from:
programs in which students have the opportunity to obtain
EGGN351 Fluid Mechanics
3 sem hrs.
specific engineering skills to complement their physics or
EGGN403 Thermodynamics II
3 sem hrs.
chemistry background. Physics or chemistry students in this
EGGN471 Heat Transfer
3 sem hrs.
program fill in their technical and free electives over their
EGGN473 Fluid Mechanics II
3 sem hrs.
standard four year Engineering Physics or Chemistry B.S.
EGGN411 Machine Design
3 sem hrs.
program with a reduced set of engineering classes. These
EGGN413 Computer-Aided Engineering
3 sem hrs.
classes come in one of two specialties within the division:
EGGN400 Introduction to Robotics
3 sem hrs.
Electrical engineering and Mechanical engineering. At the
EGGN407 Feedback Control Systems
3 sem hrs.
end of the fourth year, the student is awarded an Engineering
EGGN422 Advanced Mechanics of Materials
3 sem hrs.
Physics B.S. or Chemistry B.S., as appropriate. Students in
Combined Engineering Baccalaureate and
this program are automatically entered into the Engineering
Engineering Systems Masters Degrees
Systems Masters degree program. Just as any graduate stu-
The Division of Engineering offers a five year combined
dent, it is possible for them to graduate in one year (non-the-
program in which students have the opportunity to obtain
sis option) with a Masters of Science in Engineering Systems
specific engineering skills supplemented with advanced
degree.
coursework in Engineering Systems. Upon completion of the
Students must apply to enter this program by the begin-
program, students receive two degrees, the Bachelor of Sci-
ning of their Senior year and must have a minimum GPA of
ence in Engineering and the Master of Science in Engineer-
3.0. To complete the undergraduate portion of the program,
ing Systems.
students must successfully finish the classes indicated by the
Students must apply to enter this program by the begin-
“typical” class sequence for the appropriate track. At the be-
ning of their Senior year and must have a minimum GPA of
ginning of the Senior year, a pro forma graduate school ap-
3.0. To complete the undergraduate portion of the program,
plication is submitted and as long as the undergraduate
students must successfully finish the classes indicated in any
portion of the program is successfully completed, the student
of the four specialty programs (civil, electrical, environmen-
is admitted to the Engineering Systems graduate program.
tal or mechanical engineering). At the beginning of the Se-
Interested students can obtain additional information and
nior year, a pro forma graduate school application is
detailed curricula from the Division of Engineering or the
submitted and as long as the undergraduate portion of the
Physics Department.
program is successfully completed, the student is admitted to
the Engineering Systems graduate program.
Description of Courses
Students are required to take thirty-six credit hours for the
Freshman Year
M.S. degree. However, six credit hours can be applied to
EGGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGINEERING (I, II)
both the B.S. and M.S. degrees, as long as they are approved
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
technical elective courses at the 4XX level or higher. Up to
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
nine credit hours of 4XX level courses may be used toward
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
the M.S. degree. The remainder of the courses will be at the
Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
graduate level (5XX and above). Students will need to
EGGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
choose a program specialty (Civil, Electrical, Mechanical,
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
and Systems). The Engineering Division Graduate Bulletin
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
provides details for each of these programs and includes spe-
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Indepen-
cific instructions regarding required and elective courses for
dent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
each. Students may switch from the combined program
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
which includes a non-thesis Master of Science degree to a
Sophomore Year
M.S. degree with a thesis option; however, if students change
EGGN234. ENGINEERING FIELD SESSION, CIVIL SPE-
degree programs they must satisfy all degree requirements
CIALTY (S) The theory and practice of modern surveying.
for the M.S. with thesis degree.
Lectures and hands-on filed work teaches horizontal, vertical,
Interested students can obtain additional information from
and angular measurements and computations using tradi-
the Division of Engineering.
tional and modern equipment. Subdivision of land and appli-
cations to civil engineering practice, GPS and astronomic
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
61

observations. Prerequisite: None. Three weeks (6 day weeks)
American Datum) NAD '27, NAD '83 and (High Accuracy
in summer field session; 3 semester hours.
Reference Network) HARN. Pre-requisite: EGGN234. 2
EGGN235. ENGINEERING FIELD SESSION, MECHANI-
hours lecture; 8-9 field work days; 3 semester hours.
CAL SPECIALTY (S) This course provides the student with
EGGN334. ENGINEERING FIELD SESSION, ELECTRI-
hands-on experience in the use of modern engineering tools
CAL SPECIALTY (S) Experience in the engineering design
as part of the design process including modeling, fabrication,
process involving analysis, design, and simulation. Students
and testing of components and systems. Student use engineer-
use engineering, mathematics and computers to model, ana-
ing, mathematics and computers to conceptualize, model,
lyze, design and evaluate system performance. Teamwork
create, test, and evaluate components and systems of their
emphasized. Prerequisites: EGGN382, EGGN388, and two
creation. Teamwork is emphasized by having students work
of the following: EGGN384, EGGN385, and EGGN389.
in teams. Prerequisites: PHGN200/201, MACS260/261 and
Three weeks in summer field session; 3 semester hours.
EPIC251. Three weeks in summer field session; 3 semester
EGGN335. ENGINEERING FIELD SESSION, ENVIRON-
hours.
MENTAL SPECIALTY (S) The environmental module is in-
EGGN250. MULTIDISCIPLINARY ENGINEERING LAB-
tended to introduce students to laboratory and field analytical
ORATORY I (I, II) (WI) Laboratory experiments integrating
skills used in the analysis of an environmental engineering
instrumentation, circuits and power with computer data
problem. Students will receive instruction on the measure-
acquisitions and sensors. Sensor data is used to transition
ment of water quality parameters (chemical, physical, and
between science and engineering science. Engineering Sci-
biological) in the laboratory and field. The student will use
ence issues like stress, strains, thermal conductivity, pressure
these skills to collect field data and analyze a given environ-
and flow are investigated using fundamentals of equilibrium,
mental engineering problem. Prerequisites: EGGN353,
continuity, and conservation. Prerequisite: DCGN381 or con-
EPIC251, MACS323. Three weeks in summer field session;
current enrollment. 4.5 hours lab; 1.5 semester hour.
3 semester hours.
EGGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGINEERING (I, II)
EGGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (I,II,S) Super-
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
vised, full-time engineering- related employment for a
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
continuous six-month period in which specific educational
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
objectives are achieved. Students must meet with the Engi-
Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
neering Division Faculty Co-op Advisor prior to enrolling
Junior Year
to clarify the educational objectives for their individual
EGGN315. DYNAMICS (I, II, S) Absolute and relative mo-
Co-op program. Prerequisite: Second semester sophomore
tions. Kinetics, work-energy, impulse-momentum, vibrations.
status and a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.00.
Prerequisite: DCGN241 and MACS315. 3 hours lecture;
3 semester hours credit will be granted once toward degree
3 semester hours.
requirements. Credit earned in EGGN340, Cooperative Edu-
cation, may be used as free elective credit hours or a civil
EGGN320. MECHANICS OF MATERIALS (I, II) Funda-
specialty elective if, in the judgment of the Co-op Advisor,
mentals of stresses and strains, material properties. Axial,
the required term paper adequately documents the fact that
torsion, bending, transverse and combined loadings. Stress
the work experience entailed high-quality application of
at a point; stress transformations and Mohr’s circle for stress.
engineering principles and practice. Applying the credits as
Beams and beam deflections, thin-wall pressure vessels,
free electives or civil electives requires the student to submit
columns and buckling, fatigue principles, impact loading.
a “Declaration of Intent to Request Approval to Apply Co-op
Prerequisite: DCGN241 or MNGN317. 3 hours lecture;
Credit toward Graduation Requirements” form obtained from
3 semester hours.
the Career Center to the Engineering Division Faculty Co-op
EGGN333. SURVEYING II (I) Engineering projects with
Advisor.
local control using levels, theodolites and total stations, in-
EGGN342. STRUCTURAL THEORY (I, II) Analysis of
cluding surveying applications of civil engineering work in
determinate and indeterminate structures for both forces and
the "field". Also includes engineering astronomy and com-
deflections. Influence lines, work and energy methods,
puter generated designs; basic road design including center-
moment distribution, matrix operations, computer methods.
line staking, horizontal and vertical curves, slope staking and
Prerequisite: EGGN320. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
earthwork volume calculations. Use of commercial software
for final plan/profile and earthwork involved for the road
EGGN350. MULTIDISCIPLINARY ENGINEERING LAB-
project data collected in the field. Conceptual and mathemat-
ORATORY II (I, II) (WI) Laboratory experiments integrating
ical knowledge of applying GPS data to engineering projects.
electrical circuits, fluid mechanics, stress analysis, and other
Some discussion of the principles and equations of projec-
engineering fundamentals using computer data acquisition
tions (Mercator, Lambert, UTM, State Plane, etc.) and their
and transducers. Fluid mechanics issues like compressible
relationship to the databases of coordinates based on (North
and incompressible fluid flow (mass and volumetric), pres-
62
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

sure losses, pump characteristics, pipe networks, turbulent
EGGN382. ENGINEERING CIRCUIT ANALYSIS (I, II)
and laminar flow, cavitation, drag, and others are covered.
This course provides the theoretical fundamentals to under-
Experimental stress analysis issues like compression and ten-
stand and analyze complex electric circuits with the required
sile testing, strain gage installation, Young’s Modulus, stress
mathematical tools. The key covered topics are: (i) Applica-
vs. strain diagrams, and others are covered. Experimental
tions of linearity, superposition, Thèvenin and Norton equiv-
stress analysis and fluid mechanics are integrated in experi-
alent circuits, mesh and nodal analysis for complex electrical
ments which merge fluid power of the testing machine with
networks, (ii) Sinusoidal steady state analysis, (iii) Applica-
applied stress and displacement of material specimen. Prereq-
tion of computer aided analysis for electrical networks, (iv)
uisite: EGGN250. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment:
AC power circuit analysis, (v) Fourier series for analysis of
EGGN351, EGGN320. 4.5 hours lab; 1.5 semester hour.
ac circuits, (vi) Laplace transform for transient analysis of
EGGN351. FLUID MECHANICS (I, II, S) Properties of
electric circuits, (vii) Frequency response, poles, zeros, trans-
liquids, manometers, one-dimensional continuity. Bernoulli’s
fer function, Bode plots and filter design, (viii) Ideal and
equation, the impulse momentum principle, laminar and tur-
non-ideal operational amplifiers and (ix) ideal transformer.
bulent flow in pipes, meters, pumps, and turbines. Prerequisite:
Prerequisites: DCGN 381 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
DCGN241 or MNGN317. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN/ESGN353. FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMEN-
EGGN384. DIGITAL LOGIC (I, II) Fundamentals of digital
TAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING I (I, II) Topics cov-
logic design. Covers combinational and sequential logic cir-
ered include: history of water related environmental law and
cuits, programmable logic devices, hardware description lan-
regulation, major sources and concerns of water pollution,
guages, and computer-aided design (CAD) tools. Laboratory
water quality parameters and their measurement, material
component introduces simulation and synthesis software and
and energy balances, water chemistry concepts, microbial
hands-on hardware design. Prerequisites: DCGN381 or
concepts, aquatic toxicology and risk assessment. Prerequi-
equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
site: Junior standing or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture;
EGGN385. ELECTRONIC DEVICES AND CIRCUITS
3 semester hours.
(I, II) Semiconductor materials and characteristics, junction
EGGN/ESGN354. FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMEN-
diode operation, bipolar junction transistors, field effect tran-
TAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING II (II) Introductory
sistors, biasing techniques, four layer devices, amplifier and
level fundamentals in atmospheric systems, air pollution con-
power supply design, laboratory study of semiconductor cir-
trol, solid waste management, hazardous waste management,
cuit characteristics. Prerequisite: EGGN 382. 3 hours lecture;
waste minimization, pollution prevention, role and responsi-
3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
bilities of public institutions and private organizations in en-
EGGN 386. FUNDAMENTALS OF ENGINEERING
vironmental management (relative to air, solid and hazardous
ELECTROMAGNETICS (I, II) This course provides an
waste. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor.
introduction to electromagnetic theory as applied to electrical
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
engineering problems in wireless communications, trans-
EGGN361. SOIL MECHANICS (I, II) An introductory
mission lines, and high-frequency circuit design. The theory
course covering the engineering properties of soil, soil phase
and applications are based on Maxwell’s equations, which
relationships and classification. Principle of effective stress.
describe the electric and magnetic force-fields, the interplay
Seepage through soils and flow nets. One-dimensional con-
between them, and how they transport energy. Matlab and
solidation theory. Soil compressibility and settlement pre-
PSPICE will be used in homework assignments, to perform
diction. Shear strength of soils. Pore pressure parameters.
simulations of electromagnetic interference, electromagnetic
Introduction to earth pressure and slope stability calculations.
energy propagation along transmission lines on printed cir-
Prerequisite: EGGN320. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
cuit boards, and antenna radiation patterns. Prerequisites:
EGGN 382, MACS 348 and/or consent of instructor. 3 hours
EGGN363. SOIL MECHANICS LABORATORY (I, II)
lecture; 3 semester hours.
Introduction to laboratory testing methods in soil mechanics.
Classification, permeability, compressibility, shear strength.
EGGN388. INFORMATION SYSTEMS SCIENCE (I, II)
Prerequisite: EGGN361 or concurrent enrollment. 3 hours
The interpretation, representation and analysis of time-
lab; 1 semester hour.
varying phenomena as signals which convey information
and noise; a quantitative treatment on the properties of infor-
EGGN371. THERMODYNAMICS I (I, II, S) Definitions,
mation and noise, and the degradation of signal fidelity
properties, temperature, phase diagrams, equations of state,
through distortion, band limitation, interference and additive
steam tables, gas tables, work, heat, first and second laws of
noise. Fourier, Laplace, and Z transforms. Introductory appli-
thermodynamics, entropy, ideal gas, phase changes, availa-
cations in the analysis of dynamic data streams emanating
bility, reciprocating engines, air standard cycles, vapor cycles.
from mechanical, structural and electronic systems, system
Prerequisite: MACS213/223. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
63

diagnostics, data acquisition, control and communications.
EGGN403. THERMODYNAMICS II (II) This course in-
Prerequisite: DCGN381 and MACS315. Corequisite:
cludes the study of thermodynamic relations, Clapeyron
MACS348. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
equation, mixtures and solutions, Gibbs function, combustion
EGGN389. FUNDAMENTALS OF ELECTRIC MACHIN-
processes, first and second law applied to reacting systems,
ERY I (I, II) 3-phase electrical circuits, magnetic circuit
third law of thermodynamics, real combustion processes,
concepts and materials, transformer analysis and operation,
equilibrium of multicomponent systems, simultaneous chem-
steady state and dynamic analysis of rotating machines, syn-
ical reactions of real combustion processes, ionization,
chronous and polyphase induction motors, fractional horse-
overview of the major characteristics of spark-ignition and
power machines, laboratory study of external characteristics
compression-ignition engines, define parameters used to de-
of machines and transformers. Prerequisite: EGGN382.
scribe engine operation, develop the necessary thermody-
3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
namic and combustion theory required for a quantitative
analysis of engine behavior, develop an integrated treatment
EGGN390/MTGN390. MATERIALS AND MANUFAC-
of the various methods of analyzing idealized models of in-
TURING PROCESSES (II) This course focuses on available
ternal combustion engine cycles, and finally summarize how
engineering materials and the manufacturing processes used
operating characteristics of spark-ignition and compression-
in their conversion into a product or structure as critical
ignition engine depend on the major engine design and oper-
considerations in design. Properties, characteristics, typical
ating variables. Prerequisite: EGGN371, EGGN471. 3 hours
selection criteria, and applications are reviewed for ferrous
lecture; 3 semester hours.
and nonferrous metals, plastics and composites. The nature,
features, and economics of basic shaping operations are ad-
EGGN407. INTRODUCTION TO FEEDBACK CONTROL
dressed with regard to their limitations and applications and
SYSTEMS (I, II) System modeling through an energy flow
the types of processing equipment available. Related technol-
approach is presented, with examples from linear electrical,
ogy such as measurement and inspection procedures, numeri-
mechanical, fluid and/or thermal systems. Analysis of sys-
cal control systems and automated operations are introduced
tem response in both the time domain and frequency domain
throughout the course. Prerequisite: EGGN320, SYGN202.
is discussed in detail. Feedback control design techniques,
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
including PID, are analyzed using both analytical and com-
putational methods. Prerequisites: DCGN381 and
EGGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGINEERING (I, II)
MACS315. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
EGGN411. MACHINE DESIGN (I, II) Introduction to the
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
principles of mechanical design. Consideration of the behav-
Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
ior of materials under static and cyclic loading; failure con-
siderations. Application of the basic theories of mechanics,
EGGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
kinematics, and mechanics of materials to the design of basic
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
machine elements, such as shafts, keys, and coupling; journal
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
bearings, antifriction bearings, wire rope, gearing; brakes and
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Indepen-
clutches, welded connections and other fastenings. Prerequi-
dent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
site: EPIC251, EGGN315, and EGGN320. 3 hours lecture;
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
Senior Year
EGGN413. COMPUTER AIDED ENGINEERING (I, II)
EGGN400/MNGN400. INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS
This course introduces the student to the concept of com-
(II) Overview and introduction to the science and engineer-
puter-aided engineering. The major objective is to provide
ing of intelligent mobile robotics and robotic manipulators.
the student with the necessary background to use the com-
Covers guidance and force sensing, perception of the envi-
puter as a tool for engineering analysis and design. The Fi-
ronment around a mobile vehicle, reasoning about the envi-
nite Element Analysis (FEA) method and associated
ronment to identify obstacles and guidance path features and
computational engineering software have become significant
adaptively controlling and monitoring the vehicle health. A
tools in engineering analysis and design. This course is di-
lesser emphasis is placed on robot manipulator kinematics,
rected to learning the concepts of FEA and its application to
dynamics, and force and tactile sensing. Surveys manipulator
civil and mechanical engineering analysis and design. Note
and intelligent mobile robotics research and development.
that critical evaluation of the results of a FEA using classical
Introduces principles and concepts of guidance, position, and
methods (from statics and mechanics of materials) and engi-
force sensing; vision data processing; basic path and trajec-
neering judgment is employed throughout the course. Prereq-
tory planning algorithms; and force and position control.
uisite: EGGN320. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisite: MACS261 and DCGN381. 2 hours lecture;
1 hour lab; 3 semester hours.
64
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

EGGN422. ADVANCED MECHANICS OF MATERIALS
EGGN442. FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR ENGI-
(II) General theories of stress and strain; stress and strain
NEERS (II) A course combining finite element theory
transformations, principal stresses and strains, octahedral
with practical programming experience in which the multi-
shear stresses, Hooke’s law for isotropic material, and failure
disciplinary nature of the finite element method as a numeri-
criteria. Introduction to elasticity and to energy methods. Tor-
cal technique for solving differential equations is emphasized.
sion of noncircular and thin-walled members. Unsymmetrical
Topics covered include simple ‘structural’ element, solid elas-
bending and shear-center, curved beams, and beams on elas-
ticity, steady state analysis, transient analysis. Students get a
tic foundations. Introduction to plate theory. Thick-walled
copy of all the source code published in the course textbook.
cylinders and contact stresses. Prerequisite: EGGN320,
Prerequisite: EGGN320. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN413. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN444. DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES (I, II) To
EGGN420 (BELS420). INTRODUCTION TO BIOMED-
learn how to use the American Institute of Steel Construction/
ICAL ENGINEERING (I) The application of engineering
Load and Resistance Factor Design (AISC/LRFD) design
principles and techniques to the human body presents many
specifications, to develop understanding of the underlying
unique challenges. The discipline of Biomedical Engineering
theory, and to learn basic steel structural member design
has evolved over the past 50 years to address these chal-
principles to select the shape and size of a structural member.
lenges. Biomedical Engineering is a diverse, seemingly
The design and analysis of tension members, compression
all-encompassing field that includes such areas as biome-
members and flexural members is included, in addition to
chanics, biomaterials, bioinstrumentation, medical imaging,
basic bolted and welded connection design. Prerequisite:
rehabilitation. This course is intended to provide an intro-
EGGN342. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
duction to, and overview of, Biomedical Engineering. At the
EGGN445. DESIGN OF REINFORCED CONCRETE
end of the semester, students should have a working knowl-
STRUCTURES (I, II) This course provides an introduction
edge of the special considerations necessary to apply various
to the materials and principles involved in the design of rein-
engineering principles to the human body. Prerequisites:
forced concrete. It will allow students to develop an under-
DCGN421, DCGN381, EGGN320, EGGN351 or instructor
standing of the fundamental behavior of reinforced concrete
permission. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
under compressive, tensile, bending, and shear loadings, and
EGGN425(BELS425). MUSCULOSKELETAL BIOME-
gain a working knowledge of strength design theory and its
CHANICS (II) This course is intended to provide engineer-
application to the design of reinforced concrete beams,
ing students with an introduction to musculoskeletal
columns, slabs, footings, retaining walls, and foundations.
biomechanics. At the end of the semester, students should
Prerequisite: EGGN342. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
have a working knowledge of the special considerations nec-
EGGN448 ADVANCED SOIL MECHANICS (I) Advanced
essary to apply engineering principles to the human body.
soil mechanics theories and concepts as applied to analysis
The course will focus on the biomechanics of injury since
and design in geotechnical engineering. Topics covered will
understanding injury will require developing an understand-
include seepage, consolidation, shear strength and probabi-
ing of normal biomechanics. Prerequisite: DCGN421,
listic methods. The course will have an emphasis on numeri-
EGGN320, EGGN420/BELS420, or instructor permission.
cal solution techniques to geotechnical problems by finite
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
elements and finite differences. Prerequisite: EGGN361.
EGGN430(BELS430): BIOMEDICAL INSTRUMENTA-
3 hour lectures; 3 semester hours.
TION The acquisition, processing, and interpretation of
EGGN450. MULTIDISCIPLINARY ENGINEERING LAB-
biological signals present many unique challenges to the Bio-
ORATORY III (I, II) Laboratory experiments integrating
medical Engineer. This course is intended to provide students
electrical circuits, fluid mechanics, stress analysis, and other
with an introduction to, and appreciation for, many of these
engineering fundamentals using computer data acquisition and
challenges. At the end of the semester, students should have a
transducers. Students will design experiments to gather data for
working knowledge of the special considerations necessary
solving engineering problems. Examples are recommending
to gathering and analyzing biological signal data. Prerequi-
design improvements to a refrigerator, diagnosing and predict-
site: EGGN250 MEL I, DCGN381, EGGN420/BELS420, or
ing failures in refrigerators, computer control of a hydraulic
instructor permission. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
fluid power circuit in a fatigue test, analysis of structural fail-
EGGN441. ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (II)
ures in an off-road vehicle and redesign, diagnosis and predic-
Introduction to advanced structural analysis concepts. Non-
tion of failures in a motor/generator system. Prerequisites:
prismatic structures. Arches, Suspension and cable-stayed
DCGN381, EGGN250, EGGN352, EGGN350, EGGN351,
bridges. Structural optimization. Computer Methods. Struc-
EGGN320; concurrent enrollment in EGGN407. 3 hours lab;
tures with nonlinear materials. Internal force redistribution
1 semester hour.
for statically indeterminate structures. Graduate credit re-
quires additional homework and projects. Prerequisite:
EGGN342. 3 hour lectures; 3 semester hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
65

EGGN451. HYDRAULIC PROBLEMS (I) Review of
EGGN460. NUMERICAL METHODS FOR ENGINEERS(S)
fundamentals, forces on submerged surfaces, buoyancy and
Introduction to the use of numerical methods in the solution
flotation, gravity dams, weirs, steady flow in open channels,
of problems encountered in engineering analysis and design,
backwater curves, hydraulic machinery, elementary hydro-
e.g. linear simultaneous equations (e.g. analysis of elastic
dynamics, hydraulic structures. Prerequisite: EGGN351.
materials, steady heat flow); roots of nonlinear equations
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(e.g. vibration problems, open channel flow); eigen-value
EGGN/ESGN453. WASTEWATER ENGINEERING (I)
problems (e.g. natural frequencies, buckling and elastic sta-
The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the
bility); curve fitting and differentiation (e.g. interpretation of
fundamental phenomena involved in wastewater treatment
experimental data, estimation of gradients); integration (e.g.
processes (theory) and the engineering approaches used in
summation of pressure distributions, finite element proper-
designing such processes (design). This course will focus on
ties, local averaging ); ordinary differential equations (e.g.
the physical, chemical and biological processes applied to
forced vibrations, beam bending) All course participants will
liquid wastes of municipal origin. Treatment objectives will
receive source code consisting of a suite of numerical meth-
be discussed as the driving force for wastewater treatment.
ods programs. Prerequisite: MACS 260 or 261, MACS315,
Prerequisite: ESGN353 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lec-
EGGN320. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN464. FOUNDATIONS (I, II) Techniques of subsoil
EGGN/ESGN454. WATER SUPPLY ENGINEERING (I)
investigation, types of foundations and foundation problems,
Water supply availability and quality. Theory and design of
selection of basis for design of foundation types. Open-ended
conventional potable water treatment unit processes. Design
problem solving and decision making. Prerequisite:
of distribution systems. Also includes regulatory analysis
EGGN361. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). Prerequisite:
EGGN465. UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS (II) The
EGGN353, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semes-
focus of this course is on soil mechanics for unsaturated
ter hours.
soils. It provides an introduction to thermodynamic potentials
EGGN/ESGN455. SOLID AND HAZARDOUS WASTE
in partially saturated soils, chemical potentials of adsorbed
ENGINEERING (I) This course provides an introduction
water in partially saturated soils, phase properties and rela-
and overview of the engineering aspects of solid and haz-
tions, stress state variables, measurements of soil water suc-
ardous waste management. The focus is on control technolo-
tion, unsaturated flow laws, measurement of unsaturated
gies for solid wastes from common municipal and industrial
permeability, volume change theory, effective stress princi-
sources and the end-of-pipe waste streams and process resid-
ple, and measurement of volume changes in partially satu-
uals that are generated in some key industries. Prerequisite:
rated soils. The course is designed for seniors and graduate
EGGN354. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
students in various branches of engineering and geology
that are concerned with unsaturated soil’s hydrologic and
EGGN456. SCIENTIFIC BASIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL
mechanics behavior. Prerequisites: EGGN461 or consent of
REGULATIONS (II) A critical examination of the experi-
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ments, calculations and assumptions underpinning numerical
and narrative standards contained in federal and state envi-
EGGN471. HEAT TRANSFER (I, II) Engineering approach
ronmental regulations. Top-down investigations of the his-
to conduction, convection, and radiation, including steady-
torical development of selected regulatory guidelines and
state conduction, nonsteady-state conduction, internal heat
permitting procedures. Student directed design of improved
generation conduction in one, two, and three dimensions, and
regulations. Prerequisite: EGGN353 or consent of instructor.
combined conduction and convection. Free and forced con-
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
vection including laminar and turbulent flow, internal and
external flow. Radiation of black and grey surfaces, shape
EGGN/ESGN457. SITE REMEDIATION ENGINEERING
factors and electrical equivalence. Prerequisite: MACS315,
(II) This course describes the engineering principles and
EGGN351, EGGN371. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
practices associated with the characterization and remedia-
tion of contaminated sites. Methods for site characterization
EGGN473. FLUID MECHANICS II (I) Review of elemen-
and risk assessment will be highlighted while the emphasis
tary fluid mechanics and engineering. Two-dimensional in-
will be on remedial action screening processes and technol-
ternal and external flows. Steady and unsteady flows. Fluid
ogy principles and conceptual design. Common isolation and
engineering problems. Compressible flow. Computer solu-
containment and in situ and ex situ treatment technology will
tions of various practical problems for mechanical and re-
be covered. Computerized decision-support tools will be used
lated engineering disciplines. Prerequisite: EGGN351 or
and case studies will be presented. Prerequisite: EGGN354
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
66
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

EGGN478. ENGINEERING DYNAMICS (I) Applications
the main objectives of this course is to focus on the interdis-
of dynamics to design, mechanisms and machine elements.
ciplinary aspects of integration of the alternative sources of
Kinematics and kinetics of planar linkages. Analytical and
energy, including hydropower, wind power, photovoltaic, and
graphical methods. Four-bar linkage, slider-crank, quick-
energy storage for those systems. Power electronic systems
return mechanisms, cams, and gears. Analysis of nonplanar
will be discussed and how those electronic systems can be
mechanisms. Static and dynamic balancing of rotating ma-
used for stand-alone and grid-connected electrical energy ap-
chinery. Free and forced vibrations and vibration isolation.
plications. Prerequisite: EGGN382 or consent of instructor.
Prerequisite: EGGN315; concurrent enrollment in MACS315.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN 487. ADVANCED ELECTRIC POWER SYSTEMS
EGGN482. MICROCOMPUTER ARCHITECTURE AND
LABORATORY (II) Electric power grid or the intercon-
INTERFACING (I) Microprocessor and microcontroller
nected power network is one of the most complex systems.
architecture focusing on hardware structures and elementary
Evaluating the system operation and planning for future ex-
machine and assembly language programming skills essential
pansion, reliability and security analysis has become increas-
for use of microprocessors in data acquisition, control, and
ingly more complex. The common techniques utilized in the
instrumentation systems. Analog and digital signal condition-
design includes commercially available software. The Pow-
ing, communication, and processing. A/D and D/A converters
erWorld Simulator is one of the most commonly used such
for microprocessors. RS232 and other communication stan-
software and will be featured in this class. Emphasis will
dards. Laboratory study and evaluation of microcomputer
be focused on determining how the power flow within a large
system; design and implementation of interfacing projects.
system is controlled and understanding the factors that influ-
Prerequisite: EGGN384 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lec-
ence voltage regulation and reactive power control. Contin-
ture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
gency analysis, evaluating system improvements, and
EGGN483. ANALOG & DIGITAL COMMUNICATION
planning for future expansion will also be featured. Short
SYSTEMS (II) Signal classification; Fourier transform;
circuit currents resulting from symmetrical and unsymmetri-
filtering; sampling; signal representation; modulation; de-
cal faults will also be calculated. Prerequisites: EGGN 484
modulation; applications to broadcast, data transmission,
and/or consent of instructor. 3 hours laboratory; 1 semester
and instrumentation. Prerequisite: EGGN388 or consent of
hour.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
EGGN488. RELIABILITY OF ENGINEERING SYSTEMS
EGGN484. POWER SYSTEMS ANALYSIS (I) 3-phase
(I) This course addresses uncertainty modeling, reliability
power systems, per-unit calculations, modeling and equiva-
analysis, risk assessment, reliability-based design, predictive
lent circuits of major components, voltage drop, fault calcu-
maintenance, optimization, and cost- effective retrofit of
lations, symmetrical components and unsymmetrical faults,
engineering systems such as structural, sensory, electric, pipe-
system grounding, power-flow, selection of major equipment,
line, hydraulic, lifeline and environmental facilities. Topics
design of electric power distribution systems. Prerequisite:
include introduction of reliability of engineering systems,
EGGN389. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
stochastic engineering system simulation, frequency analysis
of extreme events, reliability and risk evaluation of engineer-
EGGN485. INTRODUCTION TO HIGH POWER ELEC-
ing systems, and optimization of engineering systems. Pre-
TRONICS (II) Power electronics are used in a broad range
requisite: MACS323. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
of applications from control of power flow on major trans-
mission lines to control of motor speeds in industrial facili-
EGGN491. SENIOR DESIGN I (I, II) (WI) This course is
ties and electric vehicles, to computer power supplies. This
the first of a two-semester capstone course sequence giving
course introduces the basic principles of analysis and design
the student experience in the engineering design process.
of circuits utilizing power electronics, including AC/DC,
Realistic open-ended design problems are addressed for real
AC/AC, DC/DC, and DC/AC conversions in their many con-
world clients at the conceptual, engineering analysis, and the
figurations. Prerequisites: EGGN385, EGGN389. 3 hours
synthesis stages and include economic and ethical considera-
lecture; 3 semester hours.
tions necessary to arrive at a final design. Students are as-
signed to interdisciplinary teams and exposed to processes in
EGGN486. PRACTICAL DESIGN OF SMALL RENEW-
the areas of design methodology, project management, com-
ABLE ENERGY SYSTEMS (I) This course provides the
munications, and work place issues. Strong emphasis is
fundamentals to understand and analyze renewable energy
placed on this being a process course versus a project course.
powered electric circuits. It covers practical topics related to
This is a writing-across-the-curriculum course where stu-
the design of alternative energy based systems. It is assumed
dents' written and oral communication skills are strength-
the students will have some basic and broad knowledge of
ened. The design projects are chosen to develop student
the principles of electrical machines, thermodynamics, elec-
creativity, use of design methodology and application of
tronics, and fundamentals of electric power systems. One of
prior course work paralleled by individual study and re-
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
67

search. Prerequisite: Students must have completed the sum-
Environmental Science
mer field session associated with their specialty area prior to
entering Senior Design I. 1-2 hour lecture; 6 hours lab; 3 se-
and Engineering
mester hours
ROBERT L. SIEGRIST, Professor and Division Director
EGGN492. SENIOR DESIGN II (I, II) (WI) This course is
BRUCE D. HONEYMAN, Professor
the second of a two-semester sequence to give the student ex-
TISSA ILLANGASEKARE, Professor and AMAX Distinguished
perience in the engineering design process. Design integrity
Chair
and performance are to be demonstrated by building a proto-
PHILIPPE ROSS, Professor
type or model, or producing a complete drawing and specifi-
RONALD R.H. COHEN, Associate Professor
cation package, and performing pre-planned experimental
JÖRG DREWES, Associate Professor
tests, wherever feasible, to verify design compliance with
LINDA A. FIGUEROA, Associate Professor
client requirements. Prerequisite: EGGN491. 1 hour lecture;
JUNKO MUNAKATA MARR, Associate Professor
6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
JOHN E. McCRAY, Associate Professor
TZAHI CATH, Assistant Professor
EGGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGINEERING (I, II)
JOHN R. SPEAR, Assistant Professor
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
ROBERT F. HOLUB, Research Professor
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
MICHAEL SEIBERT, Research Professor
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
MARIA L. GHIRARDI, Research Associate Professor
Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
MATTHIAS KOHLER, Research Associate Professor
MICHELLE CRIMI, Research Assistant Professor
EGGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
MATTHEW C. POSEWITZ, Research Assistant Professor
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
PEI XU, Research Assistant Professor
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
KATHRYN LOWE, Senior Research Associate
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Indepen-
JILL M.B. TOMARAS, Research Associate
dent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
Program Description
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
The Environmental Science and Engineering (ESE) Divi-
sion offers specialty and minor programs in Environmental
Science and Engineering. ESE provides an undergraduate
curriculum leading to a Minor (18 hours) or an Area of Spe-
cial Interest (ASI) (12 hours).
Environmental Engineering Specialty in the
Engineering Division
The Environmental Engineering Specialty introduces
students to the fundamentals of environmental engineering
including the scientific and regulatory basis of public health
and environmental protection. Topics covered include envi-
ronmental science and regulatory processes, water and waste-
water engineering, solid and hazardous waste management,
and contaminated site remediation.
See entries in this Bulletin under Engineering (pg. 48) and
the degree program leading to the BS in Engineering with a
Specialty in Environmental Engineering. This undergraduate
Specialty is supported by the Environmental Science and
Engineering Division.
Environmental Science and Engineering Minor
and ASI
General Requirements:
A Minor Program of study must consist of a minimum of
18 credit hours of a logical sequence of courses, only three
hours of which may be taken at the 100- or 200- level.
An Area of Special Interest (ASI) must consist of a mini-
mum of 12 credit hours of a logical sequence of courses, only
three hours of which may be taken at the 100- or 200-level.
68Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

A Minor Program / Area of Special Interest declaration
ESGN299. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
(available in the Registrar’s Office) should be submitted for
search or special problem projects supervised by faculty
approval prior to the student’s completion of half of the hours
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
proposed to constitute the program. Approvals are required
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: Indepen-
from the Director of the Environmental Science and Engi-
dent Study form must be complete and submitted to the
neering Division, the student’s advisor, and the Department
Registrar. Variable credit: 1-6.
Head or Division Director in the department or division in
ESGN/SYGN203. NATURAL AND ENGINEERED ENVI-
which the student is enrolled.
RONMENTAL SYSTEMS Introduction to natural and engi-
All students pursuing the ESE Minor or ASI are required
neered environmental systems analysis. Environmental
to take ESGN/EGGN353 and ESGN/EGGN354.
decision making, sustainable development, pollution sources,
Additional courses for the ASI or Minor sequence must be
effects and prevention, and environmental life cycle assess-
selected from:
ment. The basic concepts of material balances, energy bal-
ances, chemical equilibrium and kinetics and structure and
ESGN401 Fundamentals of Ecology
ESGN440A Environmental Pollution: Sources, Characteristics,
function of biological systems will be used to analyze envi-
Transport and Fate
ronmental systems. Case studies in sustainable development,
ESGN/EGGN453 Wastewater Engineering
industrial ecology, pollution prevention and life cycle assess-
ESGN/EGGN454 Water Supply Engineering
ment with be covered. The goal of this course is to develop
ESGN/EGGN456 Scientific Basis of Environmental Regulations
problem-solving skills associated with the analysis of environ-
ESGN/EGGN457 Site Remediation Engineering
mental systems. Prerequisites: CHGN124 or concurrent;
ESGN462 Solid Waste Minimization and Recycling
MACS112 or concurrent; PHGN 100; SYGN101. 3 semester
ESGN463 Pollution Prevention: Fundamentals and Practice
hours.
Combined Degree Program Option
ESGN301/BELS301. GENERAL BIOLOGY I (I) This is
CSM Undergraduate students have the opportunity to
the first semester an introductory course in Biology. Empha-
begin work on a M.S. degree in Environmental Science and
sis is placed on the methods of science; structural, molecular,
Engineering while completing their Bachelor’s degree. The
and energetic basis of cellular activities; genetic variability
CSM Combined Degree Program provides the vehicle for
and evolution; diversity and life processes in plants and ani-
students to use undergraduate coursework as part of their
mals; and, principles of ecology. Prerequisite: None. 3 hours
Graduate Degree curriculum. For more information please
lecture; 3 semester hours.
see the ESE Division website: http://www.mines.edu/
academic/envsci/ucombine.html.
ESGN303/BELS303. GENERAL BIOLOGY II (II) This is
the continuation of General Biology I. Emphasis is placed on
Description of Courses
an examination of organisms as the products of evolution.
Undergraduate Courses
The diversity of life forms will be explored. Special attention
ESGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCI-
will be given to the vertebrate body (organs, tissues and sys-
ENCE AND ENGINEERING (I, II) Pilot course or special
tems) and how it functions. Prerequisite: General Biology I,
topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instruc-
or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
tor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once.
ESGN311/BELS311. GENERAL BIOLOGY I LABORA-
Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit
TORY (I) This course provides students with laboratory exer-
hours.
cises that complement lectures given in ESGN301/BELS301,
ESGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
the first semester introductory course in Biology. Emphasis is
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
placed on the methods of science; structural, molecular, and
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
energetic basis of cellular activities; genetic variability and
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Indepen-
evolution; diversity and life processes in plants and animals;
dent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
and, principles of ecology. Offered with the collaboration of
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Red Rocks Community College. Corequisite or Prerequisite:
ESGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCI-
ESGN/BELS301 or equivalent. 3 hours laboratory; 1 semes-
ENCE AND ENGINEERING (I, II) Pilot course or special
ter hour.
topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instruc-
ESGN313/BELS313. GENERAL BIOLOGY II LABORA-
tor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once.
TORY (II) This course provides students with laboratory ex-
Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit
ercises that complement lectures given in
hours.
ESGN303/BELS303, the second semester introductory
course in Biology. Emphasis is placed on an examination of
organisms as the products of evolution. The diversity of life
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
69

forms will be explored. Special attention will be given to the
apply to all the above. Three to four weekend field trips will
vertebrate body (organs, tissues and systems) and how it
be arranged during the semester. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
functions. Offered with the collaboration of Red Rocks Com-
hours.
munity College. Co-requisite or Prerequisite:
ESGN402/BELS402. CELL BIOLOGY AND PHYSIOL-
ESGN/BELS303 or equivalent. 3 hours laboratory; 1 semes-
OGY (II) An introduction to the morphological, biochemical
ter hour.
and biophysical properties of cells and their significance in
ESGN321/BELS321. INTRODUCTION TO GENETICS (II)
the life processes. Prerequisite: General Biology I, or equiva-
A study of the mechanisms by which biological information
lent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
is encoded, stored, and transmitted, including Mendelian
ESGN403/CHGN403. INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRON-
genetics, molecular genetics, chromosome structure and re-
MENTAL CHEMISTRY (I) Processes by which natural and
arrangement, cytogenetics, and population genetics. Pre-
anthropogenic chemicals interact, react and are transformed
requisite: General Biology I or equivalent. 3 hours lecture +
and redistributed in various environmental compartments.
3 hours laboratory; 4 semester hours.
Air, soil and aqueous (fresh and saline surface and ground-
ESGN/EGGN353. FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMEN-
waters) environments are covered, along with specialized
TAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING I (I, II) Topics cov-
environments such as waste treatment facilities and the upper
ered include history of water related environmental law and
atmosphere. Prerequisites: SYGN101, DCGN209, and
regulation, major sources and concerns of water pollution,
CHGN222. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
water quality parameters and their measurement, material
ESGN440. ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION: SOURCES,
and energy balances, water chemistry concepts, microbial
CHARACTERISTICS, TRANSPORT AND FATE (I) This
concepts, aquatic toxicology and risk assessment. Prerequi-
course describes the environmental behavior of inorganic and
site: Junior standing or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture;
organic chemicals in multimedia environments, including
3 semester hours.
water, air, sediment and biota. Sources and characteristics of
ESGN/EGGN354. FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMEN-
contaminants in the environment are discussed as broad cate-
TAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING II (II) Introductory
gories, with some specific examples from various industries.
level fundamentals in atmospheric systems, air pollution con-
Attention is focused on the persistence, reactivity, and parti-
trol, solid waste management, hazardous waste management,
tioning behavior of contaminants in environmental media.
waste minimization, pollution prevention, role and responsi-
Both steady and unsteady state multimedia environmental
bilities of public institutions and private organizations in en-
models are developed and applied to contaminated sites. The
vironmental management (relative to air, solid and hazardous
principles of contaminant transport in surface water, ground-
waste. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor.
water and air are also introduced. The course provides stu-
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
dents with the conceptual basis and mathematical tools for
ESGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCI-
predicting the behavior of contaminants in the environment.
ENCE AND ENGINEERING (I, II) Pilot course or special
Prerequisite: EGGN353 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lec-
topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instruc-
ture; 3 semester hours.
tor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once.
ESGN/EGGN453. WASTEWATER ENGINEERING (I)
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Variable credit: 1-6
The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the
semester hours.
fundamental phenomena involved in wastewater treatment
ESGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
processes (theory) and the engineering approaches used in
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
designing such processes (design). This course will focus on
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
the physical, chemical and biological processes applied to
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Indepen-
liquid wastes of municipal origin. Treatment objectives will
dent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
be discussed as the driving force for wastewater treatment.
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Prerequisite: ESGN353 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lec-
ture; 3 semester hours.
ESGN401. FUNDAMENTALS OF ECOLOGY (I) Biologi-
cal and ecological principles discussed and industrial exam-
ESGN/EGGN454. WATER SUPPLY ENGINEERING (II)
ples of their use given. Analysis of ecosystem processes,
Water supply availability and quality. Theory and design of
such as erosion, succession, and how these processes relate
conventional potable water treatment and processes. Design
to engineering activities, including engineering design and
of distribution systems. Also includes regulatory analysis
plant operation. Criteria and performance standards analyzed
under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). Prerequisite:
for facility siting, pollution control, and mitigation of im-
EGGN353 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semes-
pacts. North American ecosystems analyzed. Concepts of
ter hours.
forestry, range, and wildlife management integrated as they
70
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

ESGN/EGGN455. SOLID AND HAZARDOUS WASTE
ESGN463. POLLUTION PREVENTION: FUNDAMEN-
ENGINEERING (II) This course provides an introduction
TALS AND PRACTICE (II) The objective of this course is to
and overview of the engineering aspects of solid and haz-
introduce the principles of pollution prevention, environmen-
ardous waste management. The focus is on control technolo-
tally benign products and processes, and manufacturing sys-
gies for solid wastes from common municipal and industrial
tems. The course provides a thorough foundation in pollution
sources and the end-of-pipe waste streams and process resid-
prevention concepts and methods. Engineers and scientists are
uals that are generated in some key industries. Prerequisite:
given the tools to incorporate environmental consequences into
EGGN354. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
decision-making. Sources of pollution and its consequences
ESGN/EGGN456. SCIENTIFIC BASIS OF ENVIRON-
are detailed. Focus includes sources and minimization of in-
MENTAL REGULATIONS (I) A critical examination of the
dustrial pollution; methodology for life-cycle assessments and
experiments, calculations and assumptions underpinning nu-
developing successful pollution prevention plans; technological
merical and narrative standards contained in federal and state
means for minimizing the use of water, energy, and reagents in
environmental regulations. Top-down investigations of the
manufacturing; and tools for achieving a sustainable society.
historical development of selected regulatory guidelines and
Materials selection, process and product design, and packaging
permitting procedures. Student directed design of improved
are also addressed. Prerequisite: EGGN/ESGN353 or
regulations. Prerequisite: EGGN353. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
EGGN/ESGN354 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
mester hours.
semester hours.
ESGN/EGGN457. SITE REMEDIATION ENGINEERING
ESGN490. ENVIRONMENTAL LAW (I) Specially de-
(II) This course describes the engineering principles and
signed for the needs of the environmental quality engineer,
practices associated with the characterization and remedia-
scientist, planner, manager, government regulator, consultant,
tion of contaminated sites. Methods for site characterization
or advocate. Highlights include how our legal system works,
and risk assessment will be highlighted while the emphasis
environmental law fundamentals, all major US EPA/state en-
will be on remedial action screening processes and technol-
forcement programs, the National Environmental Policy Act,
ogy principles and conceptual design. Common isolation and
air and water pollutant laws, risk assessment and manage-
containment and in-situ and ex-situ treatment technology will
ment, and toxic and hazardous substance laws (RCRA,
be covered. Computerized decision-support tools will be
CERCLA, TSCA, LUST, etc). Prerequisites: ESGN353
used and case studies will be presented. Prerequisites:
or ESGN354, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture;
EGGN353, EGGN354 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
3 semester hours.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
ESGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCI-
ESGN462/MTGN462. SOLID WASTE MINIMIZATION
ENCE AND ENGINEERING (I, II) Pilot course or special
AND RECYCLING (I) This course will examine, using case
topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instruc-
studies, how industry applies engineering principles to mini-
tor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once.
mize waste formation and to meet solid waste recycling chal-
Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit
lenges. Both proven and emerging solutions to solid waste
hours.
environmental problems, especially those associated with
ESGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
metals, will be discussed. Prerequisites: EGGN/ESGN353,
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
EGGN/ESGN354, and ESGN302/CHGN403 or consent of
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Indepen-
dent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
71

Geology and Geological
ence and basic engineering along with specialized upper
level instruction in integrated applications to real problems.
Engineering
Engineering design is integrated throughout the four year
program, beginning in Design I (Freshman year) and ending
MURRAY W. HITZMAN, Professor, Charles F. Fogarty Professor of
with the capstone design courses in the senior year. The pro-
Economic Geology, and Department Head
gram is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Com-
JOHN B. CURTIS, Professor
WENDY J. HARRISON, Professor
mission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and
EILEEN POETER, Professor
Technology, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD
SAMUEL B. ROMBERGER, Professor
21202-4012, telephone (410) 347-7700. Students have the
RICHARD F. WENDLANDT, Professor
background to take the Fundamentals of Engineering Exam,
DAVID A. BENSON, Associate Professor
the first step in becoming a registered Professional Engineer.
L. GRAHAM CLOSS, Associate Professor
Graduates follow five general career paths:
JERRY D. HIGGINS, Associate Professor
JOHN D. HUMPHREY, Associate Professor and Acting Department
Engineering Geology and Geotechnics. Careers in site
Head (2006/2007)
investigation, design and stabilization of foundations or
KEVIN W. MANDERNACK, Associate Professor (also Chemistry
slopes; site characterization, design, construction and
and Geochemistry)
remediation of waste disposal sites or contaminated sites;
JOHN E. McCRAY, Associate Professor
and assessment of geologic hazards for civil, mining or
ERIC P. NELSON, Associate Professor
environmental engineering projects.
PIRET PLINK-BJORKLUND, Associate Professor
PAUL SANTI, Associate Professor
Ground-Water Engineering. Careers in assessment and
BRUCE TRUDGILL, Associate Professor
remediation of ground-water contamination, design of
MICHAEL N. GOOSEFF, Assistant Professor
ground-water control facilities for geotechnical projects and
CHRISTIAN V. SHOREY, Instructor
exploration for and development of ground-water supplies.
CHARLES F. KLUTH, Distinguished Scientist
JEFFREY W. HEDENQUIST, Research Associate Professor
Petroleum Exploration and Development Engineering.
DONNA S. ANDERSON, Research Assistant Professor
Careers in search for and development of oil, gas and coal
MARY CARR, Research Assistant Professor
and their efficient extraction.
GEOFF THYNE, Research Assistant Professor
Mineral Exploration and Development Engineering.
THOMAS L.T. GROSE, Professor Emeritus
Careers in search for and development of natural deposits of
JOHN D. HAUN, Professor Emeritus
metals, industrial materials and rock aggregate.
RICHARD W. HUTCHINSON, Professor Emeritus
KEENAN LEE, Professor Emeritus
Geological Science. Students are also well prepared to
A. KEITH TURNER, Professor Emeritus
pursue careers in basic geoscience. Graduates have become
JOHN E. WARME, Professor Emeritus
experts in fields as divergent as global climate change, the
ROBERT J. WEIMER, Professor Emeritus
early history of the Earth, planetary science, fractal represen-
TIMOTHY A. CROSS, Associate Professor Emeritus
tation of ground-water flow and simulation of sedimentary
GREGORY S. HOLDEN, Associate Professor Emeritus and
rock sequences, to name a few. Careers are available in re-
Assistant Department Head
search and education.
Program Description
The curriculum may be followed along two concentration
A Bachelor of Science degree in Geological Engineering
paths with slightly different upper division requirements.
is the basis for careers concentrating on the interaction of
Both concentrations are identical in the first two years as stu-
humans and the earth. Geological Engineers deal with a wide
dents study basic science, mathematics, engineering science,
variety of the resource and environmental problems that
and geological science. In the junior year those students
come with accommodating more and more people on a finite
pursuing careers in ground-water engineering, engineering
planet. Geologic hazards and conditions must be recognized
geology and geotechnics, or geoenvironmental engineering
and considered in the location and design of foundations for
applications follow the Environmental, Engineering Geology
buildings, roads and other structures; waste disposal facilities
and Geotechnics, and Ground-Water Engineering Concentra-
must be properly located, designed and constructed; contami-
tion. Students anticipating careers in resource exploration
nated sites and ground water must be accurately character-
and development or who expect to pursue graduate studies in
ized before cleanup can be accomplished; water supplies
geological sciences follow the Mineral and Petroleum Explo-
must be located, developed and protected; and new mineral
ration Engineering Concentration.
and energy resources must be located and developed in an
At all levels the Geological Engineering Program empha-
environmentally sound manner. Geological Engineers are the
sizes laboratory and field experience. All courses have a lab-
professionals trained to meet these challenges.
oratory session, and after the junior year students participate
The Geological Engineering curriculum provides a strong
in a field course, which is six weeks of geologic and engi-
foundation in the basic sciences, mathematics, geological sci-
72
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

neering mapping and direct observation. The course involves
approaches toward thinking and analysis, and personal pref-
considerable time outdoors in the mountains and canyons of
erence. They should feel capable of working in a technical
Utah and southwestern Colorado.
capacity and communicating with others in an international
At the senior level, students begin to focus on a career path
geoscience and geoengineering arena.
by taking course sequences in at least two areas of geological
Graduates should practice ethical behavior and integrity,
engineering specialization. The course sequences begin with
and they should function such that their society benefits from
a 4 unit course in the fundamentals of a field of geological
their work in the geosciences and geoengineering disciplines.
engineering which is followed by a 3 unit design-oriented
Program Requirements
course that emphasizes experience in direct application of
In order to achieve the program goals listed above, every stu-
principles through design projects.
dent working towards the Bachelor of Science Degree in Geo-
Students interested in careers in Geological Engineering
logical Engineering must complete the following requirements:
are encouraged to enroll in a one unit Spring course (GEOL102)
Degree Requirements (Geological Engineering)
entitled “Careers in Geological Engineering.” The course, a
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
series of presentations by faculty and outside professionals
GEGN202 Geol. Principles & Processes
3
3
4
on all aspects of these careers, is designed to provide students
MACS213 Calc. for Scientists & Engn’rs III
4
4
with the background necessary to make informed career
DCGN241 Statics
3
3
decisions. All students are invited to participate.
SYGN200 Human Systems
3
3
Program Educational Objectives (Bachelor of
PAGN201 Physical Education III
2
0.5
Total
14.5
Science in Geological Engineering)
In addition to contributing toward achieving the educa-
Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
EPIC251 GIS Epics II
2
3
3
tional objectives described in the CSM Graduate Profile and
GEGN206 Earth Materials
2
3
3
the ABET Accreditation Criteria, the Geological Engineering
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
Program at CSM has established the following program edu-
PHGN200 Physics II
3.5
3
4.5
cational objectives:
EGGN320 Mechanics of Materials
3
3
Graduates of the Department should have depth and
PAGN202 Physical Education IV
2
0.5
breadth in one or more of the following fields: ground-water
Total
17
engineering, engineering geology and geotechnics, environ-
Following the sophomore year, Geological Engineering students
mental geology, and natural resource exploration and devel-
choose from one of two concentrations: 1. Minerals and Petroleum
opment. They should have the knowledge and experience to
Exploration Engineering 2. Environmental, Engineering Geology
recognize problems and design solutions through application
and Geotechnics, and Ground-water Engineering
of scientific and engineering principles and methods.
Minerals and Petroleum Exploration Engineering
Graduates must have the communication skills which per-
Concentration
mit them to convey technical information, geoscience and
Recommended for students intending careers in explora-
geoengineering concepts, and results of technical studies to
tion and development of mineral and fuels resources, or in-
peers and the lay public. Communication skills include oral,
tending careers in geoscience research and education.
written and graphic presentations, computer-based retrieval,
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
manipulation and analysis of technical information, and gen-
GEOL309 Structural Geology
3
3
4
eral computer literacy.
GEOL321 Mineralogy & Mineral
Characterization
2
3
3
Graduates should appreciate and respect the characteristics
DCGN209 Thermodynamics
3
3
and worth of leadership and teamwork, and should possess
EBGN201 Principles of Economics
3
3
the attitude that teamwork and cooperation are equally im-
EGGN361 Soil Mechanics OR
3
3
portant values as leadership.
MNGN321 Introduction to Rock Mechanics*
2
3
3
Total
16
Graduates should have the skills and desire, as well as tech-
nical breadth and depth, to continue their personal and profes-
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
sional growth through life-long learning. Graduates should
GEOL307 Petrology
2
3
3
GEGN317 Field Methods
6
2
have the understanding that personal and professional flexi-
GEOL314 Stratigraphy
3
3
4
bility, creativity, resourcefulness, receptivity and openness
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective I
3
3
are crucial attributes to continued growth and success in in-
Tech Elective II *
3
3
creasingly diverse, multi-disciplinary technical environments.
EGGN351 Fluid Mechanics
3
3
Graduates should appreciate and respect diversity of cul-
Total
18
ture, language, religion, social-political-economic systems,
*Technical Electives I & II: Either MNGN321 or EGGN361 is
required as ONE of the technical electives. An additional technical
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
73

elective must be selected so that the total technical elective credit
Summer Field Term
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
hours are composed of a balance of engineering science and engi-
GEGN316 Field Geology
6
6
neering design.
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Summer Field Term
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
GEGN468 Engineering Geology
3
3
4
GEGN316 Field Geology
6
6
GEGN467 Ground-Water Engineering
3
3
4
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
GEGN432 Geological Data Management
1
6
3
GEGN4— Option Elective
3
3
4
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective II
3
3
GEGN4— Option Elective
3
3
4
Free Elective
3
3
GEGN432 Geological Data Management
1
6
3
Total
17
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective II
3
3
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Free Elective
3
GEGN469 Engineering Geology Design
3
3
Total
17
GEGN470 Ground-Water Engineering Design 3
3
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective III
3
3
GEGN4— Design Elective
2
3
3
Free Elective
3
3
GEGN4— Design Elective
2
3
3
Free Elective
3
3
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective III
3
3
Total
15
Free Elective
3
Degree Total
134.5
Free Elective
3
Students in the Environmental, Engineering Geology and
Total
15
Geotechnics, and Ground-Water Engineering Concentration
Degree Total
136.5
may further specialize by utilizing their free elective courses
Option Electives:
to emphasize a specific specialty. Suggested courses are pre-
Students must take TWO of the following four courses.
sented below and should be selected in consultation with the
GEGN401 Mineral Deposits
4 credits
student’s advisor. The emphasis area is an informal designa-
GEGN438 Petroleum Geology
4 credits
tion only and it will not appear on the transcript.
GEGN467 Ground-Water Engineering
4 credits
Engineering Geology and Geotechnics Emphasis:
GEGN468 Engineering Geology & Geotechnics
4 credits
EGGN464 Foundations
Design Electives:
GEGN475 Applications of Geographic Information Systems
Students must take TWO design courses, corresponding in
EBGN321 Engineering Economics
subject area to the Option Elective.
EGGN465 Unsaturated Soil Mechanics
GEGN399 Independent Study in Engineering Geology
GEGN403 Mineral Exploration Design
3 credits
GEGN476 Desktop Mapping Applications for Project Data
GEGN439 Multi-Disciplinary Petroleum Design
3 credits
Management
GEGN469 Engineering Geology Design
3 credits
GEGN499 Independent Study in Engineering Geology
GEGN470 Ground-Water Engineering Design
3 credits
GEOL307 Petrology
Environmental, Engineering Geology and Geotechnics,
GEOL321 Mineralogy & Mineral Characterization
and Ground-Water Engineering Concentration
MACS261 Programming Concepts
Recommended for students intending careers in geotechni-
MNGN404 Tunneling
cal engineering, hydrogeology, or other environmental engi-
MNGN408 Underground Design and Construction
neering careers.
MNGN410 Excavation Project Management
MNGN445/545 Rock Slope Design
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Water Engineering Emphasis:
GEOL309 Structural Geology
3
3
4
DCGN209 Introduction to Thermodynamics
3
3
EBGN321 Engineering Economics
or
EGGN/ESGN353 Fundamentals of Environmental Sci. & Engr. I
EGGN371 Thermodynamics
3
3
EGGN/ESGN354 Fundamentals of Environmental Sci. & Engr. II
EBGN201 Principles of Economics
3
3
EGGN451 Hydraulic Problems
EGGN361 Soil Mechanics
3
3
EGGN465 Unsaturated Soil Mechanics
EGGN363 Soil Mechanics Lab
1
1
EGGN473 Fluid Mechanics
EGGN351 Fluid Mechanics
3
3
EGGN/ESGN453 Wastewater Engineering
Total
17
EGGN/ESGN454 Water Supply Engineering
ESGN401 Fundamentals of Ecology
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
ESGN440 Environmental Pollution
GEGN317 Field Methods
6
2
ESGN/EGGN455 Solid & Hazardous Waste Engineering
GEGN473 Site Investigation
3
3
ESGN/EGGN456 Scientific Basis of Environmental Regulations
GEOL314 Stratigraphy
3
3
4
ESGN/EGGN457 Site Remediation Engineering
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective I
3
3
ESGN490 Environmental Law
MNGN321 Rock Mechanics
2
3
3
ESGN/CHGN403 Intro. to Environmental Chemistry
Total
15
GEGN499 Independent Study in Hydrogeology
74
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

GEGN475 Applications of Geographic Information Systems
Description of Courses
GEGN481 Advanced Hydrology
GEGN483 Math Modeling of Ground-Water Systems
Freshman Year
GEOL321 Mineralogy & Mineral Characterization
GEOL102. INTRODUCTION TO GEOLOGICAL ENGI-
GPGN311 Survey of Exploration Geophysics
NEERING (II) Presentations by faculty members and out-
LAIS487 Environmental Politics & Policy
side professionals of case studies to provide a comprehensive
LAIS488 Water Politics & Policy
overview of the fields of Geology and Geological Engineer-
MACS260 Fortran Programming
ing and the preparation necessary to pursue careers in those
MACS261 Programming Concepts
fields. A short paper on an academic professional path will be
MACS332 Linear Algebra
required. Prerequisite: SYGN101 or concurrent enrollment.
MACS333 Intro to Mathematical Modeling
1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour.
Geological Engineering Minor
GEGN/GEOL198. SEMINAR IN GEOLOGY OR GEO-
Students, other than Geological Engineering majors, desir-
LOGICAL ENGINEERING (I, II) Special topics classes
ing to receive a minor in Geological Engineering must com-
taught on a one-time basis. May include lecture, laboratory
plete 18 hours of Geology and Geological Engineering
and field trip activities. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor
courses as follows:
and department head. Variable credit; 1 to 6 semester hours.
1. SYGN101 Earth and Environmental Systems
GEGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING
2. At least one course from each of the following groups:
GEOLOGY OR ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY (I, II)
Earth Materials
Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems
GEGN206 Earth Materials
in geological engineering or engineering hydrogeology. Pre-
Structural Geology
requisite: “Independent Study” form must be completed and
GEOL308 Applied Structural Geology or
submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
GEOL309 Structural Geology and Tectonics
GEOL199. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GEOLOGY (I, II)
Stratigraphy
Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems
GEOL314 Stratigraphy or
in geology. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form must be
GEOL315 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit;
1 to 6 credit hours.
3. One senior area elective course can be chosen from the
following:
Sophomore Year
GEGN401 Mineral Deposits
GEGN 202. GEOLOGIC PRINCIPLES AND PROCESSES
GEGN438 Petroleum Geology
(I) Introduction to principles of geomorphology and histori-
GEGN467 Ground-Water Engineering
cal geology. Geomorphology of glacial, volcanic, arid, karst,
GEGN468 Engineering Geology & Geotechnics
and complex geological landscapes. Introduction to weather-
ing, soils, hillslopes, and drainage systems. Geologic time
4. Elective Geology & Geological Engineering courses to
scale and deep time, stratigraphic principles, evolution and
total 18 credits. (Design electives listed below are strongly
the fossil record, geochronology, plate tectonics, and critical
recommended.)
events in Earth history. Laboratories emphasize fieldwork in
GEGN403 Mineral Exploration Design
geomorphic regions of Colorado, map skills, time and order-
GEGN439 Multi-Disciplinary Petroleum Design
ing of geologic events, and fossil preservation and identifica-
GEGN469 Engineering Geology Design
tion. Prerequisite: SYGN 101, 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab:
GEGN470 Ground-Water Engineering Design
4 semester hours.
Area of Special Interest
GEGN206. EARTH MATERIALS (II) Introduction to Earth
An Area of Special Interest (ASI) consists of 12 or more
Materials, emphasizing the structure, formation, and behavior
hours of course work. To receive an ASI, a student must take
of minerals and rocks. Laboratories emphasize the recognition,
at least 12 hours of a logical sequence of courses, only three
description, and engineering evaluation of earth materials.
credit hours of which may be at the 100- or 200- level.
Prerequisite: SYGN101. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 se-
Additionally a total of not more than three credit hours of
mester hours.
the sequence may be specifically required by the degree pro-
gram in which the student is graduating. For Geological
GEGN/GEOL298. SEMINAR IN GEOLOGY OR GEO-
Engineering, ASI students must satisfy item 2 of the
LOGICAL ENGINEERING (I, II) Special topics classes
Geological Engineering minor requirements above, or gain
taught on a one-time basis. May include lecture, laboratory
written approval of an alternative program.
and field trip activities. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor
and department head. Variable credit; 1 to 6 semester hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
75

GEGN299. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING
and analysis of structures related to rock engineering and
GEOLOGY OR ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY (I, II)
mining. Structural features and processes are related to
Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems in
stress/strain theory and rock mechanics principles. Lab and
geological engineering or engineering hydrogeology. Pre-
field projects include deformation experiments, geologic
requisite: “Independent Study” form must be completed and
map, cross section, and orientation data analysis of structural
submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 semester hours.
features including fractures, faults, folds, and rock cleavages.
GEOL299. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GEOLOGY (I, II)
Prerequisite: SYGN 101. 2 semester hours combined lecture
Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems in
and lab.
geology. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form must be
GEOL314. STRATIGRAPHY (II) Lectures and laboratory
completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit;
and field exercises in concepts of stratigraphy and biostratig-
1 to 6 semester hours.
raphy, facies associations in various depositional environments,
Junior Year
sedimentary rock sequences and geometries in sedimentary
GEGN307. PETROLOGY (II) An introduction to igneous,
basins, and geohistory analysis of sedimentary basins. Pre-
sedimentary and metamorphic processes, stressing the appli-
requisite: SYGN101, GEOL202. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab;
cation of chemical and physical mechanisms to study the ori-
4 semester hours.
gin, occurrence, and association of rock types. Emphasis on
GEOL315. SEDIMENTOLOGY AND STRATIGRAPHY (I)
the megascopic and microscopic classification, description,
Integrated lecture, laboratory and field exercises on the gene-
and interpretation of rocks. Analysis of the fabric and physi-
sis of sedimentary rocks as related to subsurface porosity and
cal properties. Prerequisite: GEOL321, DCGN209. 2 hours
permeability development and distribution for non-geology
lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
majors. Emphasis is placed on siliciclastic systems of vary-
GEOL308. INTRODUCTORY APPLIED STRUCTURAL
ing degrees of heterogeneity. Topics include diagenesis, fa-
GEOLOGY (II) Nature and origin of structural features of
cies analysis, correlation techniques, and sequence and
Earth’s crust emphasizing oil entrapment and control of ore
seismic stratigraphy. Application to hydrocarbon exploitation
deposition. Structural patterns and associations are discussed
stressed throughout the course. Required of all PEGN stu-
in context of stress/strain and plate tectonic theories, using
dents. Prerequisite: SYGN101, PEGN308, or consent of in-
examples of North American deformed belts. Lab and field
structor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
projects in structural geometry, map air photo and cross sec-
GEGN316. FIELD GEOLOGY (S) Six weeks of field work,
tion interpretation, and structural analysis. Course required
stressing geology of the Southern Rocky Mountain Province.
of all PEGN and MNGN students. Prerequisite: SYGN101.
Measurement of stratigraphic sections. Mapping of igneous,
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
metamorphic, and sedimentary terrain using air photos, topo-
GEOL309. STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY AND TECTONICS
graphic maps, plane table, and other methods. Diversified
(I) (WI) Recognition, habitat, and origin of deformational
individual problems in petroleum geology, mining geology,
structures related to stresses and strains (rock mechanics and
engineering geology, structural geology, and stratigraphy.
microstructures) and modern tectonics. Structural development
Formal reports submitted on several problems. Frequent
of the Appalachian and Cordilleran systems. Comprehensive
evening lectures and discussion sessions. Field trips empha-
laboratory projects use descriptive geometry, stereographic
size regional geology as well as mining, petroleum, and engi-
projection, structural contours, map and air photo interpreta-
neering projects. . Prerequisite: GEGN 202 , GEGN 206,
tion, structural cross section and structural pattern analysis.
GEOL314, GEOL309, and GEGN317. 6 semester hours
Required of Geological and Geophysical Engineers. Pre-
(Field Term).
requisite: SYGN101, GEGN 202 and GEGN 206 or
GEGN317. GEOLOGIC FIELD METHODS (II) Methods
GPGN210. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
and techniques of geologic field observations and interpre-
GEOL 310. EARTH MATERIALS AND RESOURCES (II)
tations. Lectures in field techniques and local geology. Lab-
Introduction to Earth Materials, emphasizing the structure,
oratory and field project in diverse sedimentary, igneous,
formation, distribution and engineering behavior of minerals,
metamorphic, structural, and surficial terrains using aerial
rocks and ores. Laboratories emphasize the recognition, de-
photographs, topographic maps and compass and pace meth-
scription and engineering evaluation of natural materials.
ods. Geologic cross sections maps, and reports. Weekend
Lectures present the knowledge of natural materials,
exercises required. Prerequisite to GEGN316. Prerequisite:
processes and resources necessary for mining engineering ca-
GEGN202, GEOL309 or GEOL308. Completion or concur-
reers. Prerequisite: SYGN 101. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab:
rent enrollment in GEGN206 and GEOL314. 1 hour lecture,
4 semester hours.
8 hours field; 2 semester hours.
GEOL 311. STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY FOR MINING EN-
GEOL321. MINERALOGY AND MINERAL CHARAC-
GINEERS (I) Nature and origin of structural features of
TERIZATION (I) Principles of mineralogy and mineral
Earth's crust emphasizing structural controls of ore deposits
characterization. Crystallography of naturally occurring
76
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

materials. Principles of crystal chemistry. Interrelationships
GEGN403. MINERAL EXPLORATION DESIGN (II) (WI)
among mineral structure, external shape, chemical composi-
Exploration project design: commodity selection, target se-
tion, and physical properties. Introduction to mineral stabil-
lection, genetic models, alternative exploration approaches
ity. Laboratories emphasize analytical methods, including
and associated costs, exploration models, property acquisi-
X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and optical
tion, and preliminary economic evaluation. Lectures and lab-
microscopy. Prerequiste; SYGN 101, CHGN 124, GEGN
oratory exercises to simulate the entire exploration sequence
206. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab: 3 semester hours.
from inception and planning through implementation to dis-
GEGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (I, II, S) Super-
covery, with initial ore reserve calculations and preliminary
vised, full-time, engineering-related employment for a con-
economic evaluation. Prerequisite: GEGN401. 2 hours lec-
tinuous six-month period (or its equivalent) in which specific
ture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
educational objectives are achieved. Prerequisite: Second
GEGN404. ORE MICROSCOPY/ FLUID INCLUSIONS
semester sophomore status and a cumulative grade-point
(II) Identification of ore minerals using reflected light
average of at least 2.00. 1 to 3 semester hours. Cooperative
microscopy, micro-hardness, and reflectivity techniques.
Education credit does not count toward graduation except
Petrographic analysis of ore textures and their significance.
under special conditions.
Guided research on the ore mineralogy and ore textures of
GEGN342. ENGINEERING GEOMORPHOLOGY (I)
classic ore deposits. Prerequisites: GEOL321, GEGN401, or
Study of interrelationships between internal and external
consent of instructor. 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
earth processes, geologic materials, time, and resulting land-
GEGN405. MINERAL DEPOSITS (I) Physical and chemi-
forms on the Earth’s surface. Influences of geomorphic
cal characteristics and geologic and geographic setting of
processes on design of natural resource exploration programs
magmatic, hydrothermal, and sedimentary metallic mineral
and siting and design of geotechnical and geohydrologic
deposits from the aspects of genesis, exploration, and min-
projects. Laboratory analysis of geomorphic and geologic
ing. For non-majors. Prerequisite: GEOL308 or concurrent
features utilizing maps, photo interpretation and field obser-
enrollment. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
vations. Prerequisite: SYGN101. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab;
GEGN 432. GEOLOGICAL DATA MANAGEMENT (I)
3 semester hours.
Techniques for managing and analyzing geological data,
GEGN/GEOL398. SEMINAR IN GEOLOGY OR GEO-
including statistical analysis procedures and computer pro-
LOGICAL ENGINEERING (I, II) Special topics classes
gramming. Topics addressed include elementary probability,
taught on a one-time basis. May include lecture, laboratory
populations and distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing,
and field trip activities. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor
analysis of data sequences, mapping, sampling and sample
and department head. Variable credit; 1 to 6 semester hours.
representativity, linear regression, and overview of univariate
GEGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING
and multivariate statistical methods. Practical experience
GEOLOGY OR ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY (I, II)
with principles of software programming and statistical
Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems in
analysis for geological applications via suppled software and
geological engineering or engineering hydrogeology. Pre-
data sets from geological case histories. Prerequistes: Senior
requisite: “Independent Study” form must be completed and
standing in Geological Engineering or permission of instruc-
submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
tor. 1 hour lecture, 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
GEOL399. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GEOLOGY (I, II)
GEGN438. PETROLEUM GEOLOGY (I) Source rocks,
Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems
reservoir rocks, types of traps, temperature and pressure
in geology. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form must be
conditions of the reservoir, theories of origin and accumula-
completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit;
tion of petroleum, geology of major petroleum fields and
1 to 6 semester hours.
provinces of the world, and methods of exploration for petro-
leum. Term report required. Laboratory consists of study of
Senior Year
well log analysis, stratigraphic correlation, production map-
GEGN401. MINERAL DEPOSITS (I) Introductory presenta-
ping, hydrodynamics and exploration exercises. Prerequisite:
tion of magmatic, hydrothermal, and sedimentary metallic ore
GEOL309 and GEOL314; GEGN316 or GPGN486 or
deposits. Chemical, petrologic, structural, and sedimentologi-
PEGN316. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
cal processes that contribute to ore formation. Description of
classic deposits representing individual deposit types. Re-
GEGN/GPGN/PEGN439. MULTI-DISCIPLINARY PETRO-
view of exploration sequences. Laboratory consists of hand
LEUM DESIGN (II) (WI) This is a multi-disciplinary de-
specimen study of host rock-ore mineral suites and mineral
sign course that integrates fundamentals and design concepts
deposit evaluation problems. Prerequisite: GEGN316 and
in geological, geophysical, and petroleum engineering. Stu-
DCGN209. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
dents work in integrated teams from each of the disciplines.
Open-ended design problems are assigned including the de-
velopment of a prospect in an exploration play and a detailed
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
77

engineering field study. Detailed reports are required for the
design reports and oral presentations are required. Prerequi-
prospect evaluation and engineering field study. Prerequisite:
site: GEGN468 or equivalent. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab;
GE Majors: GEOL308 or GEOL309, GEGN438, GEGN316;
3 semester hours.
PE majors: PEGN316, PEGN414, PEGN422, PEGN423,
GEGN470. GROUND-WATER ENGINEERING DESIGN
PEGN424 (or concurrent) GEOL308; GP Majors: GPGN302
(II) (WI) Application of the principles of hydrogeology and
and GPGN303. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
ground-water engineering to water supply, geotechnical, or
GEGN442. ADVANCED ENGINEERING GEOMOR-
water quality problems involving the design of well fields,
PHOLOGY (II) Application of quantitative geomorphic
drilling programs, and/or pump tests. Engineering reports,
techniques to engineering problems. Map interpretation,
complete with specifications, analysis, and results, will be re-
photo interpretation, field observations, computer modeling,
quired. Prerequisite: GEGN467 or equivalent or consent of
and GIS analysis methods. Topics include: coastal engineer-
instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
ing, fluvial processes, river engineering, controlling water
GEOL470/GPGN470. APPLICATIONS OF SATELLITE
and wind erosion, permafrost engineering. Multi-week de-
REMOTE SENSING (II) Students are introduced to geo-
sign projects and case studies. Prerequisite: GEGN342 and
science applications of satellite remote sensing. Introductory
GEGN468, or graduate standing; GEGN475/575 recom-
lectures provide background on satellites, sensors, methodol-
mended. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
ogy, and diverse applications. One or more areas of applica-
GEGN466. GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING (I) Theory
tion are presented from a systems perspective. Guest lecturers
of groundwater occurrence and flow. Relation of ground-
from academia, industry, and government agencies present
water to surface; potential distribution and flow; theory of
case studies focusing on applications, which vary from se-
aquifer tests; water chemistry, water quality, and contaminant
mester to semester. Students do independent term projects,
transport. Laboratory sessions on water budgets, water chem-
under the supervision of a faculty member or guest lecturer,
istry, properties of porous media, solutions to hydraulic flow
that are presented both written and orally at the end of the
problems, analytical and digital models, and hydrogeologic
term. Prerequisites: consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture;
interpretation. Prerequisite: mathematics through calculus
3 semester hours.
and MACS315, GEOL309, GEOL315, and EGGN351, or
GEGN473. GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING SITE INVES-
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
TIGATION (II) Methods of field investigation, testing, and
GEGN467. GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING (I) Theory
monitoring for geotechnical and hazardous waste sites, in-
of groundwater occurrence and flow. Relation of ground-
cluding: drilling and sampling methods, sample logging,
water to surface water; potential distribution and flow; theory
field testing methods, instrumentation, trench logging,
of aquifer tests; water chemistry, water quality, and contami-
foundation inspection, engineering stratigraphic column and
nant transport. Laboratory sessions on water budgets, water
engineering soils map construction. Projects will include tech-
chemistry, properties of porous media, solutions to hydraulic
nical writing for investigations (reports, memos, proposals,
flow problems, analytical and digital models, and hydrogeo-
workplans). Class will culminate in practice conducting sim-
logic interpretation. Prerequisite: mathematics through calcu-
ulated investigations (using a computer simulator). 3 hours
lus and MACS315, GEOL309, GEOL314 or GEOL315, and
lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN351, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours
GEGN475. APPLICATIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC INFOR-
lab; 4 semester hours.
MATION SYSTEMS (II) An introduction to Geographic
GEGN468. ENGINEERING GEOLOGY AND GEOTECH-
Information Systems (GIS) and their applications to all areas
NICS (I) Application of geology to evaluation of construc-
of geology and geological engineering. Lecture topics in-
tion, mining, and environmental projects such as dams,
clude: principles of GIS, data structures, digital elevation
waterways, tunnels, highways, bridges, buildings, mine
models, data input and verification, data analysis and spatial
design, and land-based waste disposal facilities. Design
modeling, data quality and error propagation, methods of
projects including field, laboratory, and computer analysis are
GIS projects, as well as video presentations. Prerequisite:
an important part of the course. Prerequisite: MNGN321 and
SYGN101. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
concurrent enrollment in EGGN361/EGGN363 or consent of
GEGN476. DESKTOP MAPPING APPLICATIONS FOR
instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 semester hours.
PROJECT DATA MANAGEMENT (I, II) Conceptual over-
GEGN469. ENGINEERING GEOLOGY DESIGN (II) (WI)
view and hands-on experience with a commercial desktop
This is a capstone design course that emphasizes realistic
mapping system. Display, analysis, and presentation mapping
engineering geologic/geotechnics projects. Lecture time is
functions; familiarity with the software components, includ-
used to introduce projects and discussions of methods and
ing graphical user interface (GUI); methods for handling dif-
procedures for project work. Several major projects will be
ferent kinds of information; organization and storage of
assigned and one to two field trips will be required. Students
project documents. Use of raster and vector data in an inte-
work as individual investigators and in teams. Final written
grated environment; basic raster concepts; introduction to
78Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

GIS models, such as hill shading and cost/distance analysis.
Oceanography
Prerequisite: No previous knowledge of desktop mapping or
GEOC407. ATMOSPHERE, WEATHER AND CLIMATE (II)
GIS technology assumed. Some computer experience in op-
An introduction to the Earth’s atmosphere and its role in
erating within a Windows environment recommended. 1 hour
weather patterns and long term climate. Provides basic
lecture; 1 semester hour
understanding of origin and evolution of the atmosphere,
GEGN481. ADVANCED HYDROGEOLOGY (I) Lectures,
Earth’s heat budget, global atmospheric circulation and
assigned readings, and discussions concerning the theory,
modern climatic zones. Long- and short-term climate change
measurement, and estimation of ground water parameters,
including paleoclimatology, the causes of glacial periods and
fractured-rock flow, new or specialized methods of well
global warming, and the depletion of the ozone layer. Causes
hydraulics and pump tests, tracer methods, and well con-
and effects of volcanic eruptions on climate, El Nino, acid
struction design. Design of well tests in variety of settings.
rain, severe thunderstorms, tornadoes, hurricanes, and ava-
Prerequisites: GEGN467 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
lanches are also discussed. Microclimates and weather pat-
lecture; 3 semester hours.
terns common in Colorado. Prerequisite: Completion of CSM
GEGN483. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF GROUND-
freshman technical core, or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
WATER SYSTEMS (II) Lectures, assigned readings, and
mester hours. Offered alternate years; Spring 2005.
direct computer experience concerning the fundamentals and
GEOC408. INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY (II)
applications of analytical and finite-difference solutions to
An introduction to the scientific study of the oceans, includ-
ground water flow problems as well as an introduction to in-
ing chemistry, physics, geology, biology, geophysics, and
verse modeling. Design of computer models to solve ground
mineral resources of the marine environment. Lectures from
water problems. Prerequisites: Familiarity with computers,
pertinent disciplines are included. Recommended back-
mathematics through differential and integral calculus, and
ground: basic college courses in chemistry, geology, mathe-
GEGN467. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
matics, and physics. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
GEGN/GEOL498. SEMINAR IN GEOLOGY OR GEO-
Offered alternate years; Spring 2004.
LOGICAL ENGINEERING (I, II) Special topics classes
taught on a one-time basis. May include lecture, laboratory
and field trip activities. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor
and department head. Variable credit; 1 to 6 semester hours.
GEGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING
GEOLOGY OR ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY (I, II)
Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems in
geological engineering or engineering hydrogeology. Pre-
requisite: “Independent Study” form must be completed and
submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
GEOL499. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GEOLOGY (I, II)
Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems in
geology. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form must be
completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit;
1 to 6 credit hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2005–2006
79

Geophysics
nations, mitigating the threat of geohazards (earthquakes,
volcanoes, landslides, avalanches) to populated areas, con-
TERENCE K. YOUNG, Professor and Department Head
tributing to homeland security (including detection and re-
THOMAS L. DAVIS, Professor
moval of unexploded ordnance and land mines), evaluating
DAVE HALE, Charles Henry Green Professor of Exploration
changes in climate and managing humankind’s response to
Geophysics
them, and exploring other planets.
GARY R. OLHOEFT, Professor
MAX PEETERS, Baker Hughes Professor of Petrophysics and
Energy companies and mining firms employ geophysicists
Borehole Geophysics
to explore for hidden resources around the world. Engineer-
ROEL K. SNIEDER, Keck Foundation Professor of Basic
ing firms hire geophysical engineers to assess the Earth’s
Exploration Science
near-surface properties when sites are chosen for large
ILYA D. TSVANKIN, Professor
construction projects and waste-management operations.
THOMAS M. BOYD, Associate Professor and Dean of Graduate
Environmental organizations use geophysics to conduct
Studies
YAOGUO LI, Associate Professor
groundwater surveys and to track the flow of contaminants.
LIZET B. CHRISTIANSEN, Assistant Professor
On the global scale, geophysicists employed by universities
PAUL C. SAVA, Assistant Professor
and government agencies (such as the United States Geo-
NORMAN BLEISTEIN, Research Professor and University
logical Survey, NASA, and the National Oceanographic and
Emeritus Professor
Atmospheric Administration) try to understand such Earth
KENNETH L. LARNER, Research Professor and University
processes as heat flow, gravitational, magnetic, electric,
Emeritus Professor
thermal, and stress fields within the Earth’s interior. For the
MICHAEL L. BATZLE, Research Associate Professor
past decade, 100% of CSM’s geophysics graduates have
ROBERT D. BENSON, Research Associate Professor
found employment in their chosen field, with about 20%
MANIKA PRASAD, Research Associate Professor
choosing to pursue graduate studies.
FENG SU, Research Associate Professor
STEPHEN J. HILL, Adjunct Associate Professor
Founded in 1926, the Department of Geophysics at the
DAVID J. WALD, Adjunct Associate Professor
Colorado School of Mines is recognized and respected
WARREN B. HAMILTON, Distinguished Senior Scientist
around the world for its programs in applied geophysical re-
PIETER HOEKSTRA, Distinguished Senior Scientist
search and education. With 20 active faculty and an average
THOMAS R. LAFEHR, Distinguished Senior Scientist
class size of 15, students receive individualized attention in a
MISAC N. NABIGHIAN, Distinguished Senior Scientist
close-knit department. The Colorado School of Mines offers
ADEL ZOHDY, Distinguished Senior Scientist
one of only two undergraduate geophysical engineering pro-
FRANK A. HADSELL, Emeritus Professor
ALEXANDER A. KAUFMAN, Emeritus Professor
grams in the entire United States accredited by the Engineer-
GEORGE V. KELLER, Emeritus Professor
ing Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for
PHILLIP R. ROMIG, JR., Emeritus Professor
Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050,
Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, telephone (410) 347-7700. Geo-
Program Description
physical Engineering undergraduates who may have an inter-
Geophysicists study the Earth’s interior through physical
est in professional registration as engineers are encouraged to
measurements collected at the earth’s surface, in boreholes,
take the Engineer in Training (EIT) / Fundamentals of Engi-
from aircraft, or from satellites. Using a combination of
neering (FE) exam as seniors. Given the interdisciplinary
mathematics, physics, geology, chemistry, hydrology, and
nature of geophysics, the undergraduate curriculum requires
computer science, both geophysicists and geophysical engi-
students to become thoroughly familiar with geological,
neers analyze these measurements to infer properties and
mathematical, and physical theories in addition to the various
processes within the Earth’s complex interior. Non-invasive
geophysical methodologies.
imaging beneath the surface of Earth and other planets by
geophysicists is analogous to non-invasive imaging of the
Geophysics Field Camp. Each summer, a base of field
interior of the human body by medical specialists.
operations is set up for four weeks in the mountains of Colo-
rado for students who have completed their junior year. Stu-
The Earth supplies all materials needed by our society,
dents prepare geological maps and cross sections and then
serves as the repository of used products, and provides a
use these as the basis for conducting seismic, gravimetric,
home to all its inhabitants. Geophysics and geophysical
magnetic, and electrical surveys. After acquiring these vari-
engineering have important roles to play in the solution of
ous geophysical datasets, the students process the data and
challenging problems facing the inhabitants of this planet,
develop an interpretation that is consistent with all the infor-
such as providing fresh water, food, and energy for Earth’s
mation. In addition to the required four-week program, stu-
growing population, evaluating sites for underground con-
dents can also participate in other diverse field experiences.
struction and containment of hazardous waste, monitoring
In recent years these have included cruises on seismic ships
non-invasively the aging infrastructures of developed
in the Gulf of Mexico, studies at an archeological site, inves-
80
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

tigations at an environmental site, a ground-penetrating radar
1. Think for themselves and demonstrate the willingness to
survey on an active volcano in Hawaii, and a well-logging
question conventional formulations of problems, and are
school offered by Baker Atlas.
capable of solving these problems independently.
Study Abroad. The Department of Geophysics encourages
2. Are creative and demonstrate the ability to conceive and
its undergraduates to spend one or two semesters studying
validate new hypotheses, new problem descriptions, and
abroad. At some universities credits can be earned that sub-
new methods for analyzing data.
stitute for course requirements in the geophysical engineer-
3. Are good experimentalists and have demonstrated the abil-
ing program at CSM. Information on universities that have
ity to design and carry out a geophysical field survey or
established formal exchange programs with CSM can be ob-
laboratory experiment and ensure that the recorded data
tained either from the Department of Geophysics or the Of-
are of the highest-possible quality.
fice of International Programs.
4. Can program a computer in a high-level language to ac-
Combined BS/MS Program. Undergraduate students in
quire, process, model and display scientific data.
the Geophysical Engineering program who would like to con-
tinue directly into the Master of Science program in Geo-
5. Can deal rationally with uncertainty and have demon-
physics or Geophysical Engineering are allowed to fulfill part
strated that they understand that geophysical data are
of the requirements of their graduate degree by including up to
always incomplete and uncertain; can quantify the un-
six hours of specified course credits which also were used in
certainty and recognize when it is not acceptable to make
fulfilling the requirements of their undergraduate degree. Stu-
decisions based on these data.
dents interested to take advantage of this option should meet
6. Have demonstrated qualities that are the foundation of
with their advisor or department head as early as possible in
leadership; know the importance of taking risks, and are
their undergraduate program to determine which elective
able to make good judgments about the level of risk that
courses will be acceptable and advantageous for accelerating
is commensurate with their knowledge, experience, and
them through their combined BS/MS studies.
chance of failure; realize that failure is unavoidable if you
Summer Jobs in Geophysics. In addition to the summer
want to learn and grow.
field camp experience, students are given opportunities every
Curriculum
summer throughout their undergraduate career to work as
Geophysics is an applied and interdisciplinary science, hence
summer interns within the industry, at CSM, or for govern-
students must have a strong foundation in physics, mathematics,
ment agencies. Students have recently worked outdoors with
geology and computer sciences. Superimposed on this founda-
geophysics crews in various parts of the U.S., South Amer-
tion is a comprehensive body of courses on the theory and prac-
ica, and offshore in the Gulf of Mexico.
tice of geophysical methods. As geophysics and geophysical
The Cecil H. and Ida Green Graduate and Professional
engineering involve the study and exploration of the entire earth,
Center. The lecture rooms, laboratories, and computer-aided
our graduates have great opportunities to work anywhere on,
instruction areas of the Department of Geophysics are located in
and even off, the planet. Therefore, emphasis is placed on elec-
the Green Center. The department maintains equipment for con-
tives in the humanities that give students an understanding of in-
ducting geophysical field measurements, including magnetome-
ternational issues and different cultures. To satisfy all these
ters, gravity meters, ground-penetrating radar, and instruments
requirements, every student who obtains a Bachelor’s Degree in
for recording seismic waves. Students have access to the Depart-
Geophysical Engineering at CSM must complete the courses in
ment petrophysics laboratory for measuring properties of porous
the CSM Core Curriculum plus the following (see the course
rocks. Undergraduate students also have their own room which
flowchart on the Department of Geophysics webpage):
is equipped with networked PCs and provides a friendly envi-
Degree Requirements (Geophysical Engineering)
ronment for work, study, relaxation, and socializing.
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Geophysical Engineering Program Outcomes
EBGN201 Principles of Economics
3
3
(Bachelor of Science in Geophysical Engineering)
MACS213 Calculus for Scientists
& Engineers III
4
4
Geophysical engineers and geophysicists must apply quanti-
(1)EPIC251 Design II Earth Engineering
3
3
tative techniques to analyze an entity as complex as the Earth.
PAGN201 Physical Education
2
0.5
Geophysical graduates, therefore, require a special combination
PHGN200 Physics II
3.5
3
4.5
of traits and abilities to thrive in this discipline. In addition to
GEGN202 Geological Principles & Processes
3
3
4
contributing toward achieving the educational outcomes de-
Total
19
scribed in the CSM Graduate Profile and the ABET Accredita-
tion Criteria, the Geophysical Engineering Program at CSM
strives to graduate students who:
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
81

Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
at 300 level and above from engineering and science departments at
(1)MACS261 Programming Concepts Java
2
3
3
CSM and other universities. Courses from CSM are approved by the
GPGN210 Materials of the Earth
3
3
4
student’s advisor; courses from other universities are approved by
GEOL308 Introductory Applied
the Undergraduate Advisory Committee (UAC) of the Department of
Structural Geology
2
3
3
Geophysics.
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
(4)Students can take either GPGN438 or GPGN439 to satisfy the sen-
PAGN202 Physical Education
2
0.5
ior design requirement. The multidisciplinary design course
SYGN200 Human Systems
3
3
GPGN439, offered only in Spring semester, is strongly recom-
Total
16.5
mended for students interested in petroleum exploration and produc-
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
tion. Students interested in non-petroleum applications of geophysics
GPGN303 Introduction to Gravity and
take GPGN438 for 3 credit hours, either by enrolling for all 3 credit
Magnetic Methods
3
3
4
hours in one semester (Fall or Spring) or by enrolling for a portion of
PHGN311 Introduction to Mathematical Physics 3
3
the 3 hours in Fall and the remainder in Spring.
GPGN320 Continuum Mechanics
3
3
Minor in Geophysics/Geophysical Engineering
GPGN321 Theory of Fields I: Static Fields
3
3
Geophysics plays an important role in many aspects of
GPGN315 Field Methods for Geophysicists
6
2
civil engineering, petroleum engineering, mechanical engi-
(2)Electives
3
3
neering, and mining engineering, as well as mathematics,
Total
18
physics, geology, chemistry, hydrology, and computer sci-
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
ence. Given the natural connections between these various
GEOL314 Stratigraphy
3
3
4
fields and geophysics, it may be of interest for students in
GPGN302 Introduction to Seismic Methods
3
3
4
other majors to consider choosing to minor in geophysics, or
GPGN308 Introduction to Electrical and
to choose geophysics as an area of specialization. The core of
Electromagnetic Methods
3
3
4
courses taken to satisfy the minor requirement must include
GPGN322 Theory of Fields II:
some of the following geophysics methods courses.
Time Varying Fields
3
3
(2)Electives
3
3
GPGN210, Materials of the Earth
Total
18
GPGN302, Seismic Methods
Summer Session
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
GPGN303, Gravity and Magnetic Methods
GPGN486 Geophysics Field Camp
4
4
GPGN308, Electrical and Electromagnetic Methods
Total
4
GPGN419, Well Log Analysis and Formation Evaluation
GPGN470, Applications of Satellite Remote Sensing
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
GPGN404 Digital Systems Analysis
3
3
The remaining hours can be satisfied by a combination
(3)Advanced Elective
3
3
of other geophysics courses, as well as courses in geology,
(4)GPGN438 Senior Design or
mathematics, and computer science depending on the stu-
GPGN439 in Spring Semester
dent’s major.
(2)Electives
6
6
Students should consult with the Department of Geo-
Total
12
physics to get their sequence of courses approved before
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
embarking on a minor program.
GPGN432 Formation Evaluation
3
3
4
GPGN494 Physics of the Earth
3
3
Description of Courses
(4)GPGN439 Multi-disciplinary Petro. Design
2
3
3
Freshman/Sophomore Year
or GPGN438 beginning Fall Semester
GPGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN GEOPHYSICS (I, II)
GPGN470 Applications of remote sensing
3
3
New topics in geophysics. Each member of the academic
(2)Electives
6
6
faculty is invited to submit a prospectus of the course to the
Total
19
department head for evaluation as a special topics course. If
Grand Total
139.5
selected, the course can be taught only once under the 198
(1)In Fall semester, sophomores should take the section of EPIC251
title before becoming part of the regular curriculum under a
offered by the Department of Geophysics that introduces scientific
new course number and title. Prerequisite: Consent of depart-
computing. In Spring semester, sophomores take a course in object-
ment. Credit – variable, 1 to 6 hours.
oriented programming using Java.
(2)Electives must include at least 9 hours in an approved HSS Clus-
GPGN199. GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION (I, II) Indi-
ter. The Department of Geophysics encourages its students to con-
vidual project; instrument design, data interpretation, problem
sider organizing their electives to form a Minor or an Area of Special
analysis, or field survey. Prerequisites: Consent of department
Interest (ASI). A guide suggesting various Minor and ASI programs
and “Independent Study” form must be completed and sub-
can be obtained from the Department office.
mitted to the Registrar. Credit dependent upon nature and
(3)The advanced electives should be chosen from advanced GP meth-
extent of project, not to exceed 6 semester hours.
ods courses (GPGN414, GPGN422, GPGN452) or technical courses
82
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

GPGN210. MATERIALS OF THE EARTH (II) (WI) Intro-
of linear time-invariant systems, the course brings Fourier
duction to the physical and chemical properties and processes
theory and filter theory to life through demonstrations of
in naturally occurring materials. Combination of elements to
their immense power in large-scale processing of seismic data
become gases, liquids and solids (minerals), and aggregation
to improve signal-to-noise ratio and ultimately the accuracy
of fluids and minerals to become rocks and soils. Basic mate-
of seismic images of the Earth’s subsurface. Prerequisites:
rial properties that describe the occurrence of matter such as
PHGN200, MACS213, MACS315, and GPGN210, PHGN311,
crystal structure, density, and porosity. Properties relating to
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 se-
simple processes of storage and transport through the diffu-
mester hours.
sion equation (such as Fick, Ohm’s, Hooke’s, Fourier’s, and
GPGN303. GRAVITY AND MAGNETIC METHODS (I)
Darcy’s Laws) as exhibited in electric, magnetic, elastic,
Introduction to land, airborne, oceanographic, and borehole
mechanical, thermal, and fluid flow properties. Coupled
gravity and magnetic exploration. Reduction of observed
processes (osmosis, electromagnetic, nuclear magnetic relax-
gravity and magnetic values. Theory of potential-field anom-
ation). The necessity to statistically describe properties of
alies introduced by geologic distributions. Methods and limi-
rocks and soils. Multiphase mixing theories, methods of
tations of interpretations. Prerequisites: PHGN200, MACS213,
modeling and predicting properties. Inferring past processes
MACS315, and GPGN210, and concurrent enrollment in
acting on rocks from records left in material properties. Envi-
PHGN311, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours
ronmental influences from temperature, pressure, time and
lab; 4 semester hours.
chemistry. Consequences of nonlinearity, anisotropy, hetero-
geneity and scale. Prerequisites: PHGN200 and MACS112,
GPGN308. INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL AND
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 se-
ELECTROMAGNETIC METHODS (II) This is an intro-
mester hours.
ductory course on electrical and electromagnetic methods for
subsurface exploration. The course begins with a review of
GPGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN GEOPHYSICS (I, II)
the factors influencing the electrical properties of rocks.
New topics in geophysics. Each member of the academic
Methods to be discussed are electrical methods with various
faculty is invited to submit a prospectus of the course to the
electrode arrays for profiling and soundings, and ground and
department head for evaluation as a special topics course. If
airborne electromagnetic methods using both natural (e.g. the
selected, the course can be taught only once under the 298
magnetotelluric method) and man-made (e.g. the time do-
title before becoming a part of the regular curriculum under a
main method) sources for electromagnetic fields. Other tech-
new course number and title. Prerequisite: Consent of depart-
niques reviewed are self-potential, induced polarization and
ment. Credit - variable, 1 to 6 hours.
ground penetrating radar. The discussion of each method in-
GPGN299 GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION (I, II) Indi-
cludes a treatise of the principles, instrumentation, proce-
vidual project; instrument design, data interpretation, prob-
dures of data acquisition, analysis, and interpretation. These
lem analysis, or field survey. Prerequisites: Consent of
various methods are employed in geotechnical and environ-
department and “Independent Study” form must be com-
mental engineering and resources exploration (base and
pleted and submitted to the Registrar. Credit dependent upon
precious metals, industrial minerals, geothermal and hydro-
nature and extent of project, not to exceed 6 semester hours.
carbons). The laboratory will focus on demonstrating various
Junior Year
methods in the field, and working through case histories. Pre-
GPGN302. SEISMIC METHODS I: INTRODUCTION TO
requisites: PHGN200, MACS213, MACS315, GPGN210,
SEISMIC METHODS (II) (WI) This is an introductory
PHGN311, and GPGN321, or consent of instructor. 3 hours
study of seismic methods for imaging the Earth’s subsurface,
lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
with emphasis on reflection seismic exploration. Starting
GPGN311. SURVEY OF EXPLORATION GEOPHYSICS
with the history and development of seismic exploration, the
(I) The fundamentals of geophysical exploration are taught
course proceeds through an overview of methods for acquisi-
through the use of a series of computer simulations and field
tion of seismic data in land, marine, and transitional environ-
exercises. Students explore the physics underlying each geo-
ments. Underlying theoretical concepts, including working
physical method, design geophysical surveys, prepare and
initially with traveltime equations for simple subsurface
submit formal bids to clients contracting the work, and col-
geometries, are used to introduce general issues in seismic
lect, process, and interpret the resulting data. Emphasis is
data processing, as well as the nature of seismic data inter-
placed on understanding the processes used in designing and
pretation. The course introduces basic concepts, mathematics,
interpreting the results of geophysical exploration surveys.
and physics of seismic wave propagation (including deriva-
Prior exposure to computer applications such as web browsers,
tion of the one-dimensional acoustic wave equation and its
spreadsheets, and word processors is helpful. Prerequisites:
solution in multi-layered media), emphasizing similarities
MACS213, PHGN200, and SYGN101. 3 hours lecture,
with the equations and physics that underlie all geophysical
3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
methods. Using analysis of seismometry as a first example
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
83

GPGN315. SUPPORTING GEOPHYSICAL FIELD INVES-
mester sophomore status and a cumulative grade-point aver-
TIGATIONS (I) Prior to conducting a geophysical investiga-
age of 2.00. 0 to 3 semester hours. Cooperative Education
tion, geophysicists often need input from related specialists
credit does not count toward graduation except under special
such as geologists, surveyors, and land-men. Students are
conditions.
introduced to the issues that each of these specialists must
GPGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN GEOPHYSICS (I, II)
address so that they may understand how each affects the
New topics in geophysics. Each member of the academic
design and outcome of geophysical investigations. Students
faculty is invited to submit a prospectus of the course to the
learn to use and understand the range of applicability of a
department head for evaluation as a special topics course. If
variety of surveying methods, learn the tools and techniques
selected, the course can be taught only once under the 398
used in geological field mapping and interpretation, and ex-
title before becoming a part of the regular curriculum under a
plore the logistical and permitting issues directly related to
new course number and title. Prerequisite: Consent of depart-
geophysical field investigations. Prerequisite: GEOL308 or
ment. Credit-variable, 1 to 6 hours.
GEOL309, or consent of instructor. 6 hours lab, 2 semester
hours.
GPGN399. GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION (I, II)
Individual project; instrument design, data interpretation,
GPGN320. ELEMENTS OF CONTINUUM MECHANICS
problem analysis, or field survey. Prerequisites: Consent of
AND WAVE PROPAGATION (I) Introduction to continuum
department and “Independent Study” form must be com-
mechanics and elastic wave propagation with an emphasis on
pleted and submitted to the Registrar. Credit dependent upon
principles and results important in seismology and earth sci-
nature and extent of project, not to exceed 6 semester hours.
ences in general. Topics include a brief overview of elemen-
tary mechanics, stress and strain, Hooke’s law, notions of
Senior Year
geostatic pressure and isostacy, fluid flow and Navier-stokes
GPGN404. DIGITAL SIGNAL ANALYSIS (I) The funda-
equation. Basic discussion of the wave equation for elastic
mentals of one-dimensional digital signal processing as
media, plane wave and their reflection/transmission at inter-
applied to geophysical investigations are studied. Students
faces. Prerequisites: MACS213, PHGN200. 3 hours lecture;
explore the mathematical background and practical conse-
3 semester hours.
quences of the sampling theorem, convolution, deconvolu-
tion, the Z and Fourier transforms, windows, and filters.
GPGN321. THEORY OF FIELDS I: STATIC FIELDS (I)
Emphasis is placed on applying the knowledge gained in lec-
Introduction to the theory of gravitational, magnetic, and
ture to exploring practical signal processing issues. This is
electrical fields encountered in geophysics. Emphasis on the
done through homework and in-class practicum assignments
mathematical and physical foundations of the various phe-
requiring the programming and testing of algorithms dis-
nomena and the similarities and differences in the various
cussed in lecture. Prerequisites: MACS213, MACS315, and
field properties. Physical laws governing the behavior of the
PHGN311, or consent of instructor. Knowledge of a com-
gravitational, electric, and magnetic fields. Systems of equa-
puter programming language is assumed. 2 hours lecture;
tions of these fields. Boundary value problems. Uniqueness
2 hours lab, 3 semester hours.
theorem. Influence of a medium on field behavior. Prerequi-
sites: PHGN200, MACS213, and MACS315, and concurrent
GPGN414. ADVANCED GRAVITY AND MAGNETIC
enrollment in PHGN311 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lec-
METHODS (II) Instrumentation for land surface, borehole,
ture; 3 semester hours.
sea floor, sea surface, and airborne operations. Reduction of
observed gravity and magnetic values. Theory of potential
GPGN322. THEORY OF FIELDS II: TIME-VARYING
field effects of geologic distributions. Methods and limita-
FIELDS (II) Constant electric field. Coulomb’s law. System
tions of interpretation. Prerequisite: GPGN303, or consent of
of equations of the constant electric field. Stationary electric
instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
field and the direct current in a conducting medium. Ohm’s
law. Principle of charge conservation. Sources of electric
GPGN419/PEGN419. WELL LOG ANALYSIS AND FOR-
field in a conducting medium. Electromotive force. Resis-
MATION EVALUATION (I) The basics of core analysis and
tance. System of equations of the stationary electric field.
the principles of all common borehole instruments are re-
The magnetic field, caused by constant currents. Biot-Savart
viewed. The course shows (computer) interpretation methods
law. The electromagnetic induction. Faraday’s law. Prerequi-
that combine the measurements of various borehole instru-
site: GPGN321, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture;
ments to determine rock properties such as porosity, perme-
3 semester hours.
ability, hydrocarbon saturation, water salinity, ore grade, ash
content, mechanical strength, and acoustic velocity. The im-
GPGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (I, II, S) Super-
pact of these parameters on reserves estimates of hydrocar-
vised, full-time, engineering-related employment for a con-
bon reservoirs and mineral accumulations are demonstrated.
tinuous six-month period (or its equivalent) in which specific
In spring semesters, vertical seismic profiling, single well
educational objectives are achieved. Prerequisite: Second se-
and cross-well seismic are reviewed. In the fall semester, top-
84
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

ics like formation testing, and cased hole logging are cov-
Project economics including risk analysis are an integral part
ered. Prerequisites: MACS315, PHGN311, GPGN302,
of the course. Prerequisites: GP majors: GPGN302 and
GPGN303, GPGN308. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab; 3 semes-
GPGN303. GE Majors: GEOL308 or GEOL309, GEGN316,
ter hours.
GEGN438. PE majors: PEGN316, PEGN414, PEGN422,
GPGN422. ADVANCED ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRO-
PEGN423, PEGN424 (or concurrent). 2 hours lecture,
MAGNETIC METHODS (I) In-depth study of the applica-
3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
tion of electrical and electromagnetic methods to crustal
GPGN452. ADVANCED SEISMIC METHODS (I) Histori-
studies, minerals exploration, oil and gas exploration, and
cal survey. Propagation of body and surface waves in elastic
groundwater. Laboratory work with scale and mathematical
media; transmission and reflection at single and multiple
models coupled with field work over areas of known geology.
interfaces; energy relationships; attenuation factors; data
Prerequisite: GPGN308, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lec-
processing (including velocity interpretation, stacking, and
ture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
migration); and interpretation techniques. Acquisition,
GPGN432. FORMATION EVALUATION (II) The basics of
processing, and interpretation of laboratory model data;
core analysis and the principles of all common borehole in-
seismic processing using an interactive workstation. Pre-
struments are reviewed. The course teaches interpretation
requisites: GPGN302 and concurrent enrollment in GPGN404,
methods that combine the measurements of various borehole
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 se-
instruments to determine rock properties such as porosity,
mester hours.
permeability, hydrocarbon saturation, water salinity, ore
GPGN470/GEOL470. APPLICATIONS OF SATELLITE
grade and ash content. The impact of these parameters on re-
REMOTE SENSING (II) Students are introduced to geo-
serve estimates of hydrocarbon reservoirs and mineral accu-
science applications of satellite remote sensing. Introductory
mulations is demonstrated. Geophysical topics such as
lectures provide background on satellites, sensors, methodol-
vertical seismic profiling, single well and cross-well seismic
ogy, and diverse applications. One or more areas of appli-
are emphasized in this course, while formation testing, and
cation are presented from a systems perspective. Guest
cased hole logging are covered in GPGN419/PEGN419
lecturers from academia, industry, and government agencies
presented in the fall. The laboratory provides on-line course
present case studies focusing on applications, which vary
material and hands-on computer log evaluation exercises.
from semester to semester. Students do independent term
Prerequisites: MACS315, PHGN311, GPGN302, GPGN303
projects, under the supervision of a faculty member or guest
and GPGN308. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
lecturer, that are presented both written and orally at the end
Only one of the two courses GPGN432 and GPGN419/
of the term. Prerequisites: PHGN200, MACS315, GEOL308
PEGN419 can be taken for credit.
or GEOL309, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
GPGN438. GEOPHYSICS PROJECT DESIGN (I, II) (WI)
mester hours.
Complementary design course for geophysics restricted elec-
GPGN486. GEOPHYSICS FIELD CAMP (S) Introduction
tive course(s). Application of engineering design principles
to geological and geophysical field methods. The program
to geophysics through advanced work, individual in charac-
includes exercises in geological surveying, stratigraphic sec-
ter, leading to an engineering report or senior thesis and oral
tion measurements, geological mapping, and interpretation of
presentation thereof. Choice of design project is to be arranged
geological observations. Students conduct geophysical sur-
between student and individual faculty member who will
veys related to the acquisition of seismic, gravity, magnetic,
serve as an advisor, subject to department head approval.
and electrical observations. Students participate in designing
Prerequisites: GPGN302, GPGN303, GPGN308, and com-
the appropriate geophysical surveys, acquiring the observa-
pletion of or concurrent enrollment in geophysics method
tions, reducing the observations, and interpreting these obser-
courses in the general topic area of the project design. Credit
vations in the context of the geological model defined from
variable, 1 to 3 hours. Course can be retaken once.
the geological surveys. Prerequisites: GEOL308 or
GPGN439. GEOPHYSICS PROJECT DESIGN (II)
GEOL309, GEOL314, GPGN302, GPGN303, GPGN308,
GEGN439/PEGN439. MULTI-DISCIPLINARY PETRO-
GPGN315 or consent of instructor. Up to 6 weeks field; up to
LEUM DESIGN (II) This is a multidisciplinary design
6 semester hours, minimum 4 hours
course that integrates fundamentals and design concepts in
GPGN494. PHYSICS OF THE EARTH (II) (WI) Students
geological, geophysical, and petroleum engineering. Students
will explore the fundamental observations from which physi-
work in integrated teams consisting of students from each of
cal and mathematical inferences can be made regarding the
the disciplines. Multiple open-end design problems in oil and
Earth’s origin, structure, and evolution. These observations
gas exploration and field development, including the devel-
include traditional geophysical observations (e.g., seismic,
opment of a prospect in an exploration play and a detailed
gravity, magnetic, and radioactive) in addition to geochemi-
engineering field study, are assigned. Several detailed written
cal, nucleonic, and extraterrestrial observations. Emphasis is
and oral presentations are made throughout the semester.
placed on not only cataloging the available data sets, but on
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
85

developing and testing quantitative models to describe these
Liberal Arts and
disparate data sets. Prerequisites: GEGN202, GPGN302,
GPGN303, GPGN308, PHGN311, and MACS315, or consent
International Studies
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
LAURA J. PANG, Associate Professor and Division Director
GPGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN GEOPHYSICS (I, II)
CARL MITCHAM, Professor
New topics in geophysics. Each member of the academic
BARBARA M. OLDS, Professor and Associate Vice President for
faculty is invited to submit a prospectus of the course to the
Educational Innovation
department head for evaluation as a special topics course. If
EUL-SOO PANG, Professor
selected, the course can be taught only once under the 498
ARTHUR B. SACKS, Professor and Associate Vice President for
title before becoming a part of the regular curriculum under a
Academic & Faculty Affairs
new course number and title. Prerequisite: Consent of depart-
HUSSEIN A. AMERY, Associate Professor
ment. Credit-variable, 1 to 6 hours.
JAMES V. JESUDASON, Associate Professor
JUAN C. LUCENA, Associate Professor
GPGN499. GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION (I, II) Indi-
SYLVIA GAYLORD, Assistant Professor
vidual project; instrument design, data interpretation, prob-
TINA L. GIANQUITTO, Assistant Professor
lem analysis, or field survey. Prerequisite: Consent of
JOHN R. HEILBRUNN, Assistant Professor
department, and “Independent Study” form must be com-
JON LEYDENS, Assistant Professor and Writing Program Administrator
pleted and submitted to the Registrar. Credit dependent upon
SUZANNE M. MOON, Assistant Professor
nature and extent of project, not to exceed 6 semester hours.
JAMES D. STRAKER, Assistant Professor
SANDY WOODSON, Senior Lecturer and Undergraduate Advisor
ROBERT KLIMEK, Lecturer
TONI LEFTON, Lecturer
ROSE PASS, Lecturer
JENNIFER SCHNEIDER, Lecturer
SUSAN J. TYBURSKI, Lecturer
GEORGE WILLIAM SHERK, Associate Research Professor
BETTY J. CANNON, Emeritus Associate Professor
W. JOHN CIESLEWICZ, Emeritus Professor
DONALD I. DICKINSON, Emeritus Professor
WILTON ECKLEY, Emeritus Professor
PETER HARTLEY, Emeritus Associate Professor
T. GRAHAM HEREFORD, Emeritus Professor
JOHN A. HOGAN, Emeritus Professor
KATHLEEN H. OCHS, Emeritus Associate Professor
ANTON G. PEGIS, Emeritus Professor
THOMAS PHILIPOSE, University Emeritus Professor
JOSEPH D. SNEED, Emeritus Professor
RONALD V. WIEDENHOEFT, Emeritus Professor
KAREN B. WILEY, Emeritus Associate Professor
ROBERT E.D. WOOLSEY, Emeritus Professor
Program Description
The Division of Liberal Arts and International Studies
(LAIS) does not offer an undergraduate degree. It does offer
five minor programs (see below). LAIS also offers a Master
of International Political Economy of Resources, Graduate
Certificates in International Political Economy, and a Gradu-
ate Individual Minor. (see the Graduate Bulletin for details).
The LAIS curriculum is based in the many disciplines that
comprise the Humanities and Social Sciences. Coursework in
LAIS prepares students for the non-technical challenges of
their future professional lives and brings intellectual enrich-
ment to their personal lives. LAIS courses examine the cul-
tural, philosophical, ethical, social, political, environmental,
international, and global contexts, past and present, which im-
pact the practice and application of science and engineering in
today's world.
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Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Two of three required core courses in the Humanities and
d) understand the meaning and implications of “steward-
Social Sciences are delivered by LAIS, namely LAIS 100
ship of the Earth”;
(previously LIHU 100), Nature and Human Values, and
e) to communicate effectively in writing and orally.
SYGN 200, Human Systems. The third required core course,
EBGN 201, Principles of Economics, is delivered by the Di-
Curriculum
vision of Economics and Business. Students may choose to
Key to courses offered by the LAIS Division:
satisfy their economics requirement by taking both EBGN
LAIS
Humanities and Social Sciences
311, Principles of Microeconomics, and EBGN 312, Princi-
LICM Communication
ples of Macroeconomics, in lieu of EBGN 201.
LIFL
Foreign Language
LIMU Music
Beyond the core, LAIS offers the majority of the courses
SYGN Systems
that meet the 9 credit-hour Clusters requirement in the Hu-
CSM students in all majors must take 19 credit-hours in
manities and Social Sciences, in partnership with the Division
Humanities and Social Science courses ranging from fresh-
of Economics and Business. Students choose one of three the-
man through senior levels of course work. These courses are
matic clusters within which to complete this requirement: the
housed in LAIS and the Division of Economics and Business
Humanities Cluster; the Public Policy Cluster; or the Interna-
(EB).
tional Studies Cluster. All students, except single majors in
Economics and Business, may apply both EBGN 311 and
Ten of the 19 hours are specified: LAIS 100 (previously
EBGN 312 toward completing the Public Policy Cluster.
LIHU100), Nature and Human Values (4 credit-hours);
SYGN200, Human Systems (3 credit-hours); and
The Division's faculty members strive for excellence in
EBGN201, Principles of Economics (3 credit-hours). The
both their teaching and research and expect high levels of aca-
remaining 9 credit-hours must be chosen from a thematic
demic performance from their students. Disciplinary expertise
cluster area (see below.)
within LAIS among its full-time faculty includes: Composi-
tion; Creative Writing; Culture Studies; Film and Media Stud-
NOTE: Students may elect to satisfy the Economics core re-
ies; Geography; History; International Political Economy;
quirement by taking both EBGN311 and EBGN312 in-
Law (including environmental policy); Literature; Music; Phi-
stead of EBGN201. Students (other than single majors in
losophy (including Ethics); Political Science; Science and
Economics) choosing the EBGN 311 and 312 option
Technology Studies; Science, Technology, and Society Stud-
may apply both of these courses toward fulfilling the
ies; and Sociology. Adjunct faculty members add expertise in
Public Policy cluster. Students considering a major in
Art, Foreign Languages, and Operations Research, and add
Economics are advised to take the EBGN311/312 se-
depth in History, Law, Literature, and Political Science.
quence instead of taking EBGN201.
As a service to the CSM community, the LAIS Division
NOTE: Any LAIS course, including Communication and
operates the LAIS Writing Center, which provides students
Music courses, may be taken as a free elective.
with instruction tailored to their individual writing problems,
NOTE: See the Foreign Languages (LIFL) section below for
and faculty with support for Writing Across the Curriculum.
the CSM foreign language policy relative to restrictions
Faculty and staff are also welcome to make use of the Writ-
that apply to previous foreign language course work, or
ing Center’s expertise for writing projects and problems.
native or second language knowledge/fluency.
Program Educational Objectives
Required Courses
In addition to contributing toward achieving the educa-
LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100)
tional objectives described in the CSM Graduate Profile and
Nature and Human Values
4 sem hrs.
the ABET Accreditation Criteria, the course work in the
EBGN201
Principles of Economics
3 sem hrs.
Division of Liberal Arts and International Studies is designed
SYGN200
Human Systems
3 sem hrs.
LAIS/EBGN Cluster Courses
9 sem hrs.
to help CSM develop in students the ability to engage in life-
Total
19 sem hrs.
long learning and recognize the value of doing so by acquir-
ing the broad education necessary to:
Cluster Requirements
1. Undergraduate students are required to take a minimum
a) understand the impact of engineering solutions in con-
of 9 credit-hours from one of the following clusters:
temporary, global, international, societal, political, and
Humanities (formerly Humankind & Values); Public
ethical contexts;
Policy (formerly Society & Decisions and Environment,
b) understand the role of Humanities and Social Sciences
Resources, Science, & Technology); or International
in identifying, formulating, and solving engineering
Studies (no change). Students who began to fulfill their
problems;
cluster requirements prior to the beginning of the aca-
c) prepare people to live and work in a complex world;
demic year 2004-05 have the option of staying with the
previous cluster structure (“Humankind and Values,”
“Society and Decisions,” “Environment, Resources,
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
87

Science, and Technology,” and “International Studies”),
LAIS485 (previously LISS474) Constitutional Law and Politics
or they may switch to the new structure (“Humanities,”
LAIS486 (previously LISS462) Science & Technology Policy
“Public Policy,” or “International Studies”). Students
LAIS498 (previously LIHU or LISS498) Special Topics
who did not begin fulfilling their cluster requirements as
LAIS499 (previously LIHU or LISS499) Independent Study
of the beginning of the academic year 2004-05 must do
PUBLIC POLICY CLUSTER (formerly Society &
so within the new structure.
Decisions and Environment, Resources, Science, &
2. Three of the 9 credit-hours must be a 400-level LAIS
Technology)
(previously LIHU or LISS) course, or a 400-level
EBGN310 Environment & Resource Economics
EBGN course with a policy focus as indicated in the
EBGN311 Microeconomics
Clusters lists.
EBGN312 Macroeconomics
3. Single majors in Economics must take all 9 credit-hours
EBGN330 Energy Economics
from LAIS.
EBGN342 Economic Development
EBGN401 History of Economic Thought
4. Students other than single majors in Economics may
EBGN441 International Economics
take up to 6 credit-hours in EBGN.
LAIS220
Introduction to Philosophy
HUMANITIES CLUSTER (formerly Humankind &
LAIS221 (previously LISS 312) Introduction to Religions
Values)
LAIS285 (previously LISS375) Introduction to Law & Legal
EBGN401 History of Thought
Systems
LIFLxxx
All LIFL (foreign language) courses
LAIS298 (previously LIHU or LISS298) Special Topics
LAIS220 Introduction to Philosophy
LAIS299 (previously LIHU or LISS299) Independent Study
LAIS221 (previously LISS312) Introduction to Religion
LAIS320 (previously LIHU325) Introduction to Ethics
LAIS285 (previously LISS375) Introduction to Law & Legal
LAIS335 (previously LISS340) IPE of Latin America
Systems
LAIS337 (previously LISS342) IPE of Asia
LAIS298 (previously LIHU or LISS298) Special Topics
LAIS339 (previously LISS344) IPE of Middle East
LAIS299 (previously LIHU or LISS299) Independent Study
LAIS341 (previously LISS346) IPE of Africa
LAIS300 (previously LIHU301) Creative Writing: Fiction
LAIS345 (previously LISS335) International Political Economy (IPE)
LAIS301 (previously LIHU305) Creative Writing: Poetry
LAIS370 (previously LIHU365) History of Science
LAIS305 (previously LIHU376) American Literature: Colonial
LAIS371 (previously LIHU367) History of Technology
Period to the Present
LAIS398 (previously LIHU or LISS398) Special Topics
LAIS306 (previously LIHU377) African American Literature:
LAIS399 (previously LIHU or LISS399) Independent Study
Foundations to Present
LAIS402 (previously LIHU412) Writing Proposals for a Better
LAIS314 (previously LIHU300) Journey Motif in Modern Literature
World
LAIS315 (previously LIHU339) Musical Traditions of the Western
LAIS420 (previously LIHU420) Business, Engineering &
World
Leadership Ethics
LAIS317 (previously LISS455) Japanese History & Culture
LAIS470 (previously LISS461) Technology & Gender: Issues
LAIS320 (previously LIHU325) Introduction to Ethics
LAIS485 (previously LISS474) Constitutional Law & Politics
LAIS321 (previously LIHU326) Political Philosophy & Engineering
LAIS486 (previously LISS462) Science & Technology Policy
LAIS322 Introduction to Logic
LAIS487 (previously LISS480) Environmental Politics and Policy
LAIS325 (previously LISS300) Cultural Anthropology
LAIS488 (previously LISS482) Water Politics & Policy
LAIS365 (previously LIHU350) History of War
LAIS498 (previously LIHU or LISS498) Special Topics
LAIS375 (previously LIHU362) Engineering Cultures
LAIS499 (previously LIHU or LISS499) Independent Study
LAIS379 (previously LISS410) Utopias/Dystopias
INTERNATIONAL STUDIES CLUSTER
LAIS398 (previously LIHU or LISS398) Special Topics
EBGN312 Principles of Macroeconomics
LAIS399 (previously LIHU or LISS399) Independent Study
EBGN342 Economic Development
LAIS401 (previously LIHU405) Creative Writing: Poetry
EBGN441 International Economics
LAIS402 (previously LIHU412) Writing Proposals for a Better World
LIFLxxx
All LIFL (foreign language) Courses
LAIS405 (previously LIHU470) Becoming American: Literary
LAIS298 (previously LIHU or LISS298) Special Topics
Perspectives
LAIS299 (previously LIHU or LISS299) Independent Study
LAIS406 (previously LIHU401) The American Dream: Illusion or
LAIS317 (previously LISS455) Japanese History & Culture
Reality?
LAIS335 (previously LISS340) IPE of Latin America
LAIS409 (previously LIHU406) Shakespearean Drama
LAIS337 (previously LISS342) IPE of Asia
LAIS414 (previously LIHU402) Heroes and Anti-Heroes
LAIS339 (previously LISS344) IPE of the Middle East
LAIS420 (previously LIHU420) Business, Engineering Leadership
LAIS341 (previously LISS346) IPE of Africa
Ethics
LAIS345 (previously LISS335) International Political
LAIS465 (previously LIHU479) The American Military Experience
Economy (IPE)
LAIS470 (previously LISS461) Technology and Gender: Issues
LAIS370 (previously LIHU365) History of Science
LAIS475 (previously LIHU363) Engineering Cultures in the
LAIS371 (previously LIHU367) History of Technology
Developing World
LAIS375 (previously LIHU362) Engineering Cultures
LAIS476 (previously LIHU460) Technology & International
LAIS398 (previously LIHU or LISS398) Special Topics
Development
88
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

LAIS399 (previously LIHU or LISS399) Independent Study
Students should consult these advisors for the specific re-
LAIS435 (previously LISS440) Latin American Development
quirements for these minors.
LAIS436 (previously LISS441) Hemispheric Integration in the
Americas
Humanities Minor
LAIS437 (previously LISS442) Asian Development
Program Advisor: Dr. Tina Gianquitto. The focus in the
LAIS441 (previously LISS446) African Development
Humanities is the memorial record of the human imagination
LAIS442 (previously LISS447) Natural Resources & War in Africa
and intellect, discovering, recreating, and critically examin-
LAIS446 (previously LISS430) Globalization
ing the essential core of experience that sustains the human
LAIS447 (previously LISS433) Global Corporations
spirit in all adventures of our common life. The making of
LAIS448 (previously LISS431) Global Environmental Issues
this record appears in various forms of art, including Litera-
LAIS449 (previously LISS432) Cultural Dynamics of Global
ture, Visual Arts, Music (non-performing), Philosophy, and
Development
History. The Humanities (HU) Minor offers a variety of
LAIS450 (previously LISS435) Political Risk Assessment
LAIS451 (previously LISS439) Political Risk Assessment Research
opportunities to explore the wealth of our heritage. Students
Seminar
work with the HU Advisor to design a coherent set of courses
LAIS452 (Previously LISS437) Corruption and Development
to constitute a minor program appropriate to their interests.
LAIS459 (previously LISS434) International Field Practicum
International Political Economy Minor
LAIS475 (previously LIHU363) Engineering Cultures in the
Program Advisor: Dr. James Jesudason. Ideal for students
Developing World
anticipating careers in the earth resources industries. The In-
LAIS476 (previously LIHU460) Technology & International
ternational Political Economy (IPE) Program at CSM was the
Development
LAIS498 (previously LIHU or LISS498) Special Topics
first such program in the U.S. designed with the engineering
LAIS499 (previously LIHU or LISS499) Independent Study
and applied science student in mind, and remains one of the
very few international engineering programs with this focus.
Minor Programs
International Political Economy is the study of the interplay
LAIS offers five minor programs. Students who elect to
among politics, the economy, and culture. In today’s global
pursue a minor usually will automatically satisfy their Clus-
economy, international engineering and applied science deci-
ter requirements. They will also need to use their free elec-
sions are fundamentally political decisions made by sover-
tive hours to complete a minor. Students may choose to
eign nations. Therefore, International Political Economy
pursue an Area of Special Interest (ASI) in any of the LAIS
theories and models are often used in evaluating and imple-
minor programs. Minors are a minimum of 18 credit-hours;
menting engineering and science projects. Project evalua-
ASIs are a minimum of 12 credit-hours. No more than half
tions and feasibilities now involve the application of such
the credits to be applied towards an LAIS minor or ASI may
IPE methods as political risk assessment and mitigation.
be transfer credits. The LAIS Undergraduate Advisor must
approval all transfer credits that will be used for an LAIS
The IPE Program at CSM includes courses focusing on
minor or ASI.
Latin America/the Americas, Asia Pacific, Sub-Saharan
Africa, and the Middle East/Islamic World; courses with a
Prior to the completion of the sophomore year, a student
global focus; and foreign language study.
wishing to declare an LAIS Minor must fill out an LAIS
Minor form (available in the LAIS Office) and obtain
The IPE minor is also a gateway to the Combined Under-
approval signatures from the appropriate minor advisor in
graduate/Graduate Program in International Political Econ-
LAIS and from the LAIS Director. The student must also fill
omy. The Combined Program leads to either a master's
out a Minor/Area of Special Interest Declaration (available in
degree (Master of International Political Economy of Re-
the Registrar’s Office) and obtain approval signatures from
sources), or either one or two Graduate Certificates (15
the student’s CSM advisor, from the Head or Director of the
credit-hours each) in International Political Economy. See the
student’s major department or division, and from the LAIS
Graduate Bulletin for further details.
Director.
Science, Technology, and Society Minor
The five minors or ASIs available and their advisors are:
Program Advisor: Dr. Carl Mitcham. The Science, Tech-
nology, and Society (STS) Minor focuses on science and
Humanities Minor.
Dr. Tina Gianquitto
technology (or technoscience) in a societal context: how
International Political Economy Minor.
technoscience influences society, and how society influences
Dr. James Jesudason
technosciences. Courses provide historical and analytical
Science, Technology, and Society Minor.
approaches to questions inevitably confronting professional
Dr. Carl Mitcham
scientists, engineers, managers, and policy makers in both
Humanitarian Studies and Technology
public and private sectors. Such questions concern, for
Dr. Juan Lucena
example, professional ethical responsibilities, intellectual
Individualized Undergraduate Minor.
property rights, science policy formation, appropriate regula-
Prof. Sandy Woodson
tory regimes, assessments of societal impacts, and the roles
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
89

of technical innovation in economic development or inter-
Example 2: A course which counts toward two different
national competitiveness. Students work with the STS Advi-
clusters. “LAIS 345. International Political Economy
sor to tailor a course sequence appropriate to their interests
(PI),” wherein “(PI)” indicates that this course counts to-
and background.
ward fulfilling requirements in either the Public Policy (P)
Humanitarian Studies and Technology Minor
or International Studies (I) cluster.
Program Advisor: Dr. Juan Lucena. The Humanitarian
Code
Studies and Technology Minor (HST) concerns itself with
H
Humanities Cluster only
the intersection of society, culture, and technology in
P
Public Policy Cluster only
humanitarian projects. Technologically-oriented humanitar-
I
International Studies Cluster only
ian projects are intended to provide fundamental needs (like
HP
Humanities or Public Policy Cluster
food, water, shelter, and clothing) when these are missing or
HI
Humanities or International Studies Cluster
inadequate, or higher-level needs for underserved communi-
PI
Public Policy or International Studies Cluster
ties. HST courses are offered through LAIS with additional
LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100). NATURE AND HUMAN
technical electives offered by departments across campus.
VALUES (NHV) Nature and Human Values will focus on
Students may also wish to investigate the 28-credit minor in
diverse views and critical questions concerning traditional
Humanitarian Engineering.
and contemporary issues linking the quality of human life
Individualized Undergraduate Minor
and Nature, and their interdependence. The course will ex-
Program Advisor: Prof. Sandy Woodson. Students declar-
amine various disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches
ing an Undergraduate Individual Minor in LAIS must choose regarding two major questions: 1) How has Nature affected
18 restricted elective hours in LAIS in accordance with a
the quality of human life and the formulation of human val-
coherent rationale reflecting some explicit focus that the stu-
ues and ethics? (2) How have human actions, values, and
dent wishes to pursue. A student desiring this minor must de-
ethics affected Nature? These issues will use cases and exam-
sign it in consultation with a member of the LAIS faculty
ples taken from across time and cultures. Themes will in-
who approves the rationale and the choice of courses.
clude but are not limited to population, natural resources,
Description of Courses
stewardship of the Earth, and the future of human society.
This is a writing-intensive course that will provide instruc-
IMPORTANT NOTICE:
tion and practice in expository writing, using the disciplines
NEW COURSE NUMBERINGSYSTEM.
and perspectives of the Humanities and Social Sciences.
Effective Fall 2005, the Division of Liberal Arts and Inter-
4 hours lecture/seminar; 4 semester hours.
national Studies completely renumbered its Humanities, So-
cial Sciences, and Foreign Language courses. The previous
LAIS 101 (previously LIHU 101) SHORT FORM NATURE
designations of “LIHU” and “LISS” have been replaced by
AND HUMAN VALUES For students with a minimum of
the common designation “LAIS.” Foreign language courses
three strong composition and related transfer credits, this
continue to retain the designation “LIFL,” but the course
course will, with LAIS undergraduate advisory permission,
numbers themselves have changed to bring CSM in line with
complete the LAIS 100 (LIHU 100) Nature and Human and
standard numbering practices at public institutions of higher
Value requirement. Prerequsite: transfer college composition
education elsewhere in Colorado.
course. 2 hours lecture/discussion; 2 semester hours.
The courses listed below follow the new numerical se-
LAIS 198 (previously LIHU198). SPECIAL TOPICS Pilot
quence, which differs from the previous sequence in which
course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
LIHU and LISS courses appeared. The old numbers appear
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is
in parentheses after the new numbers. A conversion table for
offered only once.Variable credit: 1 to 6 semester hours.
course number may be found in the CSM 2005-2006 Under-
LAIS 199 (previously LIHU 199) INDEPENDENT STUDY
graduate Bulletin.
Individual research or special problem projects supervised by
Please direct any questions or concerns to the Division of
a faculty member. Primarily for students who have com-
Liberal Arts and International Studies.
pleted their Humanities and Social Science requirements. In-
structor consent required. Prerequisite: “Independent Study”
CLUSTER CODES
form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Vari-
Each of the courses listed below that is a “cluster course”
able credit: 1 to 6 semester hours.
has a code that appears in parentheses after the title to indi-
LAIS 220 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY A general
cate to which cluster or clusters the course applies.
introduction to philosophy that explores historical and ana-
Example 1: A course which counts toward only one cluster.
lytic traditions. Historical exploration may compare and con-
“LAIS 301. CREATIVE WRITING: FICTION (H),”
trast ancient and modern, rationalist and empiricist, European
wherein “(H)” indicates that this course counts toward ful-
and Asian approaches to philosophy. Analytic exploration
filling requirements in the Humanities (H) cluster only.
may consider such basic problems as the distinction between
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2006–2007

illusion and reality, the one and the many, the structure of
LAIS 301 (previously LIHU 305) CREATIVE WRITING:
knowledge, the existence of God, the nature of mind or self.
POETRY I (H) This course focuses on reading and writing
3 hours lecture, 3 credit hours. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (pre-
poetry. Students will learn many different poetic forms to
viously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
compliment prosody, craft, and technique. Aesthetic prefer-
LAIS 221 (previously LISS 312). INTRODUCTION TO RE-
ences will be developed as the class reads, discusses, and
LIGIONS (HP) This course has two focuses. We will look at
models some of the great American poets. Weekly exercises
selected religions emphasizing their popular, institutional,
reflect specific poetic tools, encourage the writing of literary
and contemplative forms; these will be four or five of the
poetry, and stimulate the development of the student’s craft.
most common religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism,
The purpose of the course is to experience the literature and
Christianity, and/or Islam. The second point of the course
its place in a multicultural society, while students “try on”
focuses on how the Humanities and Social Sciences work.
various styles and contests in order to develop their own
We will use methods from various disciplines to study reli-
voice. The course enrollment is split between the 300 and
gion-history of religions and religious thought, sociology, an-
400 levels (see LAIS 401), to allow returning students the
thropology and ethnography, art history, study of myth,
opportunity for continued development. An additional book
philosophy, analysis of religious texts and artifacts (both con-
review and presentation, as well as leading the small groups
temporary and historical), analysis of material culture and the
will be expected of returning students. Prerequisite: LAIS
role it plays in religion, and other disciplines and methodolo-
100 (previously LIHU 100). Prerequisite or corequisite:
gies. We will look at the question of objectivity; is it possible
SYGN 200. 3 hours seminar. 3 semester hours.
to be objective? We will approach this methodological ques-
LAIS 305 (previously LIHU 376) AMERICAN LITERA-
tion using the concept “standpoint.” For selected readings,
TURE: COLONIAL PERIOD TO THE PRESENT (H).
films, and your own writings, we will analyze what the
This course offers an overview of American literature from
“standpoint” is. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously
the colonial period to the present. The texts of the class pro-
LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
vide a context for examining the traditions that shape the
lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours
American nation as a physical, cultural and historical space.
LAIS 285 (previously LISS 375). INTRODUCTION TO
As we read, we will focus on the relationships between com-
LAW AND LEGAL SYSTEMS (PH) Examination of differ-
munity, landscape, history, and language in the American
ent approaches to, principles of, and issues in the law in the
imagination. We will concentrate specifically on conceptions
U.S. and other societies. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously
of the nation and national identify in relation to race, gender,
LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
and class difference. Authors may include: Rowlandson,
lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
Brown, Apess, Hawthorne, Douglass, Melville, Whitman,
James, Stein, Eliot, Hemingway, Silko, and Auster. Prerequi-
LAIS 298 (previously LIHU298). SPECIAL TOPICS Pilot
site: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100) Prerequisite or corequi-
course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
site: SYGN 200. 3 hours lecture/discussion, 3 semester hours.
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is
offered only once. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously
LAIS 306 (previously LIHU 377). AFRICAN AMERICAN
LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. Variable
LITERATURE: FOUNDATIONS TO PRESENT (H). This
credit: 1 to 6 semester hours.
course is an examination of African-American literature from
its origins in black folklore to the present. Students will be
LAIS 299 (previously LIHU 199) INDEPENDENT STUDY
introduced to the major texts and cultural productions of the
Individual research or special problem projects supervised by
African American tradition. We will examine a diverse col-
a faculty member. Primarily for students who have com-
lection of materials including slave narratives, autobiogra-
pleted their Humanities and Social Science requirements. In-
phies, essays, and novels, in addition to musical traditions
structor consent required. Prerequisite: “Independent Study”
such as spirituals, gospel, ragtime, and blues. The materials
form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Vari-
of this class offer an opportunity to identify literary charac-
able credit: 1 to 6 semester hours.
teristics that have evolved out of the culture, language, and
LAIS 300 (previously LIHU301). CREATIVE WRITING:
historical experience of black people and to examine con-
FICTION (H) Students will write weekly exercises and read
structions of race and racial difference in America. Authors
their work for the pleasure and edification of the class. The
may include: Equiano, Douglass, Chesnutt, DuBois, Johnson,
midterm in this course will be the production of a short story.
Hughes, Hurston, Toomer, Larsen, Wright, Ellison, Hayden,
The final will consist of a completed, revised short story. The
and Morrison. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100),
best of these works may be printed in a future collection. Pre-
prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours lecture/
requisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or
discussion; 3 semester hours.
corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours lecture/discussion; 3 semes-
LAIS 314 (previously LIHU 300). THE JOURNEY MOTIF
ter hours.
IN MODERN LITERATURE (H) This course will explore
the notion that life is a journey, be it a spiritual one to dis-
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
91

cover one’s self or geographical one to discover other lands
LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
and other people. The exploration will rely on the major liter-
lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
ary genres—drama, fiction, and poetry—and include authors
LAIS 335 (previously LISS 340). INTERNATIONAL
such as Twain, Hurston, Kerouac, Whitman, and Cormac
POLITICAL ECONOMY OF LATIN AMERICA (PI)
McCarthy. A discussion course. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (pre-
A broad survey of the interrelationship between the state
viously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
and economy in Latin America as seen through an examina-
3 hours lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
tion of critical contemporary and historical issues that shape
LAIS 315 (previously LIHU 339). MUSICAL TRADITIONS
polity, economy, and society. Special emphasis will be given
OF THE WESTERN WORLD (H). An introduction to music
to the dynamics of interstate relationships between the devel-
of the Western world from its beginnings to the present. Pre-
oped North and the developing South. Prerequisite: LAIS
requisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or
100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite:
corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours lecture/discussion; 3 semes-
SYGN200. 3 hours lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
ter hours.
LAIS 337 (previously LISS 342). INTERNATIONAL
LAIS 317 (previously LISS 455). JAPANESE HISTORY
POLITICAL ECONOMY OF ASIA (PI) A broad survey of
AND CULTURE (HI) Japanese History and Culture covers
the interrelationship between the state and economy in East
Japan’s historical and cultural foundations from earliest times
and Southeast Asia as seen through an examination of critical
through the modern period. It is designed to allow students
contemporary and historical issues that shape polity, econ-
who have had three semesters of Japanese language instruc-
omy, and society. Special emphasis will be given to the dy-
tion (or the equivalent) to apply their knowledge of Japanese
namics of interstate relationships between the developed
in a social science-based course. Major themes will include:
North and the developing South. Prerequisite: LAIS 100
cultural roots; forms of social organization; the development
(previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
of writing systems; the development of religious institutions;
3 hours lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
the evolution of legal institutions; literary roots; and clan
LAIS 339 (previously LISS 344). INTERNATIONAL
structure. Prerequisites: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100).
POLITICAL ECONOMY OF THE MIDDLE EAST (PI)
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 se-
A broad survey of the interrelationships between the state
mester hours.
and market in the Middle East as seen through an examina-
LAIS 320 (previously LIHU 325). INTRODUCTION TO
tion of critical contemporary and historical issues that shape
ETHICS (HP) A general introduction to ethics that explores
polity, economy, and society. Special emphasis will be given
its analytic and historical traditions. Reference will com-
to the dynamics between the developed North and the devel-
monly be made to one or more significant texts by such
oping South. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100).
moral philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Thomas
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours lecture/
Aquinas, Kant, John Stuart Mill, and others. Prerequisite:
discussion; 3 semester hours.
LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite:
LAIS 341 (previously LISS 346). INTERNATIONAL
SYGN200. 3 hours lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
POLITICAL ECONOMY OF AFRICA (PI) A broad survey
LAIS 321 (previously LIHU 326). POLITICAL PHILOSO-
of the interrelationships between the state and market in
PHY AND ENGINEERING (H) A critical exploration of
Africa as seen through an examination of critical contem-
how engineering may be related to different philosophies of
porary and historical issues that shape policy, economy, and
the common good. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously
society. Special emphasis will be given to the dynamics be-
LIHU100). Corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours lecture/discussion;
tween the developed North and the developing South. Pre-
3 semester hours.
requisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU 100). Prerequisite or
LAIS 322 INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC A general introduc-
corequisite: SYGN 200. 3 hours lecture/discussion. 3 semes-
tion to logic that explores its analytic and historical tradi-
ter hours.
tions. Coverage will commonly consider informal and formal
LAIS 345 (previously LISS 335). INTERNATIONAL
fallacies, syllogistic logic, sentential logic, and elementary
POLITICAL ECONOMY (PI) International Political Econ-
quantification theory. Reference will commonly be made to
omy is a study of contentious and harmonious relationships
the work of such logical theorists as Aristotle, Frege, Russell
between the state and the market on the nation-state level,
and Whitehead, Quine, and others. Prerequisite: LAIS 100
between individual states and their markets on the regional
(previously LIHU100). Corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours lec-
level, and between region-states and region-markets on the
ture, 3 credit hours.
global level. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100).
LAIS 325 (previously LISS 300). CULTURAL ANTHRO-
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours lecture/
POLOGY (H) A study of the social behavior and cultural
discussion; 3 semester hours.
development of humans. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously
LAIS 365 (previously LIHU350). HISTORY OF WAR (H)
History of War looks at war primarily as a significant human
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2006–2007

activity in the history of the Western World since the times of
structor consent required. Prerequisite: “Independent Study”
Greece and Rome to the present. The causes, strategies, re-
form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Vari-
sults, and costs of various wars will be covered, with consid-
able credit: 1 to 6 semester hours.
erable focus on important military and political leaders as
Note: Students enrolling in 400-level courses are required
well as on noted historians and theoreticians. The course is
to have senior standing or permission of instructor.
primarily a lecture course with possible group and individual
presentations as class size permits. Tests will be both objec-
LAIS 401 (previously LIHU 405) CREATIVE WRITING:
tive and essay types. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously
POETRY II (H) This course is a continuation of LAIS 301
LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
(LIHU 305) for those interested in developing their poetry
lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
writing further. It focuses on reading and writing poetry. Stu-
dents will learn many different poetic forms to compliment
LAIS 370 (previously LIHU 365) HISTORY OF SCIENCE
prosody, craft, and technique. Aesthetic preferences will be
(PI) An introduction to the social history of science, explor-
developed as the class reads, discusses, and models some of
ing significant people, theories, and social practices in
the great American poets. Weekly exercises reflect specific
science, with special attention to the histories of physics,
poetic tools, encourage the writing of literary poetry, and
chemistry, earth sciences, ecology, and biology. Prerequisite:
simulate the development of the student’s craft. The purpose
LAIS 100 (previously LIHU 100). Prerequisite or co-requisite
of the course is to experience the literature and its place in a
SYGN 200. 3 hours lecture/discussion. 3 semester hours.
multicultural society, while students “try on” various styles
LAIS 371 (previously LIHU 367) HISTORY OF TECH-
and contexts in order to develop their own voice. The course
NOLOGY (PI) A survey of the history of technology in the
enrollment is split between the 300 and 400 levels to allow
modern period (from roughly 1700 to the present), exploring
returning students the opportunity for continued develop-
the role technology has played in the political and social his-
ment. An additional book review and presentation, as well as
tory of countries around the world. Prerequisite: LAIS 100
leading the small groups will be expected of returning stu-
(previously LIHU 100). Prerequisite or co-requisite SYGN
dents. Prerequisite: LAIS 301 (LIHU 305). Prerequisite or
200. 3 hours lecture/discussion. 3 semester hours.
corequisite: SYGN 200. 3 hours seminar. 3 semester.
LAIS 375 (previously LIHU362). ENGINEERING CUL-
LAIS 402 (previously LIHU 412) WRITING PROPOSALS
TURES (HI) This course seeks to improve students’ abilities
FOR A BETTER WORLD (HP) This course develops the
to understand and assess engineering problem solving from
student’s writing and higher-order thinking skills and helps
different cultural, political, and historical perspectives. An
meet the needs of underserved populations, particularly via
exploration, by comparison and contrast, of engineering cul-
funding proposals written for nonprofit organizations. Pre-
tures in such settings as 20th century United States, Japan,
requisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU 100). Prerequisite or
former Soviet Union and present-day Russia, Europe, South-
corequisite: SYGN 200. 3 semester hours.
east Asia, and Latin America. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previ-
LAIS 405 (previously LIHU 470). BECOMING AMERI-
ously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
CAN: LITERARY PERSPECTIVES (H) This course will
3 hours lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
explore the increasing heterogeneity of U.S. society by ex-
LAIS 379 (previously LISS 410). UTOPIAS/DYSTOPIAS
amining the immigration and assimilation experience of
(H) This course studies the relationship between society,
Americans from Europe, Africa, Latin America, and Asia as
technology, and science using fiction and film as a point of
well as Native Americans. Primary sources and works of
departure. A variety of science fiction novels, short stories,
literature will provide the media for examining these phe-
and films will provide the starting point for discussions.
nomena. In addition, Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.’s thesis about the
These creative works will also be concrete examples of
‘unifying ideals and common culture’ that have allowed the
various conceptualizations that historians, sociologists,
United States to absorb immigrants from every corner of the
philosophers, and other scholars have created to discuss the
globe under the umbrella of individual freedom, and the vari-
relationship. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100).
ous ways in which Americans have attempted to live up to
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 se-
the motto ‘e pluribus unum’ will also be explored. Prerequi-
mester hours.
site: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or
LAIS 398 (previously LIHU398). SPECIAL TOPICS Pilot
corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
LAIS 406 (previously LIHU 401). THE AMERICAN
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is
DREAM: ILLUSION OR REALITY? (H) This seminar will
offered only once.Variable credit: 1 to 6 semester hours.
examine ‘that elusive phrase, the American dream,’ and ask
LAIS 399 (previously LIHU 399) INDEPENDENT STUDY
what it meant to the pioneers in the New World, how it with-
Individual research or special problem projects supervised by
ered, and whether it has been revived. The concept will be
a faculty member. Primarily for students who have com-
critically scrutinized within cultural contexts. The study will
pleted their Humanities and Social Science requirements. In-
rely on the major genres of fiction, drama, and poetry, but
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
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will venture into biography and autobiography, and will
zation; democracy; and public policy formulation as it relates
range from Thoreau’s Walden to Kerouac’s On the Road and
to development goals. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously
Boyle’s Budding Prospects. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previ-
LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
ously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
seminar; 3 semester hours.
3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
LAIS 436 (previously LISS 441). HEMISPHERIC INTEGRA-
LAIS 409 (previously LIHU 406) SHAKESPEAREAN
TION IN THE AMERICAS (I) This international political
DRAMA (H) Shakespeare, the most well known writer in
economy seminar is designed to accompany the endeavor
English and perhaps the world, deals with universal themes
now under way in the Americas to create a free trade area for
and the ultimate nature of what it is to be a human being. His
the entire Western Hemisphere. Integrating this hemisphere,
plays are staged, filmed, and read around the globe, even
however, is not just restricted to the mechanics of facilitating
after 400 years. This seminar will explore why Shakespeare’s
trade but also engages a host of other economic, political,
plays and characters have such lasting power and meaning to
social, cultural, and environmental issues, which will also be
humanity. The seminar will combine class discussion, lecture,
treated in this course. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously
and video. Grades will be based on participation, response
LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
essays, and a final essay. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously
seminar; 3 semester hours.
LIHU 100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN 200. 3 hours
LAIS 437 (previously LISS 442) ASIAN DEVELOPMENT
seminar. 3 semester hours.
(I) This international political economy seminar deals with
LAIS 414 (previously LIHU 402). HEROES AND ANTI-
the historical development of Asia Pacific from agrarian to
HEROES: A TRAGIC VIEW (H) This course features heroes
post-industrial eras; its economic, political, and cultural
and antiheroes (average folks, like most of us), but because it
transformation since World War II, contemporary security
is difficult to be heroic unless there are one or more villains
issues that both divide and unite the region; and globalization
lurking in the shadows, there will have to be an Iago or
processes that encourage Asia Pacific to forge a single
Caesar or a politician or a member of the bureaucracy to
trading bloc. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100).
overcome. Webster’s defines heroic as ‘exhibiting or marked
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar;
by courage and daring.’ Courage and daring are not confined
3 semester hours.
to the battlefield, of course. One can find them in surprising
LAIS 441 (previously LISS 446). AFRICAN DEVELOP-
places—in the community (Ibsen’s Enemy of the People), in
MENT (I) This course provides a broad overview of the
the psychiatric ward (Kesey’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s
political economy of Africa. Its goal is to give students an
Nest), in the military (Heller’s Catch-22), on the river (Twain’s
understanding of the possibilities of African development
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn or in a “bachelor pad”
and the impediments that currently block its economic
(Simon’s Last of the Red Hot Lovers). Prerequisite: LAIS
growth. Despite substantial natural resources, mineral re-
100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite:
serves, and human capital, most African countries remain
SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
mired in poverty. The struggles that have arisen on the conti-
LAIS 420 (previously LIHU 420) BUSINESS, ENGINEER-
nent have fostered thinking about the curse of natural re-
ING AND LEADERSHIP ETHICS (HP) A critical explo-
sources where countries with oil or diamonds are beset with
ration of business, management, engineering, and leadership
political instability and warfare. Readings give first an intro-
ethics, with an emphasis on relations among these fields of
duction to the continent followed by a focus on the specific
practice. 3 hours seminar/discussion; 3 semester hours.
issues that confront African development today. Prerequisite:
LAIS 435 (previously LISS 440). LATIN AMERICAN
LAIS 100 (previously LIHU 100). Prerequisite or co-requisite:
DEVELOPMENT (I) A senior seminar designed to explore
SYGN 200. 3 hours seminar. 3 semester.
the political economy of current and recent past development
LAIS 442 (previously LISS 447) NATURAL RESOURCES
strategies, models, efforts, and issues in Latin America, one
AND WAR IN AFRICA (I) Africa possesses abundant
of the most dynamic regions of the world today. Develop-
natural resources yet suffers civil wars and international
ment is understood to be a nonlinear, complex set of
conflicts based on access to resource revenues. The course
processes involving political, economic, social, cultural, and
examines the distinctive history of Africa, the impact of the
environmental factors whose ultimate goal is to improve the
resource curse, mismanagement of government and corrup-
quality of life for individuals. The role of both the state and
tion, and specific cases of unrest and war in Africa. Prerequi-
the market in development processes will be examined.
stie: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU 100). Prerequesite or
Topics to be covered will vary as changing realities dictate
corequisite: SYGN 200. 3 hours seminar. 3 semester hours.
but will be drawn from such subjects as inequality of income
LAIS 446 (previously LISS 430). GLOBALIZATION (I)
distribution; the role of education and health care; region-
This international political economy seminar is an historical
markets; the impact of globalization; institution-building;
and contemporary analysis of globalization processes exam-
corporate-community-state interfaces; neoliberalism; privati-
ined through selected issues of world affairs of political, eco-
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2006–2007

nomic, military, and diplomatic significance. Prerequisite:
LAIS 452 (previously LISS 437). CORRUPTION AND
LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite:
DEVELOPMENT (I) This course addresses the problem of
SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
corruption and its impact on development. Readings are
LAIS 447 (previously LISS 433). GLOBAL CORPORA-
multidisciplinary and include policy studies, economics, and
TIONS (I) This international political economy seminar
political science. Students will acquire an understanding of
seeks to (1) understand the history of the making of global
what constitutes corruption, how it negatively affects devel-
corporations and their relationship to the state, region-markets,
opment, and what they, as engineers in a variety of profes-
and region-states; and (2) analyze the on-going changes in
sional circumstances, might do in circumstances in which
global, regional, and national political economies due to the
bribe paying or bribe taking might occur. Prereqisite: LAIS
presence of global corporations. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (pre-
100 (previously LIHU 100). Prerequeiste or corequisite:
viously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
SYGN 200. 3 hours seminar. 3 semester hours.
3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
LAIS 459 (previously LISS 434). INTERNATIONAL
LAIS 448 (previously LISS 431). GLOBAL ENVIRON-
FIELD PRACTICUM (I) For students who go abroad for an
MENTAL ISSUES (I) Critical examination of interactions
on-site practicum involving their technical field as practiced
between development and the environment and the human
in another country and culture; required course for students
dimensions of global change; social, political, economic, and
pursuing a certificate in International Political Economy;
cultural responses to the management and preservation of
all arrangements for this course are to be supervised and
natural resources and ecosystems on a global scale. Explo-
approved by the advisor of the International Political Econ-
ration of the meaning and implications of “Stewardship of
omy minor program. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously
the Earth” and “Sustainable Development.” Prerequisite:
LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
LAIS100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite:
seminar; 3 semester hours.
SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
LAIS 465 (previously LIHU 479). THE AMERICAN MILI-
LAIS 449 (previously LISS 432). CULTURAL DYNAMICS
TARY EXPERIENCE (H) A survey of military history, with
OF GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (I) Role of cultures and
primary focus on the American military experience from
nuances in world development; cultural relationship between
1775 to present. Emphasis is placed not only on military
the developed North and the developing South, specifically
strategy and technology, but also on relevant political, social,
between the U.S. and the Third World. Prerequisite: LAIS
and economic questions. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously
100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite:
LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
seminar; 3 semester hours. Open to ROTC students or by
permission of the LAIS Division.
LAIS 450 (previously LISS 435). POLITICAL RISK
ASSESSMENT (I) This course will review the existing
LAIS 470 (previously LISS 461). TECHNOLOGY AND
methodologies and techniques of risk assessment in both
GENDER: ISSUES (HP) This course focuses on how women
country-specific and global environments. It will also seek to
and men relate to technology. Several traditional disciplines
design better ways of assessing and evaluating risk factors
will be used: philosophy, history, sociology, literature, and a
for business and public diplomacy in the increasingly global-
brief look at theory. The class will begin discussing some
ized context of economy and politics wherein the role of the
basic concepts such as gender and sex and the essential and/or
state is being challenged and redefined. Prerequisite: LAIS
social construction of gender, for example. We will then focus
100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite:
on topical and historical issues. We will look at modern engi-
SYGN200. Prerequisite: At least one IPE 300- or 400-level
neering using sociological studies that focus on women in
course and permission of instructor. 3 hours seminar; 3 se-
engineering. We will look at some specific topics including
mester hours.
military technologies, ecology, and reproductive technologies.
Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite
LAIS 451 (previously LISS 439). POLITICAL RISK
or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
ASSESSMENT RESEARCH SEMINAR (I) This inter-
national political economy seminar must be taken concur-
LAIS 475 (previously LIHU 363). ENGINEERING CUL-
rently with LISS435, Political Risk Assessment. Its purpose
TURES IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD (HI) An investi-
is to acquaint the student with empirical research methods
gation and assessment of engineering problem solving in the
and sources appropriate to conducting a political risk assess-
developing world using historical and cultural cases. Coun-
ment study, and to hone the students’ analytical abilities. Pre-
tries to be included range across Africa, Asia, and Latin
requisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or
America. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100).
corequisite: SYGN200. Concurrent enrollment in LAIS 450
Corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours lecture/ discussion; 3 semes-
(previously LISS435). 1 hour seminar; 1 semester hour.
ter hours.
LAIS 476 (previously LIHU 460) TECHNOLOGY AND
INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (HI) An historical
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
95

examination of the role of technology in humanitarian and
LAIS 499 (previously LIHU 499) INDEPENDENT STUDY
social improvement projects. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previ-
Individual research or special problem projects supervised by
ously LIHU 100). Corequisite: SYGN 200. 3 hours
a faculty member. Primarily for students who have com-
lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
pleted their Humanities and Social Science requirements. In-
LAIS 485 (previously LISS 474). CONSTITUTIONAL
structor consent required. Prerequisite: “Independent Study”
LAW AND POLITICS (HP) This course presents a compre-
form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Vari-
hensive survey of the U.S. Constitution with special attention
able credit: 1 to 6 semester hours.
devoted to the first ten Amendments, also known as the Bill
Foreign Languages (LIFL)
of Rights. Since the Constitution is primarily a legal docu-
A variety of foreign languages is available through the
ment, the class will adopt a legal approach to constitutional
LAIS Division. Students interested in a particular language
interpretation. However, as the historical and political con-
should check with the LAIS Division Office to determine
text of constitutional interpretation is inseparable from the
when these languages might be scheduled. In order to gain
legal analysis, these areas will also be covered. Significant
basic proficiency from their foreign language study, students
current developments in constitutional jurisprudence will
are encouraged to enroll for at least two semesters in what-
also be examined. The first part of the course deals with Arti-
ever language(s) they elect to take. If there is sufficient de-
cles I through III of the Constitution, which specify the divi-
mand, the Division can provide third- and fourth-semester
sion of national governmental power among the executive,
courses in a given foreign language. No student is permit-
legislative, and judicial branches of government. Addition-
ted to take a foreign language that is either his/her native
ally, the federal nature of the American governmental system,
language or second language. Proficiency tests may be used
in which governmental authority is apportioned between the
to determine at what level a student should be enrolled, but a
national government and the state governments, will be stud-
student cannot receive course credit by taking these tests.
ied. The second part of the course examines the individual
Foreign Language Policy
rights specifically protected by the amendments to the Con-
Students will not receive credit toward their LAIS or Free
stitution, principally the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth,
Elective graduation requirements for taking a foreign language
and Fourteenth Amendments. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (pre-
in which they have had previous courses as per the following
viously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
formula:
3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
If a student has taken one year in high school or one semes-
LAIS 486 (previously LISS 462). SCIENCE AND TECH-
ter in college, he/she will not receive graduation credit for the
NOLOGY POLICY (HP) An examination of current issues
first semester in a CSM foreign language course. Likewise, if
relating to science and technology policy in the United States
a student has taken two years in high school or two semesters
and, as appropriate, in other countries. Prerequisite: LAIS
in college, he/she will not receive graduation credit for the
100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite:
second semester, and if a student has taken three years in high
SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
school or three semesters in college, he/she will not receive
LAIS 487 (previously LISS 480). ENVIRONMENTAL
graduation credit for the third semester.
POLITICS AND POLICY (P) Seminar on environmental
LIFL 113 (previously LIFL 221). SPANISH I (HI) Funda-
policies and the political and governmental processes that
mentals of spoken and written Spanish with an emphasis on
produce them. Group discussion and independent research on
vocabulary, idiomatic expressions of daily conversation, and
specific environmental issues. Primary but not exclusive
Spanish American culture. 3 semester hours.
focus on the U.S. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previously
LIHU100). Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
LIFL 123 (previously LIFL 321). SPANISH II (HI) Continu-
seminar; 3 semester hours.
ation of Spanish I with an emphasis on acquiring conversa-
tional skills as well as further study of grammar, vocabulary,
LAIS 488 (previously LISS 482). WATER POLITICS AND
and Spanish American culture. 3 semester hours.
POLICY (P) Seminar on water policies and the political and
governmental processes that produce them, as an exemplar of
LIFL 213 (previously LIFL 421). SPANISH III (HI) Empha-
natural resource politics and policy in general. Group discus-
sis on furthering conversational skills and a continuing study
sion and independent research on specific politics and policy
of grammar, vocabulary, and Spanish American culture. 3 se-
issues. Primary but not exclusive focus on the U.S. Pre-
mester hours.
requisite: LAIS 100 (previously LIHU100). Prerequisite or
LIFL 114 (previously LIFL 222). ARABIC I (HI) Funda-
corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
mentals of spoken and written Arabic with an emphasis on
LAIS 498 (previously LIHU498). SPECIAL TOPICS Pilot
vocabulary, idiomatic expressions of daily conversation, and
course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
culture of Arabic-speaking societies. 3 semester hours.
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is
LIFL 124 (previously LIFL 322). ARABIC II (HI) Continua-
offered only once.Variable credit: 1 to 6 semester hours.
tion of Arabic I with an emphasis on acquiring conversa-
96
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

tional skills as well as further study of grammar, vocabulary,
LIFL 218 (previously LIFL 429). JAPANESE III (HI)
and culture of Arabic speaking societies. 3 semester hours.
Emphasis on furthering conversational skills and a con-
LIFL 214 (previously LIFL 422). ARABIC III (HI) Empha-
tinuing study of grammar, vocabulary, and Japanese culture.
sis on furthering conversational skills and a continuing study
3 semester hours.
of grammar, vocabulary, and culture of Arabic-speaking soci-
LIFL 198, 298, 398, and 498. SPECIAL TOPICS Pilot
eties. 3 semester hours.
course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
LIFL 115 (previously LIFL 223). GERMAN I (HI) Funda-
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is
mentals of spoken and written German with an emphasis on
offered only once. Variable credit: 1 to 6 semester hours.
vocabulary, idiomatic expressions of daily conversation, and
LIFL 199, 299, 399, and 499. INDEPENDENT STUDY In-
German culture. 3 semester hours.
dividual research or special problem projects supervised by a
LIFL 125 (previously LIFL 323). GERMAN II (HI) Contin-
faculty member. Instructor consent required. Prerequisite:
uation of German I with an emphasis on acquiring conversa-
"Independent Study" form must be completed and submitted
tional skills as well as further study of grammar, vocabulary,
to the Registrar. Variable credit: 1 to 6 semester hours.
and German culture. 3 semester hours.
Communication (LICM)
LIFL 215 (previously LIFL 423). GERMAN III (HI)
Courses in communication do not count toward the LAIS
Emphasis on furthering conversational skills and a con-
restricted elective requirement but may be taken for free
tinuing study of grammar, vocabulary, and German culture.
elective credit and to complete a communications minor or
3 semester hours.
Area of Special Interest (ASI).
LIFL 116 (previously LIFL 224). RUSSIAN I (HI) Funda-
LICM301. ORAL COMMUNICATION A five-week course
mentals of spoken and written Russian with an emphasis on
which teaches the fundamentals of effectively preparing and
vocabulary, idiomatic expressions of daily conversation, and
presenting messages. “Hands-on” course emphasizing short
Russian culture. 3 semester hours.
(5- and 10-minute) weekly presentations made in small
groups to simulate professional and corporate communica-
LIFL 126 (previously LIFL 324). RUSSIAN II (HI) Contin-
tions. Students are encouraged to make formal presentations
uation of Russian I with an emphasis on acquiring conversa-
which relate to their academic or professional fields. Exten-
tional skills as well as further study of grammar, vocabulary,
sive instruction in the use of visuals. Presentations are re-
and Russian culture. 3 semester hours.
hearsed in class two days prior to the formal presentations,
LIFL 216 (previously LIFL 424). RUSSIAN III (HI)
all of which are video-taped and carefully evaluated. 1 hour
Emphasis on furthering conversational skills and a con-
lecture/lab; 1 semester hour.
tinuing study of grammar, vocabulary, and Russian culture.
LICM306. SELECTED TOPICS IN WRITTEN COMMU-
3 semester hours.
NICATION Information on courses designated by this
LIFL 117 (previously LIFL 226). PORTUGUESE I (HI)
number may be obtained from the LAIS Division. Will de-
Fundamentals of spoken and written Portuguese with an
pend on the level of the specific course. 1 to 3 hours
emphasis on vocabulary, idiomatic expressions of daily
lecture/lab; variable credit: 1 to 3 semester hours.
conversation, and Brazilian culture. 3 semester hours.
Music (LIMU)
LIFL 127 (previously LIFL 326). PORTUGUESE II (HI)
A cultural opportunity for students with music skills to
Continuation of Portuguese I with an emphasis on acquiring
continue study in music for a richer personal development.
conversational skills as well as further study of grammar,
Free elective hours required by degree-granting departments
vocabulary, and Brazilian culture. 3 semester hours.
may be satisfied by a maximum of 3 semester hours total of
LIFL 217 (previously LIFL 426). PORTUGUESE III (HI)
concert band (i.e., spring semester), chorus, or physical edu-
Emphasis on furthering conversational skills and a con-
cation and athletics.
tinuing study of grammar, vocabulary, and Brazilian culture.
LIMU101, 102, 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, 402. BAND Study,
3 semester hours.
rehearsal, and performance of concert, marching and stage
LIFL 118 (previously LIFL 229). JAPANESE I (HI) Funda-
repertory. Emphasis on fundamentals of rhythm, intonation,
mentals of spoken and written Japanese with an emphasis on
embouchure, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour.
vocabulary, idiomatic expressions of daily conversation, and
LIMU111, 112, 211, 212, 311, 312, 411, 412. CHORUS
Japanese culture. 3 semester hours.
Study, rehearsal, and performance of choral music of the
LIFL 128 (previously LIFL 329). JAPANESE II (HI)
classical, romantic, and modern periods with special empha-
Continuation of Japanese I with an emphasis on acquiring
sis on principles of diction, rhythm, intonation, phrasing, and
conversational skills as well as further study of grammar,
ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour.
vocabulary, and Japanese culture. 3 semester hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
97

LIMU340. MUSIC THEORY The course begins with the
Mathematical and
fundamentals of music theory and moves into their more
complex applications. Music of the common practice period
Computer Sciences
is considered. Aural and visual recognition of harmonic
materials covered is emphasized. Prerequisite: LAIS 339
GRAEME FAIRWEATHER, Professor and Department Head
(previously LIHU339) or consent of instructor. 3 hours
BERNARD BIALECKI, Professor
lecture/discussion; 3 semester hours.
MAHADEVAN GANESH, Professor
WILLY HEREMAN, Professor
(See also LIHU339. MUSICAL TRADITIONS OF THE
PAUL A. MARTIN, Professor
WESTERN WORLD in preceding list of LAIS courses.)
DINESH MEHTA, Professor
LIMU 350 MUSIC TECHNOLOGY An introduction to the
WILLIAM C. NAVIDI, Professor
TRACY CAMP, Associate Professor
physics of music and sound. The history of music technology
BARBARA M. MOSKAL, Associate Professor
from wax tubes to synthesizers. Construction of instruments
LUIS TENORIO, Associate Professor
and studio. 3 hours lecture. 3 semester hours.
MICHAEL COLAGROSSO, Assistant Professor
LIMU 401 JAZZ ENSEMBLE/PEP BAND - FALL The Jazz
REINHARD FURRER, Assistant Professor
Ensemble provides an opportunity for students to participate
QI HAN, Assistant Professor
in a musical ensemble in the jazz big band format. Jazz
JAE YOUNG LEE, Assistant Professor
music is a unique American art form. The big band jazz for-
XIAOWEN (JASON) LIU, Assistant Professor
HUGH KING, Senior Lecturer
mat is an exciting way for students to experience the power,
CYNDI RADER, Senior Lecturer
grace and beauty of this art form and music in general. The
TERRY BRIDGMAN, Lecturer
class will consist of regular weekly rehearsals and one or
G. GUSTAVE GREIVEL, Lecturer
more concert performance (s). 1 semester hour.
ROMAN TANKELEVICH, Lecturer
LIMU 402 JAZZ ENSEMBLE/PEP BAND - SPRING The
SCOTT STRONG, Instructor
Jazz Ensemble provides an opportunity for students to partic-
WILLIAM R. ASTLE, Professor Emeritus
NORMAN BLEISTEIN, Professor Emeritus
ipate in a musical ensemble in the jazz big band format. Jazz
ARDEL J. BOES, Professor Emeritus
music is a unique American art form. The big band jazz for-
AUSTIN R. BROWN, Professor Emeritus
mat is an exciting way for students to experience the power,
RAYMOND R. GUTZMAN, Professor Emeritus
grace and beauty of this art form and music in general. The
FRANK G. HAGIN, Professor Emeritus
class will consist of regular weekly rehearsals and one or
DONALD C.B. MARSH, Professor Emeritus
more concert performance(s). 1 semester hour.
STEVEN PRUESS, Professor Emeritus
LIMU 403 JAZZ LAB The Jazz Lab provides an opportunity
ROBERT E. D. WOOLSEY, Professor Emeritus
BARBARA B. BATH, Associate Professor Emerita
for students to participate in a musical ensemble in the jazz
RUTH MAURER, Associate Professor Emerita
combo format. Jazz music is a unique American art form.
ROBERT G. UNDERWOOD, Associate Professor Emeritus
The jazz combo format is an exciting way for students to ex-
perience the joy and sense of achievement of performing this
Program Description
great American music form. The class will consist of regular
The Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department
weekly rehearsals and one or more concert performance(s). 1
(MCS) offers an undergraduate degree in which the student
semester hour.
may select a program in the mathematical and computer sci-
ences. There are three tracks: (i) the Computational and Ap-
Systems (SYGN)
plied Mathematics (CAM) option, (ii) the Statistics option,
SYGN200. HUMAN SYSTEMS Human Systems is an in-
and (iii) the Computer Sciences option. Each track offers a
terdisciplinary historical examination of key systems created
unique opportunity to study mathematical and computer sci-
by humans—namely, political, economic, social, and cultural
ences in an engineering environment. All three tracks empha-
institutions—as they have evolved worldwide from the in-
size technical competence, problem solving, teamwork,
ception of the modern era (ca. 1500) to the present. This
projects, relation to other disciplines, and verbal, written, and
course embodies an elaboration of these human systems as
graphical skills.
introduced in their environmental context in Nature and
Human Values and will reference themes and issues explored
The department provides the teaching skills and technical
therein. It also demonstrates the cross-disciplinary applicabil-
expertise to develop mathematical and computer sciences
ity of the ‘systems’ concept. Assignments will give students
capabilities for all Colorado School of Mines students. In
continued practice in writing. Prerequisite: LAIS 100 (previ-
addition, MCS programs support targeted undergraduate
ously LIHU100. 3 hours lecture/discussion; 3 semester
majors in mathematical and computer sciences and also grad-
hours).
uate degree programs relevant to mathematical and computer
sciences aspects of the CSM mission.
98Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

In a broad sense, these programs stress the development
Identifying, formulating and solving mathematics/com-
of practical applications techniques to enhance the overall
puter science problems, and
attractiveness of mathematical and computer sciences ma-
Analyzing and interpreting statistical data.
jors to a wide range of employers in industry. More
specifically, we utilize a summer "field session" program
Students will demonstrate an understanding and apprecia-
in Computer Science and the senior capstone experiences
tion for the relationship of mathematics/computer science to
in Computational and Applied Mathematics, and Statistics
other fields by:
to engage high level undergraduate students in problems
Applying mathematics/computer science to solve prob-
of practical applicability for potential employers. These
lems in other fields,
courses are designed to simulate an industrial job or re-
Working in cooperative multi-disciplinary teams, and
search environment. The close collaboration with potential
employers or professors improves communication be-
Choosing appropriate technology to solve problems in
tween our students and the private sector as well as with
other disciplines.
sponsors from other disciplines on campus.
Students will demonstrate an ability to communicate math-
Mathematical and Computer Sciences majors can use their
ematics/computer science effectively by:
free electives to take additional courses of special interest to
Giving oral presentations,
them. This adds to the flexibility of the program and qualifies
Completing written explanations,
students for a wide variety of careers.
Interacting effectively in cooperative teams,
Any program of this type requires emphasis in study areas
which utilize the special skills of the Department. These areas
Creating well documented programs, and
are:
Understanding and interpreting written material in
Computational and Applied Mathematics: Classical scat-
mathematics/computer science.
tering theory, dynamical systems, nonlinear partial differ-
Curriculum
ential equations, numerical analysis, symbolic computing,
The calculus sequence emphasizes mathematics applied to
and mathematics education.
problems students are likely to see in other fields. This sup-
Applied Computer Sciences: Artificial intelligence, neural
ports the curricula in other programs where mathematics is
networks, parallel processing, pattern recognition, computer
important, and assists students who are underprepared in
vision, computer graphics, databases, and fuzzy set theory.
mathematics. Priorities in the mathematics curriculum include:
Applied Statistics: Stochastic modeling, Monte Carlo meth-
applied problems in the mathematics courses and
ods, biostatistics, statistical genetics, statistical methods in
ready utilization of mathematics in the science and
cosmology, and inverse problems.
engineering courses.
Program Educational Objectives (Bachelor of
This emphasis on the utilization of mathematics and com-
Science in Mathematical and Computer Sciences) puter sciences continues through the upper division courses.
In addition to contributing toward achieving the educa-
Another aspect of the curriculum is the use of a spiraling
tional objectives described in the CSM Graduate Profile and
mode of learning in which concepts are revisited to deepen
the ABET Accreditation Criteria, the Mathematical and Com-
the students’ understanding. The applications, team work,
puter Sciences Program at CSM has established the follow-
assessment, and communications emphasis directly address
ing program educational objectives:
ABET criteria and the CSM graduate profile. The curriculum
offers the following three study options:
Students will demonstrate technical expertise within
mathematics/computer science by:
Degree Requirements (Mathematical and
Designing and implementing solutions to practical prob-
Computer Sciences)
lems in science and engineering,
Computational and Applied Mathematics Option
Using appropriate technology as a tool to solve prob-
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
MACS213 Calc. for Scientists & Eng. III
4
4
lems in mathematics/computer science, and
MACS261 Programming Concepts
3
3
Creating efficient algorithms and well structured com-
EPIC251 Design II
2
3
3
puter programs.
PHGN200 Physics II
3.5
3
4.5
Students will demonstrate a breadth and depth of knowl-
*EBGN201 Principles of Economics/
SYGN200 Systems
3
3
edge within mathematics/computer science by:
PAGN201 Physical Education III
2
0.5
Extending course material to solve original problems,
Total
18
Applying knowledge of mathematics/computer science
to the solution of problems,
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2005–2006
99

Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
MACS262 Data Structures
3
3
MACS262 Data Structures
3
3
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
MACS342 Honors Linear Algebra
3
3
MACS342 Honors Linear Algebra
3
3
*SYGN200 Systems/EBGN201
3
3
*SYGN200 Systems/EBGN201
3
3
LAIS/EBGN - H&SS Cluster Elective I
3
3
LAIS/EBGN - H&SS Cluster Elective I
3
3
PAGN202 Physical Education IV
2
0.5
PAGN202 Physical Education IV
2
0.5
Total
15.5
Total
15.5
*Student can choose order of EBGN201 and SYGN 200
*Student can choose order of EBGN201 and SYGN 200
Summer Field Session
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Summer Field Session
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
MACS300 Foundations of Advanced Math.
4
MACS300 Foundations of Advanced Math.
4
Total
4
Total
4
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
MACS334 Introduction to Probability
3
3
MACS334 Introduction to Probability
3
3
MACS401 Introduction to Analysis
3
3
MACS401 Introduction to Analysis
3
3
MACS407 Introduction to Scientific Computing 3
3
MACS407 Introduction to Scientific Computing 3
3
LAIS/EBGN - H&SS Cluster Elective II
3
3
LAIS/EBGN - H&SS Cluster Elective II
3
3
Free Elective
3
3
Free Elective
3
3
Free Elective
3
3
Free Elective
3
3
Total
18
Total
18
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
MACS454 Complex Analysis
3
3
MACS335 Introduction to Statistics
3
3
MACS458 Abstract Algebra
3
3
MACS458 Abstract Algebra
3
3
MACS Elective - Mathematics
3
3
MACS Elective - Mathematics
3
3
Free Elective
3
3
Free Elective
3
3
Free Elective
3
3
Free Elective
3
3
Total
15
Total
15
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
MACS433 Mathematical Biology
3
3
MACS424 Introduction to Applied Statistics
3
3
MACS441 Computer Graphics
3
3
MACS433 Mathematical Biology
3
3
MACS455 Partial Differential Equations
3
3
MACS438 Stochastic Models
3
3
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective III
3
3
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective III
3
3
Free Elective
3
3
Free Elective
3
3
Total
15
Total
15
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
MACS440 Parallel Computing
3
3
MACS436 Advanced Statistical Modeling
3
3
MACS484 Math. & Comp. Modeling (Capstone) 3
3
MACS482 Statistics Practicum (Capstone)
3
3
MACS Elective - Mathematics
3
3
MACS Elective - Mathematics
3
3
MACS Elective - Mathematics
3
3
MACS Elective - Mathematics
3
3
Free Elective
3
3
Free Elective
3
3
Total
15
Total
15
Degree Total
133.5
Degree Total
133.5
Statistics Option
Computer Sciences Option
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
MACS213 Calc. for Scientists & Eng. III
4
4
MACS213 Calc. for Scientists & Eng. III
4
4
MACS261 Programming Concepts
3
3
MACS261 Programming Concepts
3
3
EPIC251 Design II
2
3
3
EPIC251 Design II
3
1
3
PHGN200 Physics II
3.5
3
4.5
PHGN200 Physics II
3
3
4.5
*EBGN201 Principles of Economics/
EBGN201 Principles of Economics/
SYGN200 Systems
3
3
SYGN200 Systems
3
3
PAGN201 Physical Education III
2
0.5
PAGN201 Physical Education III
2
0.5
Total
18
Total
18
100
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Computer Science
MACS262 Data Structures
3
3
For an Area of Special Interest in Computer Sciences, the
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
student should take:
MACS332 Linear Algebra
3
3
*SYGN200 Systems/EBGN201
3
3
MACS262 Data Structures
Free Elective
3
3
MACS306 Software Engineering
PAGN202 Physical Education IV
2
0.5
MACS341 Machine Organization and Assembly Language
Total
15.5
Programming –or-
MACS358 Discrete Mathematics & Algebraic Structures
*Student can choose order of EBGN201 and SYGN200
MACS406 Design and Analysis of Algorithms –or-
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
MACS407 Introduction to Scientific Computing
MACS306 Software Engineering
3
3
For the Minor in Computer Sciences, the student should
MACS323 Prob. & Stat. for Engineers
3
3
take:
MACS341 Mach. Org. & Assembly Lang. Prog. 3
3
MACS358 Discrete Math & Algebraic Struct.
3
3
MACS262 Data Structures
Area of Special Interest
3
3
MACS306 Software Engineering
Total
15
MACS341 Machine Organization and Assembly Language
Programming
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
MACS406 Design and Analysis of Algorithms –or-
MACS406 Dsgn. & Analysis of Algorithms
3
3
MACS407 Introduction to Scientific Computing
MACS407 Intro to Scientific Computing
3
3
MACS Elective – Computer Science
3
3
and two 400-level courses, which may not be languages
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective I
3
3
transferred from another university.
Area of Special Interest
3
3
Total
15
Combined BS/MS in Mathematical and Computer
Sciences
Summer Field Session
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
The Department of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
MACS370 Field Course (six weeks)
6
Total
6
offers a combined Bachelor of Science/Master of Science
program in both Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
that enables students to complete a Bachelor of Science and a
MACS442 Operating Systems
3
3
Master of Science simultaneously. The student takes an addi-
MACS461 Senior Seminar I
1
1
tional 30 credit hours of coursework at the graduate level, in
MACS Elective – Computer Science
3
3
addition to the undergraduate requirements, and completes
Area of Special Interest
3
3
both degrees at the same time. Interested students should
Free elective
3
3
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective II
3
3
contact the department for further information.
Total
16
Description of Courses
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
MACS100. INTRODUCTORY TOPICS FOR CALCULUS
MACS400 Princ. of Programming Languages
3
3
(S) An introduction and/or review of topics which are essen-
MACS462 Senior Seminar II
1
1
tial to the background of an undergraduate student at CSM.
MACS Elective – Computer Science
3
3
This course serves as a preparatory course for the Calculus
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective III
3
3
Free elective
3
3
curriculum and includes material from Algebra, Trigonome-
Area of Special Interest
3
3
try, Mathematical Analysis, and Calculus. Topics include
Total
16
basic algebra and equation solving, solutions of inequalities,
Degree Total
134.5
trigonometric functions and identities, functions of a single
variable, continuity, and limits of functions. Prerequisite:
Minor/ASI Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Consent of Instructor. 1 semester hour.
Mathematical Sciences
For an Area of Special Interest in Mathematical Sciences,
MACS111. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGI-
the student should take the following:
NEERS I (I, II, S) First course in the calculus sequence,
including elements of plane geometry. Functions, limits, con-
MACS323 Probability and Statistics for Engineers
tinuity, derivatives and their application. Definite and indefi-
MACS332 Linear Algebra
nite integrals; Prerequisite: precalculus. 4 hours lecture; 4
MACS333 Introduction to Mathematical Modeling
MACS407 Introduction to Scientific Computing
semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General
Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.
For the Minor in Mathematical Sciences, the student
should take the following courses in addition to those listed
MACS112. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGI-
for the ASI:
NEERS II (I, II, S) Vectors, applications and techniques of
integration, infinite series, and an introduction to multivariate
Two additional 400-level Mathematics courses
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
101

functions and surfaces. Prerequisite: MACS111. 4 hours lec-
MACS262 DATA STRUCTURES (I, II, S) Defining and
ture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed
using data structures such as linked lists, stacks, queues, bi-
General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.
nary trees, binary heap, hash tables. Introduction to algorithm
MACS122. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGI-
analysis, with emphasis on sorting and search routines. Lan-
NEERS II HONORS (I) Same topics as those covered in
guage skills: abstract data types, templates and inheritance.
MACS112 but with additional material and problems. Pre-
Prerequisite: MACS261. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
requisite: Consent of Department. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester
MACS298. SPECIAL TOPICS (I, II, S) Selected topics
hours.
chosen from special interests of instructor and students. Pre-
MACS198. SPECIAL TOPICS (I, II, S) Pilot course or spe-
requisite: Consent of Department Head. 1 to 3 semester hours.
cial topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of
MACS299. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II, S) Individual
instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
only once. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. Variable
member; also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
credit: 1 to 6 semester hours.
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: Indepen-
MACS199. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II, S) Individual
dent Study form must be completed and submitted to the
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
Registrar. Variable Credit: 1 to 6 credit hours.
member; also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
MACS300. FOUNDATIONS OF ADVANCED MATHE-
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: Indepen-
MATICS (S) (WI) This course is an introduction to commu-
dent Study form must be completed and submitted to the
nication in mathematics as well computational tools for
Registrar. Variable Credit: 1 to 6 credit hours.
mathematics. This writing intensive course provides a transi-
Sophomore Year
tion from the Calculus sequence to the upper-division mathe-
MACS213. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGI-
matics curriculum at CSM. Topics include logic and
NEERS III (I, II, S) Multivariable calculus, including partial
recursion, techniques of mathematical proofs, reading and
derivatives, multiple integration, and vector calculus. Pre-
writing proofs, mathematics software. Prerequisites:
requisite: MACS112 or MACS122. 4 hours lecture; 4 semes-
MACS213, MACS223 or MACS224. 2 hours lecture, 1 hour
ter hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General
seminar, 2 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.
Junior Year
MACS223. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGI-
MACS306. SOFTWARE ENGINEERING (I, II) Introduc-
NEERS III HONORS (II) Same topics as those covered in
tion to the software life cycle, including planning, design,
MACS213 but with additional material and problems. Pre-
implementation and testing. Topics include top down pro-
requisite: Consent of Department. 4 hours lecture;
gram design, problem decomposition, iterative refinement,
4 semester hours.
program modularity and abstract data types. Course work
emphasizes good programming practices via models, metrics
MACS224. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGI-
and documents created and used throughout the software en-
NEERS III HONORS(AP) (I) Early introduction of vectors,
gineering process. Prerequisite: MACS262. 3 hours lecture;
linear algebra, multivariable calculus. Vector fields, line and
3 semester hours.
surface integrals. Prerequisite: Consent of Department.
4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
MACS315. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (I, II, S)
Classical techniques for first and higher order equations and
MACS260 FORTRAN PROGRAMMING (I, II) Computer
systems of equations. Laplace transforms. Phase plane and
programming in Fortran90/95 with applications to science
stability analysis of non-linear equations and systems. Appli-
and engineering. Program design and structure, problem
cations to physics, mechanics, electrical engineering, and
analysis, debugging, program testing. Language skills: arith-
environmental sciences. Prerequisite: MACS213, MACS223
metic, input/output, branching and looping, functions, arrays,
or MACS224. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
data types. Introduction to operating systems. Prerequisite:
none. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
MACS323. PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS FOR ENGI-
NEERS I (I, II, S) Elementary probability, propagation of
MACS261 PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS (I, II, S) Com-
error, discrete and continuous probability models, interval
puter programming in a contemporary language such as C++
estimation, hypothesis testing, and linear regression with
or Java, using software engineering techniques. Problem solv-
emphasis on applications to science and engineering. Pre-
ing, program design, documentation, debugging practices.
requisite: MACS213, MACS223 or MACS224. 3 hours
Language skills: input/output, control, repetition, functions,
lecture; 3 semester hours.
files, classes and abstract data types, arrays, and pointers.
Introduction to operating systems and object-oriented pro-
MACS324. PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS FOR ENGI-
gramming. Application to problems in science and engineer-
NEERS II (II) Continuation of MACS323. Multiple regres-
ing. Prerequisite: none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
sion analysis, analysis of variance, basic experimental
102
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

design, and distribution-free methods. Applications empha-
Topics include machine level instructions and operating
sized. Prerequisite: MACS323 or consent of instructor.
system calls used to write programs in assembly language.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
This course provides insight into the way computers operate
MACS325. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS WITH HONORS
at the machine level. Prerequisite: MACS261. 3 hours lec-
(II) Same topics as those covered in MACS315 but with
ture; 3 semester hours.
additional material and problems. Prerequisite: Consent of
MACS342. HONORS LINEAR ALGEBRA (II) Same topics
Department. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
as those covered in MACS332 but with additional material
MACS332. LINEAR ALGEBRA (I, II) Systems of linear
and problems as well as a more rigorous presentation. Pre-
equations, matrices, determinants and eigenvalues. Linear
requisite: MACS213, MACS223 or MACS224. 3 hours lec-
operators. Abstract vector spaces. Applications selected from
ture; 3 semester hours.
linear programming, physics, graph theory, and other fields.
MACS348. ADVANCED ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS
Prerequisite: MACS213, MACS223 or MACS224. 3 hours
(I, II, S) Introduction to partial differential equations, with
lecture; 3 semester hours.
applications to physical phenomena. Fourier series. Linear
MACS333. INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL
algebra, with emphasis on sets of simultaneous equations.
MODELING. (II) This course gives students the opportunity
This course cannot be used as a MACS elective by MACS
to build mathematical models of real-world phenomena. It
majors. Prerequisite: MACS315 or MACS325. 3 hours lec-
considers several practical problems drawn from engineering
ture; 3 semester hours.
and the sciences. For each, the problem is defined and then
MACS358. DISCRETE MATHEMATICS & ALGEBRAIC
the student discovers how the underlying principles lead to a
STRUCTURES (I, II) This course is an introductory course
mathematical model. The course concentrates on difference
in discrete mathematics and algebraic structures. Topics in-
and differential equation models. In each case, the student
clude: formal logic; proofs, recursion, analysis of algorithms;
solves the model and analyzes how the model and its solu-
sets and combinatorics; relations, functions, and matrices;
tions are useful in understanding the original problem. Pre-
Boolean algebra and computer logic; trees, graphs, finite-
requisites: MACS315, MACS325 or consent of instructor. 3
state machines and regular languages. Prerequisite: MACS213,
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MACS223 or MACS224. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MACS334. INTRODUCTION TO PROBABILITY (I) An
MACS370. FIELD COURSE (S) (WI) This is the Computer
introduction to the theory of probability essential for prob-
Science option’s capstone course where the students apply
lems in science and engineering. Topics include axioms of
their course work knowledge to a challenging applied prob-
probability, combinatorics, conditional probability and inde-
lem in mathematics or computer science. In this course they
pendence, discrete and continuous probability density func-
analyze, modify and solve a significant applied problem. The
tions, expectation, jointly distributed random variables,
students work in groups of three or four for a period of six
Central Limit Theorem, laws of large numbers. Prerequisite:
forty-hour weeks. By the end of the field session they must
MACS213, MACS223 or MACS224. 3 hours lecture, 3 se-
have a finished product with appropriate supporting docu-
mester hours.
ments. At a minimum CS students should have completed
MACS335. INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL STA-
coursework through MACS306 and Mathematics students
TISTICS (II) An introduction to the theory of statistics essen-
should have coursework through MACS333 and MACS332
tial for problems in science and engineering. Topics include
or MACS342. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 6-week
sampling distributions, methods of point estimation, methods
summer field session; 6 semester hours.
of interval estimation, significance testing for population
MACS398. SPECIAL TOPICS (I, II, S) Selected topics
means and variances and goodness of fit, linear regression,
chosen from special interests of instructor and students. Pre-
analysis of variance. Prerequisite: MACS334 3 hours lecture,
requisite: Consent of Department Head. 1 to 3 semester hours.
3 semester hours.
MACS399. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II, S) Individual
MACS340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (I, II, S) (WI)
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
Supervised, full-time engineering-related employment for a
member given agreement on a subject matter, content, and
continuous six-month period (or its equivalent) in which
credit hours. Prerequisite: Independent Study form must be
specific educational objectives are achieved. Prerequisite:
completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable Credit:
Second semester sophomore status and a cumulative grade
1 to 6 credit hours.
point average of at least 2.00. 0 to 3 semester hours. Cooper-
Senior Year
ative Education credit does not count toward graduation ex-
MACS400. PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING LAN-
cept under special conditions.
GUAGES (I, II) Study of the principles relating to design,
MACS341. MACHINE ORGANIZATION AND ASSEM-
evaluation and implementation of programming languages of
BLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING (I, II) Covers the
historical and technical interest, considered as individual enti-
basic concepts of computer architecture and organization.
ties and with respect to their relationships to other languages.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
103

Topics discussed for each language include: history, design,
iterative methods, polynomial interpolation and cubic
structural organization, data structures, name structures, con-
splines, numerical integration by adaptive quadrature and
trol structures, syntactic structures, and implementation of
multivariate quadrature, numerical methods for initial value
issues. The primary languages discussed are FORTRAN,
problems in ordinary differential equations. Emphasis is on
PASCAL, LISP, ADA, C/C++, JAVA, PROLOG, PERL.
problem solving using efficient numerical methods in scien-
Prerequisite: MACS262. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
tific computing. Prerequisite: MACS315 or MACS325 and
MACS401 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS (I) This
knowledge of computer programming. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
course is a first course in real analysis that lays out the con-
mester hours.
text and motivation of analysis in terms of the transition from
MACS411. INTRODUCTION TO EXPERT SYSTEMS (II)
power series to those less predictable series. The course is
General investigation of the field of expert systems. The first
taught from a historical perspective. It covers an introduction
part of the course is devoted to designing expert systems.
to the real numbers, sequences and series and their conver-
The last half of the course is implementation of the design
gence, real-valued functions and their continuity and differ-
and construction of demonstration prototypes of expert sys-
entiability, sequences of functions and their pointwise and
tems. Prerequisite: MACS262, MACS358. 3 hours lecture;
uniform convergence, and Riemann-Stieltjes integration the-
3 semester hours.
ory. Prerequisite: MACS213, MACS223 or MACS224, and
MACS424. INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED STATISTICS
MACS332 or MACS342. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(I) Linear regression, analysis of variance, and design of ex-
MACS403. DATA BASE MANAGEMENT (I) Design and
periments, focusing on the construction of models and evalu-
evaluation of information storage and retrieval systems, in-
ation of their fit. Techniques covered will include stepwise
cluding defining and building a data base and producing the
and best subsets regression, variable transformations, and
necessary queries for access to the stored information. Gen-
residual analysis. Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of
eralized data base management systems, query languages,
data with statistical software. Prerequisites: MACS323 or
and data storage facilities. General organization of files in-
MACS335. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
cluding lists, inverted lists and trees. System security and
MACS433/BELS433 MATHEMATICAL BIOLOGY (I)
system recovery, and system definition. Interfacing host lan-
This course will discuss methods for building and solving
guage to data base systems. Prerequisite: MACS262. 3 hours
both continuous and discrete mathematical models. These
lecture; 3 semester hours.
methods will be applied to population dynamics, epidemic
MACS404. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (I) General in-
spread, pharmcokinetics and modeling of physiologic systems.
vestigation of the Artificial Intelligence field. During the first
Modern Control Theory will be introduced and used to model
part of the course a working knowledge of the LISP pro-
living systems. Some concepts related to self-organizing
gramming language is developed. Several methods used in
systems will be introduced. Prerequisite: MACS315 or
artificial intelligence such as search strategies, knowledge
MACS325. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
representation, logic and probabilistic reasoning are devel-
MACS436. ADVANCED STATISTICAL MODELING (II)
oped and applied to problems. Learning is discussed and
Modern methods for constructing and evaluating statistical
selected applications presented. Prerequisite: MACS262,
models. Topics include generalized linear models, general-
MACS358. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ized additive models, hierarchical Bayes methods, and re-
MACS406. DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS
sampling methods. Prerequisites: MACS335 and MACS424.
(I, II) Divide-and-conquer: splitting problems into subprob-
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
lems of a finite number. Greedy: considering each problem
MACS437. MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS (II) Introduction
piece one at a time for optimality. Dynamic programming:
to applied multivariate techniques for data analysis. Topics
considering a sequence of decisions in problem solution.
include principal components, cluster analysis, MANOVA
Searches and traversals: determination of the vertex in the
and other methods based on the multivariate Gaussian distri-
given data set that satisfies a given property. Techniques of
bution, discriminant analysis, classification with nearest
backtracking, branch-and-bound techniques, techniques in
neighbors.Prerequisites: MACS335 or MACS323. 3 hours
lower bound theory. Prerequisite: MACS262, MACS213,
lecture; 3 semester hours.
MACS223 or MACS224, MACS358. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
mester hours.
MACS438. STOCHASTIC MODELS (II) An introduction
to stochastic models applicable to problems in engineering,
MACS407. INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC COMPUT-
physical science, economics, and operations research. Markov
ING (I, II) Round-off error in floating point arithmetic,
chains in discrete and continuous time, Poisson processes,
conditioning and stability, solution techniques (Gaussian
and topics in queuing, reliability, and renewal theory. Pre-
elimination, LU factorization, iterative methods) of linear
requisite: MACS434. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
algebraic systems, curve and surface fitting by the method of
least-squares, zeros of nonlinear equations and systems by
104
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

MACS440. PARALLEL COMPUTING FOR SCIENTISTS
MACS455. PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (I)
AND ENGINEERS (I) This course is designed to introduce
Linear partial differential equations, with emphasis on the
the field of parallel computing to all scientists and engineers.
classical second-order equations: wave equation, heat equa-
The students will be taught how to solve scientific problems.
tion, Laplace’s equation. Separation of variables, Fourier
They will be introduced to various software and hardware
methods, Sturm-Liouville problems. Prerequisite: MACS315
issues related to high performance computing. Prerequisite:
or MASCS325. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Programming experience in C++, consent of instructor.
MACS461. SENIOR SEMINAR I (I) (WI) Students present
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
topics orally and write research papers using undergraduate
MACS441. COMPUTER GRAPHICS (I) Data structures
mathematical and computer sciences techniques, emphasizing
suitable for the representation of structures, maps, three-
critical analysis of assumptions and models. Prerequisite: Con-
dimensional plots. Algorithms required for windowing, color
sent of Department. 1 hour seminar; 1 semester hour.
plots, hidden surface and line, perspective drawings. Survey
MACS462. SENIOR SEMINAR II (II) (WI) Students
of graphics software and hardware systems. Prerequisite:
present topics orally and write research papers using under-
MACS262. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
graduate mathematical and computer sciences techniques,
MACS442. OPERATING SYSTEMS (I, II) Covers the basic
emphasizing critical analysis of assumptions and models.
concepts and functionality of batch, timesharing and single-
Prerequisite: Consent of Department. 1 hour seminar; 1 se-
user operating system components, file systems, processes,
mester hour.
protection and scheduling. Representative operating systems
MACS471. COMPUTER NETWORKS I (I) This introduc-
are studied in detail. Actual operating system components are
tion to computer networks covers the fundamentals of com-
programmed on a representative processor. This course pro-
puter communications, using TCP/IP standardized protocols
vides insight into the internal structure of operating systems;
as the main case study. The application layer and transport
emphasis is on concepts and techniques which are valid for
layer of communication protocols will be covered in depth.
all computers. Prerequisite: MACS262, MACS341. 3 hours
Detailed topics include application layer protocols (HTTP,
lecture; 3 semester hours.
FTP, SMTP, and DNS), reliable data transfer, connection
MACS443. ADVANCED PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS
management, and congestion control. In addition, students
USING JAVA. (I, II) This course will quickly review pro-
will build a computer network from scratch and program
gramming constructs using the syntax and semantics of the
client/server network applications. Prerequisite: MACS442
Java programming language. It will compare the constructs
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
of Java with other languages and discuss program design and
MACS491. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (I) (WI)
implementation. Object oriented programming concepts will
Individual investigation under the direction of a department
be reviewed and applications, applets, servlets, graphical user
faculty member. Written report required for credit. Prerequi-
interfaces, threading, exception handling, JDBC, and network-
site: Consent of Department Head. 1 to 3 semester hours, no
ing as implemented in Java will be discussed. The basics of
more than 6 in a degree program.
the Java Virtual Machine will be presented. Prerequisites:
MACS261, MACS262. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours
MACS492. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (II) (WI)
Individual investigation under the direction of a department
MACS445. WEB PROGRAMMING (II) Web Programming
faculty member. Written report required for credit. Prerequi-
is a course for programmers who want to develop Web-based
site: Consent of Department Head. 1 to 3 semester hours, no
applications. It covers basic web site design extended by
more than 6 in a degree program.
client-side and server-side programming. Students should
know the elements of HTML and Web architecture and be
MACS498. SPECIAL TOPICS (I, II, S) Selected topics
able to program in a high level language such as C++ or
chosen from special interests of instructor and students. Pre-
Java. The course builds on this knowledge by presenting
requisite: Consent of Department Head. 1 to 3 semester hours.
topics such as Cascading Style Sheets, JavaScript, PERL and
MACS499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II, S) Individual
database connectivity that will allow the students to develop
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
dynamic Web applications. Prerequisites: Fluency in a high
member; also, given agreement on a subject matter, content,
level computer language/consent of instructor. 3 hours lec-
and credit hours. Prerequisite: Independent Study form must
ture, 3 semester hours.
be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable Credit:
MACS454. COMPLEX ANALYSIS (II) The complex plane.
1 to 6 credit hours.
Analytic functions, harmonic functions. Mapping by elemen-
tary functions. Complex integration, power series, calculus
of residues. Conformal mapping. Prerequisite: MACS315 or
MACS325. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
105

Metallurgical and
physics which contribute to building the knowledge-base and
developing the skills for the processing of materials so as to
Materials Engineering
achieve specifications requested for a particular industrial or
advanced product. The engineering principles in this disci-
JOHN J. MOORE, Trustees Professor and Department Head
pline include: crystal structure and structural analysis, thermo
STEPHEN LIU, Professor
dynamics of materials, reaction kinetics, transport phenom-
GERARD P. MARTINS, Professor
DAVID K. MATLOCK, Charles S. Fogarty Professor
ena, phase equilibria, phase transformations, microstructural
BRAJENDRA MISHRA, Professor
evolution and properties of materials.
DAVID L. OLSON, John H. Moore Distinguished Professor
The core-discipline fundamentals are applied to a broad
IVAR E. REIMANIS, Professor
range of materials processes including extraction and refin-
JOHN G. SPEER, Professor
ing of materials, alloy development, casting, mechanical
PATRICK R. TAYLOR, George S. Ansell Distinguished Professor of
working, joining and forming, ceramic particle processing,
Chemical Metallurgy
CHESTER J. VAN TYNE, FIERF Professor
high temperature reactions and synthesis of engineered mate-
STEVEN W. THOMPSON, Associate Professor
rials. In each stage of processing, the effects of resultant mi-
PATRICIO MENDEZ, Assistant Professor
crostructures and morphologies on materials properties and
RYAN P. O’HAYRE, Assistant Professor
performance are emphasized.
EDGAR E. VIDAL, Assistant Professor
Laboratories, located in Nathaniel Hill Hall, are among the
JOHN P. CHANDLER, Lecturer
best in the nation. The laboratories, in conjunction with class-
MARTIN C. MATAYA, Lecturer
room instruction, provide for a well integrated education of
GEORGE S. ANSELL, President Emeritus and Professor Emeritus
W. REX BULL, Professor Emeritus
the undergraduates working towards their baccalaureate
GERALD L. DePOORTER, Associate Professor Emeritus
degrees. These facilities are well-equipped and dedicated to:
GLEN R. EDWARDS, University Professor Emeritus
particulate and chemical/extraction metallurgical-and-materi-
ROBERT H. FROST, Associate Professor Emeritus
als processing, foundry science, corrosion and hydro-/elec-
JOHN P. HAGES, University Professor Emeritus
tro-metallurgical studies, physical and mechanical
GEORGE KRAUSS, University Professor Emeritus
metallurgy, welding and joining, forming and processing-
DENNIS W. READEY, Herman F. Coors Distinguished Professor
and-testing of ceramic materials. Mechanical testing facilities
Emeritus
include computerized machines for tensile, compression, tor-
Program Description
sion, toughness, fatigue and thermo-mechanical testing.
Metallurgical and materials engineering plays a role in all
There are also other highly specialized research laboratories
manufacturing processes which convert raw materials into
dedicated to: robotics, artificial intelligence, vapor deposi-
useful products adapted to human needs. The primary out-
tion, and plasma and high-temperature reaction-systems.
come of the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering pro-
Support analytical-laboratories for surface analysis, emission
gram is to provide undergraduates with a fundamental
spectrometry, X-ray analysis, optical microscopy and image
knowledge-base associated with materials—processing, their
analysis, electron microscopy, including an analytical scan-
properties, and their selection and application. Upon gradua-
ning transmission electron microscopy and the latest in scan-
tion, students would have acquired and developed the neces-
ning electron microscopy, and micro-thermal-analysis/mass
sary background and skills for successful careers in the
spectrometry. Metallurgical and Materials Engineering in-
materials-related industries. Furthermore, the benefits of con-
volves all of the processes which transform precursor materials
tinued education toward graduate degrees and other avenues,
into final engineered products adapted to human needs. The
and the pursuit of knowledge in other disciplines should be
objective of the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
well inculcated.
program is to impart a fundamental knowledge of materials
processing, properties, selection and application in order to
The emphasis in the Department is on materials processing
provide graduates with the background and skills needed for
operations which encompass: the conversion of mineral and
successful careers in materials related industries, for contin-
chemical resources into metallic, ceramic or polymeric mate-
ued education toward graduate degrees and for the pursuit of
rials; the synthesis of new materials; refining and processing
knowledge in other disciplines.
to produce high performance materials for applications from
consumer products to aerospace and electronics, the develop-
The program leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in
ment of mechanical, chemical and physical properties of ma-
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering is accredited by the
terials related to their processing and structure, the selection
Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation
of materials for specific applications.
Board for Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Place,
Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, telephone (410)
The metallurgical and materials engineering discipline is
347-7700.
founded on fundamentals in chemistry, mathematics and
106
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Metallurgical and Materials Engineering (MME)
4. Phase Equilibria: Phase rule; binary and ternary systems;
Program Educational Objectives
microstructural evolution; defects in crystals; surface
The Metallurgical and Materials Engineering (MME) pro-
phenomena; phase transformations: eutectic, eutectoid,
gram empasizes the structure, properties, processing and per-
martensitic, nucleation and growth, recovery; microstruc-
formance of materials and, as such, is designed to support
tural evolution; strengthening mechanisms; quantitative
five primary educational obejctives that will be demonstrated
stereology; heat treatment.
by recent graduates of the program.
5. Properties of Materials: Mechanical properties, chemical
The MME program is designed and implemented so as to
properties (oxidation and corrosion); electrical, magnetic
develop graduates who:
and optical properties: failure analysis.
1. Have a broad knowledge base of materials engineering
B. MME Applications: The course content in the Metal-
fundamentals.
lurgical and Materials Engineering Program emphasizes the
2. Can apply fundamental materials-concepts to solve
following applications:
problems.
1. Materials Processing: Particulate processing, thermo- and
3. Have written and oral communication skills as well as
electro-chemical materials-processing, hydrometallurgical
teamwork skills to be successful in their careers
processing, synthesis of materials, deformation process-
ing, casting and welding.
4. Undesratnd the importance for self-acquisition of
knowledge and continuing education.
2. Design and Application of Materials: Materials selection,
ferrous and nonferrous metals, ceramic materials, polymer-
5. Can employ their breadth of knowldege so that they
ic materials, composite materials and electronic materials.
are able to provide a range of solutions to a wide range
of materials-engineering problems, and ultimately an
3. Statistical Process Control and Design of Experiments:
optimal choice.
Statistical process-control, process capability- analysis and
design of experiments.
The five MME program educational objectives were deter-
mined by using inputs from program constituencies (faculty,
C. MME Focus Areas: There are three Focus Areas with-
stundents, visiting committee, industry/recruiters, alumni).
in the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering curriculum.
The MME program educational objectives are consistent
These are
with those of Colorado School of Mines (CSM). CSM is a
1. Physicochemical Processing of Materials
school of engineering and applied science institution, dedi-
2. Physical Metallurgy
cated to the education and training of students who will be
3. Materials Engineering
stewards of the earth's resources.
D. MME Curriculum Requirements: The Metallurgical
Curriculum
and Materials Engineering course sequence is designed to
The Metallurgical and Materials Engineering (MME)
fulfill the program goals and to satisfy the curriculum
curriculum is organized to provide three educational com-
requirements. The time sequence of courses organized by
ponents: fundamentals of materials, applications of the fun-
degree program, year and semester, is listed below.
damentals, and emphasis in one of three focus areas.
Degree Requirements (Metallurgical and
A. MME Basics: The basic curriculum in the Metallurgical
and Materials Engineering Department will provide a back-
Materials Engineering)
ground in the following topic areas:
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
DCGN209 Introduction to Thermodynamics
3
3
1. Crystal Structures and Structural Analysis: Crystal sys-
MACS213 Calculus for Scientists & Engnr’s III 4
4
tems; symmetry elements and Miller indices; atomic
PHGN200 Physics II
3.5
3
4.5
bonding; metallic, ceramic and polymeric structures; x-ray
SYGN202 Engineered Materials Systems
3
3
and electron diffraction; stereographic projection and
PAGN201 Physical Education III
2
0.5
crystal orientation; long range order; defects in materials.
Total
15
2. Thermodynamics of Materials: Heat and mass balances;
Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
thermodynamic laws; chemical potential and chemical
PHGN300 Modern Physics
3
3
equilibrium; solution thermodynamics & solution models;
DCGN241 Statics
3
3
partial molar and excess quantities; solid state thermo
EPIC251 Design II
2
3
3
dynamics; thermodynamics of surfaces; electrochemistry.
EBGN201 Principles of Economics
3
3
3. Transport Phenomena and Kinetics: Heat, mass and
SYGN200 Human Systems
3
3
momentum transport; transport properties of fluids;
PAGN202 Physical Education IV
2
0.5
diffusion mechanisms; reaction kinetics; nucleation
Total
18.5
and growth kinetics.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
107

Summer Field Session
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
training in the materials-science and processing needs of
MTGN272 Particulate Materials Processing
3
these industries. Thus, the educational objective of the pro-
Total
3
gram is to provide students with the specific educational
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
requirements to begin a career in microelectronics and, at
MTGN311 Structure of Materials
3
3
4
the same time, a broad and flexible background necessary
MTGN381 Phase Equilibria
2
2
to remain competitive in this exciting and rapidly changing
MTGN351 Metallurgical & Materials
industry. The undergraduate electives which satisfy the
Thermodynamics
4
4
requirements of the program and an overall curriculum
EGGN320 Mechanics of Materials
3
3
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective I
3
3
are outlined in an informational package “Enhanced
Total
16
Program for Preparation for Microelectronics,” available
from either the Physics or Metallurgical and Materials
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Engineering Departments. A Program Mentor in each
MTGN334 Chemical Processing of Materials
3
3
MTGN348 Microstructural Develop. of Materials3
3
4
Department can also provide counseling on the program.
MTGN352 Metallurgical & Materials Kinetics 3
3
Application for admission to this program should be made
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective II
3
3
during the first semester of the sophomore year (in special
Free Elective
3
3
cases, later entry may be approved, upon review, by one of
Total
16
the program mentors). Undergraduate students admitted to
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
the program must maintain a 3.0 grade-point average or
MTGN445 Mechanical Behavior of Materials
3
3
4
better. The graduate segment of the program requires a case
MTGN461 Trans. Phen. & Reactor Design
study report, submitted to the student’s graduate advisor.
for Met. & Mat. Engs.
2
3
3
Additional details on the Master of Engineering can be
MTGN450 Stat Process Control & Design
found in the Graduate Degree and Requirements section of
of Experiments
3
3
MTGN—MTGN Elective
3
3
the Graduate Bulletin. The case study is started during the
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective III
3
3
student’s senior design-project and completed during the
Free Elective
3
3
year of graduate study. A student admitted to the program is
Total
19
expected to select a graduate advisor, in advance of the
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
graduate-studies final year, and prior to the start of their
MTGN466 Design, Selection & Use of Mats
1
6
3
senior year. The case-study topic is then identified and
MTGN415 Electronic Properties &
selected in consultation with the graduate advisor. A formal
Applications of Materials
application, during the senior year, for admission to the
or
graduate program in Metallurgical and Materials Engineer-
MTGN442 Engineering Alloys
3
3
ing must be submitted to the Graduate School. Students who
MTGN—MTGN Elective
3
3
have maintained all the standards of the program require-
MTGN—MTGN Elective
3
3
ments leading up to this step, can expect to be admitted.
DCGN381 Electric Circuits, Electronics & Power3
3
Free Elective
3
3
#Additional “Emphasis” areas are being developed in con-
Total
18
junction with other Departments on Campus.
Degree Total
138.5
Description of Courses
Five Year Combined Metallurgical and Materials
Freshman Year
Engineering Baccalaureate and Master of
MTGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METALLURGICAL
Engineering in Metallurgical and Materials
AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING (I, II) Pilot course or
Engineering, with an Electronic-Materials
special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of
Emphasis.#
instructor(s) and student(s). The course topic is generally
The Departments of Metallurgical and Materials
offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. 1 to 3
Engineering and Physics collaborate to offer a five-year pro-
semester hours.
gram designed to meet the needs of the electronics and simi-
MTGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Independent
lar high-tech industries. Students who satisfy the requirements
work leading to a comprehensive report. This work may take
of the program obtain an undergraduate degree in either
the form of conferences, library, and laboratory work. Choice
Engineering Physics or in Metallurgical and Materials
of problem is arranged between student and a specific Depart-
Engineering in four years and a Master of Engineering degree
ment faculty-member. Prerequisite: Selection of topic with
in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering at the end of the
consent of faculty supervisor; “Independent Study Form”
fifth year. The program is designed to provide for a strong
must be completed and submitted to Registrar. 1 to 3 semes-
background in science fundamentals, as well as specialized
ter hours.
108Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Sophomore Year
MTGN334. CHEMICAL PROCESSING OF MATERIALS
MTGN272. PARTICULATE MATERIALS PROCESSING
(II) Development and application of fundamental principles
(S) Field session. Characterization and production of parti-
related to the processing of metals and materials by ther-
cles. Physical and interfacial phenomena associated with par-
mochemical and aqueous and fused salt electrochemical/
ticulate processes. Applications to metal and ceramic powder
chemical routes. The course material is presented within the
processing. Laboratory projects and plant visits. Prerequi-
framework of a formalism that examines the physical chem-
sites: DCGN209 and PHGN200. 3 weeks; 3 semester hours.
istry, thermodynamics, reaction mechanisms and kinetics in-
MTGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METALLURGICAL
herent to a wide selection of chemical-processing systems.
AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING (I, II) Pilot course or
This general formalism provides for a transferable knowledge-
special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of
base to other systems not specifically covered in the course.
instructor(s) and student(s). The course topic is generally
Prerequisite: MTGN272 and MTGN351. 3 hours lecture;
offered only once. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 1 to 3
3 semester hours.
semester hours.
MTGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (I, II, S) Super-
MTGN299. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Independent
vised, full-time, engineering-related employment for a con-
work leading to a comprehensive report. This work may take
tinuous six-month period (or its equivalent) in which specific
the form of conferences, library, and laboratory work. Choice
educational objectives are achieved. Prerequisite: Second-
of problem is arranged between student and a specific Depart-
semester sophomore status and a cumulative grade-point
ment faculty-member. Prerequisite: Selection of topic with
average of at least 2.00. 1 to 3 semester hours. Cooperative
consent of faculty supervisor; “Independent Study Form”
Education credit does not count toward graduation except
must be completed and submitted to Registrar. 1 to 3 semes-
under special conditions.
ter hours.
MTGN348. MICROSTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT (II)
Junior Year
(WI) Introduction to the relationships between microstruc-
MTGN300. FOUNDRY METALLURGY (II) Design and
ture and properties of materials, with emphasis on metals.
metallurgical aspects of casting, patterns, molding materials
Fundamentals of imperfections in crystalline materials, phase
and processes, solidification processes, risering and gating
equlibria, recrystallization and grain growth, strengthening
concepts, casting defects and inspection, melting practice, cast
mechanisms, and phase transformations. Laboratory sessions
alloy selection. Prerequisite: PHGN200/210. Co-requisite:
devoted to experiments illustrating the fundamentals pre-
MTGN302 or Consent of Instructor. 2 hours lecture; 2 se-
sented in the lectures. Prerequisites: MTGN311 and
mester hours.
MTGN351. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
MTGN301. MATERIALS ENGINEERING DESIGN AND
MTGN351. METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS
MAINTENANCE (I) Introduction of the necessary metal-
THERMODYNAMICS (I) Applications of thermodynamics
lurgical concepts for effective mine maintenance. Topics to
in extractive and physical metallurgy and materials science.
include steel selection, heat treatment, mechanical proper-
Thermodynamics of solutions including solution models,
ties, casting design and alloys, casting defects, welding
calculation of activities from phase diagrams, and measure-
materials and processes selection, weld defects, weld design,
ments of thermodynamic properties of alloys and slags. Re-
forms of corrosion protection, stainless steel, mechanical
action equilibria with examples in alloy systems and slags.
forming, aluminum and copper alloy systems, and metal
Phase stability analysis. Thermodynamic principles of phase
failure identification. This course is designed for students
diagrams in material systems, defect equilibrium and inter-
from outside the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
actions. Prerequisite: DCGN209. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester
Department. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours
hours.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
MTGN352. METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS
MTGN302. FOUNDRY METALLURGY LABORATORY
KINETICS (II) Introduction to reaction kinetics: chemical
(II) Experiments in the foundry designed to supplement the
kinetics, atomic and molecular diffusion, surface thermo-
lectures of MTGN300. Co-requisite: MTGN300. 3 hours lab;
dynamics and kinetics of interfaces and nucleation-and-growth.
1 semester hour.
Applications to materials processing and performance aspects
associated with gas/solid reactions, precipitation and dissolu-
MTGN311. STRUCTURE OF MATERIALS (I) (WI)
tion behavior, oxidation and corrosion, purification of semi-
Principles of crystallography and crystal chemistry. Charac-
conductors, carburizing of steel, formation of p-n junctions
terization of crystalline materials using X-ray diffraction
and other important materials systems. Prerequisite: MTGN351.
techniques. Applications to include compound identification,
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
lattice parameter measurement, orientation of single crystals,
and crystal structure determination. Laboratory experiments
MTGN381. INTRODUCTION TO PHASE EQUILIBRIA
to supplement the lectures. Prerequisites: PHGN200/210 and
IN MATERIALS SYSTEMS (I) Review of the concepts of
SYGN202. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
chemical equilibrium and derivation of the Gibbs Phase
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
109

Rule. Application of the Gibbs Phase Rule to interpreting
MTGN414/MLGN544. PROCESSING OF CERAMICS (II)
one, two and three component Phase Equilibrium Diagrams.
Principles of ceramic processing and the relationship be-
Application to alloy and ceramic materials systems. Empha-
tween processing and microstructure. Raw materials and
sis on the evolution of phases and their amounts and the
raw materials preparation, forming and fabrication, thermal
resulting microstructural development. Prerequisite/
processing, and finishing of ceramic materials will be cov-
Co-requisite: MTGN351. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
ered. Principles will be illustrated by case studies on specific
MTGN390/EGGN390. MATERIALS AND MANUFAC-
ceramic materials. A project to design a ceramic fabrication
TURING PROCESSES (I, II, S) Engineering materials and
process is required. Field trips to local ceramic manufactur-
the manufacturing processes used in their conversion into a
ing operations. Prerequisite: MTGN31 or consent of the in-
product or structure as critical considerations in design. Prop-
structor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
erties, characteristics, typical selection criteria, and applica-
MTGN415/MLGN515. ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES AND
tions are reviewed for ferrous and nonferrous metals, plastics
APPLICATIONS OF MATERIALS (II) Survey of the elec-
and composites. Characteristics, features, and economics of
trical properties of materials, and the applications of materi-
basic shaping operations are addressed with regard to their
als as electrical circuit components. The effects of chemistry,
limitations and applications and the types of processing
processing and microstructure on the electrical properties.
equipment available. Related technology such as measure-
Functions, performance requirements and testing methods of
ment and inspection procedures, numerical control systems
materials for each type of circuit component. General topics
and automated operations are introduced concomitantly. Pre-
covered are conductors, resistors, insulators, capacitors,
requisite: EGGN320 and SYGN202 or Consent of Instructor.
energy converters, magnetic materials and integrated
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
circuits. Prerequisites: PHGN200, MTGN311 or MLGN501,
MTGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METALLURGICAL
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING (I, II) Pilot course or
MTGN416/MLGN516. PROPERTIES OF CERAMICS (II)
special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of
Survey of the properties of ceramic materials and how these
instructor(s) and student(s). The course topic is generally
properties are determined by the chemical structure (compo-
offered only once. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 1 to 3
sition), crystal structure, and the microstructure of crystalline
semester hours.
ceramics and glasses. Thermal, optical, and mechanical prop-
MTGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Independent
erties of single-phase and multiphase ceramics, including
work leading to a comprehensive report. This work may take
composites, are covered. Prerequisites: PHGN200, MTGN311
the form of conferences, library, and laboratory work. Choice
or MLGN501, MTGN4l2 or Consent of Instructor. 3 hours
of problem is arranged between student and a specific Depart-
lecture, 3 semester hours.
ment faculty-member. Prerequisite: Selection of topic with
MTGN417. REFRACTORY MATERIALS (I) Refractory
consent of faculty supervisor; “Independent Study Form”
materials in metallurgical construction. Oxide phase dia-
must be completed and submitted to Registrar. 1 to 3 semes-
grams for analyzing the behavior of metallurgical slags in
ter hours.
contact with materials of construction. Prerequisite: Consent
Senior Year
of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MTGN403. SENIOR THESIS (I, II) Two semester individ-
MTGN419/MLGN519. NON-CRYSTALLINE MATERIALS
ual research under the direction of members of the Metallur-
(II) Introduction to the principles of glass science-and-
gical and Materials Engineering faculty. Work may include
engineering and non-crystalline materials in general. Glass
library and laboratory research on topics of relevance. Oral
formation, structure, crystallization and properties will be
presentation will be given at the end of the second semester
covered, along with a survey of commercial glass composi-
and written thesis submitted to the committee for evaluation.
tions, manufacturing processes and applications. Prerequi-
Prerequisites: Senior standing in the Department of Metallur-
sites: MTGN311 or MLGN501, MLGN512/MTGN412, or
gical and Materials Engineering and Consent of Department
Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Head. 6 semester hours (3 hours per semester).
MTGN422. PROCESS ANALYSIS AND DEVELOPMENT
MTGN412/MLGN512. CERAMIC ENGINEERING (I)
(II) Aspects of process development, plant design and man-
Application of engineering principles to nonmetallic and
agement. Prerequisite: MTGN334. Co-requisite: MTGN424
ceramic materials. Processing of raw materials and produc-
or Consent of Instructor. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
tion of ceramic bodies, glazes, glasses, enamels, and cements.
MTGN424. PROCESS ANALYSIS AND DEVELOPMENT
Firing processes and reactions in glass bonded as well as me-
LABORATORY (II) Projects to accompany the lectures in
chanically bonded systems. Prerequisite: MTGN348. 3 hours
MTGN422. Prerequisite: MTGN422 or Consent of Instructor.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
110
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

MTGN430. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY OF IRON AND
standing of concepts in a wide variety of alloy systems.
STEELMAKING (I) Physical chemistry principles of blast
Metallic systems considered include iron and steels, copper,
furnace and direct reduction production of iron and refining
aluminum, titanium, superalloys, etc. Phase stability, micro-
of iron to steel. Discussion of raw materials, productivity,
structural evolution and structure/property relationships are
impurity removal, deoxidation, alloy additions, and ladle
emphasized. Prerequisite: MTGN348 or Consent of Instruc-
metallurgy. Prerequisite: MTGN334. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
tor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
mester hours.
MTGN445/MLGN505*. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF
MTGN431. HYDRO- AND ELECTRO-METALLURGY (I)
MATERIALS (I) (WI) Mechanical properties and relation-
Physicochemical principles associated with the extraction
ships. Plastic deformation of crystalline materials. Relation-
and refining of metals by hydro- and electrometallurgical
ships of microstructures to mechanical strength. Fracture,
techniques. Discussion of unit processes in hydrometallurgy,
creep, and fatigue. Laboratory sessions devoted to advanced
electrowinning, and electrorefining. Analysis of integrated
mechanical-testing techniques to illustrate the application of
flowsheets for the recovery of nonferrous metals. Prerequi-
the fundamentals presented in the lectures. Prerequisite:
sites: MTGN334, MTGN351 and MTGN352. Co-requisite:
MTGN348. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4/3* semester hours.
MTGN461, MTGN433 or Consent of Instructor. 2 hours
*This is a 3 semester-hours graduate-course in the Materials
lecture; 2 semester hours.
Science Program (ML) and a 4 semester-hours undergradu-
MTGN432. PYROMETALLURGY (II) Extraction and re-
ate-course in the MTGN program.
fining of metals including emerging practices. Modifications
MTGN450/MLGN550. STATISTICAL PROCESS CON-
driven by environmental regulations and by energy mini-
TROL AND DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS (I) Introduction
mization. Analysis and design of processes and the impact of
to statistical process control, process capability analysis and
economic constraints. Prerequisite: MTGN334. 3 hours lec-
experimental design techniques. Statistical process control
ture; 3 semester hours.
theory and techniques developed and applied to control
MTGN433. HYDRO- AND ELECTRO-METALLURGY
charts for variables and attributes involved in process control
LABORATORY (I) Experiments designed to supplement the
and evaluation. Process capability concepts developed and
lectures in MTGN431. Co-requisite: MTGN431 or Consent
applied to the evaluation of manufacturing processes. Theory
of Instructor. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hours.
of designed experiments developed and applied to full fac-
torial experiments, fractional factorial experiments, screening
MTGN434. DESIGN AND ECONOMICS OF METALLUR-
experiments, multilevel experiments and mixture experi-
GICAL PLANTS (II) Design of metallurgical processing
ments. Analysis of designed experiments by graphical and
systems. Methods for estimating process costs and profitabil-
statistical techniques. Introduction to computer software for
ity. Performance, selection, and design of process equipment.
statistical process control and for the design and analysis of
Integration of process units into a working plant and its eco-
experiments. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lec-
nomics, construction, and operation. Market research and
ture, 3 semester hours.
surveys. Prerequisites: DCGN209, MTGN351 or Consent of
Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MTGN451. CORROSION ENGINEERING (II) Principles
of electrochemistry. Corrosion mechanisms. Methods of cor-
MTGN436. CONTROL AND INSTRUMENTATION OF
rosion control including cathodic and anodic protection and
METALLURGICAL PROCESSES (II) Analysis of processes
coatings. Examples, from various industries, of corrosion
for metal extraction and refining using classical and direct-
problems and solutions. Prerequisite: DCGN209. 3 hours
search optimization methods and classical process control
lecture; 3 semester hours
with the aid of chemical functions and thermodynamic trans-
fer operations. Examples from processes in physicochemical
MTGN452. CERAMIC AND METAL MATRIX COMPOS-
and physical metallurgy. Prerequisite: MTGN334 or Consent
ITES Introduction to the synthesis, processing, structure,
of Instructor. Co-requisite: MTGN438 or Consent of Instruc-
properties and performance of ceramic and metal matrix
tor. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
composites. Survey of various types of composites, and cor-
relation between processing, structural architecture and prop-
MTGN438. CONTROL AND INSTRUMENTATION OF
erties. Prerequisites: MTGN272, MTGN311, MTGN348,
METALLURGICAL PROCESSES LABORATORY (II)
MTGN351. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
Experiments designed to supplement the lectures in
MTGN436. Prerequisite: MTGN436 or Consent of
MTGN453. PRINCIPLES OF INTEGRATED CIRCUIT
Instructor. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
PROCESSING (I) Introduction to the electrical conductivity
of semiconductor materials; qualitative discussion of active
MTGN442. ENGINEERING ALLOYS (II) This course is
semiconductor devices; discussion of the steps in integrated
intended to be an important component of the physical metal-
circuit fabrication; detailed investigation of the materials sci-
lurgy sequence, to reinforce and integrate principles from
ence and engineering principles involved in the various steps
earlier courses, and enhance the breadth and depth of under-
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
111

of VLSI device fabrication; a presentation of device packag-
MTGN463. POLYMER ENGINEERING (I) Introduction to
ing techniques and the processes and principles involved.
the structure and properties of polymeric materials, their
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semes-
deformation and failure mechanisms, and the design and
ter hours.
fabrication of polymeric end items. Molecular and crystallo-
MTGN456. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY (II) Introduction
graphic structures of polymers will be developed and related
to electron optics and the design and application of transmis-
to the elastic, viscoelastic, yield and fracture properties of
sion and scanning electron microscopes. Interpretation of
polymeric solids and reinforced polymer composites. Em-
images produced by various contrast mechanisms. Electron
phasis on forming and joining techniques for end-item fabri-
diffraction analysis and the indexing of electron diffraction
cation including: extrusion, injection molding, reaction
patterns. Prerequisite: MTGN311 or Consent of Instructor.
injection molding, thermoforming, and blow molding. The
Co-requisite: MTGN458. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
design of end-items in relation to: materials selection, manu-
facturing engineering, properties, and applications. Prerequi-
MTGN458. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY LABORATORY
site: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(II) Laboratory exercises to illustrate specimen preparation
techniques, microscope operation, and the interpretation of
MTGN464. FORGING AND FORMING (II) Introduction
images produced from a variety of specimens, and to supple-
to plasticity. Survey and analysis of working operations of
ment the lectures in MTGN456. Co-requisite: MTGN456.
forging, extrusion, rolling, wire drawing and sheet-metal
3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
forming. Metallurgical structure evolution during working.
Prerequisites: EGGN320 and MTGN348 or EGGN390.
MTGN461. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA AND REACTOR
2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab, 3 semester hours
DESIGN FOR METALLURGICAL-AND-MATERIALS
ENGINEERS (I) Introduction to the conserved-quantities:
MTGN466. MATERIALS DESIGN: SYNTHESIS, CHAR-
momentum, heat, and mass transfer, and application of chem-
ACTERIZATION AND SELECTION (II) (WI) Application
ical kinetics to elementary reactor-design. Examples from
of fundamental materials-engineering principles to the design
materials processing and process metallurgy. Molecular
of systems for extraction and synthesis, and to the selection
transport properties: viscosity, thermal conductivity, and
of materials. Systems covered range from those used for met-
mass diffusivity of materials encountered during processing
allurgical processing to those used for processing of emer-
operations. Uni-directional transport: problem formulation
gent materials. Microstructural design, characterization and
based on the required balance of the conserved- quantity ap-
properties evaluation provide the basis for linking synthesis
plied to a control-volume. Prediction of velocity, temperature
to applications. Selection criteria tied to specific require-
and concentration profiles. Equations of change: continuity,
ments such as corrosion resistance, wear and abrasion resist-
motion, and energy. Transport with two independent variables
ance, high temperature service, cryogenic service, vacuum
(unsteady-state behavior). Interphase transport: dimensionless
systems, automotive systems, electronic and optical systems,
correlations friction factor, heat, and mass transfer coefficients.
high strength/weight ratios, recycling, economics and safety
Elementary concepts of radiation heat-transfer. Flow behavior
issues. Materials investigated include mature and emergent
in packed beds. Design equations for: Continuous- Flow/
metallic, ceramic and composite systems used in the manu-
Batch Reactors with Uniform Dispersion and Plug Flow
facturing and fabrication industries. Student-team design-
Reactors. Digital computer methods for the design of metal-
activities including oral- and written–reports. Prerequisite:
lurgical systems. Laboratory sessions devoted to: Tutorials/
MTGN351, MTGN352, MTGN445 and MTGN461 or Con-
Demonstrations to facilitate the understanding of concepts
sent of Instructor. 1 hour lecture, 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
related to selected topics; and, Projects with the primary focus
MTGN475. METALLURGY OF WELDING (I) Introduc-
on the operating principles and use of modern electronic-
tion to welding processes thermal aspects; metallurgical
instrumentation for measurements on lab-scale systems in
evaluation of resulting microstructures; attendant phase
conjunction with correlation and prediction strategies for
transformations; selection of filler metals; stresses; stress
analysis of results. Prerequisites: MACS315, MTGN334 and
relief and annealing; preheating and post heating; distortion
MTGN352. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
and defects; welding ferrous and nonferrous alloys; and, weld-
MTGN462/ESGN462. SOLID WASTE MINIMIZATION
ing tests. Prerequisite: MTGN348. Co-requisite: MTGN477.
AND RECYCLING (I) This course will examine, using case
2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
studies, how industry applies engineering principles to mini-
MTGN477. METALLURGY OF WELDING LABORATORY
mize waste formation and to meet solid waste recycling chal-
(I) Experiments designed to supplement the lectures in
lenges. Both proven and emerging solutions to solid waste
MTGN475. Prerequisite: MTGN475. 3 hours lab; 1 semester
environmental problems, especially those associated with
hour.
metals, will be discussed. Prerequisites: EGGN/ESGN353,
EGGN/ESGN354, and ESGN302/CHGN403 or Consent of
Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
112
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

MTGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METALLURGICAL
Mining Engineering
AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING (I, II) Pilot course or
special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of
TIBOR G. ROZGONYI, Professor and Department Head
instructor(s) and student(s). The course topic is generally
KADRI DAGDELEN, Professor
offered only once. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 1 to 3
UGUR OZBAY, Professor
semester hours.
LEVENT OZDEMIR, Professor and Director of Earth Mechanics
Institute
MTGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Independent
MARK KUCHTA, Associate Professor
advanced-work leading to a comprehensive report. This work
HUGH MILLER, Associate Professor
may take the form of conferences, library, and laboratory
MASAMI NAKAGAWA, Associate Professor
work. Selection of problem is arranged between student and
D. SCOTT KIEFFER, Assistant Professor
a specific Department faculty-member. Prerequisite: Selec-
MANOHAR ARORA, Senior Lecturer
tion of topic with consent of faculty supervisor; “Independent
BAKI YARRAR, Professor Emeritus
Study Form” must be completed and submitted to Registrar.
VILEM PETR, Research Assistant Professor
1 to 3 semester hours.
Program Description
Mining engineering is a broad profession, which embraces
all required activities to facilitate the recovery of valuable
minerals and products from the earth’s crust for the benefit
of humanity. It is one of the oldest engineering professions,
which continues to grow in importance. It has often been
said: “If it was not grown in the field or fished out of the
water, then it must have been mined.” An adequate supply of
mineral products at competitive prices is the life-blood of the
continuing growth of industrialized nations and the founda-
tion of the progress for the developing countries.
The function of the mining engineer is to apply knowledge
of pertinent scientific theory, engineering fundamentals, and
improved technology to recover natural resources. Mining is a
world-wide activity involving the extraction of non-metallics,
metal ores of all kinds, and solid fuel and energy sources
such as coal and nuclear materials. In addition to mineral
extraction, the skills of mining engineers are also needed in a
variety of fields where the earth’s crust is utilized, such as the
underground construction industry. The construction industry,
with its requirements of developing earth (rock) systems,
tunnels and underground chambers, and the hazardous waste
disposal industry are examples of such applications. These
are expanding needs, with a shortage of competent people;
the mining engineer is well qualified to meet these needs.
The importance of ecological and environmental planning
is recognized and given significant attention in all aspects of
the mining engineering curriculum.
CSM mining engineering students study the principles and
techniques of mineral exploration, and underground and sur-
face mining operations, as well as, mineral processing
technologies. Studies include rock mechanics, rock fragmen-
tation, plant and mine design, mine ventilation, surveying,
valuation, industrial hygiene, mineral law, mine safety, com-
puting, mineral processing, solution mining and operations
research. Throughout the mining engineering curriculum, a
constant effort is made to maintain a balance between theo-
retical principles and their engineering applications. The
mining engineering graduate is qualified for positions in en-
gineering, supervision, and research.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
113

The program leading to the degree Bachelor of Science
ship in their professional life. The curriculum focuses on the
in Mining Engineering is accredited by the Engineering
application of engineering principles to solving problems, in
Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for
short, engineering design in an earth systems approach.
Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050,
Degree Requirements (Mining Engineering)
Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, telephone (410) 347-7700.
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Program Educational Objectives (Bachelor of
MACS213 Calc. for Scientists & Engn’rs III
4
4
Science in Mining Engineering)
PHGN200 Physics II
3.5
3
4.5
In addition to contributing toward achieving the educa-
EBGN201 Principles of Economics
3
3
DCGN241 Statics
3
3
tional objectives described in the CSM Graduate profile and
EPIC251 Design II
2
3
3
the ABET Accreditation Criteria, the educational objectives
PAGN201 Physical Education III
2
0.5
which the Mining Engineering Department aspires to accom-
Total
18
plish can be seen in the attributes of our graduates. The grad-
Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
uate is equipped with:
EGGN351 Fluid Mechanics
3
3
uA sound knowledge in the required basic sciences and
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
engineering fundamentals;
MNGN210 Introductory Mining
3
3
SYGN200 Human Systems
3
3
uKnowledge and experience in the application of engi-
MNGN317 Dynamics for Mn. Engs.
1
1
neering principles to the exploitation of earth’s
EGGN320 Mechanics of Materials
3
3
resources and construction of earth (rock) systems in
PAGN202 Physical Education IV
2
0.5
an engineering systems orientation and setting;
Total
16.5
uAbility to solve complex mining and earth systems
Summer Field Session
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
MNGN300 Summer Field Session
3
related problems;
Total
3
uCapability for team work and decision making;
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
uAppreciation of the global role of minerals in the
EGGN371 Engineering Thermodynamics
3
3
changing world;
MNGN308 Mine Safety
1
1
MNGN309 Mine Engineering Lab
8
2
uDesire for continuing education, intellectual and profes-
MNGN312 Surface Mine Design
2
3
3
sional development, analysis and creativity;
MNGN321 Introductory Rock Mechanics
2
3
3
uSelf confidence and articulation, with high professional
GEOL311 Structural Geology
2
2
and ethical standards.
Free Elective
3
3
Total
17
Curriculum
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
The mining engineering curriculum is devised to facilitate
DCGN381 Electrical Circuits, Elec. & Pwr
3
3
the widest employability of CSM graduates. The curriculum is
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective I
3
3
based on scientific engineering and geologic fundamentals and
MNGN314 Underground Mine Design
3
3
the application of these fundamentals to design and operate
MNGN316 Coal Mining Methods and Design
2
3
3
mines and to create structures in rock and prepare mine prod-
GEOL310 Earth Materials and Resources
4
4
ucts for the market. To achieve this goal, the curriculum is
Free Elective
3
3
designed to ensure that the graduates:
Total
19
ubecome broad based mining engineers who can tackle
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
MNGN408 Underground Design and Const.
2
2
the problems of both hard and soft rock mining,
MNGN414 Mine Plant Design
2
3
3
regardless of whether the mineral deposit requires
MNGN428 Mining Eng. Design Report I
3
1
surface or underground methods of extraction,
MNGN438 Geostatistics
2
3
3
uhave an opportunity, through elective courses, to spe-
MNGN322/323 Intro. to Mineral Processing
3
2
3
cialize in one or more aspects of the mining engineer-
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective II
3
3
Free Elective
3
3
ing profession,
Total
18
uare interested in an academic or research career, or wish
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
to pursue employment in related fields, have a suffi-
MNGN429 Mining Eng. Design Report II
3
2
ciently sound scientific and engineering foundation to
MNGN433 Mine Systems Analysis I
3
3
do so effectively.
MNGN427 Mine Valuation
2
2
MNGN424 Mine Ventilation
2
3
3
This purpose permeates both the lower and upper divi-
MNGN410 Excavation Project Management
2
2
sion courses. Another important aspect of the curriculum is
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective III
3
3
the development of the students’ capabilities to be team
Total
15
members, with the added objective of preparing them for leader-
Degree Total
139.5
114
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Description of Courses
MNGN312. SURFACE MINE DESIGN (I) (WI) Analysis
Freshman Year
of elements of surface mine operation and design of surface
MNGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MINING ENGINEER-
mining system components with emphasis on minimization
ING (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics
of adverse environmental impact and maximization of effi-
chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s).
cient use of mineral resources. Ore estimates, unit operations,
Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instruc-
equipment selection, final pit determinations, short- and long-
tor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
range planning, road layouts, dump planning, and cost esti-
mation. Prerequisite: MNGN210 and MNGN300. 2 hours
MNGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) (WI) Indi-
lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
vidual research or special problem projects supervised by
a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree
MNGN316. COAL MINING METHODS (II) (WI) Devoted
on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
to surface and underground coal mining methods and design.
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
The surface mining portion emphasizes area-mining methods,
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
including pertinent design-related regulations, and over-
burden removal systems. Pit layout, sequencing, overburden
Sophomore Year
equipment selection and cost estimation are presented. The
MNGN210. INTRODUCTORY MINING (I, II) Survey of
underground mining portion emphasizes general mine layout;
mining and mining economics. Topics include mining law,
detailed layout of continuous, conventional, longwall, and
exploration and sampling, reserve estimation, project evalua-
shortwall sections. General cost and manning requirements;
tion, basic unit operations including drilling, blasting, load-
and production analysis. Federal and state health and safety
ing and hauling, support, shaft sinking and an introduction to
regulations are included in all aspects of mine layout. Pre-
surface and underground mining methods. Prerequisite:
requisite: MNGN210. 2 hours lecture, 2 semester hours
None. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MNGN321. INTRODUCTION TO ROCK MECHANICS
MNGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MINING ENGINEER-
Physical properties of rock, and fundamentals of rock sub-
ING (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics
stance and rock mass response to applied loads. Principles
chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s).
of elastic analysis and stress-strain relationships. Elementary
Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instruc-
principles of the theoretical and applied design of under-
tor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
ground openings and pit slopes. Emphasis on practical ap-
MNGN300. SUMMER FIELD SESSION (S) Classroom
plied aspects. Prerequisite: DCGN241 or MNGN317. 2 hours
and field instructions in the theory and practice of surface
lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
and underground mine surveying. Introduction to the applica-
MNGN333. EXPLOSIVES ENGINEERING I This course
tion of various computer-aided mine design software packages
gives students in engineering and applied sciences the oppor-
incorporated in upper division mining courses. Prerequisite:
tunity to examine and develop a fundamental knowledge in-
completion of sophomore year; Duration: first three weeks of
cluding terminology and understanding of explosives science
field term; 3 semester hours.
and engineering concepts. Student learning will be demon-
MNGN317. DYNAMICS FOR MINING ENGINEERS (II)
strated by assignments, quizzes, and exams. Learning assis-
For mining engineering majors only. Absolute and relative
tance will come in the form of multidisciplinary lectures
motions, kinetics, work-energy, impulse-momentum and
complemented by a few experts’ lectures from government,
angular impulse-momentum. Prerequisite: MACS213/223,
industry and the explosives engineering community. 3 semes-
DCGN241. 1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour.
ter hours. Pre-requisites: none.
Junior Year
MNGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (I, II, S) Super-
MNGN308. MINE SAFETY (I) Causes and prevention of
vised, full-time, engineering-related employment for a con-
accidents. Mine safety regulations. Mine rescue training.
tinuous six-month period (or its equivalent) in which specific
Safety management and organization. Prerequisite: MNGN210.
educational objectives are achieved. Prerequisite: Second
1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour. Should be taken concurrently
semester sophomore status and a cumulative grade-point
with MNGN309.
average of at least 2.00. 0 to 3 semester hours. Cooperative
MNGN309. MINING ENGINEERING LABORATORY (I)
Education credit does not count toward graduation except
Training in practical mine labor functions including: opera-
under special conditions.
tion of jackleg drills, jumbo drills, muckers, and LHD ma-
MNGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MINING ENGINEER-
chines. Training stresses safe operation of equipment and
ING (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics
safe handling of explosives. Introduction to front-line man-
chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s).
agement techniques. Prerequisite: MNGN210. 2 semester
Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instruc-
hours. Should be taken concurrently with MNGN308.
tor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
115

MNGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) (WI) Individ-
vations. Use of numerical models for design of shafts, tun-
ual research or special problem projects supervised by a fac-
nels and large chambers. Prerequisite: Instructor’s consent.
ulty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in odd years.
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Inde-
MNGN407. ROCK FRAGMENTATION (II) Theory and
pendent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
application of rock drilling, rock boring, explosives, blasting,
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
and mechanical rock breakage. Design of blasting rounds,
Senior Year
applications to surface and underground excavation. Pre-
MNGN314. UNDERGROUND MINE DESIGN (II) Selec-
requisite: DCGN241 concurrent enrollment or instructors con-
tion, design, and development of most suitable underground
sent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in odd years.
mining methods based upon the physical and the geological
MNGN408 UNDERGROUND DESIGN AND CONSTRUC-
properties of mineral deposits (metallics and nonmetallics),
TION (I) Soil and rock engineering applied to underground
conservation considerations, and associated environmental
civil works. Tunneling and the construction of underground
impacts. Reserve estimates, development and production
openings for power facilities, water conveyance, transporta-
planning, engineering drawings for development and extrac-
tion, and waste disposal; design, excavation and support of
tion, underground haulage systems, and cost estimates. Pre-
underground openings. Emphasis on consulting practice, case
requisite: MNGN210 and MNGN300. 2 hours lecture,
studies, geotechnical design, and construction methods. Pre-
3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
requisite: EGGN361, MNGN321, or instructor’s consent.
MNGN322/323. INTRODUCTION TO MINERAL PRO-
2 hours of lecture; 2 semester hours.
CESSING AND LABORATORY (I) Principles and practice
MNGN410. EXCAVATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT (II)
of crushing, grinding, size classification; mineral concentra-
Successful implementation and management of surface and
tion technologies including magnetic and electrostatic sepa-
underground construction projects, preparation of contract
ration, gravity separation, and flotation. Sedimentation,
documents, project bidding and estimating, contract awarding
thickening, filtration and product drying as well as tailings
and notice to proceed, value engineering, risk management,
disposal technologies are included. The course is open to all
construction management and dispute resolution, evaluation
CSM students. Prerequisite: PHGN200/210, MACS213/223.
of differing site conditions claims. Prerequisite: MNGN 210
2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
or instructors consent, 2-hour lecture, 2 semester hours.
MNGN404. TUNNELING (I) Modern tunneling techniques.
MNGN414. MINE PLANT DESIGN (I) Analysis of mine
Emphasis on evaluation of ground conditions, estimation of
plant elements with emphasis on design. Materials handling,
support requirements, methods of tunnel driving and boring,
dewatering, hoisting, belt conveyor and other material han-
design systems and equipment, and safety. Prerequisite:
dling systems for underground mines. Prerequisite: MNGN312,
None. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MNGN314 or consent of lecturer. 0 hours lecture, 3 hours
MNGN405. ROCK MECHANICS IN MINING (I) The
lab; 1 semester hour.
course deals with the rock mechanics aspect of design of
MNGN418. ADVANCED ROCK MECHANICS Analytical
mine layouts developed in both underground and surface.
and numerical modeling analysis of stresses and displacements
Underground mining sections includes design of coal and
induced around engineering excavations in rock. In-situ
hard rock pillars, mine layout design for tabular and massive
stress. Rock failure criteria. Complete load deformation
ore bodies, assessment of caving characteristics of ore bodies,
behavior of rocks. Measurement and monitoring techniques
performance and application of backfill, and phenomenon of
in rock mechanics. Principles of design of excavation in
rock burst and its alleviation. Surface mining portion covers
rocks. Analytical, numerical modeling and empirical design
rock mass characterization, failure modes of slopes excavated
methods. Probabilistic and deterministic approaches to rock
in rock masses, probabilistic and deterministic approaches to
engineering designs. Excavation design examples for shafts,
design of slopes, and remedial measures for slope stability
tunnels, large chambers and mine pillars. Seismic loading of
problems. Prerequisite: MNGN321 or equivalent. 3 hours
structures in rock. Phenomenon of rock burst and its allevia-
lecture; 3 semester hours.
tion. Prerequisite: MNGN321 or professor’s consent. 3 hours
MNGN406. DESIGN AND SUPPORT OF UNDERGROUND
lecture; 3 semester hours.
EXCAVATIONS Design of underground excavations and
MNGN421. DESIGN OF UNDERGROUND EXCAVATIONS
support. Analysis of stress and rock mass deformations
(II) Design of underground openings in competent and
around excavations using analytical and numerical methods.
broken ground using rock mechanics principles. Rock bolting
Collections, preparation, and evaluation of in situ and labora-
design and other ground support methods. Coal, evaporite,
tory data for excavation design. Use of rock mass rating sys-
metallic and nonmetallic deposits included. Prerequisite:
tems for site characterization and excavation design. Study of
MNGN321, concurrent enrollment or instructor’s consent.
support types and selection of support for underground exca-
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
116
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

MNGN422/522. FLOTATION Science and engineering
MNGN433. MINE SYSTEMS ANALYSIS I (II) Applica-
governing the practice of mineral concentration by flotation.
tion of statistics, systems analysis, and operations research
Interfacial phenomena, flotation reagents, mineral-reagent
techniques to mineral industry problems. Laboratory work
interactions, and zeta-potential are covered. Flotation circuit
using computer techniques to improve efficiency of mining
design and evaluation as well as tailings handling are also
operations. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate status. 2 hours
covered. The course also includes laboratory demonstrations
lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
of some fundamental concepts. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
MNGN434. PROCESS ANALYSIS Projects to accompany
hours.
the lectures in MNGN422. Prerequisite: MNGN422 or con-
MNGN423. FLOTATION LABORATORY (I) Experiments
sent of instructor. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
to accompany the lectures in MNGN422. Corequisite:
MNGN436. UNDERGROUND COAL MINE DESIGN (II)
MNGN421 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lab; 1 semester
Design of an underground coal mine based on an actual coal
hour.
reserve. This course shall utilize all previous course material
MNGN424. MINE VENTILATION (II) Fundamentals of
in the actual design of an underground coal mine. Ventilation,
mine ventilation, including control of gas, dust, temperature,
materials handling, electrical transmission and distribution,
and humidity; ventilation network analysis and design of
fluid mechanics, equipment selection and application, mine
systems. Prerequisite: EGGN351, EGGN371 and MNGN314
plant design. Information from all basic mining survey
or instructors consent. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semes-
courses will be used. Prerequisite: MNGN316, MNGN321,
ter hours.
MNGN414, EGGN329 and MNGN381 or MNGN384. Con-
MNGN427. MINE VALUATION (II) Course emphasis is on
current enrollment with the consent of instructor permitted.
the business aspects of mining. Topics include time valuation
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
of money and interest formulas, cash flow, investment cri-
MNGN438. GEOSTATISTICS (I) Introduction to elemen-
teria, tax considerations, risk and sensitivity analysis, escala-
tary probability theory and its applications in engineering
tion and inflation and cost of capital. Calculation procedures
and sciences; discrete and continuous probability distribu-
are illustrated by case studies. Computer programs are used.
tions; parameter estimation; hypothesis testing; linear regres-
Prerequisite: Senior in Mining, graduate status or consent of
sion; spatial correlations and geostatistics with emphasis on
instructor. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
applications in earth sciences and engineering. Prerequisites:
MNGN428. MINING ENGINEERING EVALUATION
MACS112. 2 hours of lecture and 3 hours of lab. 3 semester
AND DESIGN REPORT I (I) (WI) Preparation of phase I
hours.
engineering report based on coordination of all previous
MNGN440. EQUIPMENT REPLACEMENT ANALYSIS (I)
work. Includes mineral deposit selection, geologic descrip-
Introduction to the fundamentals of classical equipment re-
tion, mining method selection, ore reserve determination, and
placement theory. Emphasis on new, practical approaches to
permit process outline. Emphasis is on detailed mine design
equipment replacement decision making. Topics include:
and cost analysis evaluation in preparation for MNGN429.
operating and maintenance costs, obsolescence factors, tech-
3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
nological changes, salvage, capital investments, minimal
MNGN429. MINING ENGINEERING EVALUATION
average annual costs, optimum economic life, infinite and
AND DESIGN REPORT II (II) (WI) Preparation of formal
finite planning horizons, replacement cycles, replacement vs.
engineering report based on all course work in the mining
expansion, maximization of returns from equipment replace-
option. Emphasis is on mine design, equipment selection,
ment expenditures. Prerequisite: MNGN427, senior or gradu-
production scheduling, evaluation and cost analysis. Pre-
ate status. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
requisite: MNGN427, 428. 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
MNGN444. EXPLOSIVES ENGINEERING II This course
MNGN431. MINING AND METALLURGICAL ENVI-
gives students in engineering and applied sciences the oppor-
RONMENT This course covers studies of the interface
tunity to acquire the fundamental concepts of explosives
between mining and metallurgical process engineering and
engineering and science applications as they apply to indus-
environmental engineering areas. Wastes, effluents and their
try and real life examples. Students will expand upon their
point sources in mining and metallurgical processes such as
MNGN333 knowledge and develop a more advanced knowl-
mineral concentration, value extraction and process metal-
edge base including an understanding of the subject as it ap-
lurgy are studied in context. Fundamentals of unit operations
plies to their specific project interests. Assignments, quizzes,
and unit processes with those applicable to waste and efflu-
concept modeling and their project development and presen-
ent control, disposal and materials recycling are covered.
tation will demonstrate student’s progress.
Engineering design and engineering cost components are
MNGN445/545. ROCK SLOPE ENGINEERING Introduc-
also included for some examples chosen. The ratio of funda-
tion to the analysis and design of slopes excavated in rock.
mentals applications coverage is about 1:1. Prerequisite: con-
Rock mass classification and strength determinations, geo-
sent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
logical structural parameters, properties of fracture sets, data
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
117

collection techniques, hydrological factors, methods of
Petroleum Engineering
analysis of slope stability, wedge intersections, monitoring
and maintenance of final pit slopes, classification of slides.
CRAIG W. VAN KIRK, Professor and Department Head
Deterministic and probabilistic approaches in slope design.
JOHN R. FANCHI, Professor
Remedial measures. Laboratory and field exercise in slope
RAMONA M. GRAVES, Professor
design. Collection of data and specimens in the field for de-
HOSSEIN KAZEMI, Chesebro’ Distinguished Professor
terring physical properties required for slope design. Applica-
ERDAL OZKAN, Professor
RICHARD L. CHRISTIANSEN, Associate Professor
tion of numerical modeling and analytical techniques to slope
ALFRED W. EUSTES III, Associate Professor
stability determinations for hard rock and soft rock environ-
TURHAN YILDIZ, Associate Professor
ments. Prerequisite: Instructor’s consent. 3 hours lecture.
JENNIFER L. MISKIMINS, Assistant Professor
3 hours semester hours.
MARK G. MILLER, Assistant Research Professor
MNGN452/552. SOLUTION MINING AND PROCESSING
BILLY J. MITCHELL, Professor Emeritus
OF ORES (II) Theory and application of advanced methods
Program Description
of extracting and processing of minerals, underground or in
The primary objectives of petroleum engineering are the
situ, to recover solutions and concentrates of value-materials,
environmentally sound exploration, development, evaluation,
by minimization of the traditional surface processing and
and recovery of oil, gas, and other fluids in the earth. Skills
disposal of tailings to minimize environmental impacts. Pre-
in this branch of engineering are needed to meet the world’s
requisite: Senior or graduate status; instructor’s consent.
ever-increasing demand for hydrocarbon fuel, thermal
3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours. Offered in spring.
energy, and waste and pollution management.
MNGN460. INDUSTRIAL MINERALS PRODUCTION (II)
Graduates of the program are in high demand in private
This course describes the engineering principles and practices
industry, as evidenced by the strong job market and high
associated with quarry mining operations related to the cement
salaries. The petroleum industry offers a wide range of em-
and aggregates industries. The course will cover resource defi-
ployment opportunities for Petroleum Engineering students
nition, quarry planning and design, extraction, and process-
during summer breaks and after graduation. Exciting experi-
ing of material for cement and aggregate production. Permitting
ences range from field work in producing oil and gas fields
issues and reclamation, particle sizing and environmental
to office jobs in small towns or large cities. Worldwide travel
practices, will be studied in depth. Prerequisite: MNGN312,
and overseas assignments are available for interested stu-
MNGN318, MNGN322, MNGN323, or consent of instructor.
dents. One of our objectives in the Petroleum Engineering
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in spring.
Department is to prepare students to succeed in an energy
MNGN482. MINE MANAGEMENT (II) Basic principles
industry that is evolving into an industry working with many
of successful mine management, supervision, administrative
energy sources. Besides developing technical competence in
policies, industrial and human engineering. Prerequisite:
petroleum engineering, you will learn how your education
Senior or graduate status or consent of instructor. 2 hours
can help you contribute to the development of alternative
lecture; 2 semester hours. Offered in odd years.
energy sources. In addition to exciting careers in the petro-
MNGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MINING ENGINEERING
leum industry, many Petroleum Engineering graduates find
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen
rewarding careers in the environmental arena, law, medicine,
from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually
business, and many other walks of life.
the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor con-
The department offers semester-abroad opportunities
sent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
through formal exchange programs with the Petroleum
MNGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) (WI) Indi-
Engineering Department at the Mining University in Leoben,
vidual research or special problem projects supervised by
Austria, Technical University in Delft, Holland, and the
a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree
University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia. Qualified under-
on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
graduate and graduate students from each school can attend
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
the other for one semester and receive full transfer credit
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
back at the home university.
Graduate courses emphasize the research aspects of the
profession, as well as advanced engineering applications.
Qualified graduate students may earn a Professional Masters
in Petroleum Reservoir Systems (offered jointly with Geol-
ogy and Geological Engineering and Geophysics), Master of
Science, Master of Engineering, and Doctor of Philosophy
degrees.
118Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

To facilitate classroom instruction and the learning experi-
in the area provide the setting for understanding the complex-
ence, the petroleum engineering faculty recommend that all
ity of geologic systems and the environmental and safety is-
petroleum engineering students have laptops for the 2006-07
sues in the context of reservoir development and management.
academic year. Recommended specifications for the laptops
It is recommended that all students considering majoring or
can be obtained from the CSM Academic Computing & Net-
minoring in Petroleum Engineering sign up for the elective
working web site.
course PEGN 102, Introduction to the Petroleum Industry in
A lab wing was completed in 1993 and the existing office
the spring semester. Seniors may take 500-level graduate
and classroom building was renovated in 1994 at a total proj-
courses that include topics such as drilling, reservoir, and pro-
ect cost exceeding $10 million. New laboratory and com-
duction engineering; reservoir simulation and characteriza-
puter equipment added during the past few years total more
tion, and economics and risk analysis. See the department for
than $3 million. The department has state-of-the-art laborato-
the registration procedure.
ries in a wide range of technical areas, including the follow-
The program leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in
ing under graduate labs:
Petroleum Engineering is accredited by the Engineering
Computer Laboratory
Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for
A state-of-the-art computer laboratory is available for
Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050,
general use and classroom instruction. Software includes
Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, telephone (410) 347-7700.
more than $5.0 million in donated industry software used by
Program Educational Objectives (Bachelor of
oil and gas companies and research labs around the world.
Science in Petroleum Engineering)
Drilling Simulator Laboratory
The Mission of the Petroleum Engineering Program has
Rare on university campuses, this lab contains a computer
evolved naturally over time in response to the needs of the
controlled, full-scale, drilling rig simulator. It includes drilling
graduates; in concert with the Colorado School of Mines
controls that can be used to simulate onshore and offshore
Institutional Mission Statement and the Profile of the Future
drilling operations and well control situations.
Graduate; and in recognition of accreditation requirements
Reservoir Characterization Laboratory
specified by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of
Properties of rock are measured that affect economic
the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.
development of reservoir resources of oil and gas. Measured
The Mission of the Petroleum Engineering Program is:
properties include permeability, porosity, and relative per-
To educate engineers for the worldwide petroleum industry
meability. “Hands on” experiences with simple and sophisti-
at the undergraduate and graduate levels, perform research
cated equipment are provided.
that enhances the state-of-the-art in petroleum technology,
Drilling Fluids Laboratory
and to serve the industry and public good through profes-
Modern equipment enables students to evaluate and design
sional societies and public service. This mission is achieved
fluid systems required in drilling operations.
through proactive leadership in providing a solid foundation
Fluids Characterization Laboratory
for both the undergraduate and graduate programs. Students
A variety of properties of fluids from oil and gas reservoirs
are well prepared for life-long learning, an international and
are measured for realistic conditions of elevated temperature
diverse career, further education, and public service. The pro-
and pressure. This laboratory accentuates principles studied
gram emphasizes integrated and multi disciplinary teamwork
in lectures.
in classroom instruction and in research, and actively pursues
interdisciplinary activities with many other CSM depart-
Petroleum Engineering Summer Field Sessions
ments, particularly the Earth Science/Engineering programs.
Two summer sessions, one after the completion of the
sophomore year and one after the junior year, are important
In addition to contributing toward achieving the educa-
parts of the educational experience. The first is a two-week
tional objectives described in the CSM Graduate Profile and
session designed to introduce the student to the petroleum
the ABET Accreditation Criteria, individuals interested in the
industry. Petroleum Engineering, a truly unique and exciting
Petroleum Engineering program educational objectives are
engineering discipline, can be experienced by visiting petro-
encouraged to contact faculty, visit the CSM campus, or visit
leum operations. Historically, the areas visited have included
our website: www.mines.edu. The Petroleum Engineering
Europe, Alaska, Canada, the U.S. Gulf Coast, California, and
program educational objectives can also be found posted in
the Rocky Mountain Region.
the hallway outside the department office. The specific educa-
tional objectives are outlined below:
The second two-week session, after the junior year, is an in-
depth study of the Rangely Oil Field and surrounding geology
1. Broad education
in Western Colorado. The Rangely Oil Field is the largest oil
CSM design and system courses
field in the Rocky Mountain region and has undergone pri-
Effective communication
mary, secondary, and enhanced recovery processes. Field trips
Skills necessary for diverse and international profes-
sional career
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
119

Recognition of need and ability to engage in lifelong
and management problems. The senior design course is truly
learning
multidisciplinary with students and professors from the Petro-
2. Solid foundation in engineering principles and
leum Engineering, Geophysics, and Geology departments.
practices
The program has state-of-the-art facilities and equipment
Society of Petroleum Engineers’ABET Program Criteria
for laboratory instruction and experimental research. To
Strong petroleum engineering faculty with diverse
maintain leadership in future petroleum engineering technol-
backgrounds
ogy, decision making, and management, computers are incor-
Technical seminars, field trips, and field sessions
porated into every part of the program, from undergraduate
3. Applied problem solving skills
instruction through graduate student and faculty research.
Designing and conducting experiments
The department is close to oil and gas field operations, oil
Analyzing and interpreting data
companies, research laboratories, and geologic outcrops of
Problem solving skills in engineering practice
nearby producing formations. There are many opportunities
Working real world problems
for short field trips and for summer and part-time employ-
4. An understanding of ethical, social, environmental,
ment in the oil and gas industry in the Denver metropolitan
and professional responsibilities
region or near campus.
Following established Department and Colorado
Degree Requirements (Petroleum Engineering)
School of Mines honor codes
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Integrating ethical and environmental issues into real
EBGN201 Principles of Economics
3
3
world problems
EPIC251/252 Design II
3
3
Awareness of health and safety issues
DCGN241 Statics
3
3
MACS213 Calculus for Scientists & Engn’rs III 4
4
5. Multidisciplinary team skills
PHGN200 Physics II
3.5
3
4.5
Integrated information and data from multiple sources
PAGN201 Physical Education III
2
0.5
Critical team skills
Total
18
Curriculum
Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
All disciplines within petroleum engineering are covered
DCGN209 Introduction to Thermodynamics
3
3
to great depth at the undergraduate and graduate levels, both
EGGN320 Mechanics of Materials
3
3
in the classroom and laboratory instruction, and in research.
PEGN251 Fluid Mechanics
3
3
Specific areas include fundamental fluid and rock behavior,
PEGN308 Res. Rock Properties
2
3
3
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
drilling, formation evaluation, well completions and stimula-
SYGN200 Human Systems
3
3
tion, well testing, production operations and artificial lift,
Total
18
reservoir engineering, supplemental and enhanced oil recov-
ery, economic evaluation of petroleum projects, environmen-
Summer Field Session
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
PEGN315 Summer Field Session I
2
2
tal and safety issues, and the computer simulation of most of
Total
2
these topics.
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
The petroleum engineering student studies mathematics,
GEOL315 Sedimentology & Stratigraphy
2
3
3
computer science, chemistry, physics, general engineering,
PEGN305 Computational Methods
2
2
the humanities, technical communication (including report
PEGN310 Reservoir Fluid Properties
2
2
writing, oral presentations, and listening skills), and environ-
PEGN311 Drilling Engineering
3
3
4
mental topics. A unique aspect is the breadth and depth of the
PEGN419 Well Log Anal. & Formation Eval.
2
3
3
total program structured in a manner that prepares each grad-
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective
I
3
3
uate for a successful career from the standpoints of technical
PAGN202 Physical Education IV
2
0
.5
competence, managerial abilities, and multidisciplinary expe-
Total
17.5
riences. The needs for continued learning and professional-
Junior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
ism are stressed.
GEOL308 Intro. Applied Structural Geology
2
3
3
PEGN438 Geostatistics
2
3
3
The strength of the program comes from the high quality of
PEGN361 Well Completions
3
3
students and professors. The faculty has expertise in teaching
PEGN411 Mechanics of Petrol. Production
3
3
and research in all the major areas of petroleum engineering
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective II
3
3
listed above. Additionally, the faculty members have signifi-
Free Elective
3
3
cant industrial backgrounds that lead to meaningful design
Total
18
experiences for the students. Engineering design is taught
Summer Field Session
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
throughout the curriculum including a senior design course on
PEGN316 Summer Field Session II
2
2
applying the learned skills to real world reservoir development
Total
2
120
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Senior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
mat with demonstrations and practical problem solving, coor-
PEGN481 Petroleum Seminar
2
2
dinated with PEGN 308. Students cannot receive credit for
PEGN423 Petroleum Reservoir Eng. I
3
3
both PEGN 251 Fluid Mechanics and EGGN351 Fluid Me-
PEGN413 Gas Meas. & Formation Evaluation
6
2
chanics. Prerequisite: MACS213. Co-requisites: PEGN 308,
PEGN414 Well Test Analysis and Design
3
3
DCGN209, DCGN241. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PEGN422 Econ. & Eval. Oil & Gas Projects
3
3
Free Elective
3
3
PEGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PETROLEUM ENGI-
Total
16
NEERING (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s).
PEGN424 Petroleum Reservoir Eng. II
3
3
Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instruc-
PEGN426 Stimulation
3
3
tor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 semester hours.
PEGN439 Multidisciplinary Design
2
3
3
PEGN299. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective III
3
3
Free Elective
3
3
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
Total
15
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Indepen-
Degree Total
139.5
dent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
Five Year Combined Baccalaureate and Masters
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 semester hours.
Degree.
PEGN308. RESERVOIR ROCK PROPERTIES (II) (WI)
The Petroleum Engineering Department offers the oppor-
Introduction to basic reservoir rock properties and their meas-
tunity to begin work on a Professional Masters in Petroleum
urements. Topics covered include: porosity, saturations, volu-
Reservoir Systems or Master of Engineering Degree while
metric equations, land descriptions, trapping mechanism,
completing the requirements for the Bachelor’s Degree.
pressure and temperature gradients, abnormally pressured
These degrees are of special interest to those planning on
reservoirs. Darcy’s law for linear horizontal and tilted flow,
studying abroad or wanting to get a head start on graduate
radial flow for single phase liquids and gases, multiphase
education. These combined programs are individualized and
flow (relative permeability). Capillary pressure and formation
a plan of study should be discussed with the student’s aca-
compressibility are also discussed. This course is designated
demic advisor any time after the Sophomore year.
as a writing intensive course (WI). Co-requisites: DCGN241,
Description of Courses
PEGN251. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
Freshman Year
Junior Year
PEGN102. INTRODUCTION TO PETROLEUM INDUSTRY
PEGN305 COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN PETRO-
(II) A survey of the elements comprising the petroleum
LEUM ENGINEERING (I) This course is an introduction to
industry-exploration, development, processing, transportation,
computers and computer programming applied to petroleum
distribution, engineering ethics and professionalism. This
engineering. Emphasis will be on learning Visual Basic pro-
elective course is recommended for all PE majors, minors,
gramming techniques to solve engineering problems. A toolbox
and other interested students. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
of fluid property and numerical techniques will be developed.
PEGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PETROLEUM ENGI-
Prerequisite: MACS213. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
NEERING (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course.
PEGN310. RESERVOIR FLUID PROPERTIES (I) Proper-
Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and stu-
ties of fluids encountered in petroleum engineering. Phase
dent(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite:
behavior, density, viscosity, interfacial tension, and composi-
Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 semester hours.
tion of oil, gas, and brine systems. Interpreting lab data for
PEGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
engineering applications. Flash calculations with k-values
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
and equation of state. Introduction to reservoir simulation
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
software. Prerequisites: DCGN209, PEGN308. Co-requisite:
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Indepen-
PEGN305.
dent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
PEGN311. DRILLING ENGINEERING (I) Study of drilling
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 semester hours.
operations, fluid design, hydraulics, drilling contracts, rig se-
Sophomore Year
lection, rotary system, well control, bit selection, drill string
PEGN251. FLUID MECHANICS (II) Fundamental course
design, directional drilling, and casing seat selection. Pre-
in engineering fluid flow introducing flow in pipelines, sur-
requisites: PEGN251, PEGN315, DCGN241. 3 hours lecture,
face facilities and oil and gas wells. Theory and application
3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
of incompressible and compressible flow, fluid statics, di-
PEGN315. SUMMER FIELD SESSION I (S) This two-
mensional analysis, laminar and turbulent flow, Newtonian
week course taken after the completion of the sophomore
and non-Newtonian fluids, and two-phase flow. Lecture for-
year is designed to introduce the student to oil and gas field
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
121

and other engineering operations. Engineering design prob-
planning, completion techniques and equipment, tubing de-
lems are integrated throughout the two-week session. On-site
sign, wellhead selection, and sand control, and perforation
visits to various oil field operations in the past included the
procedures. This course is designed as a writing intensive
Rocky Mountain region, the U.S. Gulf Coast, California,
course (WI). Prerequisite: PEGN311, EGGN320. 3 hours
Alaska, Canada and Europe. Topics covered include drilling,
lecture; 3 semester hours.
completions, stimulations, surface facilities, production, arti-
PEGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PETROLEUM ENGI-
ficial lift, reservoir, geology and geophysics. Also included
NEERING (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics
are environmental and safety issues as related to the petro-
chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s).
leum industry. Prerequisite: PEGN308. 2 semester hours.
Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instruc-
PEGN316. SUMMER FIELD SESSION II (S) This two-
tor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 semester hours.
week course is taken after the completion of the junior year.
PEGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
Emphasis is placed on the multidisciplinary nature of reser-
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
voir management. Field trips in the area provide the opportu-
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
nity to study eolian, fluvial, lacustrine, near shore, and
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Indepen-
marine depositional systems. These field trips provide the
dent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
setting for understanding the complexity of each system in
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 semester hours.
the context of reservoir development and management.
Petroleum systems including the source, maturity, and trap-
PEGN411. MECHANICS OF PETROLEUM PRODUCTION
ping of hydrocarbons are studied in the context of petroleum
(II) Nodal analysis for pipe and formation deliverability in-
exploration and development. Geologic methods incorporat-
cluding single and multiphase flow. Natural flow and design
ing both surface and subsurface data are used extensively.
of artificial lift methods including gas lift, sucker rod pumps,
Prerequisite: PEGN315, PEGN361, PEGN411, PEGN419
electrical submersible pumps, and hydraulic pumps. Pre-
and GEOL308, GEOL315. 2 semester hours.
requisites: PEGN 251, PEGN308, PEGN310, and PEGN311.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PEGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (I, II, S) Super-
vised, full-time, engineering-related employment for a con-
PEGN419. WELL LOG ANALYSIS AND FORMATION
tinuous six-month period (or its equivalent) in which specific
EVALUATION (I) An introduction to well logging methods,
educational objectives are achieved. Prerequisite: Second
including the relationship between measured properties and
semester sophomore status and a cumulative grade-point
reservoir properties. Analysis of log suites for reservoir size
average of at least 2.00. 0 to 3 semester hours. Cooperative
and content. Graphical and analytical methods will be devel-
Education credit does not count toward graduation except
oped to allow the student to better visualize the reservoir, its
under special conditions.
contents, and its potential for production. Use of the com-
puter as a tool to handle data, create graphs and log traces,
PEGN350. SUSTAINABLE ENERGY SYSTEMS (I or II) A
and make computations of reservoir parameters is required.
sustainable energy system is a system that lets us meet pres-
Prerequisite: PEGN308. Co-requisites: PEGN310, GEOL315.
ent energy needs while preserving the ability of future gener-
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
ations to meet their needs. Sustainable Energy Systems
introduces undergraduate students to sustainable energy sys-
Senior Year
tems that will be available in the 21st century. The course fo-
PEGN413. GAS MEASUREMENT AND FORMATION
cuses on sustainable energy sources, especially renewable
EVALUATION LAB (I) (WI) This lab investigates the prop-
energy sources and nuclear energy (e.g., fusion). Students are
erties of a gas such as vapor pressure, dew point pressure,
introduced to the existing energy infrastructure, become fa-
and field methods of measuring gas volumes. The application
miliar with finite energy sources, and learn from a study of
of well logging and formation evaluation concepts are also
energy supply and demand that sustainable energy systems
investigated. This course is designated as a writing intensive
are needed. The ability to improve energy use efficiency and
course (WI). Prerequisites: PEGN308, PEGN310, PEGN419.
the impact of energy sources on the environment are dis-
6 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
cussed. Examples of sustainable energy systems and their ap-
PEGN414. WELL TEST ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (I)
plicability to different energy sectors are presented. The
Solution to the diffusivity equation. Transient well testing:
course is recommended for students who plan to enter the en-
build-up, drawdown, multi-rate test analysis for oil and gas.
ergy industry or students who would like an introduction to
Flow tests and well deliverabilities. Type curve analysis.
sustainable energy systems. Prerequisites: EPIC 151 or con-
Superposition, active and interference tests. Well test design.
sent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisite: MACS315. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PEGN361. COMPLETION ENGINEERING (II) (WI) This
PEGN422. ECONOMICS AND EVALUATION OF OIL
class is a continuation from drilling in PEGN311 into com-
AND GAS PROJECTS (I) Project economics for oil and gas
pletion operations. Topics include casing design, cement
projects under conditions of certainty and uncertainty. Topics
122
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

include time value of money concepts, discount rate assump-
PEGN439/GEGN439/GPGN439. MULTIDISCIPLINARY
tions, measures of project profitability, costs, taxes, expected
PETROLEUM DESIGN (II) This is a multidisciplinary de-
value concept, decision trees, gambler’s ruin, and Monte
sign course that integrates fundamentals and design concepts
Carlo simulation techniques. Prerequisite: PEGN438/
in geology, geophysics, and petroleum engineering. Students
MNGN438. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
work in integrated teams consisting of students from each of
PEGN423. PETROLEUM RESERVOIR ENGINEERING I
the disciplines. Multiple open-ended design problems in oil
(I) Data requirements for reservoir engineering studies.
and gas exploration and field development are assigned. Sev-
Material balance calculations for normal gas, retrograde gas
eral written and oral presentations are made throughout the
condensate, solution-gas and gas-cap reservoirs with or with-
semester. Project economics including risk analysis are an in-
out water drive. Primary reservoir performance. Forecasting
tegral part of the course. Prerequisite: PE Majors: GEOL308,
future recoveries by incremental material balance. Prerequi-
PEGN316, PEGN422, PEGN423, PEGN414. Concurrent en-
sites: PEGN316, PEGN419 and MACS315 (MACS315 only
rollment in PEGN424; GE Majors: GEOL308 or GEOL309,
for non PE majors). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
GEGN438, GEGN316; GP Majors: GPGN302 and GPGN303.
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
PEGN424. PETROLEUM RESERVOIR ENGINEERING II
(II) Reservoir engineering aspects of supplemental recovery
PEGN450. ENERGY ENGINEERING (I or II) Energy
processes. Introduction to liquid-liquid displacement
Engineering is an overview of energy sources that will be
processes, gas-liquid displacement processes, and thermal
available for use in the 21st century. After discussing the his-
recovery processes. Introduction to numerical reservoir
tory of energy and its contribution to society, we survey the
simulation, history matching and forecasting. Prerequisite:
science and technology of energy, including geothermal
PEGN423. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
energy, fossil energy, solar energy, nuclear energy, wind
energy, hydro energy, bio energy, energy and the environ-
PEGN426. WELL COMPLETIONS AND STIMULATION
ment, energy and economics, the hydrogen economy, and
(II) Completion parameters; design for well conditions. Skin
energy forecasts. This broad background will give you addi-
damage associated with completions and well productivity.
tional flexibility during your career and help you thrive in an
Fluid types and properties; characterizations of compatibili-
energy industry that is evolving from an industry dominated
ties. Stimulation techniques; acidizing and fracturing. Selec-
by fossil fuels to an industry working with many energy
tion of proppants and fluids; types, placement and
sources. Prerequisite: MACS213, PHGN200. 3 hours lecture;
compatibilities. Estimation of rates, volumes and fracture di-
3 semester hours.
mensions. Reservoir considerations in fracture propagation
and design. Prerequisite: PEGN311, PEGN361, PEGN411 and
PEGN481. PETROLEUM SEMINAR (I) (WI) Written and
MACS315. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
oral presentations by each student on current energy topics.
This course is designated as a writing intensive course (WI).
PEGN428. ADVANCED DRILLING ENGINEERING (II)
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture; 2 semes-
Rotary drilling systems with emphasis on design of drilling
ter hours.
programs, directional and horizontal well planning. This
elective course is recommended for petroleum engineering
PEGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PETROLEUM ENGI-
majors interested in drilling. Prerequisite: PEGN311,
NEERING (I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics
PEGN361. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s).
Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instruc-
PEGN438/MNGN438. GEOSTATISTICS (I & II) Introduc-
tor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 semester hours.
tion to elementary probability theory and its applications in
engineering and sciences; discrete and continuous probabil-
PEGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
ity distributions; parameter estimation; hypothesis testing;
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
linear regression; spatial correlations and geostatistics with
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
emphasis on applications in earth sciences and engineering.
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Indepen-
Prerequisites: MACS115. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 3 se-
dent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
mester hours.
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 semester hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
123

Physics
ordinarily take. These courses include engineering science,
design, systems, summer field session, and a capstone senior
JAMES A. McNEIL, Professor and Department Head
design sequence culminating in a senior thesis.
REUBEN T. COLLINS, Professor
JOHN A. DESANTO, Professor
This unique blend of physics and engineering makes
THOMAS E. FURTAK, Professor
it possible for the engineering physics graduate to work at
FRANK V. KOWALSKI, Professor
the interface between science and technology, where new
MARK T. LUSK, Professor (and Engineering)
discoveries are continually being put to practice. While the
JOHN A. SCALES, Professor
engineering physicist is at home applying existing technolo-
JEFF A. SQUIER, Professor
gies, he or she is also capable of striking out in different
P. CRAIG TAYLOR, Professor
directions to develop new technologies. It is the excitement
CHARLES G. DURFEE, III, Associate Professor
of being able to work at this cutting edge that makes the
UWE GREIFE, Associate Professor
engineering physics degree attractive to many students.
TIMOTHY R. OHNO, Associate Professor
DAVID M. WOOD, Associate Professor
Career paths of CSM engineering physics graduates vary
LINCOLN D. CARR, Assistant Professor
widely, illustrating the flexibility inherent in the program.
FREDERIC SARAZIN, Assistant Professor
Approximately half of the graduating seniors go on to gradu-
TODD G. RUSKELL, Senior Lecturer
ate school in physics or a closely related field of engineering.
MATTHEW M. YOUNG, Senior Lecturer
Some go to medical, law, or other professional post-graduate
ANITA B. CORN, Lecturer
schools. Others find employment in fields as diverse as elec-
ALEX T. FLOURNOY, Lecturer
tronics, semiconductor processing, aerospace, materials
H. VINCENT KUO, Lecturer
SUE ANNE BERGER, Instructor
development, nuclear energy, solar energy, and geophysical
P. DAVID FLAMMER, Instructor
exploration.
CHRISTOPHER M. KELSO, Instructor
The physics department maintains modern well-equipped
JAMES T. BROWN, Professor Emeritus
laboratories for general physics, modern physics, electronics,
F. EDWARD CECIL, Professor Emeritus
and advanced experimentation. There are research labora-
FRANKLIN D. SCHOWENGERDT, Professor Emeritus
tories for the study of solid-state physics, surface physics,
JOHN U. TREFNY, Professor Emeritus and President Emeritus
DON L. WILLIAMSON, Professor Emeritus
materials science, optics, and nuclear physics, including an
F. RICHARD YEATTS, Professor Emeritus
NSF-funded laboratory for solar and electronic materials
WILLIAM B. LAW, Associate Professor Emeritus
processing. The department also maintains electronic and
ARTHUR Y. SAKAKURA, Associate Professor Emeritus
machine shops.
MARK W. COFFEY, Research Professor
Program Educational Objectives (Bachelor of
ROBERT F. HOLUB, Research Professor
VICTOR KAYDANOV, Research Professor
Science in Engineering Physics)
JAMES E. BERNARD, Research Associate Professor
In addition to contributing toward achieving the educa-
JOSEPH D. BEACH, Research Assistant Professor
tional objectives described in the CSM Graduate Profile and
the ABET Accreditation Criteria, the physics department
Program Description
embraces the broad institutional educational objectives as
Engineering Physics
summarized in the Graduate Profile. The additional engineer-
Physics is the most basic of all sciences and the foundation
ing physics program-specific educational objectivees are
of most of the science and engineering disciplines. As such,
listed below.
it has always attracted those who want to understand nature
All engineering physics graduates must have the factual
at its most fundamental level. Engineering Physics is not a
knowledge and other thinking skills necessary to con-
specialized branch of physics, but an interdisciplinary area
struct an appropriate understanding of physical phe-
wherein the basic physics subject matter, which forms the
nomena in an applied context.
backbone of any undergraduate physics degree, is taken
All engineering physics graduates must have the ability to
further toward application to engineering. The degree is ac-
communicate effectively.
credited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of
Throughout their careers engineering physics graduates
the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology,
should be able to function effectively and responsibly
111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012,
in society.
telephone (410) 347-7700. At CSM, the required engineering
physics curriculum includes all of the undergraduate physics
Five-year Combined Baccalaureate / Masters
courses that would form the physics curriculum at any good
Degree Programs
university, but in addition to these basic courses, the CSM
The Physics Department, independently, and in collabora-
requirements include pre-engineering and engineering
tion with the Department of Metallurgical and Materials En-
courses, which physics majors at other universities would not
gineering and with the Engineering Division offers five-year
124
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

programs in which students obtain an undergraduate degree
Degree Requirements (Engineering Physics)
in Engineering Physics as well as a Masters Degree in Ap-
Sophomore Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
plied Physics or an Engineering discipline. There are three
MACS213 Calculus for Scientists & Engn’rs III 4
4
engineering tracks and three physics tracks. The first two
PHGN200 Physics II
3.5
3
4.5
lead to a Masters degree in Engineering with a mechanical or
EPIC251 Design II
3
3
electrical specialty. Students in the third track receive a Mas-
SYGN200 Human Systems
3
3
ters of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering with an elec-
PAGN201 Physical Education III
2
0.5
tronic materials emphasis. The Applied Physics tracks are in
Total
15
the areas of condensed matter, applied optics, and applied nu-
Sophomore Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
clear physics. The programs emphasize a strong background
MACS315 Differential Equations
3
3
in fundamentals of science, in addition to practical experi-
DCGN210 Introduction to Thermodynamics
3
3
PHGN300/310 Physics III-Modern Physics I
3
3
ence within an applied physics or engineering discipline.
PHGN215 Analog Electronics
3
3
4
Many of the undergraduate electives of students involved in
EBGN201 Principles of Economics
3
3
each track are specified. For this reason, students are ex-
PAGN202 Physical Education IV
2
0.5
pected to apply to the program during the first semester of
Total
16.5
their sophomore year (in special cases late entry can be ap-
Summer Field Session
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
proved by the program mentors). A 3.0 grade point average
PHGN384 Summer Field Session (6 weeks)
6
must be maintained to guarantee admission into the appropri-
Total
6
ate engineering or applied physics graduate program.
Junior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
Students in the engineering tracks must complete a report
PHGN315 Advanced Physics Lab I (WI)
1
3
2
or case study during the fifth year. Students in the physics
PGHN311 Introduction to Math. Physics
3
3
tracks must complete a master’s thesis. The case study or the-
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective I
3
3
sis should begin during the senior year as part of the Senior
PHGN317 Digital Circuits
2
3
3
Design experience. Participants must identify an engineering
PHGN350 Intermediate Mechanics
4
4
or physics advisor as appropriate prior to their senior year
Total
15
who will assist in choosing an appropriate project and help
Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
coordinate the senior design project with the case study or
PHGN361 Intermediate Electromagnetism
3
3
thesis completed in the fifth year.
PHGN320 Modern Physics II
4
4
PHGN326 Advanced Physics Lab II (WI)
1
3
2
Interested students can obtain additional information and
PHGN341 Thermal Physics
3
3
detailed curricula from the Physics Department or from the
Free Elective I
3
3
participating Engineering Departments.
Total
15
Minor and Areas of Special Interest
Senior Year Fall Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
The department offers a Minor and Areas of Special Inter-
PHGN471 Senior Design I (WI)
1
6
3
est for students not majoring in physics. The requirements
PHGN462 Electromag. Waves & Opt. Physics 3
3
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective II
3
3
are as follows:
Free Elective II
3
3
Area of Specialization: 12 sem. hrs. minimum (includes 3
Free Elective III
3
3
semester hours of PHGN100 or 200)
Total
15
Minor: 18 sem. hrs. minimum (includes 3 semester hours
Senior Year Spring Semester
lec. lab. sem.hrs.
of PHGN100 or 200)
PHGN472 Senior Design II (WI)
1
6
3
LAIS/EBGN H&SS Cluster Elective III
3
3
Two courses (one year) of modern physics:
Engineering Science Elective
3
3
PHGN300 Modern Physics I 3 sem. hrs. and
Free Elective IV
3
3
PHGN320 Modern Physics II 4 sem. hrs.
Free Elective V
3
3
One course:
Total
15
PHGN341 Thermal Physics 3 sem. hrs. or
Degree Total
130.5
PHGN350 Mechanics 4 sem. hrs. or
PHGN361 Electromagnetism 3 sem. hrs.
Description of Courses
Selected courses to complete the Minor: Upper division
PHGN100. PHYSICS I - MECHANICS (I, II, S) A first
and/or graduate (500-level) courses which form a logical
course in physics covering the basic principles of mechanics
sequence in a specific field of study as determined in
using vectors and calculus. The course consists of a funda-
consultation with the Physics Department and the student’s
mental treatment of the concepts and applications of kine-
option department.
matics and dynamics of particles and systems of particles,
including Newton’s laws, energy and momentum, rotation,
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
125

oscillations, and waves. Prerequisite: MACS111 and concur-
prototyping, troubleshooting, and laboratory notebook style.
rent enrollment in MACS112/122 or consent of instructor. 2
Prerequisite: PHGN200. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 se-
hours lecture; 4 hours studio; 4.5 semester hours. Approved
mester hours.
for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equiva-
PHGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS (I, II) Pilot course or special
lency for GT-SC1.
topics course. Prerequisite: Consent of Department. Credit to
PHGN110. HONORS PHYSICS I - MECHANICS A course
be determined by instructor, maximum of 6 credit hours.
parallel to PHGN100 but in which the subject matter is
Junior Year
treated in greater depth. Registration is restricted to students
PHGN300. PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS I (I, II, S)
who are particularly interested in physics and can be ex-
The third course in introductory physics for scientists and
pected to show above-average ability. Usually an A or B
engineers including an introduction to the special theory of
grade in MACS111/121 is expected. Prerequisite: MACS111
relativity, wave-particle duality, the Schroedinger equation,
and concurrent enrollment in MACS112/122 or consent of
electrons in solids, nuclear structure and transmutations. Pre-
instructor. 2 hours lecture; 4 hours studio; 4.5 semester hours.
requisite: PHGN200/210; Concurrent enrollment in MACS315.
PHGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS (I, II) Pilot course or special
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
topics course. Prerequisite: Consent of Department. Credit to
PHGN310. HONORS PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS
be determined by instructor, maximum of 6 credit hours.
(II) A course parallel to PHGN300 but in which the subject
PHGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
matter is treated in greater depth. Registration is strongly rec-
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
ommended for physics majors or those considering the physics
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
option, but is not required. Prerequisite: PHGN200/210 and
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Indepen-
concurrent enrollment in MACS315 or consent of instructor.
dent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
PHGN311. INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL
Sophomore Year
PHYSICS Demonstration of the unity of diverse topics such
PHGN200. PHYSICS II-ELECTROMAGNETISM AND
as mechanics, quantum mechanics, optics, and electricity
OPTICS (I, II, S) Continuation of PHGN100. Introduction
and magnetism via the techniques of linear algebra, complex
to the fundamental laws and concepts of electricity and mag-
variables, Fourier transforms, and vector calculus. Prerequi-
netism, electromagnetic devices, electromagnetic behavior
site: PHGN300, MACS315, and PHGN384 or consent of in-
of materials, applications to simple circuits, electromagnetic
structor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
radiation, and an introduction to optical phenomena. Prerequi-
PHGN315. ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB I (I) (WI) Intro-
site: PHGN100/110, concurrent enrollment in MACS213/223.
duction to laboratory measurement techniques as applied to
3 hours lecture; 1 hour recitation; 1.5 hours lab; 4.5 semester
modern physics experiments. Experiments from optics and
hours.
atomic physics. A writing-intensive course with laboratory
PHGN210. HONORS PHYSICS II-ELECTROMAGNETISM
and computer design projects based on applications of mod-
AND OPTICS A course parallel to PHGN200 but in which
ern physics. Prerequisite: PHGN300/310 or consent of in-
the subject matter is treated in greater depth. Registration is
structor. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
restricted to students who show particular interest and ability
PHGN317. SEMICONDUCTOR CIRCUITS- DIGITAL (I)
in the subject of physics. Usually an A or B grade in
Introduction to digital devices used in modern electronics.
PHGN110 or an A grade in PHGN100 is expected.
Topics covered include logic gates, flip-flops, timers, coun-
Prerequisite: PHGN100/110, concurrent enrollment in
ters, multiplexing, analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog de-
MACS213/223. 3 hours lecture; 1 hour recitation; 1.5 hours
vices. Emphasis is on practical circuit design and assembly.
lab; 4.5 semester hours.
Prerequisite: PHGN215. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 se-
PHGN215 ANALOG ELECTRONICS (II) Introduction to
mester hours.
analog devices used in modern electronics and basic topics in
PHGN320 MODERN PHYSICS II: BASICS OF QUANTUM
electrical engineering. Introduction to methods of electronics
MECHANICS (II) Introduction to the Schroedinger theory
measurements, particularly the application of oscilloscopes
of quantum mechanics. Topics include Schroedinger’s equa-
and computer based data acquisition. Topics covered include
tion, quantum theory of measurement, the uncertainty princi-
circuit analysis, electrical power, diodes, transistors (FET
ple, eigenfunctions and energy spectra, angular momentum,
and BJT), operational amplifiers, filters, transducers, and
perturbation theory, and the treatment of identical particles.
integrated circuits. Laboratory experiments in the use of
Example applications taken from atomic, molecular, solid
basic electronics for physical measurements. Emphasis is
state or nuclear systems. Prerequisites: PHGN300 and
on practical knowledge gained in the laboratory, including
PHGN311. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
126
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

PHGN324. INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY AND
value problems; Ampere’s and Faraday’s laws. Prerequisite:
ASTROPHYSICS (II) Celestial mechanics; Kepler’s laws
PHGN200/210 and PHGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
and gravitation; solar system and its contents; electromagnetic
hours.
radiation and matter; stars: distances, magnitudes, spectral
PHGN384. APPARATUS DESIGN (S) Introduction to the
classification, structure, and evolution. Variable and unusual
design of engineering physics apparatus. Concentrated indi-
stars, pulsars and neutron stars, supernovae, black holes, and
vidual participation in the design of machined and fabricated
models of the origin and evolution of the universe. Prerequi-
system components, vacuum systems, electronics and com-
site: PHGN200/210. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
puter interfacing systems. Supplementary lectures on safety
PHGN326. ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB II (II) (WI) Con-
and laboratory techniques. Visits to regional research facili-
tinuation of PHGN315. A writing-intensive course which
ties and industrial plants. Prerequisite: PHGN300/310,
expands laboratory experiments to include nuclear and solid
PHGN215. Available in 4 or 6 credit hour blocks in the sum-
state physics. Prerequisite: PHGN315. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours
mer field session usually following the sophomore year. The
lab; 2 semester hours.
machine shop component also may be available in a 2-hour
PHGN333/BELS333. INTRODUCTION TO BIOPHYSICS
block during the academic year. Total of 6 credit hours re-
This course is designed to show the application of physics to
quired for the Engineering Physics option.
biology.It will assess the relationships between sequence
PHGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS (I, II) Pilot course or special
structure and function in complex biological networks and
topics course. Prerequisites: Consent of department. Credit to
the interfaces between physics, chemistry, biology and medi-
be determined by instructor, maximum of 6 credit hours.
cine. Topics include: biological membranes, biological me-
PHGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
chanics and movement, neural networks, medical imaging
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
basics including optical methods, MRI, isotopic tracers and
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
CT, biomagnetism and pharmacokinetics. Prerequisites:
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Indepen-
PHGN 200 and BELS301/ESGN301, or permission of the
dent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
instructor, 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
PHGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (I, II, S) Super-
Senior Year
vised, full-time, engineering-related employment for a con-
PHGN402. GREAT PHYSICISTS The lives, times, and
tinuous six-month period (or its equivalent) in which specific
scientific contributions of key historical physicists are ex-
educational objectives are achieved. Prerequisite: Second
plored in an informal seminar format. Each week a member
semester sophomore status and a cumulative grade-point
of the faculty will lead discussions about one or more differ-
average of at least 2.00. 1 to 3 semester hours.
ent scientists who have figured significantly in the develop-
PHGN341. THERMAL PHYSICS (II) An introduction to
ment of the discipline. Prerequisite: None. 1 hour lecture;
statistical physics from the quantum mechanical point of
1 semester hour.
view. The microcanonical and canonical ensembles. Heat,
PHGN404. PHYSICS OF THE ENVIRONMENT An exam-
work and the laws of thermodynamics. Thermodynamic
ination of several environmental issues in terms of the funda-
potentials; Maxwell relations; phase transformations. Ele-
mental underlying principles of physics including energy
mentary kinetic theory. An introduction to quantum statistics.
conservation, conversion and generation; solar energy; nuclear
Prerequisite: DCGN210 and PHGN311. 3 hours lecture;
power and weapons, radioactivity and radiation effects; aspects
3 semester hours.
of air, noise and thermal pollution. Prerequisite: PHGN200/210
PHGN350. INTERMEDIATE MECHANICS (I) Begins
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
with an intermediate treatment of Newtonian mechanics and
PHGN412. MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS Mathematical
continues through an introduction to Hamilton’s principle
techniques applied to the equations of physics; complex vari-
and Hamiltonian and Lagrangian dynamics. Includes systems
ables, partial differential equations, special functions, finite
of particles, linear and driven oscillators, motion under a
and infinite- dimensional vector spaces. Green’s functions.
central force, two-particle collisions and scattering, motion
Transforms; computer algebra. Prerequisite: PHGN311.
in non-inertial reference frames and dynamics of rigid bodies.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisite: PHGN200/210. Co-requisite: PHGN311. 4 hours
lecture; 4 semester hours.
PHGN419. PRINCIPLES OF SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS
Theory and techniques of insolation measurement. Absorptive
PHGN361. INTERMEDIATE ELECTROMAGNETISM (II)
and radiative properties of surfaces. Optical properties of
Theory and application of the following: static electric and
materials and surfaces. Principles of photovoltaic devices.
magnetic fields in free space, dielectric materials, and mag-
Optics of collector systems. Solar energy conversion tech-
netic materials; steady currents; scalar and vector potentials;
niques: heating and cooling of buildings, solar thermal
Gauss’ law and Laplace’s equation applied to boundary
(power and process heat), wind energy, ocean thermal, and
photovoltaic. Prerequisite: PHGN300/310 and MACS315.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
127

PHGN420. QUANTUM MECHANICS Schroedinger equa-
properties, magnetism, noncrystalline structure, and interfaces.
tion, uncertainty, change of representation, one-dimensional
(Graduate students in physics may register only for PHGN441.)
problems, axioms for state vectors and operators, matrix
Prerequisite: PHGN440/MLGN502, or equivalent by instruc-
mechanics, uncertainty relations, time-independent perturba-
tor’s permission. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
tion theory, time-dependent perturbations, harmonic oscilla-
PHGN450. COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS Introduction to
tor, angular momentum. Prerequisite: PHGN320 and
numerical methods for analyzing advanced physics prob-
PHGN350. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
lems. Topics covered include finite element methods, analy-
PHGN421. ATOMIC PHYSICS Introduction to the funda-
sis of scaling, efficiency, errors, and stability, as well as a
mental properties and structure of atoms. Applications to
survey of numerical algorithms and packages for analyzing
hydrogen-like atoms, fine-structure multielectron atoms,
algebraic, differential, and matrix systems. The numerical
and atomic spectra. Prerequisite: PHGN320. 3 hours lecture;
methods are introduced and developed in the analysis of ad-
3 semester hours.
vanced physics problems taken from classical physics, astro-
PHGN422. NUCLEAR PHYSICS Introduction to subatomic
physics, electromagnetism, solid state, and nuclear physics.
(particle and nuclear) phenomena. Characterization and sys-
Prerequisites: Introductory-level knowledge of C, Fortran, or
tematics of particle and nuclear states; symmetries; introduc-
Basic; PHGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
tion and systematics of the electromagnetic, weak, and strong
PHGN460. PLASMA PHYSICS Review of Maxwell’s
interactions; systematics of radioactivity; liquid drop and
equations; charged-particle orbit in given electromagnetic
shell models; nuclear technology. Prerequisite: PHGN320.
fields; macroscopic behavior of plasma, distribution func-
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
tions; diffusion theory; kinetic equations of plasma; plasma
PHGN423. DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION Review of
oscillations and waves, conductivity, magnetohydrodynamics,
basic physical principles; types of power generation treated
stability theory; Alven waves, plasma confinement. Prerequi-
include fission, fusion, magnetohydrodynamic, thermoelectric,
site: PHGN300/310. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
thermionic, fuel cells, photovoltaic, electrohydrodynamic
PHGN462. ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES AND OPTICAL
piezoelectrics. Prerequisite: PHGN300/310. 3 hours lecture;
PHYSICS (I) Solutions to the electromagnetic wave equa-
3 semester hours.
tion are studied, including plane waves, guided waves, re-
PHGN424. ASTROPHYSICS A survey of fundamental as-
fraction, interference, diffraction and polarization; applications
pects of astrophysical phenomena, concentrating on measure-
in optics; imaging, lasers, resonators and wave guides. Pre-
ments of basic stellar properties such as distance, luminosity,
requisite: PHGN361. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
spectral classification, mass, and radii. Simple models of
PHGN466. MODERN OPTICAL ENGINEERING Provides
stellar structure evolution and the associated nuclear
students with a comprehensive working knowledge of optical
processes as sources of energy and nucleosynthesis. Introduc-
system design that is sufficient to address optical problems
tion to cosmology and physics of standard big-bang models.
found in their respective disciplines. Topics include paraxial
Prerequisite: PHGN320. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
optics, imaging, aberration analysis, use of commercial ray
PHGN435/ChEN435. INTERDISCIPLINARY MICRO-
tracing and optimization, diffraction, linear systems and opti-
ELECTRONICS PROCESSING LABORATORY Applica-
cal transfer functions, detectors and optical system examples.
tion of science and engineering principles to the design,
Prerequisite: PHGN462 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lec-
fabrication, and testing of microelectronic devices. Emphasis
ture; 3 semester hours.
on specific unit operations and the interrelation among process-
PHGN471. SENIOR DESIGN (I) (WI) The first of a two-
ing steps. Prerequisites: Senior standing in PHGN, CRGN,
semester program covering the full spectrum of experimental
MTGN, or EGGN. Consent of instructor. 1.5 hours lecture,
design, drawing on all of the student’s previous course work.
4 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
At the beginning of the first semester, the student selects a
PHGN440/MLGN502. SOLID STATE PHYSICS An ele-
research project in consultation with the course coordinator
mentary study of the properties of solids including crystalline
and the faculty supervisor. The objectives of the project are
structure and its determination, lattice vibrations, electrons in
given to the student in broad outline form. The student then
metals, and semiconductors. (Graduate students in physics
designs the entire project, including any or all of the follow-
may register only for PHGN440.) Prerequisite: PH320.
ing elements as appropriate: literature search, specialized ap-
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
paratus, block-diagram electronics, computer data acquisition
and/or analysis, sample materials, and measurement and/or
PHGN441/MLGN522. SOLID STATE PHYSICS APPLICA-
analysis sequences. The course culminates in a senior thesis.
TIONS AND PHENOMENA Continuation of PHGN440/
Supplementary lectures are given on techniques of physics
MLGN502 with an emphasis on applications of the princi-
research and experimental design. Prerequisite: PHGN384
ples of solid state physics to practical properties of materials
and PHGN326. 1 hour lecture, 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
including: optical properties, superconductivity, dielectric
128Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

PHGN472. SENIOR DESIGN (II) (WI) Continuation of
Bioengineering and Life
PHGN471. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. 1 hour
lecture, 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
Sciences (BELS)
PHGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS (I, II) Pilot course or special
Minors and Areas of Special Interest Only
topics course. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Credit to
PHILIPPE E. ROSS, Professor and BELS Director
be determined by instructor, maximum of 6 credit hours.
JOEL M. BACH, Associate Professor and BELS Associate Director
PHGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
PAUL W. JAGODZINSKI, Professor
member, student and instructor agree on a subject matter,
KENT J. VOORHEES, Professor
content, deliverables, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Inde-
KEVIN W. MANDERNACK, Associate Professor
pendent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
JAMES F. RANVILLE, Associate Professor
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
KIM R. WILLIAMS, Associate Professor
DAVID T. WU, Associate Professor
Department of Chemical Engineering
JAMES F. ELY, Professor and Head
ANNETTE L. BUNGE, Professor
JOHN R. DORGAN, Professor
DAVID T. WU, Associate Professor
Division of Engineering
JOEL M. BACH, Associate Professor
WILLIAM A. HOFF, Associate Professor
JAMES CAROLLO, Assistant Research Professor
Division of Environmental Science and Engineering
ROBERT L. SIEGRIST, Professor and Director
PHILIPPE E. ROSS, Professor
RONALD R. H. COHEN, Associate Professor
LINDA A. FIGUEROA, Associate Professor
JUNKO MUNAKATA MARR, Associate Professor
JOHN R. SPEAR, Assistant Professor
MICHAEL SEIBERT, Research Professor
MARIA L. GHIRARDI, Research Associate Professor
MATTHEW C. POSEWITZ, Research Assistant Professor
Department of Geology and Geological Engineering
MURRAY W. HITZMAN, Professor and Head: Charles Franklin
Fogarty Distinguished Chair in Economic Geology
MICHAEL GOOSEFF, Assistant Professor
Division of Liberal Arts and International Studies
ARTHUR B. SACKS, Professor and Associate Vice President for
Academic and Faculty Affairs
LAURA PANG, Associate Professor and Division Director
TINA L. GIANQUITTO, Assistant Professor
Department of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
GRAEME FAIRWEATHER, Professor and Head
DINESH MEHTA, Professor
WILLIAM C. NAVIDI, Professor
HUGH KING, Senior Lecturer
Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
JOHN J. MOORE, Trustees Professor and Head
GERALD P. MARTINS, Professor
PATRICK R. TAYLOR, Professor
HANS-JOACHIM KLEEBE, Associate Professor
IVAR E. REIMANIS, Professor
REED AYERS, Research Assistant Professor (Center for Commercial
Applications of Combustion in Space)
Department of Physics
JAMES A. McNEIL, Professor and Head
THOMAS E. FURTAK, Professor
JEFF SQUIER, Professor
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
129

Programs Offered:
BELS313/ESGN313 General Biology II Laboratory
Minor in Bioengineering and Life Sciences
BELS321/ESGN321 Introduction to Genetics
Area of Special Interest in Bioengineering and Life Sciences
BELS402/ESGN402 Cell Biology and Physiology
BELS404 Anatomy and Physiology
Program Description
CHGN428 Biochemistry I
The program in Bioengineering and Life Sciences (BELS)
CHGN462/CHGC562/ESGN580 Microbiology & the Environment
is administered jointly by the Divisions of Engineering, En-
CHGN563/CHGC563/ESGN582 Environmental Microbiology Lab
vironmental Science and Engineering, and Liberal Arts and
BELS-approved Elective courses (including, but not limited to):
International Studies, and by the Departments of Chemical
BELS325/LAIS320 Introduction to Ethics
Engineering, Chemistry and Geochemistry, Geology and
BELS333/PHGN333 Introduction to Biophysics
Geological Engineering, Mathematical and Computer Sci-
BELS398 Special Topics in Bioengineering and Life Sciences
BELS415/ChEN415 Polymer Science and Technology
ences, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, and Physics.
BELS420/EGGN420 Intro to Biomedical Engineering
Each division or department is represented on both the Board
BELS425/EGGN425 Musculoskeletal Biomechanics
of Directors and the Curriculum and Research Committee,
BELS430/EGGN430 Biomedical Instrumentation
which are responsible for the operation of the program.
BELS433/MACS433 Mathematical Biology
The mission of the BELS program is to offer Minors and
BELS453/EGGN453/ESGN453 Wastewater Engineering
Areas of Special Interest (ASI) at the undergraduate level,
BELS498 Special Topics in Bioengineering and Life Sciences
and support areas of specialization at the graduate level, as
BELS525/EGES525 Musculoskeletal Biomechanics
BELS530/EGES530 Biomedical Instrumentation
well as to enable research opportunities for CSM students in
BELS541/ESGN541 Biochemical Treatment Processes
bioengineering and the life sciences.
CHGN422 Polymer Chemistry Laboratory
Bioengineering and the Life Sciences (BELS) are becom-
CHGN508 Analytical Spectroscopy
ing increasingly significant in fulfilling the role and mission
MLGN523 Applied Surface & Solution Chem.
of the Colorado School of Mines. Many intellectual frontiers
ESGN401 Fundamentals of Ecology
within the fields of environment, energy, materials, and their
ESGN544 Aquatic Toxicology
ESGN596 Molecular Environmental Biotechnology
associated fields of science and engineering , are being
ESGN545 Environmental Toxicology
driven by advances in the biosciences and the application
ESGN586 Microbiology of Engineered Environmental Systems
of engineering to living processes.
*CHGN221 Organic Chemistry I
Program Requirements:
(for students whose major program does not require it)
Minor in Bioengineering and Life Sciences:
*CHGN222 Organic Chemistry II
The Minor in BELS requires a minimum of 18 semester
(for students whose major program does not require it)
BELS570/MTGN570/MLGN570 Intro to Biocompatibility
hours of acceptable coursework, as outlined under the Re-
Premedical Students
quired Curriculum section which follows.
While medical college admissions requirements vary, most
The Area of Special Interest (ASI) in BELS requires a
require a minimum of:
minimum of 12 semester hours of acceptable coursework,
as outlined under the Required Curriculum section which
two semesters of General Chemistry with lab
follows.
two semesters of Organic Chemistry with lab
two semesters of Calculus
Enrollments in the BELS Minor and ASI are approved by
two semesters of Calculus-based Physics
the Associate Director, who monitors progress and completion.
two semesters of English Literature and Composition
Required Curriculum:
two semesters of General Biology with lab.
Both the Minor and the ASI require one core course (three
CSM currently offers all of these requirements except
semester hours). The minor requires at least six additional
the two General Biology labs. These courses can be taken
credit hours from the Basic Life Science course list, and
through a collaborative agreement at Red Rocks Community
additional BELS-approved courses to make up a total of at
college or at other local universities and colleges.
least 18 credit hours. The ASI requires at least three addi-
*Note: Only three hours of Organic Chemistry course
tional credit hours from the Life Science course list, and
credit may be applied toward the BELS minor or ASI. Gen-
additional BELS-approved courses to make up a total of at
eral rules for Minor Programs and Areas of Special Interest
least 12 credit hours.
(page 36 of this Bulletin) indicate that for a minor no more
Core Course:
than three credit hours may be taken in the student’s degree-
BELS301/ESGN301 General Biology I
granting department, and that for the ASI no more than three
Basic Life Science courses:
credit hours may be specifically required by the degree pro-
BELS303/ESGN303 General Biology II
gram in which the student is graduating.
BELS311/ESGN311 General Biology I Laboratory
130
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Description of Courses
biology. It will assess the relationships between sequence
BELS301/ESGN301. GENERAL BIOLOGY I (I and II)
structure and function in complex biological networks and the
This is the first semester of an introductory course in Biol-
interfaces between physics, chemistry, biology and medicine.
ogy. Emphasis is placed on the methods of science; struc-
Topics include: biological membranes, biological mechanics
tural, molecular, and energetic basis of cellular activities;
and movement, neural networks, medical imaging basics in-
genetic variability and evolution; diversity and life processes
cluding optical methods, MRI, isotopic tracers and CT, bio-
in plants and animals; and, principles of ecology. Prerequi-
magnetism and pharmacokinetics. Prerequisites: PHGN 200
site: None. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours semester hours.
and BELS301/ESGN301, or permission of the instructor.
3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours
BELS311/ESGN311. GENERAL BIOLOGY I LABORA-
TORY(I) This Course provides students with laboratory
BELS398 SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOENGINEERING AND
exercises that complement lectures given in ESGN301/
LIFE SCIENCES Pilot course or special topics course.
BELS301, the first semester introductory course in Biology.
Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and
Emphasis is placed on the methods of science; structural,
student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequi-
molecular, and energetic basis of cellular activities; genetic
site: Instructor consent. Variable credit: 1 to 6 credit hours.
variability and evolution; diversity and life processes in
BELS402/ESGN402. CELL BIOLOGY AND PHYSI-
plants and animals; and, principles of ecology. Offered
OLOGY (II) An introduction to the morphological, bio-
with the collaboration of Red Rocks Community College
chemical, and biophysical properties of cells and their
Co-requisite or Prerequisite: EGGS/BELS301 or equivalent.
significance in the life processes. Prerequisite: General
3 hours laboratory; 1 semester hour.
Biology I, or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
BELS303/ESGN303 GENERAL BIOLOGY II (II) This is
BELS404. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (II) This
the continuation of General Biology I. Emphasis is placed on
course will cover the basics of human anatomy and physiol-
an examination of organisms as the products of evolution.
ogy. We will discuss the gross and microscopic anatomy and
The diversity of life forms will be explored. Special attention
the physiology of the major organ systems. Where possible
will be given to the vertebrate body (organs, tissues, and sys-
we will integrate discussions of disease processes and intro-
tems) and how it functions. Prerequisite: General Biology I,
duce reliant biomedical engineering concepts. Prerequisite:
or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
None. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
BELS313/ESGN313. GENERAL BIOLOGY II LABORA-
BELS420/EGGN420. INTRO TO BIOMEDICAL ENGI-
TORY (II) This Course provides students with laboratory
NEERING (I) The application of engineering principles and
exercises that complement lectures given in ESGN303/
techniques to the human body presents many unique chal-
BELS303, the second semester introductory course in Biol-
lenges. Biomedical Engineering is a diverse, seemingly all-
ogy. Emphasis is placed on an examination of organisms as
encompassing field that includes such areas as biomechanics,
the products of evolution. The diversity of life forms will be
bioinstrumentation, medical imaging, and rehabilitation. This
explored. Special attention will be given to the vertebrate
course is intended to provide an introduction to, and over-
body (organs, tissues and systems) and how it functions.
view of, Biomedical Engineering. Prerequisites: DCGN241,
Offered with the collaboration of Red Rocks Community
DCGN381, EGGN320, EGGN351 (co-requisite or instructor
College. Co-requisite or Prerequisite: ESGN/BELS303 or
permission). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
equivalent. 3 hours laboratory; 1 semester hour.
BELS425/EGGN425 MUSCULOSKELETAL BIO-
BELS321/ESGN321. INTRO TO GENETICS (II) A study
MECHANICS This course is intended to provide engi-
of the mechanisms by which biological information is en-
neering students with an introduction to musculoskeletal
coded, stored, and transmitted, including Mendelian genetics,
biomechanics. At the end of the semester, students should
molecular genetics, chromosome structure and rearrange-
have a working knowledge of the special considerations nec-
ment, cytogenetics, and population genetics. Prerequisite:
essary to apply engineering principles to the human body.
General biology I or equivalent. 3 hours lecture + 3 hours
The course will focus on the biomechanics of injury since
laboratory; 4 semester hours.
understanding injury will require developing an understand-
BELS325/LAIS320 INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS
ing of normal biomechanics. Prerequisites: DCGN421 Statics,
A general introduction to ethics that explores its analytic
EGGN320 Mechanics of Materials, EGGN420/BELS420
and historical traditions. Reference will commonly be made
Introduction to Biomedical Engineering (or instructor per-
to one or more significant texts by such moral philosophers
mission). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Kant, John
BELS430/EGGN430 BIOMEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION
Stuart Mill, and others.
The acquisition, processing, and interpretation of biological
BELS333/PHGN333 INTRODUCTION TO BIOPHYSICS
signals presents many unique challenges to the Biomedical
This course is designed to show the application of physics to
Engineer. This course is intended to provide students with an
introduction to, and appreciation for, many of these challenges.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
131

At the end of the semester, students should have a working
biomechanics. At the end of the semester, students should
knowledge of the special considerations necessary to gather-
have a working knowledge of the special considerations nec-
ing and analyzing biological signal data. Prerequisites:
essary to apply engineering principles to the human body.
EGGN250 MEL I, DCGN381 Introduction to Electrical Cir-
The course will focus on the biomechanics of injury since
cuits, Electronics, and Power, EGGN420/BELS420 Introduc-
understanding injury will require developing an understand-
tion to Biomedical Engineering (or permission of instructor).
ing of normal biomechanics. Prerequisites: DCGN421 Statics,
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN320 Mechanics of Materials, EGGN420/BELS420
BELS498 SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOENGINEERING AND
Introduction to Biomedical Engineering (or instructor per-
LIFE SCIENCES Pilot course or special topics course.
mission). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and stu-
BELS530/EGES530 BIOMEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION
dent(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite:
The acquisition, processing, and interpretation of biological
Instructor consent. Variable credit: 1 to 6 credit hours.
signals presents many unique challenges to the Biomedical
BELS525/EGGN525. MUSCULOSKELETAL BIO-
Engineer. This course is intended to provide students with the
MECHANICS (II) This course is intended to provide engi-
knowledge to understand, appreciate, and address these chal-
neering students with an introduction to musculoskeletal
lenges. At the end of the semester, students should have a
biomechanics. At the end of the semester, students should
working knowledge of the special considerations necessary
have a working knowledge of the special considerations nec-
to gathering and analyzing biological signal data. Prerequi-
essary to apply engineering principles to the human body.
sites: EGGN250 MEL I, DCGN381 Introduction to Electrical
The course will focus on the biomechanics of injury since
Circuits, Electronics, and Power, EGGN420/BELS420 Intro-
understanding injury will require developing an understand-
duction to Biomedical Engineering (or permission of instruc-
ing of normal biomechanics. Prerequisites: DCGN241,
tor). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN320, EGGN420 (or instructor permission). 3 hours
BELS541/ESGN541. BIOCHEMICAL TREATMENT
lecture; 3 semester hours.
PROCESSES The analysis and design of biochemical
BELS530/EGGN530. BIOMEDICAL INSTRUMENTA-
processes used to transform pollutants are investigated in
TION (II) The acquisition, processing, and interpretation of
this course. Suspended growth, attached growth, and porous
biological signals present many unique challenges to the Bio-
media systems will be analyzed. Common biochemical oper-
medical Engineer. This course is intended to provide students
ations used for water, wastewater, and sludge treatment will
with an introduction to, and appreciation for, many of these
be discussed. Biochemical systems for organic oxidation and
challenges. At the end of the semester, students should have a
fermentation and inorganic oxidation and reduction will be
working knowledge of the special considerations necessary
presented. Prerequisites: ESGN504 or consent of the instruc-
to gathering and analyzing biological signal data. Prerequi-
tor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
sites: EGGN250, DCGN381, BELS420/EGGN420 (or per-
BELS453/EGGN453/ESGN453. WASTEWATER ENGI-
mission of instructor). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
NEERING (I) The goal of this course is to familiarize
BELS415/ChEN415. POLYMER SCIENCE AND TECH-
students with the fundamental phenomena involved in
NOLOGY Chemistry and thermodynamics of polymers and
wastewater treatment processes (theory) and the engineering
polymer solutions. Reaction engineering of polymerization.
approaches used in designing such processes (design). This
Characterization techniques based on solution properties.
course will focus on the physical, chemical and biological
Materials science of polymers in varying physical states.
processes applied to liquid wastes of municipal origin. Treat-
Processing operations for polymeric materials and use in
ment objectives will be discussed as the driving force for
separations. Prerequisite: CHGN211, MACS315, ChEN357,
wastewater treatment. Prerequisite: ESGN353 or consent of
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
BELS433/MACS433. MATHEMATICAL BIOLOGY (I)
CHGN422. INTRO TO POLYMER CHEMISTRY
This course will discuss methods for building and solving
LABORATORY (I) Prerequisites: CHGN221. 3 hours lab;
both continuous and discrete mathematical models. These
1 semester hour.
methods will be applied to population dynamics, epidemic
CHGN428. BIOCHEMISTRY I (I) Introductory study of the
spread, pharmacokinetics and modeling of physiologic sys-
major molecules of biochemistry: amino acids, proteins, en-
tems. Modern Control Theory will be introduced and used to
zymes, nucleic acids, lipids, and saccharides- their structure,
model living systems. Some concepts related to self-organiz-
chemistry, biological function, and biosynthesis. Stresses
ing systems will be introduced. Prerequisite: MACS315.
bioenergetics and the cell as a biological unit of organization.
3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
Discussion of classical genetics, molecular genetics, and pro-
BELS525/EGES525 MUSCULOSKELETAL BIO-
tein synthesis. Prerequisite: CHGN221 or permission of in-
MECHANICS This course is intended to provide graduate
structor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
engineering students with an introduction to musculoskeletal
132
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

CHGN462/CHGC562/ESGN580. MICROBIOLOGY &
pesticides, radioactive materials, and others. Prerequisite:
THE ENVIRONMENT This course will cover the basic fun-
none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
damentals of microbiology, such as structure and function of
CHGN563/ESGN582. MICROBIOLOGY AND THE ENVI-
procaryotic versus eucaryotic cells; viruses; classification of
RONMENT LAB. (I) An introduction to the microorgan-
microorganisms; microbial metabolism, energetics, genetics,
isms of major geochemical importance, as well as those of
growth and diversity, microbial interactions with plants, ani-
primary importance in water pollution and waste treatment.
mals, and other microbes. Additional topics covered will in-
Microbes and sedimentation, microbial leaching of metals
clude various aspects of environmental microbiology such as
from ores, acid mine water pollution, and the microbial ecol-
global biogeochemical cycles, bioleaching, bioremediation,
ogy of marine and freshwater habitats are covered. Pre-
and wastewater treatment. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
requisite: Consent of instructor. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab;
3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours. Offered in alternate years.
2 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
CHGN508. ANALYTICAL SPECTROSCOPY (II) Detailed
ESGN 401 – FUNDAMENTALS OF ECOLOGY (II). Bio-
study of classical and modern spectroscopic methods; em-
logical and ecological principles discussed and industrial
phasis on instrumentation and application to analytical chem-
examples of their use given. Analysis of ecosystem processes,
istry problems. Topics include: UV-visible spectroscopy,
such as erosion, succession, and how these processes relate
infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence and phosphorescence,
to engineering activities, including engineering design and
Raman spectroscopy, arc and spark emission spectroscopy,
plant operation. Criteria and performance standards analyzed
flame methods, nephelometry and turbidimetry, reflectance
for facility siting, pollution control, and mitigation of impacts.
methods, Fourier transform methods in spectroscopy, photo-
North American ecosystems analyzed. Concepts of forestry,
acoustic spectroscopy, rapid-scanning spectroscopy. Pre-
range, and wildlife management integrated as they apply to
requisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
all of the above. Three to four weekend trips will be arranged
hours. Offered alternate years.
during the semester. 3 lecture hours, 3 semester hours.
MLGN532. APPLIED SURFACE & SOLUTION CHEM-
ESGN586. MICROBIOLOGY OF ENGINEERED ENVI-
ISTRY. (I) Solution and surface chemistry of importance in
RONMENTAL SYSTEMS (l) Applications of microbial
mineral and metallurgical operations. Prerequisite: Consent
physiological processes to engineered and human-impacted
of department. 3 semester hours. (Fall of even years only.)
systems for the purpose of achieving environmentally
BELS544/ESGN544. AQUATIC TOXICOLOGY (II)
desirable results. Topics include microbial identification and
An introduction to assessing the effects of toxic substances on
enumeration, biofilms in engineered systems, industrial fer-
aquatic organisms, communities, and ecosystems. Topics in-
mentations and respirations, biodegradation and bioremediation
clude general toxicological principles, water quality standards,
of organic and inorganic contaminants, wastewater micro-
quantitative structure-activity relationships, single species and
biology, renewable energy generation, and agricultural biotech-
community-level toxicity measures, regulatory issues, and
nology. Prerequisite: CHGC562 or equivalent, or enrollment
career opportunities. The course includes hands-on experience
in an ESE program. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
with toxicity testing and subsequent data reduction. Prerequi-
CHGN221. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (I) Structure, prop-
site: none. 2.5 hours lecture; 1 hour lab; 3 semester hours.
erties, and reactions of the important classes of organic com-
BELS596/ESGN596. MOLECULAR ENVIRONMENTAL
pounds, introduction to reaction mechanisms. Laboratory
BIOTECHNOLOGY (l) Applications of recombinant DNA
exercises including synthesis, product purification and char-
technology to the development of enzymes and organisms
acterization. Prerequisite: CHGN124, CHGN126. 3 hours
used for environmentally friendly industrial purposes. Topics
lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
include genetic engineering technology, biocatalysis of
CHGN222. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (II) Continuation of
industrial processes by extremozymes, dye synthesis,
CHGN221. Prerequisite: CHGN221. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours
biodegradation of aromatic compounds and chlorinated sol-
lab; 4 semester hours.
vents, biosynthesis of polymers and fuels, and agricultural
biotechnology. Prerequisite: introductory microbiology and
BELS570/MTGN570/MLGN570. INTRO TO BIOCOM-
organic chemistry or consent of the instructor. 3 hours lec-
PATIBILITY Material biocompatibility is a function of
ture; 3 semester hours.
tissue/implant mechanics, implant morphology and surface
chemistry. The interaction of the physiologic environment
BELS545/ESGN545. ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY
with a material is present at each of these levels, with sub-
(II) Introduction to general concepts of ecology, biochem-
jects including material mechanical/structural matching to
istry, and toxicology. The introductory material will provide
surrounding tissues, tissue responses to materials (inflamma-
a foundation for understanding why, and to what extent, a
tion, immune response), anabolic cellular responses and tis-
variety of products and by-products of advanced industrial-
sue engineering of new tissues on scaffold materials. This
ized societies are toxic. Classes of substances to be examined
course is intended for senior level undergraduates and first
include metals, coal, petroleum products, organic compounds,
year graduate students.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
133

Energy Minor
Program Requirements:
Minor in Energy:
John R. Fanchi, Professor and Energy Minor Director
The minor requires a minimum of 18 credit hours of ac-
Marcelo Simoes, Associate Professor and Energy Minor
ceptable coursework in courses listed below. Up to 3 hours of
Co-Director
coursework may be taken in the student's degree-granting de-
Division of Economics and Business
partment. The following list presents the courses that have
CAROL DAHL, Professor
been approved for the Energy Minor.
Division of Engineering
Energy Survey Course (select one):
P.K. SEN, Professor
MARCELO SIMOES, Associate Professor
PEGN 350: Sustainable Energy Systems
PEGN 450: Energy Engineering
Department of Geology and Geological Engineering
JOHN CURTIS, Professor
Energy and Society Courses (select two):
Department of Petroleum Engineering
EBGN 330: Energy Economics
JOHN R. FANCHI, Professor
LAIS 442: Natural Resources and War in Africa
Department of Physics
LAIS 452: Corruption and Development
P. CRAIG TAYLOR, Professor
LAIS 486: Science and Technology Policy
Division of Liberal Arts and International Studies
Technical Energy Courses (select three):
LAURA PANG, Associate Professor and Division Director
ChEN 408: Natural Gas Processing
CARL MITCHAM, Professor
ChEN 409: Petroleum Processes
JOHN HEILBRUNN, Assistant Professor
ChEN 498 / EGGN 498: Fuel Cell Science & Technology
Programs Offered:
EGGN 389: Fundamentals of Electric Machinery I
Minor in Energy
EGGN 403: Thermodynamics II
Program Educational Objectives
EGGN 486: Practical Design of Small Renewable Energy
Systems
Six CSM departments and divisions have combined re-
sources to offer a Minor Program in Energy. The Energy
GEGN 438: Petroleum Geology I
Minor provides a formal structure for recognizing student
PHGN 423: Direct Energy Conversion
participation in a set of multidisciplinary courses that are
linked by their importance to global energy. Courses for the
minor can be chosen in consultation with an Energy program
advisor from a list of approved courses.
The mission of the Energy Minor at the Colorado School
of Mines is to offer opportunities for undergraduate students
to explore the technical and societal dimensions of energy
production and use as these have been manifested in the past
and are likely to exist in the future. The Energy Minor pro-
vides a formal structure for recognizing student participation
in a set of multidisciplinary courses that are linked by their
importance to global energy. Students are expected to take an
energy survey course to become familiar with a range of en-
ergy alternatives and issues, and to take courses that examine
the relationship between energy and society. In addition, stu-
dents will take a set of technical courses for a more in-depth
study of specific energy options of their choice. Courses for
the minor can be chosen in consultation with an Energy pro-
gram advisor from the list of courses presented below.
134
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Materials Science
als as electrical circuit components. The effects of chemistry,
processing, and microstructure on the electrical properties
(Interdisciplinary Program)
will be discussed, along with functions, performance require-
The interdisciplinary Materials Science Program is admin-
ments, and testing methods of materials for each type of cir-
istered jointly by the Departments of Chemical Engineering
cuit component. The general topics covered are conductors,
and Petroleum Refining, Chemistry and Geochemistry, Met-
resistors, insulators, capacitors, energy converters, magnetic
allurgical and Materials Engineering, Physics and the Divi-
materials, and integrated circuits. Prerequisites: PHGN200/
sion of Engineering. Each department is represented on both
210, MTGN311 or MLGN501, MTGN412/MLGN512, or
the Governing Board and the Graduate Affairs Committee
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
which are responsible for the operation of the program.
MLGN516/MTGN416 PROPERTIES OF CERAMICS (II)
Listed below are 400-level undergraduate courses which
A survey of the properties of ceramic materials and how
are cross-listed with 500-level Materials Science courses.
these properties are determined by the chemical structure
Additional courses offered by the Program Departments, not
(composition), crystal structure, and the microstructure of
listed here, may also satisfy the course-requirements towards
a graduate degree in this Program. Consult the Materials
crystalline ceramics and glasses. Thermal, optical, and me-
Science Program Guidelines for Graduate Students and the
chanical properties of single-phase and multi-phase ceramics,
Program Departments course-listings. It should be noted that
including composites, are covered. Prerequisites: PHGN200/
the course requirement for graduate-level registration for a
210, MTGN311 or MLGN501, MTGN412/MLGN512 or
MLGN “500”-level course which is cross-listed with a
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
400-level course-number, will include an additional course-
MLGN517/EGGN422 SOLID MECHANICS OF MATERI-
component above that required for 400-level credit.
ALS (I) Review mechanics of materials. Introduction to
MLGN502/PHGN440. SOLID STATE PHYSICS (II)
elastic and non-linear continua. Cartesian tensors and stresses
An elementary study of the properties of solids including
and strains. Analytical solution of elasticity problems. Develop
crystalline structure and its determination, lattice vibrations,
basic concepts of fracture mechanics. Prerequisite: EGGN320
electrons in metals, and semiconductors. Prerequisite:
or equivalent, MACS315 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
PHGN300 or PHGN325 and MACS315. 3 hours lecture;
mester hours. Semester to be offered: Spring
3 semester hours.
MLGN519/MTGN419. NON-CRYSTALLINE MATERI-
MLGN505*/MTGN445. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF
ALS (II) An introduction to the principles of glass science-
MATERIALS (I) Mechanical properties and relationships.
and-engineering and non-crystalline materials in general.
Plastic deformation of crystalline materials. Relationships of
Glass formation, structure, crystallization and properties will
microstructures to mechanical strength. Fracture, creep, and
be covered, along with a survey of commercial glass compo-
fatigue. Prerequisite: MTGN348. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours
sitions, manufacturing processes and applications. Prerequi-
lab; 3*/4 semester hours. * This is a 3 hour-credit graduate-
sites: MTGN311 or MLGN501, MLGN512/MTGN412, or
course in the Materials Science Program and a 4 hour-credit
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
undergraduate-course in the MTGN program.
MLGN522/PHGN441. SOLID STATE PHYSICS APPLICA-
MLGN510/CHGN410 SURFACE CHEMISTRY (I) Intro-
TIONS AND PHENOMENA Continuation of MLGN502/
duction to colloid systems, capillarity, surface tension and
PHGN440 with an emphasis on applications of the principles
contact angle, adsorption from solution, micelles and micro-
of solid state physics to practical properties of materials in-
emulsions, the solid/gas interface, surface analytical tech-
cluding optical properties, superconductivity, dielectric prop-
niques, van der Waal forces, electrical properties and colloid
erties, magnetism, noncrystalline structure, and interfaces.
stability, some specific colloid systems (clays, foams and
Graduate students in physics cannot receive credit for
emulsions). Students enrolled for graduate credit in MLGN510
MLGN522, only PHGN441. Prerequisite: MLGN502/
must complete a special project. Prerequisite: DCGN209 or
PHGN440. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Those receiving
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
graduate credit will be required to submit a term paper, in ad-
dition to satisfying all of the other requirements of the course.
MLGN512/MTGN412. CERAMIC ENGINEERING (II)
Application of engineering principles to nonmetallic and
MLGN530/CHGN430/CRGN415. INTRODUCTION TO
ceramic materials. Processing of raw materials and production
POLYMER SCIENCE (I) An introduction to the chemistry
of ceramic bodies, glazes, glasses, enamels, and cements.
and physics of macromolecules. Topics include the properties
Firing processes and reactions in glass bonded as well as
and statistics of polymer solutions, measurements of molecu-
mechanically bonded systems. Prerequisite: MTGN348.
lar weights, molecular weight distributions, properties of
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
bulk polymers, mechanisms of polymer formation, and prop-
erties of thermosets and thermoplasts including elastomers.
MLGN515/MTGN415. ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES AND
Prerequisite: CHGN327 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lec-
APPLICATIONS OF MATERIALS (II) Survey of the elec-
ture; 3 semester hours.
trical properties of materials, and the applications of materi-
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
135

MLGN531/CRGN416. INTRODUCTION TO POLYMER
Guy T. McBride, Jr.
ENGINEERING (II) This class provides a background in
polymer fluid mechanics, polymer rheological response and
Honors Program in Public
polymer shape forming. The class begins with a discussion
of the definition and measurement of material properties. In-
Affairs for Engineers
terrelationships among the material response functions are
elucidated and relevant correlations between experimental
DR. LORING ABEYTA, Interim Principal Tutor and Program
Director
data and material response in real flow situations are given.
Processing operations for polymeric materials will then be
Program Educational Objectives
addressed. These include the flow of polymers through cir-
The McBride Honors Program in Public Affairs for Engi-
cular, slit, and complex dies. Fiber spinning, film blowing,
neers offers 24 semester hours of seminars and off-campus
extrusion and coextrusion will be covered as will injection
activities that have the primary educational objective of pro-
molding. Graduate students are required to write a term
viding a select number of CSM students the opportunity to
paper and take separate examinations which are at a more
cross the boundaries of their technical expertise into the ethi-
advanced level. Prerequisite: CHEN307, EGGN351 or
cal, cultural, and socio-political dimensions of science and
equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
technology. Students will gain the values, knowledge, and
MLGN544/MTGN414 PROCESSING OF CERAMICS (II)
skills to prove, project, and test the moral and social implica-
A description of the principles of ceramic processing and
tions of their future professional judgments and activities, not
the relationship between processing and microstructure.
only for the particular organizations with which they will be
Raw materials and raw material preparation, forming and
involved, but also for the nation and the world. To achieve
fabrication, thermal processing, and finishing of ceramic
this educational objective, the program seeks to bring themes
materials will be covered. Principles will be illustrated by
from the humanities and the social sciences into the CSM
case studies on specific ceramic materials. A project to de-
curriculum to develop in students the habits of thought nec-
sign a ceramic fabrication process is required. Field trips
essary for effective management, social and environmental
to local ceramic manufacturing operations are included.
responsibility, and enlightened leadership.
Prerequisites: MTGN311, MTGN331, and
Program Description
MTGN412/MLGN512 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
Designed and taught by teams of faculty members from
lecture; 3 semester hours.
the humanities, social sciences, life and physical sciences,
MLGN550/MLGN450. STATISTICAL PROCESS CON-
and engineering, the curriculum of the McBride Honors Pro-
TROL AND DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS (II) An intro-
gram in Public Affairs for Engineers features the following
duction to statistical process control, process capability
educational experiences:
analysis and experimental design techniques. Statistical
u Student-centered seminars guided by faculty moderators
process control theory and techniques will be developed
from various disciplines.
and applied to control charts for variables and attributes in-
volved in process control and evaluation. Process capability
u An interdisciplinary approach that integrates domestic
concepts will be developed and applied for the evaluation
and global perspectives into the curriculum.
of manufacturing processes. The theory and application of
u One-to-one long-lasting relationships between faculty
designed experiments will be developed and applied for
and students.
full factorial experiments, fractional factorial experiments,
u Development and practice of oral/written communica-
screening experiments, multilevel experiments and mixture
tion and listening skills.
experiments. Analysis of designed experiments will be car-
ried out by graphical and statistical techniques. Computer
u Opportunity to travel to Washington, DC and abroad as
software will be utilized for statistical process control and
part of the McBride curriculum.
for the design and analysis of experiments. Prerequisite:
u Intellectual relationships and camaraderie.
Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
u Public affairs or policy related internship.
A central experience in the program is the Practicum (an
internship, overseas study, public service, or thesis), which
usually comes during the summer following the junior year.
Because engineers and scientists will continue to assume
significant responsibilities as leaders in public and private
sectors, it is essential that CSM students be prepared for
more than the traditional first jobs in industry. Leadership
and management demand an understanding of the accelerat-
ing pace of change that marks the social, political, and eco-
136
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

nomic currents of society and a commitment to social and
u understanding that the McBride faculty is committed to
environmental responsibility. While the seminars in the pro-
provide the best education to help students become
gram are designed to nourish such an understanding, the
thoughtful and responsible persons and professionals;
goal of the internship is to put students into situations where
u upholding the highest standards of ethical conduct, par-
they may see firsthand the kinds of challenges that they will
ticularly those related to academic honesty and respect
face in their professional lives.
for peers;
Foreign study is also possible either through CSM-
u accepting CSM educational goals, particularly those
sponsored trips or through individual plans arranged in
related to meeting the Profile of the Colorado School
consultation with the Principal Tutor and CSM’s Office of
of Mines.
International Programs. The cost for any foreign study is the
responsibility of the student.
Although the educational experiences in the McBride
Honors Program are rigorous and demand a high degree of
Student Profile
persistence from the students, McBride graduates have
The McBride Honors Program in Public Affairs for
gained positions of their choice in industry and government
Engineers seeks to enroll students who can profit most from
more easily than others and have been successful in winning
the learning experiences upon which the program is based
admission to high-quality graduate and professional schools.
while significantly contributing to faculty and peer learning.
Whereas most conventional honors programs admit students
Admission
almost exclusively on the basis of academic record, in the
Interested students should apply to the McBride program
McBride Honors Program test scores, grade point, and class
during the summer prior to their first semester of freshman
rank form only part of the criteria used in the admission
year by filling out an application, writing an essay, and
process. Applicants must demonstrate their leadership poten-
securing letters of recommendation (see website for details).
tial, commitment to public service, willingness to understand
Applicants will be interviewed in September by a team of
and respect perspectives other than their own, and writing,
faculty and Honor students. Finalists will be announced in
listening, and speaking abilities through an essay and an
October. Once a finalist accepts the responsibilities and
interview with faculty members.
honors of being a member of the Program (see above), s/he
begins taking Honors seminars in the Spring semester of
Once admitted into the program, a McBride student com-
freshmen year.
mits to
u completing the 24-credit-hour McBride curriculum as
Transfer and Graduation Policies
stated in the catalog, deviating from this program of
The McBride Program accepts applications from transfer
studies only with permission from the program admin-
students as follows:
istration;
u Transfer students who enter CSM in the Fall semester
u participating in the McBride seminars as an active and
must fill out an application and go through the applica-
responsible learner, always completing reading and
tion and interview process with all freshmen applicants
writing assignments in order to be ready to teach and
(see above).
learn from peers and instructors;
u Transfer students who enter CSM in the Spring semes-
u engaging in the highest level of intellectual discourse in
ter must submit a full application, including the essay,
a civil and respectful manner with all members of the
and arrange an interview with the Principal Moderator
CSM community, even with those who hold different
and the Chair of McBride’s Executive Committee be-
beliefs, values, and views of the world;
fore the first day of Spring semester classes.
u accepting and behaving according to the rules estab-
All transfer students should expect to take the entire
lished for the Washington Policy and Foreign Area
McBride curriculum (24 credit hours) in residence. Only
Study trips to ensure the safety of peers, maximize the
under very special circumstances, the Principal Tutor will
educational experience of the group, and maintain
assess a petition by a transfer student for course substitutions.
CSM’s high reputation;
Academic Standards
u accepting responsibility for grades, which means that
Because of the nature of the program, students are ex-
s/he will earn the grade that s/he deserves given his/her
pected to commit to the highest levels of writing, reading,
level of commitment and respect to the learning process;
and discussion before and during McBride seminars. Partici-
u understanding that McBride’s academic standards re-
pation in class projects and discussions is essential. Students
quire students to maintain a minimum GPA of 2.9 at all
who do not maintain an appropriate level of such participa-
times, otherwise the student will be placed on academic
tion may be asked to leave the program.
probation in the Program;
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
137

Academic integrity and honesty are expected of the stu-
icy. Prerequisite: HNRS201 or permission of the Principal
dents in the program. Any infractions in these areas will be
Tutor. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
handled under the rules of CSM and may result in dismissal
HNRS301. INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY
from the program.
International political economy is the study of the dynamic
The program demands a high level of achievement not
relationships between nation-states and the global market-
only in honors courses, but in all academic work attempted.
place. Topics include: international and world politics,
To that end, a student must meet the following requirements:
money and international finance, international trade, multi-
u A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.9 (based on the aver-
national and global corporations, global development, transi-
age undergraduate GPA on campus) in all course work
tion economies and societies, and developing economies and
at CSM at any given time.
societies. Prerequisite: HNRS202 or permission of Principal
Tutor. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
u A minimum GPA of 3.0 in Honors coursework to re-
main in good academic standing.
HNRS302. TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC
CHANGE A critical analysis of the interactions among sci-
u A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.9 and an Honors
ence, technology, and American values and institutions. The
GPA of 3.0 at the time of graduation in order to receive
seminar will study the role of technology in American society
the “Minor in the McBride Honors Program in Public
and will debate the implications of technology transfer from
Affairs”. Graduating seniors who fall below these
developed to developing nations. Students will learn to relate
minimums will receive a “Minor in Public Affairs.”
technological issues to socio-economic and religious aspects
A student who falls below any of these minimums will be
of society and explore the moral and social consequences of
placed on probation for one semester. If the required mini-
technological innovations. Prerequisite: HNRS202 or permis-
mum GPA has not been met at the end of that semester, the
sion of Principal Tutor. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
student will be dropped from the program.
HNRS311. U.S. PUBLIC POLICY: DOMESTIC AND FOR-
Description of Courses
EIGN Detailed examination of United States public policy,
HNRS101. PARADOXES OF THE HUMAN CONDITION
using a case study approach to guide students to understand
Study of the paradoxes in the human condition as expressed
the various aspects of policy making and the participants in
in significant texts in classics, literature, moral philosophy,
the process. As an outcome of this seminar, students will
and history; drama and music, both classical and contem-
have the ability to engage in informed, critical analysis of
porary, history, biography, and fiction. Prerequisite: Fresh-
public policy, and will understand the process and how they
man status in the McBride Honors Program. 3 hours seminar;
may become involved in it. Students should expect to spend
3 semester hours.
spring break in Washington, D.C., as part of this seminar.
Prerequisite: HNRS301 or HNRS302 or permission of Prin-
HNRS201. CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY: A STUDY OF
cipal Tutor. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
DIVERSE CULTURES A study of cultures within the
United States and abroad and the behavior of people. The
HNRS312 FOREIGN AREA STUDY A survey of current
seminar will emphasize the roles of languages, religions,
public policy issues of a selected country or region, based on
moral values, and legal and economic systems in the cultures
a broad survey of history and culture as well as contemporary
selected for inquiry. Prerequisite: HNRS101 or consent of the
social, technological, economic and political trends. The
Principal Tutor. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
areas that might be studied in a three year rotation; Far East
(China and Taiwan or Hong Kong, Indonesia and/or Malaysia),
HNRS202. COMPARATIVE POLITICAL AND ECO-
Latin America (Brazil or Chile), Middle East/Africa (Turkey
NOMIC SYSTEMS This course constitutes a comparative
or South Africa). Students taking this seminar in preparation
study of the interrelationships between political and economic
for a McBride sponsored trip abroad might be able to take a
systems in theory and practice. Totalitarianism, authoritarian-
brief intensive language course before departure. Prerequi-
ism, democracy, anarchy, socialism, and communism will be
site: HNRS301 or HNRS302 or permission of Principal Tutor.
examined in their historical and theoretical contexts and
3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
compared with baseline concepts of what constitutes a politi-
cal system. Economics will be studied from a historical/
HNRS401. MCBRIDE PRACTICUM: INTERNSHIP An
developmental approach, examining classical and neo-
off-campus practicum which may include an internship in a
classical economics and theories of major western econo-
company, government agency, or public service organization
mists, including Smith, Marx, and Keynes. Specific nation or
(domestic or foreign), or foreign study as a part of a McBride
area case studies will be used to integrate concepts and to ex-
group or individually. The practicum must have prior approval
plore possible new global conditions which define the roles
of the Principal Tutor. All students completing a practicum
of governments and other institutions in the development,
are expected to keep an extensive journal and write a pro-
planning, and control of economic activities and social pol-
fessional report detailing, analyzing, and evaluating their
138Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

experiences. Prerequisite: HNRS311. 3 hours seminar;
Military Science
3 semester hours.
HNRS402. MCBRIDE PRACTICUM: FOREIGN AREA
(Army ROTC-AROTC)
STUDY FIELD TRIP After completing the HNRS312
The Military Science Program at the Colorado School of
Foreign Area Study seminar, students travel to the selected
Mines develops the qualities of citizenship and leadership in
country or region. Students will gain first hand experience
the individual which are desirable in both military and civil-
interacting and communicating with people from another
ian enterprises. Successful completion of the four-year pro-
culture. Students will complete a written research and analy-
gram qualifies the student for a commission as a Second
sis report using historic cultural, technological, political, or
Lieutenant in the United States Army, Army Reserve or
an economic theme. Prerequisite: HNRS312 or permission of
Army National Guard. Full benefit of the program is
Principal Tutor. 3 hours seminar, 3 semester hours.
achieved by participating in the four-year program; however,
HNRS411. STUDY OF LEADERSHIP AND POWER An
late entry may be possible by attendance at the summer
intellectual examination into the nature of leadership and
Basic Camp.
power. Focuses on understanding and interpreting the leader-
Basic Course. (Freshman and Sophomore-level Military
ship role, both its potential and its limitations, in various
Science): No obligation is incurred by enrolling in any
historical, literary, political, socio-economic, and cultural
Freshman or Sophomore-level Military Science course
contexts. Exemplary leaders and their antitypes are analyzed.
(except by Military Science Scholarship winners). Students
Characteristics of leaders are related to their cultural and
receive training in military skills such as drill and cere-
temporal context. This course will ask questions regarding
monies, uniform wear, customs and courtesies of the service,
the morality of power and its uses. Leadership in technical
small unit tactics, and background information on the role
and non-technical environments will be compared and con-
and organization of the Army. Freshman cadets will receive
trasted. Additionally, power and empowerment, and the
extensive training and practical experience in using a map
complications of becoming or of confronting a leader are
and compass to navigate cross-country. Sophomore cadets
scrutinized. Prerequisite: HNRS311 or HNRS312 or permis-
will receive training in First Aid. Additionally, all cadets
sion of Principal Tutor. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
receive training, and have the opportunity to participate, in
HNRS412. CONFLICT RESOLUTION An in-depth look at
several outdoor activities.
creative, non-violent, non-litigious, win-win ways to handle
Advanced AROTC. Enrollment in the last two years of
conflicts in personal, business, environmental and govern-
AROTC is both elective and selective for non-scholarship
mental settings. The class will learn concepts, theories and
students. Applicants must demonstrate academic proficiency,
methods of conflict resolution, study past and present cases,
leadership ability and officer potential. The Advanced
and observe on-going conflict resolution efforts in the Den-
Course builds on the individual skills learned in the Basic
ver area. Prerequisite: HNRS311 or HNRS312 or permission
Course. During the Junior year (MSIII) cadets receive train-
of Principal Tutor. 3 hour seminar. 3 semester hours.
ing in small unit tactics in preparation for their attendance at
HNRS420. SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND ETHICS
the AROTC Advanced Camp (normally attended during the
A comprehensive inquiry into ethical and moral issues raised
summer after their Junior year). Cadets also receive training
by modern science and technology. Issues covered include:
in management, ethics and leadership, as well as practical
the contention that science is value neutral; the particular
experience in performing as the leader in a stressful environ-
sorts of ethical problems faced by engineers in their public
ment. The senior level (MSIV) cadets receive training on
and political roles in deciding uses of materials and energy;
how the Army functions at a higher level by planning and
the personal problems faced in the development of a career in
executing many of the Cadet Battalion activities.
science and technology; the moral dilemmas inherent in
AROTC Credit. Military Science credits may be applied to
using natural forms and energies for human purposes; and
the free elective portion of the degree programs, or used in
the technologically dominated modern civilization. The sem-
the Military Science minor program. Military Supplies.
inar will consist of readings and discussion of ethical issues
Military Science textbooks, uniforms and accessories are
in plays, works of fiction, and films. Prerequisite: HNRS411
issued free of charge to students in the AROTC program.
or HNRS412 or permission of the Principal Tutor. 3 hours
Students enrolled in Advanced Military Science courses also
seminar; 3 semester hours.
receive a subsistence allowance of $250 per month for fresh-
men, $300 per month for sophomores, $350 per month for
juniors, and $400 per month for seniors during the regular
school year. AROTC Scholarships. The United States
Government offers qualified male or female applicants
AROTC Scholarships to attend the Colorado School of
Mines. AROTC Scholarships pay tuition and fees (within the
limits set by the law), provides a book allowance and pay a
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
139

subsistence allowance during the school year for the duration
Commissioned Service. The mission of the NROTC pro-
of the scholarship. The student may pursue any 4-year degree
gram is to provide regular and reserve officers to the fleet
program offered at CSM. Upon graduation, AROTC Scholar-
and Marine Corps for service in the “Unrestricted Line”
ship cadets receive commissions and will be required to serve
fields. Unrestricted Line officers specialize in one of the
in the military for four years of an active duty and four years
following: Surface ships, submarines, aviation (Pilot or
of Reserve Forces duty, for a total of eight years. Individuals
Naval Flight Officer), Special Warfare (SEALs) or Special
interested in applying for AROTC Scholarships should con-
Operations (Diving, Salvage, Explosive Ordnance Disposal).
tact high school guidance counselors or the Professor of
Marine Corps officer commissionees enter a variety of fields
Military Science, CSM, no later than the first month of the
including infantry, aviation, armor, and combat engineering.
senior year in high school. There are also 2-year and 3-year
Regardless of the type of commission earned, regular or
AROTC Scholarships available to students already in college.
reserve, virtually all NROTC graduates serve on active duty
A 2-year AROTC Reserve Forces Duty Scholarship is avail-
after commissioning. Men and women interested in these
able for cadets entering the Advanced Military Science
and other programs leading to commissions in the Naval
course who wish to pursue a Reserve Forces military obliga-
Service are encouraged to contact the NROTC Unit at
tion. Another option available to cadets is the Department of
492-8287 or in person at Folsom Stadium, Gate 6, Room
the Army Scientific and Engineering AROTC Cooperative
241, University of Colorado, Boulder.
Program (DASE AROTC CO-OP). DASE students are hired
as Department of the Army civilians. They receive the pay,
Air Force ROTC (AFROTC)
insurance, sick leave and other benefits provided DA civilian
Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps
employees. In addition, upon successful completion of the
U.S. Air Force ROTC offers several programs leading to a
program, students will have the opportunity for continued
commission in the U.S. Air Force upon receipt of at least a
employment. Qualified students may receive financial assis-
baccalaureate degree.
tance of up to $5,000 per year to cover cost of tuition, books
Standard Four-Year Program
and living expenses.
This standard program is designed for incoming freshmen
Navy ROTC (NROTC)
or any student with four years remaining until degree com-
Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps
pletion. It consists of three parts: the General Military
Course (GMC) for lower division (normally freshmen and
Colorado School of Mines students may pursue a com-
sophomore) students; the Professional Officer Course (POC)
mission as an officer in the U.S. Navy or Marine Corps
for upper division students (normally juniors and seniors);
through a cross town agreement with the Naval ROTC Unit
and Leadership Laboratory (LLAB—attended by all cadets).
at the University of Colorado, Boulder. NROTC offers two-
Completion of a four-week summer training course is
year and four-year scholarship programs and college (non-
required prior to commissioning.
scholarship) programs. Navy scholarships may be earned
through a national competition based on college board exams
Modified Two-Year Program
and high school record, or while the student is enrolled in
All undergraduate and graduate students are eligible for
college based on college grades and military performance.
this program. It is offered to full-time, regularly enrolled
Scholarship students receive tuition and fees, books, and a
degree students and requires at least two years of full-time
$100 per month subsistence allowance during their last two
college (undergraduate or graduate level, or a combination).
years in the program (advanced standing).
Those selected for this program must complete a six-week
NROTC students attending Colorado School of Mines
field training program during the summer months as a pre-
must attend a weekly drill session at the University of Colo-
requisite for entry into the Professional Officer Course the
rado Boulder campus and fulfill other military responsibili-
following fall semester.
ties. Additionally, they must complete a series of Naval
Leadership Lab
Science courses at the Boulder campus by special arrange-
All AFROTC cadets must attend Leadership Lab (1-1/2
ment with the appropriate NROTC staff instructor. Navy
hours per week). The laboratory involves a study of Air Force
option students must complete course work in calculus,
customs and courtesies, drill and ceremonies, career opportu-
physics, computer science, American military history or
nities, and the life and work of an Air Force junior officer.
national security policy, and a foreign language. Marine
Other AFROTC Programs
Corps option students are required to complete courses in
Other programs are frequently available based on current
American military history or national security policy and a
Air Force needs. Any AFROTC staff member in Boulder (303
foreign language. Students should check with their NROTC
492-8351) can discuss best alternatives. Interested students
class advisor to determine specific course offerings which
should make initial contact as early as possible to create the
fulfill the above requirements.
best selection opportunity, as selection is on a competitive
basis. There is no obligation until a formal contract is entered.
140
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Description of Courses
Junior Year
Freshman Year
MSGN301. APPLIED PRINCIPLES OF LEADERSHIP
*Indicates courses that may be used to satisfy PAGN
AND COMMAND I (I) An introduction to the organization
semester requirements.
of the U.S. Army in the field. Application of leadership prin-
ciples in the command environment emphasizing motivation,
*MSGN103. ADVENTURES IN LEADERSHIP I (I)
performance counseling, group development, ethics, and
Development of individual skills necessary to become an
attention to detail. Lab Fee. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the
effective small group leader. Training is challenging and
AROTC Advanced Course or consent of department. 3 hours
encompasses a wide variety of skills. A major emphasis is
lecture; 3 semester hours.
placed on map reading and land navigation principles, in-
cluding use of the lensatic compass, terrain interpretation,
MSGN302. APPLIED PRINCIPLES OF LEADERSHIP
intersection, resection, and magnetic declination. Cadets also
AND COMMAND II (II) The theory and practice of small
receive training in marksmanship, physical training (PT), and
unit tactical operations to include small unit tactics, military
military drill, and the Army organization. Lab Fee. 1 hour
problems analysis, communications techniques, and troop
lecture, 2 hours lab, 3 hours PT, and 80 hours field training;
leading procedures. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the AROTC
2 semester hours.
Advanced Course or consent of department. Lab Fee. 3 hours
lecture; 3 semester hours.
*MSGN104. ADVENTURES IN LEADERSHIP II (II)
Continuation of MSGN103 training with increased emphasis
MSGN303. LEADERSHIP LABORATORY (I) Develop-
on leadership. Training also includes small unit tactics, and
ment of military leadership techniques to include preparation
First Aid training. Lab Fee. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab,
of operation plans, presentation of instruction, and super-
3 hours PT, and 80 hours field training; 2 semester hours.
vision of underclass military cadets. Instruction in military
drill, ceremonies, and customs and courtesies of the Army.
MSGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MILITARY SCIENCE
Must be taken in conjunction with MSGN301. Prerequisite:
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen
Enrollment in the AROTC Advanced Course or consent of
from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually
department. Lab Fee. 2 hours lab, 3 hours PT, 80 hours field
the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor con-
training; .5 semester hour.
sent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
MSGN304. LEADERSHIP LABORATORY (II) Continued
MSGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
development of military leadership techniques with the major
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
emphasis on leading an Infantry Squad. Training is “hands-on.”
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
Practical exercises are used to increase understanding of the
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Indepen-
principles of leadership learned in MSGN302. Must be taken
dent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
in conjunction with MSGN302. Prerequisite: Enrollment in
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
the ROTC Advanced Course or consent of department. Lab
Sophomore Year
Fee. 2 hours lab, 3 hours PT, 80 hours field training; .5 se-
*MSGN203. ADVENTURES IN LEADERSHIP III (I)
mester hour.
Continues the development of those individual skills taught
ADVANCED CAMP (Fort Lewis, WA) A six (6) week Ad-
in MSGN103 and 104. Increased emphasis on the role of the
vanced Camp is required for completion of the AROTC pro-
Leader/Trainer. Cadets receive training in First Aid. As with
gram. The camp should be attended between the junior and
MSGN103, the majority of the training is in the field. Lab
senior year. The emphasis at Advanced Camp is placed on
Fee. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab, 3 hours PT, and 80 hours
the development of individual leadership initiative and self-
field training; 2 semester hours.
confidence. Students are rated on their performance in vari-
*MSGN204. ADVENTURES IN LEADERSHIP IV (II)
ous positions of leadership during the camp period. The U.S.
In this course emphasis is on development of leadership
Army reimburses students for travel to and from Advanced
skills necessary in a small group environment. Students are
Camp. In addition, students receive approximately $600.00
trained in the mechanics of small unit tactics, the required to
pay while attending camp. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the
perform in various leadership positions. Cadets take an in-
AROTC Advanced Course and successful completion of
creased role in the planning and execution of cadet activities.
MSGN301 through 304.
Lab Fee. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab, 3 hours PT, and 80
MSGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MILITARY SCIENCE
hours field training; 2 semester hours.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen
MSGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MILITARY SCIENCE
from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen
the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor con-
from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually
sent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor con-
sent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
141

MSGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
MSGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MILITARY SCIENCE
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Indepen-
the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor con-
dent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
sent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
MSGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
Senior Year
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
MSGN401. ETHICS, PROFESSIONALISM, AND MILI-
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
TARY JUSTICE (I) An introduction to military ethics and
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Indepen-
professionalism with emphasis on the code of the officer. A
dent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
study of military justice and its application to military life.
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Orientation to Army administrative, training, and logistics
(AFROTC)
systems. Pre-commissioning orientation. Prerequisite: Enroll-
AFAS100. AFROTC P/T .5 hours
ment in the AROTC Advanced Course or consent of depart-
ment. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
AFAS101. THE AIR FORCE TODAY I This course deals
with the US Air Force in the contemporary world through a
MSGN402. THE AMERICAN MILITARY EXPERIENCE
study of the total force structure, strategic offensive and
(II) A study of the history of the United States military in
defensive forces, general purpose forces, aerospace support
order to better understand the role played by the armed forces
forces, and the development of communicative skills. 1 hour
in American society today through a study of the origins and
lecture, 1.5 hours lab; 1.5 semester hour.
development of military policy, organization and technology;
relating these to political, social and economic development
AFAS102. THE AIR FORCE TODAY II A continuation of
during this period.
The Air Force Today I. 1 hour lecture, 1.5 hours lab; 1.5
semester hour.
MSGN403. LEADERSHIP LABORATORY (I) Continued
development of leadership techniques by assignment in the
AFAS103. DEVELOPMENT OF AIR POWER I One
command and staff positions in the Cadet Battalion. Cadets
1-hour lecture and one 1.5 hour lab per week. This course is
are expected to plan and execute much of the training associ-
designed to examine general aspects of air and space power
ated with the day-to-day operations within the cadet battal-
through a historical perspective. Utilizing this perspective,
ion. Utilizing the troop leading and management principles
the course covers a time period from the first balloons and
learned in previous classes, cadets analyze the problems
dirigibles to the space-age global positioning systems of the
which the battalion faces, develop strategies, brief recom-
Persian Gulf War. Historical examples are provided to extrapo-
mendations, and execute the approved plan. Lab Fee. Pre-
late the development of Air Force capabilities (competencies),
requisite: Enrollment in the AROTC Advanced Course or
and missions (functions) to demonstrate the evolution of what
consent of department. 2 hours lab, 1 hour PT, and 80 hours
has become today’s USAF air and space power. Furthermore,
field training; .5 semester hour.
the course examines several fundamental truths associated
with war in the third dimension: e.g., Principles of War and
MSGN404. LEADERSHIP LABORATORY (II) Continued
Tenets of Air and Space Power. As a whole, this course pro-
leadership development by serving in the command and staff
vides the students with a knowledge level understanding for
positions in the Cadet Battalion. Cadets take a large role in
the general element and employment of air and space power,
determining the goals and direction of the cadet organization,
from an institutional doctrinal and historical perspective. In
under supervision of the cadre. Cadets are required to plan
addition, the students will continue to discuss the importance
and organize cadet outings and much of the training of under-
of the Air Force Core Values with the use of operational ex-
classmen. Lab Fee. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the AROTC
amples and historical Air Force leaders and will continue to
Advanced Course or consent of department. Lab Fee. 2 hours
develop their communication skills. Leadership Laboratory is
lab, 1 hour PT, and 80 hours field training; .5 semester hour.
mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course
MSGN497. SPECIAL STUDIES IN LEADERSHIP AND
by providing cadets with followership experiences. 1 hour
SMALL GROUP DYNAMICS I (I) The course is specifi-
lecture, 1.5 hours lab; 1.5 semester hours.
cally geared to the unique leadership challenges faced by
AFAS104. DEVELOPMENT OF AIR POWER II A contin-
individuals involved in CSM student government and other
uation of DEVELOPMENT OF AIR POWER I. One 1-hour
campus leadership positions. Instruction emphasis is on forces
lecture and one 1.5 hour lab per week; 1.5 semester hours.
and dynamics which shape and define leader/manager’s job
in the campus environment. Prerequisite: Currently appointed
or elected leader of a recognized student organization or con-
sent of the department head. 1 hour lecture and 5 hours lab;
3 semester hours.
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Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

AFAS105. AIR FORCE MANAGEMENT AND LEADER-
Physical Education and
SHIP I Two 1.5 hour seminars and one 1.5 hour lab per
week. This course is a study of leadership, management
Athletics
fundamentals, professional knowledge, Air Force personnel
and evaluation systems, leadership ethics, and communica-
TOM SPICER, Department Head, Professor and Athletic Director
tion skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies
DIXIE CIRILLO, Assistant Athletic Director
are used to examine Air Force leadership and management
JENNIFER McINTOSH, Athletics Trainer
GREG JENSEN, Assistant Trainer
situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practi-
JEFF SIROVATKA, Assistant Trainer
cal application of the concepts being studied. A mandatory
DAN R. LEWIS, Associate Athletic Director
Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing
OSCAR BOES, Cross Country Coach
advanced leadership experiences in officer-type activities,
MARTY HEATON, Assistant Football Coach
giving students the opportunity to apply leadership and man-
JASON KOLTZ, Assistant Football Coach
agement principles of this course. 3 hours lecture, 1.5 hours
JASON MUNOZ, Assistant Football Coach
lab; 3.5 semester hours.
PAULA KRUEGER, Women’s Basketball Coach
PRYOR ORSER, Men’s Basketball Coach
AFAS106. AIR FORCE MANAGEMENT AND LEADER-
BOB WRITZ, Golf Coach
SHIP II A continuation of AIR FORCE MANAGEMENT
DAVID HUGHES, Swimming and Diving Coach
AND LEADERSHIP I. Two 1.5 hour seminars and 1.5 hour
FRANK KOHLENSTEIN, Men’s Soccer Coach
lab per week. 3 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab; 3.5 semester
MICHAEL MULVANEY, Baseball Coach
hours.
MARK ROBERTS, Softball Coach
AFAS107. NATIONAL SECURITY FORCES IN CON-
ROBERT STITT, Football Coach
BRANDON LEIMBACH , Recreational & Club Sports Director
TEMPORARY AMERICAN SOCIETY I Two 1.5 hour
ART SIEMERS, Track Coach
seminars and one 1.5 hour lab per week. This course exam-
KEITH WILSON, Strength Coach
ines the national security process, regional studies, advanced
SHELLY JOHNSON, Volleyball Coach
leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special topics of
STEVEN KIMPEL, Wrestling Coach, Physical Education Director
interest focus on the military as a profession, officership,
The Department of Physical Education and Athletics
military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation
offers a four-fold physical education and athletics program
for active duty, and current issues affecting military profes-
which includes (a) required physical education; (b)inter-
sionalism. Within this structure, continued emphasis is given
collegiate athletics; (c) intramural athletics; and (d) recre-
to refining communication skills. A mandatory Leadership
ational athletics.
Laboratory complements this course by providing advanced
leadership and management principles of this course. 3 hours
A large number of students use the college’s facilities for
lecture, 1.5 hours lab; 3.5 semester hours.
purely recreational purposes, including swimming, tennis,
soccer, basketball, volleyball, weight lifting, softball, and
racquetball.
Russell H. Volk Gymnasium
A tri-level complex containing a NCAA regulation swim-
ming pool, a basketball arena, two racquetball/handball
courts, wrestling room, weight training facility, locker space,
and offices for the Physical Education Department.
Steinhauer Field House
A completely renovated facility of 35,000-sq. ft., which
provides for the needs of intercollegiate athletics, physical
education classes, intramurals and student recreation.
Baseball Diamond
Located west of Brooks Field and has seating accommoda-
tions for 500 spectators.
Softball Field
Located adjacent to the baseball field.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
143

Brooks Field
Intramural and Club Sports
Named in honor of Ralph D. Brooks, former member of
The intramural program features a variety of activities
the Board of Trustees of the School of Mines, Brooks Field
ranging from those offered in the intercollegiate athletic pro-
includes a football/soccer field equipped with lights and a
gram to more recreational type activities. They are governed
steel-concrete grandstand and bleachers which seat 3,500
by the CSM Rec. Sports Council and CSM Sports Club
spectators.
Council. Current offerings may be viewed in the second floor
Tennis Courts
of the Volk Gymnasium on the IM board. All activities are
The Department maintains four tennis courts.
offered in the following categories: Independent men, organi-
zational men, independent women, and co-ed.
Swenson Intramural Complex
Two fields are available for intramural/recreation sports.
The club sport program is governed by the CSM Sport
Club Council. There are 29 competitive groups currently
Required Physical Education.
under this umbrella. Some teams engage in intercollegiate
Each student at Colorado School of Mines is required to
competition at the non-varsity level, some serve as
complete four Physical Education classes, beginning with the
instructional/recreational entities, and some as strictly
prerequisite classes of PAGN101 and PAGN102. Four sepa-
recreational interest groups. They are funded through
rate semesters of Physical Education is a graduation require-
ASCSM. Some of the current organizations are Billiards,
ment. Exceptions: (1) a medical excuse verified by a
Caving, Climbing, Cheerleading, Ice Hockey, Karate, Kendo,
physician; (2) veterans, honorably discharged from the armed
Kayak, Judo, Lacrosse, Men’s Rugby, Women’s Rugby,
forces; (3) entering students 26 years or older or students
Shooting, Ski Team, Snowboard, Women’s Soccer, Men’s
holding a bachelor’s degree. Normally, it is fulfilled during
Ultimate Frisbee, Women’s Ultimate Frisbee, Volleyball,
the first two years of attendance. Transfer students should
Water Polo.
clear with the Admissions Offices regarding advanced stand-
ing in physical education. Students who transfer in as fresh-
Description of Courses
men or sophomores without any PA credits will be required
All students are required to complete PAGN101 and
to take PAGN101 and PAGN102. Participation in intercolle-
PAGN102 before they will be allowed to register in higher
giate athletics may be substituted for required semesters and
level activity classes. The only exceptions to this requirement
hours of physical education. ROTC students can waive the
are students enrolled in intercollegiate athletics and ROTC.
physical education requirement when a similar physical ac-
(See Required Physical Education.)
tivity is required in their respective ROTC Programs.
Freshman Year
Upper-class students who wish to continue taking physi-
PAGN101. PHYSICAL EDUCATION (I) (Required) A gen-
cal education after completing graduation requirements may
eral overview of life fitness basics which includes exposure
re-enroll in any of the regularly scheduled classes on an
to educational units of Nutrition, Stress Management, Drug
elective basis.
and Alcohol Awareness. Instruction in Fitness units provide
All students enrolled in physical education shall provide
the student an opportunity for learning and the beginning
their own gym uniform, athletic shoes, and swimming suit.
basics for a healthy life style.
A non-refundable $10 fee is assessed for the required locker
PAGN102. PHYSICAL EDUCATION (II) (Required) Sec-
service. Lockers are also available to students who are not
tions in physical fitness and team sports, relating to personal
enrolled in physical education classes for the same fee.
health and wellness activities. Prerequisite: PAGN101 or
Intercollegiate Athletics
consent of the Department Head.
The School is a charter member of the Rocky Mountain
Sophomore, Junior, Senior Years
Athletic Conference (RMAC) and the National Collegiate
Students may select one of several special activities listed
Athletic Association (NCAA). Sports offered include: foot-
below. Approved transfer credit may be substituted for the
ball, men’s and women’s basketball, wrestling, men’s and
following classes:
women’s track, men’s and women’s cross country, baseball,
PAGN201. PERSONAL WELLNESS Provides an overview
men’s golf, men’s and women’s swimming, men’s and
of the 5 Dimensions of Wellness: Physical, Social, Emo-
women’s soccer, and women’s volleyball and softball. One
tional, Intellectual and Spiritual. Students will take a proac-
hour credit is given for a semester’s participation in each sport.
tive approach to developing strategies for optimum wellness
Through a required athletic fee, all full-time students at-
including goal setting and application of wellness principles
tending CSM become members of the CSM Athletic Associa-
through assignments and group in-class work. Prerequisites:
tion, which financially supports the intercollegiate athletic
PAGN101 and PAGN102 or consent of Department Head.
program. With this fee, each CSM student receives free ad-
2 hours lecturer; 1 semester hour.
mission to all home athletic events. The Director of Athletics
administers this program.
144
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

PAGN205 through PAGN236. (Students enrolling in these
Intercollegiate Athletics
courses may be required to furnish their own equipment.)
Instruction and practice in fundamentals and mechanics of
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Depart-
the selected sport in preparation for collegiate competition.
ment Head. 2 hours activity; .5 semester hour.
Satisfactory completion of any course fulfills one semester of
PAGN205A. BEGINNING KARATE
physical education requirements. Note: All courses shown
PAGN205B/C. INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED KARATE
below, numbered 151 to 182 inclusive are likewise offered as
PAGN205D/E. YOGA
junior, and senior courses. For freshmen and sophomores,
PAGN205F. JUDO
they are numbered 151 to 182; juniors and seniors, 351 to
PAGN209. BEGINNING GOLF (I)
382. Odd numbered courses are offered in the fall, even num-
PAGN210. BEGINNING GOLF (II)
bered courses in the spring.
PAGN211A. WOMEN’S RACQUETBALL
PAGN211B. BEGINNING RACQUETBALL
PAGN151. BASEBALL (I)
PAGN215. TENNIS (I)
PAGN152. BASEBALL (II)
PAGN216. TENNIS (II)
PAGN153. BASKETBALL (I) A-men; B-women
PAGN217. CO-ED WEIGHT TRAINING (I)
PAGN154. BASKETBALL (II) A-men; B-women
PAGN217C. WOMEN’S WEIGHT TRAINING
PAGN157. CROSS COUNTRY (I)
PAGN218. CO-ED WEIGHT TRAINING (II)
PAGN159. FOOTBALL (I)
PAGN221. BADMINTON (I)
PAGN160. FOOTBALL (II)
PAGN235. AEROBICS (I)
PAGN161. GOLF (I)
PAGN235D. WATER AEROBICS
PAGN162. GOLF (II)
PAGN235E. SWIMMING
PAGN167. SOCCER (I)
PAGN235F/G FLYFISHING
PAGN168. SOCCER (II)
PAGN236. AEROBICS (II)
PAGN169. SWIMMING (I)
PAGN301A INTERMEDIATE BASKETBALL
PAGN170. SWIMMING (II)
PAGN301B INTERMEDIATE VOLLEYBALL
PAGN171. TENNIS (I)
PAGN310A. WOMEN’S RUGBY
PAGN172. TENNIS (II)
PAGN173. TRACK (I)
PAGN174. TRACK (II)
PAGN175. WRESTLING (I)
PAGN176. WRESTLING (II)
PAGN177. VOLLEYBALL (I)
PAGN178. VOLLEYBALL (II)
PAGN179. SOFTBALL (I)
PAGN180. SOFTBALL (II)
Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1 semester hour.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
145

Section 6 - Research Centers and
Institutes
Advanced Coatings and Surface
in research and education in the ferrous metallurgy branch of
Engineering Laboratory
materials science and engineering. Objectives of ASPPRC
The Advanced Coating and Surface Engineering Labora-
are to perform research of direct benefit to the users and pro-
tory (ACSEL) is a multi-disciplinary laboratory that serves as
ducers of steels, to educate graduate students within the con-
a focal point for industry- driven research and education in
text of research programs of major theoretical and practical
advanced thin films and coating systems, surface engineer-
interest to the steel-using and steel-producing industries, to
ing, tribology, electronic, optical and magnetic thin films and
stimulate undergraduate education in ferrous metallurgy, and
devices. The laboratory is supported by a combination of
to develop a forum to stimulate advances in the processing,
government funding agencies (NSF, DOE, DOD) and an in-
quality and application of steel.
dustrial consortium that holds annual workshops designed to
Research programs consist of several projects, each of
maximize interaction between participants, evaluate the re-
which is a graduate student thesis. Small groups of students
search conducted by graduate students and faculty, and pro-
and faculty are involved in each of the research programs.
vide direction and guidance for future activities. ACSEL
Sponsor representatives are encouraged to participate on the
provides opportunities for CSM faculty and graduate stu-
graduate student committees.
dents to visit and work in sponsor facilities, participate in
The Center was established with a five-year grant of
technical meetings with sponsors, and for CSM graduates to
$575,000 from the National Science Foundation, and is now
gain employment with sponsors.
self-sufficient, primarily as a result of industry support.
Advanced Control of Energy and
Center for Automation, Robotics and
Power Systems
Distributed Intelligence
The Advanced Control of Energy and Power Systems Cen-
The Center for Automation, Robotics and Distributed In-
ter (ACEPS), based in the Engineering Division, features a
telligence (CARDI) focuses on the study and application of
unique partnership consisting of industry, the National Sci-
advanced engineering and computer science research in con-
ence Foundation (NSF), the Department of Energy (DOE),
trol theory, learning, neural networks, robotics, data mining,
the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Colorado
image processing, signal processing, sensor fusion, informa-
School of Mines (CSM) and twelve other universities. The
tion technology, distributed networks, sensor and actuator de-
mission of ACEPS is to conduct fundamental and applied re-
velopment and artificial intelligence to problems in
search supporting the technical advancement of the electric
environment, energy, natural resources, materials, transporta-
utility industry, their customers, and component suppliers in
tion, information, communications and medicine. CARDI
the field of electric power systems and power electronics
concentrates on problems which are not amenable to tradi-
with special emphasis on the advanced/intelligent control and
tional solutions within a single discipline, but rather require a
power quality in the generation, transmission, distribution,
multi-disciplinary systems approach to integrate technolo-
and utilization; using such research as a means of advancing
gies. The systems require closed loop controllers that incor-
graduate education.
porate artificial intelligence and machine learning techniques
Center research projects focus on the development of an
to reason autonomously or in cooperation with a human su-
intelligent energy system that will employ advanced power
pervisor.
electronics, enhanced computer and communications systems,
Established in 1994, CARDI includes faculty from the
renewable energy applications, and distributed generation.
Division of Engineering, departments of Mathematical and
Examples include development of intelligent substations, im-
Computer Science, Geophysics, Metallurgical and Materials
pact of highly varying loads, power quality, electrical equip-
Engineering, and Environmental Science and Engineering.
ment life assessment, and intelligent automatic generation
Research is sponsored by industry, federal agencies, state
control for transient loads.
agencies, and joint government-industry initiatives. Interac-
Advanced Steel Processing and
tion with industry enables CARDI to identify technical needs
Products Research Center
that require research, to cooperatively develop solutions, and
to generate innovative mechanisms for the technology trans-
The Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research
fer. Enthusiastic and motivated students are encouraged to
Center (ASPPRC) at Colorado School of Mines was estab-
join CARDI for education and research in the area of robotics
lished in 1984. The Center is a unique partnership between
and intelligent systems.
industry, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and Colo-
rado School of Mines, and is devoted to building excellence
146
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Center for Combustion and
The primary goals of the Center for Engineering
Environmental Research
Education are
The Center for Combustion and Environmental Research
u To conduct world-class research on teaching and learning
(CCER) is an interdisciplinary research and educational unit
in science and engineering.
established by research active faculty with expertise in the
u To use the results of that research to continually improve
chemistry and physics of energy conversion processes. Staff
instruction at the Colorado School of Mines to better sup-
members include faculty, research faculty, post doctoral asso-
port the learning process of our students.
ciates, and graduate students. Funded research projects are
u To support the educational needs of science and engineer-
varied but fall into 5 core areas: fuel cells, diesel combustion
ing instructors at the pre-college, college, graduate and
experiments and modeling, materials synthesis in flames,
professional development levels.
combustion modeling, and optical measurement development
for combustion systems and combustion effluent flows. As
Center for Environmental Risk
society’s energy needs evolve, it is expected that a sixth area
Assessment
focused on fuels will emerge within the center as well.
The mission of the Center for Environmental Risk Assess-
Due to the energy conversion focus, collaborative projects
ment (CERA) at CSM is to unify and enhance environmental
typically include CSM’s Engineering Division and the
risk assessment research and educational activities at CSM.
Chemical Engineering Department. For further information,
By bringing diverse, inter-disciplinary expertise to bear on
contact the center director, Professor Terry Parker of the
problems in environmental risk assessment, CERA facilitates
Engineering Division.
the development of significantly improved, scientifically-
Center for Earth Materials, Mechanics,
based approaches for estimating human and ecological risks
and for using the results of such assessments. Education and
and Characterization
research programs within CERA integrate faculty and stu-
EM2C is a multidisciplinary research center intended to
dents from the departments of Chemical Engineering and
promote research in a variety of areas including rock
Petroleum Refining, Environmental Sciences and Engineer-
mechanics, earth systems, and nontraditional characteriza-
ing, Chemistry and Geochemistry, Mathematics and Com-
tion. The Center does not limit its focus to either “hard” or
puter Science, and Geology and Geological Engineering.
“soft” rock applications but instead fosters research in both
arenas and encourages interdisciplinary communication be-
Center for Intelligent Biomedical
tween the associated disciplines. The Colorado School of
Devices and Musculoskeletal Systems
Mines is a world leader in multidisciplinary integration and
The multi-institutional Center for Intelligent Biomedical
therefore presents a unique atmosphere to promote the suc-
Devices and Musculoskeletal systems (IBDMS) integrates
cess of such research. Faculty and students from the Depart-
programs and expertise from CSM and the University of
ments of Petroleum Engineering, Geophysical Engineering,
Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center. Established
Geology and Geological Engineering, Engineering, and
at CSM as a National Science Foundation (NSF) Industry/
Mining Engineering are involved in EM2C. In addition to
University Cooperative Research Center, IBDMS is also
traditional topics in these disciplines, the center cultivates
supported by industry, State, and Federal organizations.
research in nontraditional characterization such as arctic ice
IBDMS has become an international center for the
coring, extraterrestrial space boring, and laser/rock destruc-
development of Computer Assisted Surgery, Advanced
tion for multiple applications. EM2C was established in
Orthopaedic Applications, Sports Medicine, Occupational
2003.
Biomechanics, and Biomaterials. Through the efforts of this
Center for Engineering Education
center, new major and minor programs in bioengineering and
The Center serves as a focal point for educational research
biotechnology are being established at both the CSM graduate
conducted by CSM faculty. Successfully educating tomorrow’s
and undergraduate levels.
scientists and engineers requires that we look at student learning
IBDMS seeks to establish educational programs in addition
as a system. The principles of cognitive psychology and educa-
to short- and long-term basic and applied research efforts that
tional psychology provide the best explanation of how this learn-
would enhance the competitive position of Colorado and U.S.
ing system works. Education will be most effective when
bio-industry in the international markets. IBDMS focuses the
educational research, informed by the principles of cognitive and
work of diverse engineering, materials and medicine disci-
educational psychology, along with the application of that re-
plines. Its graduates are a new generation of students with an
search, and teaching, are linked and interrelated.
integrated engineering and medicine systems view, with in-
creasing opportunities available in the biosciences.
For more information about the IBDMS Center please con-
tact Dr. Joel M. Bach at jmbach@mines.edu or 303-384-2161.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
147

Center for Research on Hydrates and
CSEM also serves to guide and strengthen the curriculum
Other Solids
in electronic materials and related areas. CSEM members
Since 1975, the Center for Research on Hydrates and
develop and teach relevant courses. CSEM also emphasizes
Other Solids has performed both fundamental and applied re-
training through research experiences for both graduate and
search on natural gas hydrates, curious ice-like compounds
undergraduate students. Graduate students in the above-
composed of water and hydrocarbon gases. Gas hydrates,
mentioned departments as well as the materials science pro-
which generally form at cold temperatures and high pres-
gram can pursue research on center-related projects.
sures, present both a major challenge and major opportunity
Undergraduates are involved through engineering design
in energy production. Gas hydrates can plug deep sea and
courses and summer research experiences. Close proximity
arctic gas and oil pipelines, and preventing hydrate formation
to the National Renewable Energy Lab and several local pho-
is a major design and operational challenge. On the other
tovoltaic companies provides a unique opportunity for stu-
hand, naturally occurring gas hydrates could potentially pro-
dents to work with industry and government labs as they
vide the world's largest resource of natural gas. Recently, re-
solve real world problems. External contacts also provide
searchers at the center have also found that hydrates can be
guidance in targeting the educational curriculum toward the
used a hydrogen storage material, for potential use in fuel
needs of the electronic materials industry.
cell vehicles.
Center for Space Resources (CSR)
With active participation of faculty, graduate, and under-
The Center for Space Resources is dedicated to the human
graduate students, the center provides a unique combination
and robotic exploration of space and to the utilization of what
of expertise that has enabled CSM to achieve international
we learn to the improvement of our society by developing
prominence in gas hydrate research. CSM participants inter-
technologies for space resource extraction, manufacturing in
act on an on-going basis with sponsors and other collabora-
space, and life-support systems on spacecraft and planetary
tors, including frequent visits to their facilities both in the US
habitats. While there are several practical applications of
and abroad. For students, this interaction often continues be-
space exploration on Earth, the greatest achievement bring-
yond graduation, with opportunities for employment at spon-
ing benefits to humankind would be to develop commercial
soring industries. More information can be found at the
applications of space technology, including space and plane-
center website, www.mines.edu/research/chs.
tary resources, in space.
Center for Solar and Electronic
These will one day form the basis for new space industries
Materials
that include the harvesting of solar energy outside Earth's at-
mosphere, the development of an in-space reusable trans-
The Center for Solar and Electronic Materials (CSEM)
portation infrastructure carrying payloads from Earth to
was established in 1995 to focus, support, and extend grow-
geostationary orbits, the Moon or Mars and back, servicing
ing activity in electronic materials for solar applications, in
of satellites to extend their useful lifetimes and reduce the
electronic and microelectronic technologies, and in related
costs of space operations, and processing of value-added ma-
optical technologies. In addition to photovoltaics, CSEM
terials in Earth orbit based on lunar material resources.
supports research into advanced optics, novel optical devices,
thin film materials, polymeric devices, micro fluidic devices,
These goals are pursued by a Consortium involving faculty
nanoscale science and nanofabrication, novel characteriza-
and students from several departments, NASA and other gov-
tion, electronic materials processing, process simulation, and
ernment agencies, and industrial partners working together
systems issues associated with electronic materials and de-
on space-related projects.
vices. Alternative energy technologies and sustainability are
Center for Wave Phenomena
also areas of interest. CSEM facilitates interdisciplinary col-
With sponsorship for its research by 24 companies in the
laborations across the CSM campus and fosters interactions
worldwide oil exploration industry and several government
with national laboratories, industries, public utilities, local
agencies, this program, which includes faculty and students
state and federal government, and other universities. The
from the Departments of Geophysics, is engaged in a co-
center coordinates grant applications by its members to col-
ordinated and integrated program of research in wave propa-
lective funding opportunities, manages a joint-use laboratory
gation, inverse problems and seismic data processing. Its
with a broad range of characterization and processing tools,
methods have applications to seismic exploration and reser-
purchases joint-use tools based on member needs and main-
voir monitoring, global seismology, nondestructive testing
tains a virtural computational lab. In fulfilling its research
and evaluation, and land-mine detection, among other areas.
and educational mission, CSEM draws from expertise in the
Extensive use is made of analytical methods as well as com-
departments of Physics, Chemical Engineering, Metallurgical
putational techniques. Methodology is developed through
and Materials Engineering, Chemistry and Geochemistry,
computer implementation, based on the philosophy that the
and from the Division of Engineering.
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ultimate test of an inverse method is its application to experi-
joint effort between CSM and the Coors Ceramics Company
mental data. Thus, the group starts from a physical problem,
(now CoorsTek), the Center is dedicated to excellence in re-
develops a mathematical model that adequately represents
search and graduate education in high technology ceramic and
the physics, derives an approximate solution, generates a
composite materials. The goal of the Center is to translate
computer code to implement the method, performs tests on
advances in materials science into new and improved ceramic
synthetic data, and finally, on field data.
fabrication processes and ceramic and composite materials.
Center for Welding, Joining and
Current research projects cover a broad spectrum of materials
and phenomena including porous ceramics and metals for fil-
Coatings Research
ters; nano-scale powder preparation and mechanics; ceramic-
The Center for Welding, Joining and Coatings Research
metal composites; fuel cell, solar cell and battery materials;
(CWJCR) is an interdisciplinary organization with researchers
high temperature gas and plasma corrosion; interparticle
and faculty from the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
forces; structure of grain boundaries; and mechanical proper-
Department, the Engineering Division, and the Mining Engi-
ties of thin films. Current projects are supported by both in-
neering Department. The goal of CWJCR is to promote edu-
dustry and government and several students are performing
cation and research, and to advance understanding of the
their research through a collaboration with the National Re-
metallurgical and processing aspects of welding, joining and
newable Energy Laboratory located in Golden. Each project
coating processes. Current center activities include: educa-
involves research leading to a graduate thesis of a student.
tion, research, conferences, short courses, seminars, informa-
tion source and transfer, and industrial consortia. The Center
Colorado Energy Research Institute
receives significant support from industry, national laborato-
Originally established in 1974 and reestablished in 2004,
ries and government entities.
the Colorado Energy Research Institute (CERI) promotes re-
search and educational activities through networking among
The Center for Welding, Joining and Coatings Research
all constituencies in Colorado, including government agen-
strives to provide numerous opportunities that directly con-
cies, energy industries, and universities. CERI’s mission is to
tribute to the student’s professional growth. Some of the
serve as a state and regional resource on energy and energy-
opportunities include:
related minerals issues, provide energy status reports, spon-
Direct involvement in the projects that constitute the
sorship of symposia, demonstration programs, and reports on
Center’s research program.
research results. CERI’s activities enhance the development
Interaction with internationally renowned visiting scholars.
and promotion of energy and energy-related minerals educa-
Industrial collaborations that provide equipment, materials
tion programs in the areas of energy development, utilization,
and services.
and conservation, and provide a basis for informed energy-
Research experience at industrial plants or national labo-
related state policies and actions.
ratories.
Professional experience and exposure before nationally
Colorado Institute for Fuels and
recognized organizations through student presentations
Energy Research
of university research.
The Colorado Institute for Fuels and Energy Research
Direct involvement in national welding, materials, and
(CIFER) is an interdisciplinary research institute involving
engineering professional societies.
faculty and students from several academic departments at
Chevron Center of Research
the Colorado School of Mines. CIFER originally was formed
to assist industry, State and Federal governments in develop-
Excellence
ing and implementing clean air policy for the benefit of the
The Chevron Center of Research Excellence (CoRE) is a
U.S. and particularly for high altitude communities through
partnership between the Colorado School of Mines (CSM)
the development of newer, cleaner burning fuels and the
and Chevron (CVX) to conduct research on sedimentary ar-
technology to properly use fuels. It has evolved to include a
chitecture and reservoir characterization and modeling. The
substantial component of combustion and fuel cell research
center supports the development of new earth science tech-
as well has energy related computational modeling.
nology while providing CVX international employees the op-
portunity to earn advanced degrees.
Colorado Institute for Macromolecular
Colorado Center for Advanced
Science and Engineering
The Colorado Institute for Macromolecular Science and
Ceramics
Engineering (CIMSE) was established in 1999 by an inter-
The Colorado Center for Advanced Ceramics (CCAC) is
disciplinary team of faculty from several CSM departments.
developing the fundamental knowledge that is leading to im-
It is sponsored by the National Science Foundation, the Envi-
portant technological developments in advanced ceramics and
ronmental Protection Agency, the United States Department
composite materials. Established at CSM in April 1988 as a
of Agriculture, and the Department of Energy.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
149

The mission of the Institute is to enhance the training and
hardware systems and has amassed extensive databases and
research capabilities of CSM in the area of polymeric and
specialized computer programs. Outreach activities for the
other complex materials as well as to promote education in
Institute include the offering of short courses to the industry,
the areas of materials, energy, and the environment.
and sponsorship and participation in major international con-
Fourteen CSM faculty members from eight departments
ferences in tunneling, shaft drilling, raise boring and mine
are involved with the Institute’s research. The research vol-
mechanization.
ume is more than $1 million and supports around 15 full-time
The full-time team at EMI consists of scientists, engineers,
graduate students in polymers, nonotechnology, colloids, mi-
and support staff. Graduate students pursue their thesis work
crofluidics, and complex fluids. Current research projects in-
on Institute projects, while undergraduate students are em-
clude plastics and nanocomposites from renewable resources,
ployed in research.
novel methods for synthesizing polymers and self-assem-
bling nanostructures, microfluidc flow manipulation for
International Ground Water Modeling
chemical and biological separations, and theory and compu-
Center
tational study of complex matter.
The International Ground Water Modeling Center
CIMSE works to improve the educational experience of
(IGWMC) is an information, education, and research center
undergraduate and graduate students in polymers and com-
for ground-water modeling established at Holcomb Research
plex fluids as well as to maintain state-of-the-art lab facili-
Institute in 1978, and relocated to the Colorado School of
ties. The science and engineering of materials is a core
Mines in 1991. Its mission is to provide an international focal
competency of CSM, and CIMSE will play an important role
point for ground-water professionals, managers, and educa-
in ensuring that our students remain competitive.
tors in advancing the use of computer models in ground-
water resource protection and management. IGWMC
Energy and Minerals Field Institute
operates a clearinghouse for ground-water modeling soft-
The Energy and Minerals Field Institute is an educational ac-
ware; organizes conferences, short courses and seminars; and
tivity serving Colorado School of Mines students and external
provides technical advice and assistance related to ground
audiences. The goal of the Institute is to provide better under-
water. In support of its information and training activities,
standing of complex regional issues surrounding development
IGWMC conducts a program of applied research and devel-
of western energy and mineral resources by providing firsthand
opment in ground-water modeling.
experience that cannot be duplicated in the classroom. The In-
Kroll Institute for Extractive Metallurgy
stitute conducts field programs for educators, the media, gov-
ernment officials, industry, and the financial community. The
The Kroll Institute for Extractive Metallurgy (KIEM), a
Institute also hosts conferences and seminars throughout the
Center for Excellence in Extractive Metallurgy, was estab-
year dealing with issues specific to western resources develop-
lished at the Colorado School of Mines in 1974 using a be-
ment. Students involved in Institute programs are afforded a
quest from William J. Kroll. Over the years, the Kroll
unique opportunity to learn about the technological, economic,
Institute has provided support for a significant number of
environmental, and policy aspects of resource development.
undergraduate and graduate students who have gone on to
make important contributions to the mining, minerals and
Excavation Engineering and Earth
metals industries. The initial endowment has provided a great
Mechanics Institute
foundation for the development of a more comprehensive
The Excavation Engineering and Earth Mechanics Institute
program to support industry needs.
(EMI), established in 1974, combines education and research
The primary objectives of the Kroll Institute are to provide
for the development of improved excavation technology. By
research expertise, well-trained engineers to industry, and re-
emphasizing a joint effort among research, academic, and
search and educational opportunities to students, in the areas
industrial concerns, EMI contributes to the research, devel-
of minerals, metals and materials processing; extractive and
opment and testing of new methods and equipment, thus
chemical metallurgy; chemical processing of materials; and
facilitating the rapid application of economically feasible
recycling and waste treatment and minimization.
new technologies.
Marathon Center of Excellence for
Current research projects are being conducted throughout
Reservoir Studies
the world in the areas of tunnel, raise and shaft boring, rock
mechanics, micro-seismic detection, machine instrumenta-
Marathon Center of Excellence for Reservoir Studies con-
tion and robotics, rock fragmentation and drilling, materials
ducts collaborative research on timely topics of interest to the
handling systems, innovative mining methods, and mine de-
upstream segment of the petroleum industry and provides
sign and economics analysis relating to energy and non-fuel
relevant technical service support, technology transfer, and
minerals development and production. EMI has been a pio-
training to the Center’s sponsors. Research includes sponsor-
neer in the development of special applications software and
ship of M.S. and Ph.D. graduate students, while technology
transfer and training involve one-on-one training of practic-
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ing engineers and students from the sponsoring companies.
Reservoir Characterization Project
The Center is a multi-disciplinary organization housed in the
The Reservoir Characterization Project (RCP), established
Petroleum Engineering Department. The Center activities
in 1985 at Colorado School of Mines, is an industry-sponsored
call for the collaboration of the CSM faculty and graduate
research consortium. Its mission is to develop and apply 4-D,
students in various engineering and earth sciences disciplines
9-C seismology and associated technologies for enhanced
together with local world-class experts. The Center was initi-
reservoir recovery. Each multi-year research phase focuses
ated with a grant from Marathon Oil Company in 2003 and
on a consortium partner’s unique field location, where multi-
has been serving the oil industry around the world. The cur-
component seismic data are recorded, processed and inter-
rent research topics include: reservoir engineering aspects of
preted to define reservoir heterogeneity and architecture.
horizontal and deviated wells, Non-Darcy flow effects in hy-
Each field study has resulted in the development and ad-
draulic fractures and naturally fractured reservoirs, stream-
vancement of new 3- and 4-D multicomponent acquisition,
line modeling in dual-porosity reservoirs, multi-scale
processing, and interpretation technology, which has led to
simulation methods to capture the fine-scale heterogeneity
additional hydrocarbon recovery. Research currently focuses
effects in displacement processes, modeling of transient flow
on dynamic reservoir characterization, which enables moni-
in hydraulically fractured horizontal wells, naturally frac-
toring of the reservoir production process.
tured reservoirs containing multiple sets of intersecting frac-
tures, numerical modeling of reservoirs containing sparse
The Reservoir Characterization Project promotes interdis-
naturally fractured regions, improved modeling of matrix
ciplinary research and education among industry and stu-
vertical flow in dual-porosity reservoirs, steam assisted grav-
dents in the fields of geophysics, geology and geological
ity drainage (SAGD) for medium gravity foamy oil reser-
engineering, and petroleum engineering.
voirs.
Petroleum Exploration and Production
Center
The Petroleum Exploration and Production Center (PEPC)
is an interdisciplinary educational and research organization
specializing in applied studies of petroleum reservoirs. The
center integrates disciplines from within the Departments of
Geology and Geological Engineering, Geophysics and Petro-
leum Engineering.
PEPC offers students and faculty the opportunity to par-
ticipate in research areas including: improved techniques for
exploration, drilling, completion, stimulation and reservoir
evaluation techniques; characterization of stratigraphic
architecture and flow behavior of petroleum reservoirs at
multiple scales; evaluation of petroleum reserves and re-
sources on a national and worldwide basis; and development
and application of educational techniques to integrate the
petroleum disciplines.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
151

Section 7 - Services
Arthur Lakes Library
Information about hours, services, and the activation of new
Arthur Lakes Library is a regional information center for
accounts is available on the web site at http://www.mines.edu/
engineering, energy, minerals and materials science, and
academic/computer/, directly from the front desk of the
associated engineering and science fields. The library pro-
Computing Center (Green Center 231) or CTLM locations,
vides educational and research resources to support and
or by calling (303) 273-3431.
enhance the academic mission of CSM. The library staff is
Workrooms in several locations on campus contain net-
committed to excellence in supporting the information needs
worked PCs and workstations. Printers, scanners, digitizers,
of the CSM community and providing access to information
and other specialized resources are available for use in some
for library users.
of the locations.
The library collections include more than 500,000 vol-
In addition to central server and facilities operations,
umes; approximately 1800 serial titles with hundreds of data-
services provided to the campus community include e-mail,
bases and e-journals; over 201,000 maps; archival materials
wired and wireless network operation and support, modem
on CSM and western mining history; and several special col-
pools, access to the commodity Internet, Internet 2, and Na-
lections. The library is a selective U.S. and Colorado state
tional Lambda Rail, network security, volume and site licens-
depository with over 600,000 government publications, in-
ing of software, on-line training modules, videoconferencing,
cluding selected NTIS publications.
and campus web site and central systems administration and
Access to CSM collections is provided by Catalyst, the
support. In addition, support and administration is provided
on-line public access catalog and circulation system. Students
for some academic department servers, laboratories, and
and faculty have access to nearly all of the library’s electronic
desktops. AC&N manages and supports the central course
resources from any computer on the campus network, includ-
management system (Blackboard), calendaring services,
ing those in networked CSM residential facilities. Dial-up
printing, short-term equipment loan, and room scheduling for
and Internet access is also available from on and off-campus.
some general computer teaching classrooms.
See the library’s web page at http://www.mines.edu/library/
All major campus buildings are connected to the comput-
for more information and Web links.
ing network operated by AC&N and many areas of the cam-
Reference resources include specialized electronic data-
pus are covered by the wireless network. All residence halls
bases, websites and print indexes. Reference librarians pro-
and the Mines Park housing complex are wired for network
vide instruction and personal help as needed, conduct library
access and some fraternity and sorority houses are also di-
research sessions for classes, and provide e-mail and tele-
rectly connected to the network.
phone reference and research services.
All users of Colorado School of Mines computing and net-
In addition to material that can be checked out from the
working resources are expected to comply with all policies
CSM library and other libraries within the Colorado Alliance,
related to the use of these resources. Policies are posted at
interlibrary loan service provides access to materials from re-
http://www.mines.edu/academic/computer/policies/. For
gional and world-wide libraries.
more information about AC&N, see the web pages at
http://www.mines.edu/academic/computer/.
Academic Computing and Networking
Please note that all Academic Computing and Networking
Copy Center
facility offices and labs currently located in the Green Center
Located on the first floor of Guggenheim Hall, the Copy
are expected to move to the CTLM addition sometime during
Center offers on-line binding, printed tabs, and halftones.
the 2006-2007 academic year. Please check with AC&N
Printing can be done on all paper sizes from odd-sized origi-
staff if you have questions about this relocation.
nals. Some of the other services offered are GBC and Velo
Binding, folding, sorting and collating, reduction and en-
Academic Computing and Networking (AC&N) provides
largement, two sided copying, and color copying. We have a
computing and networking services to meet the instructional,
variety of paper colors, special resume paper and CSM
research, and networking infrastructure needs of the campus.
watermark for thesis copying. These services are available
AC&N manages and operates the campus network along
to students, faculty, and staff. The Copy Center campus
with central academic computing systems and laboratories
extension is 3202.
located in the Green Center, CTLM, Writing Center, and
Library. In addition, AC&N’s academic department support
CSM Alumni Association
services group provides support services for many depart-
(CSMAA) The Colorado School of Mines Alumni Asso-
mental servers, laboratories, and desktops.
ciation, established in 1895, serves the Colorado School of
Central computing accounts and services are available to
Mines and its alumni. Services and benefits of membership
registered students and current faculty and staff members.
include:
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Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

Mines, a quarterly publication covering campus and
Petroleum Hall and Metals Hall are lecture rooms seating
alumni news; an online directory of all Mines alumni for net-
123 and 310, respectively. Each room has audio visual equip-
working purposes; on-line job listings; section activities that
ment. In addition, the Green Center houses the modern Com-
provide social and networking connections to the campus and
puting Center and the Department of Geophysics.
other Mines alumni around the world; invitations to local and
annual alumni meetings, reunions, golf tournaments and
INTERLINK Language Center (ESL)
other special events on and off campus; awards, including the
The INTERLINK Language program combines intensive
opportunity to nominate outstanding fellow alumni and be
English language instruction (ESL) with academic training
nominated yourself; CSM library privileges for Colorado res-
and cultural orientation to prepare students for their studies at
idents; access to career service aids; discounts with partner
CSM. Designed for international students in engineering and
vendors; and e-mail forwarding services.
the sciences, the program prepares students for a successful
transition to their new academic and cultural environment.
Benefits for current Colorado School of Mines students are
The curriculum focuses on individual student needs, utilizing
legacy grants for children or grandchildren of alumni; the
experiential learning projects, media technology (video, film,
Student Financial Assistance Program; recognition banquets
computers, TV, radio, the Internet) and various sources and
for graduating seniors/graduate students; the CSMAA Men-
resources in the surrounding community. Successful comple-
torship program, pairing students with alumni for profes-
tion of the program may entitle academically qualified stu-
sional development; assistance and support of School events
dents to begin their academic studies without a TOFEL score.
such as Homecoming; alumni volunteer assistance in student
recruiting; Order of the Engineer ceremonies; and programs
The program is open to adults who have completed sec-
enabling alumni input in school programming.
ondary school in good standing (grade point average of C+
or above) and are able to meet their educational and living
For further information, call 303 273-3295, FAX 303
expenses. For further information contact INTERLINK Lan-
273-3583, e-mail csmaa@mines.edu, or write Mines Alumni
guage Center (ESL) at:
Association, 1600 Arapahoe Street, P.O. Box 1410, Golden,
CO 80402-1410.
INTERLINK Language Center (ESL)
Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401
Environmental Health and Safety
http://www.eslus.com
The Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) Department
http://www.mines.edu/Outreach/interlink
is located in Chauvenet Hall room 195. The Department pro-
Email: interlinkcsm@mines.edu
vides a variety of services to students, staff and faculty mem-
Tele: 303-273-3516
bers. Functions of the Department include: hazardous waste
Fax: 303-278-4055
collection and disposal; chemical procurement and distribu-
tion; chemical spill response; assessment of air and water
LAIS Writing Center
quality; fire safety; laboratory safety; industrial hygiene; ra-
Located in room 311 Stratton Hall (phone: 303-273-3085),
diation safety; biosafety; and recycling. Staff is available to
the LAIS Writing Center is a teaching facility providing all
consult on issues such as chemical exposure control, hazard
CSM students, faculty, and staff with an opportunity to
identification, safety systems design, personal protective
enhance their writing abilities. The LAIS Writing Center
equipment, or regulatory compliance. Stop by our office or
faculty are experienced technical and professional writing
call 303 273-3316. The EHS telephone is monitored nights
instructors who are prepared to assist writers with every-
and weekends to respond to spills and environmental emer-
thing from course assignments to scholarship and job appli-
gencies.
cations. This service is free to CSM students, faculty, and
staff and entails one-to-one tutoring and online resources (at
Green Center
http://www.mines.edu/Academic/lais/wc/writingcenter.html).
Completed in 1971, the Cecil H. and Ida Green Graduate
and Professional Center is named in honor of Dr. and Mrs.
Off-Campus Study
Green, major contributors to the funding of the building.
A student must enroll in an official CSM course for any
period of off-campus, course-related study, whether U.S. or
Bunker Memorial Auditorium, which seats 1,386, has a
foreign, including faculty-led short courses, study abroad, or
large stage that may be used for lectures, concerts, drama
any off-campus trip sponsored by CSM or led by a CSM fac-
productions, or for any occasion when a large attendance is
ulty member. The registration must occur in the same term
expected.
that the off-campus study takes place. In addition, the stu-
Friedhoff Hall contains a dance floor and an informal
dent must complete the necessary release, waiver, and emer-
stage. Approximately 600 persons can be accommodated at
gency contact forms, transfer credit pre-approvals, and
tables for banquets or dinners. Auditorium seating can be
FERPA release, and provide adequate proof of current health
arranged for up to 450 people.
insurance prior to departure. For additional information con-
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
153

cerning study abroad requirements, contact the Office of In-
Women in Science, Engineering and
ternational Programs at (303) 384-2121; for other informa-
Mathematics (WISEM) Program
tion, contact the Registrar’s Office.
The mission of WISEM is to enhance opportunities for
Office of International Programs
women in science and engineering careers, to increase reten-
The Office of International Programs (OIP) fosters and
tion of women at CSM, and to promote equity and diversity
facilitates international education, research and outreach at
in higher education. The office sponsors programs and serv-
CSM. OIP is administered by the Office of Academic Affairs.
ices for the CSM community regarding gender and equity
OIP is located in 109 Stratton Hall. For more specific
issues. For further information, contact: Debra K. Lasich,
information about study abroad and other international pro-
Executive Director of Women in Science, Engineering
grams, contact OIP at 384-2121 or visit the OIP web page
and Mathematics, Colorado School of Mines, 1133 17th
(http://www.mines.edu/Academic/lais/OIP/).
Street, Golden, CO 80401-1869, or call (303) 273-3097;
dlasich@mines.edu or http://www.mines.edu/Academic/
The office works with the departments and divisions of the
affairs/wisem/.
School to: (1) help develop and facilitate study abroad oppor-
tunities for CSM students while serving as an informational
Public Relations
and advising resource for them; (2) assist in attracting new
The communications staff in the President’s Office is re-
international students to CSM; (3) serve as a resource for
sponsible for public relations and marketing initiatives at
faculty and scholars of the CSM community, promoting
Mines. For information about the School’s publications
faculty exchanges, faculty-developed overseas learning
guidelines, including the use of Mines logos, and for
opportunities, and the pursuit of collaborative international
media-related requests, contact Marsha Williams, Director
research activities; (4) foster international outreach and tech-
of Integrated Marketing Communications, 303-273-3326 or
nology transfer programs; (5) facilitate arrangements for offi-
marswill@mines.edu.
cial international visitors to CSM; and (6) in general, helps
Research Services
promote the internationalization of CSM’s curricular pro-
The Office of Research Services (ORS), under the Associ-
grams and activities. OIP promotes and coordinates the
ate Vice President for Finance and Operations and Controller,
submission of Fulbright, Rhodes, Churchill and Marshall
provides administrative support in proposal preparation and
Scholarship programs on campus.
contract and grant administration, which includes negotia-
Office of Technology Transfer
tion, account set-up, and close out of expired agreements. In-
The purpose of the Office of Technology Transfer (OTT)
formation on any of these areas of research and specific
is to reward innovation and entrepreneurial activity by stu-
forms can be accessed on our web site at
dents, faculty and staff, recognize the value and preserve
www.is.mines.edu/ors.
ownership of CSM’s intellectual property, and contribute to
Special Programs and Continuing
Colorado’s and the nation’s economic growth. OTT reports
directly to the CSM President, and the office works closely
Education (SPACE)
with the Vice President of Research and Technology Transfer
The SPACE Office offers short courses, special pro-
and the School’s Office of Legal Services to coordinate ac-
grams, and professional outreach programs to practicing
tivities. Through its internal technical review team and exter-
engineers and other working professionals. Short courses,
nal business commercialization board, OTT strives to:
offered both on the CSM campus and throughout the US,
provide concentrated instruction in specialized areas and are
(1) Initiate and stimulate entrepreneurship and develop-
taught by faculty members, adjuncts, and other experienced
ment of mechanisms for effective investment of
professionals. The Office offers a broad array of program-
CSM’s intellectual capital;
ming for K-12 teachers and students through its Teacher
(2) Secure CSM’s intellectual properties generated by
Enhancement Program, and the Denver Earth Science Project.
faculty, students, and staff;
The Office also coordinates educational programs for inter-
national corporations and governments through the Inter-
(3) Contribute to the economic growth of the community,
national Institute for Professional Advancement and hosts the
state, and nation through facilitating technology trans-
Mine Safety and Health Training Program. A separate bulletin
fer to the commercial sector;
lists the educational programs offered by the SPACE Office,
(4) Retain and motivate faculty by rewarding entrepre-
CSM, 1600 Arapahoe St., Golden, CO 80401. Phone: 303
neurship;
273-3321; FAX 303 273-3314; email space@mines.edu;
website www.mines.edu/Outreach/Cont_Ed.
(5) Utilize OTT opportunities to advance high-quality
faculty and students;
(6) Generate a new source of revenue for CSM to expand
the school’s research and education.
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Telecommunications
The Telecommunications Office provides long distance
The Telecommunications Office is located at the west end
services for the Residence Halls, Sigma Nu house, Fiji house,
of the Plant Facilities building, and provides telephone services
PI PHI House, ALPHA PHI House, SIGMA KAPPA House
to the Campus. The Telecommunications Office also main-
and Mines Park housing areas through individual account
tains a CSM Campus Directory in conjunction with the Infor-
codes. Long distance rates for domestic calling are 0.05 cents
mation Services department available anytime to faculty, staff,
per minute, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. International
and students on the Web at www.mines.edu/directory.
rates are available at the Telecommunications Office or
through the Web at http://www.is.mines.edu/telecomm/
Local telephone service is provided, as part of the housing
Students/StudRate.asp. Accounts are issued by request at
rates (optional for Mines Park residence). The Telecommuni-
any time. Monthly long distance charges are assessed to the
cations Office provides maintenance for telephone lines and
student accounts by the 5th of each month for calls made the
services. Students will need to bring or purchase their own
prior month, and invoices are mailed directly to students at
calling line ID device if they choose to take advantage of this
their campus address. Questions regarding the above services
feature.
should be directed to the Telecommunications Office by call-
ing (303) 273-3000 or 1-800-446-9488 and saying Telecom-
munications, or via the Web at http://www.is.mines.edu/
telecomm/.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
155

Directory of the School
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
PETER HAN, 1993-A.B., University of Chicago; M.B.A.,
JOHN K. COORS CoorsTek, Inc., 16000 Table Mountain
University of Colorado; Vice President for Institutional
Parkway, Golden, CO 80403
Advancement
DEANN CRAIG 536 Milwaukee Street, Denver, CO 80206
JOHN POATE, 2006-B.S., M.S., Melbourne University;
M.A., Ph.D., Australian National University; Vice President
FRANK DeFILIPPO Bledsoe, DeFilippo, Rees, LLC, 1675
for Research and Technology Transfer
Broadway, Suite 2440, Denver, CO 80202
ARTHUR B. SACKS, 1993-B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A.,
L. ROGER HUTSON Paladin Energy Partners, LLC, 410
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Associate Vice
17th Street, Suite 1200, Denver CO 80202
President for Academic and Faculty Affairs; Professor of
MICHAEL S. NYIKOS 2285 El Rio Drive, Grand Junction,
Liberal Arts and International Studies
CO 81503
BARBARA M. OLDS, 1984-B.A., Stanford University;
TERRANCE G. TSCHATSCHULA Aspen Petroleum Prod-
M.A., Ph.D., University of Denver; Associate Vice President
ucts, 2121 S. Oneida Street, Suite 625, Denver, CO 80224
for Educational Innovation; Professor of Liberal Arts and In-
DAVID. J. WAGNER David Wagner & Associates, P.C.,
ternational Studies
8400 E. Prentice Ave., Englewood, CO 80111
THOMAS M. BOYD, 1993-B.S., M.S., Virginia Polytechnic
JUSTIN CHICHESTER Student Representative
Institute and State University; Ph.D., Columbia University;
EMERITUS MEMBERS OF BOT
Dean of Graduate Studies; Associate Professor of Geo-
physics
Ms. Sally Vance Allen
Mr. Joseph Coors, Jr.
LORING ABEYTA, 2006-B.A., University of Denver; M.A.,
Mr. William K. Coors
St. Thomas Seminary; Ph.D., University of Denver, Interim
Mr. Frank Erisman
Principal Tutor and Program Director, Guy T. McBride, Jr.
Mr. Hugh W. Evans
Honors Program
Mr. Jack Grynberg
SARAH ANDREWS, 2005-B.S., Indiana University, Assis-
Rev. Don K. Henderson
tant Director of Admissions
Mr. Anthony L. Joseph
LINDA J. BALDWIN, 1994-B.S., Iowa State University;
Ms. Karen Ostrander Krug
Continuing Education Program Coordinator
Mr. J. Robert Maytag
Mr. Terence P. McNulty
GEOFFREY B. BARSCH, 2004-B.S., Colorado State Uni-
Mr. Donald E. Miller
versity; Director, Budget and Planning
Mr. F. Steven Mooney
PAUL BARTOS, 2000-B.S.,Wayne State University; M.S.,
Mr. Randy L. Parcel
Stanford University; Geology Museum Curator
Mr. David D. Powell, Jr.
GARY L. BAUGHMAN, 1984-B.S.Ch.E., Ohio University;
Mr. John A. Reeves, Sr.
M.S., Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Director of Special
Mr. Fred R. Schwartzberg
Programs and Continuing Education
Mr. Ted P. Stockmar
DAVID G. BEAUSANG, 1993-B.S., Colorado State Univer-
Mr. Charles E. Stott, Jr.
sity; Computing Support Specialist
Mr. J. N. Warren
Mr. James C. Wilson
HEATHER BOYD, 1990-B.S., Montana State University;
M.Ed., Colorado State University; Senior Assistant Director
ADMINISTRATION
of Admissions
MYLES W. SCOGGINS, 2006-B.S., Ph.D., University of
Tulsa; M.S., University of Oklahoma; President
RICHARD M. BOYD, 2000-B.S., Regis University; Director
of Public Safety
NIGEL T. MIDDLETON, 1990-B.Sc., Ph.D., University of
the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg; Executive Vice President
RONALD L. BRUMMETT, 1993-B.A., Metropolitan State
for Academic Affairs and Dean of Faculty; Professor of
College; M.A., University of Northern Colorado; M.B.A.,
Engineering, P.E., S. Africa
University of Colorado Denver; Director of CSM Career
Center and the Office for Student Development and Aca-
HAROLD R. CHEUVRONT, 1976-84, 1985-B.S., M.A.,
demic Services
West Virginia University; Ph.D., University of Northern Colo-
rado; Vice President for Student Life and Dean of Students
TIMOTHY W. CAKE, 1994-B.S., Colorado State University;
M.S., Regis University; Director of Plant Facilities
156
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

CAROL R. CHAPMAN, 1999-B.A.,Wells College; M.P.A.,
KATHLEEN GODEL-GENGENBACH, 1998-B.A., M.A.,
University of Colorado; Special Assistant to the President
University of Denver; Ph.D., University of Colorado; Direc-
DIXIE CIRILLO, 1991-B.S., University of Northern Colo-
tor, Office of International Programs
rado; Assistant Director of Financial Aid and NCAA Com-
BRUCE P. GOETZ, 1980-84, 1987- B.A., Norwich Univer-
pliance Coordinator
sity; M.S., M.B.A., Florida Institute of Technology; Director
JULIE COAKLEY, 2001-B.S., University of Toledo; M.S.,
of Admissions
University of Toledo; Executive Assistant to the Vice Presi-
SHARON HART, 1999-B.S., Colorado School of Mines; M.A.,
dent for Academic Affairs
University of Colorado; Director of Institutional Research
THERESE DEEGAN-YOUNG, 1987-B.A., St. Louis Uni-
LINN HAVELICK, 1988-B.A., M.S., University of Colorado
versity; M.A., University of Colorado; Student Development
at Denver; CIH; Director, Environmental Health & Safety
Center Counselor
CHRISTINA JENSEN, 1999-B.A., M.S., San Diego State
TERRANCE DINKEL, 1999-B.S., University of Colorado;
University; Assistant Director, Admission and Financial Aid
M.S., American Technological University; Program Coordi-
EVE JORDAL, 2000-Executive Assistant to the Vice Presi-
nator, Mine Safety and Health Program
dent for Student Life and Dean of Students
STEPHEN DMYTRIW, 1999-B.S., University of Nevada;
JOHN KANE, 2000-B.A., University of Colorado Boulder;
Program Coordinator, Mine Safety and Health Program
Director of Materials Management
JENNIFER DOANE, 2005-B.A., Colorado State University,
LISA KINZEL, 2006-B.A., State University of New York at
M.A., University of Colorado, Colorado Springs; Assistant
Geneseo; Executive Assistant to the Vice President for Re-
Director of Student Activities
search and Technology Transfer
MICHAEL DOUGHERTY, 2003-B.A., Cumberland College:
MELVIN L. KIRK, 1995-B.S., M.A., University of Northern
M.B.A., University of Alaska Anchorage; Director of Human
Colorado; Student Development Center Counselor
Resources
ROBERT KNECHT, 1977-P.E., M.S., Ph.D., Colorado School
LOUISA DULEY, 2000-B.S.,Western State College; Assis-
of Mines; Director of EPICS
tant Director of Admissions
ROGER A. KOESTER, 1989-B.A., Grinnell College; M.B.A.,
RHONDA L. DVORNAK, 1994-B.S., Colorado School of
Drake University; Director of Financial Aid
Mines; Continuing Education Program Coordinator
DAVID LARUE, 1998-B.A., St. Thomas Seminary College;
KATHLEEN FEIGHNY, 2001-B.A., M.A., University of
M.A., University of Colorado at Denver; Ph.D., University of
Oklahoma; Program Manager, Division of Economics and
Colorado at Boulder; Computer Support Specialist
Business
DEBRA K. LASICH, 1999-B.S., Kearney State College; M.A.,
ROBERT FERRITER, 1999-A.S., Pueblo Junior College;
University of Nebraska; Executive Director of the Women in
B.S., M.S., Colorado School of Mines; Director, Mine Safety
Science, Engineering, and Mathematics (WISEM) Program
and Health Program
ROBERT A. MacPHERSON, 1988-B.S., United States Naval
RICHARD FISCHER, 1999-B.A., St. John’s University;
Academy; Radiation Safety Officer
Program Coordinator, Mine Safety and Health Program
A. EDWARD MANTZ, 1994-B.S., Colorado School of
DAN FOX, 2005-B.S., Montana State University, M.S., East-
Mines; Director of Green Center
ern New Mexico University, Ph.D., University of Northern
Colorado; Director of Residence Life
MICHAEL McGUIRE, 1999-Engineer of Mines, Colorado
School of Mines; Program Coordinator, Mine Safety and
KELLY FOX, 2004-B.A., University of Nebraska; M.P.A.,
Health Program
University of Colorado; Director of Policy, Planning and
Analysis
JERRY MARTINEZ, 2005-B.S., Metropolitan State College;
Assistant Director of Financial Aid
MELODY A. FRANCISCO, 1988-89, 1991-B.S., Montana
State University; Continuing Education Program Coordinator
LARA MEDLEY, 2003-B.S., University of Colorado at
Boulder; M.P.A., University of Colorado at Denver; Registrar
ROBERT A. FRANCISCO, 1988-B.S., Montana State Uni-
versity; Director of Student Life
MARY MITTAG-MILLER, 1998-Director of the Office of
Research Services
GEORGE FUNKEY, 1991-M.S., Michigan Technological
University; Director of Information Services
DANIEL MONTEZ, 2003-B.S., University of Northern Colo-
rado; M.S., University of Colorado at Denver; Associate Vice
LISA GOBERIS, 1998-B.S., University of Northern Colo-
President for Finance and Operations
rado; Assistant Director of the Student Center
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
157

DEREK MORGAN, 2003- B.S., University of Evansville;
MARSHA WILLIAMS, 1998-B.S., Kansas State University;
M.S., Colorado State University; Director of Student Activities
M.S., University of Colorado; Director of Integrated Market-
DAVID MOSCH, 2000-B.S., New Mexico Institute of Mining
ing Communications
and Technology; Edgar Mine Manager
DEREK J. WILSON, 1982-B.S., University of Montana;
DAG NUMMEDAL, 2004-B.A., M.A., University of Oslo;
Director of the Computing Center
Ph.D., University of Illinois; Executive Director of the Colo-
A. WILLIAM YOUNG, 1974-B.S., North Carolina State Uni-
rado Energy Research Institute
versity; M.S., University of Denver; Director of Enrollment
ANITA PARISEAU, 2004-B.S., Ithaca College; Director of
Management and Associate Vice President for Student Life
Alumni Relations/Executive Director CSM Alumni Association
ED ZUCKER, 2001-B.A., M.S., University of Arizona;
TRICIA DOUTHIT PAULSON, 1998-B.S., Colorado School
Computing Services Support Manager
of Mines; Associate Registrar
EMERITI
ROGER PIERCE, 2000-B.S.,Wisconsin Institute of Technol-
GEORGE S. ANSELL, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Rensselaer Poly-
ogy; Program Coordinator, Mine Safety and Health Program
technic Institute; Emeritus President and Professor of Metal-
JAMES L. PROUD, 1994-B.S., University of Wisconsin,
lurgical Engineering, P.E.
Whitewater; M.A., California State Polytechnic University;
THEODORE A. BICKART, B.E.S., M.S.E., D.Engr., The
Continuing Education Program Coordinator
Johns Hopkins University; Emeritus President and Professor
ANGIE REYES, 1997-B.A., Chadron State College; Student
of Engineering
System Manager.
GUY T. McBRIDE, JR. B.S., University of Texas; D.Sc.,
MARIAN E. ROHRER, R.N., 1998-Director, Student Health
Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Emeritus President, P.E.
Center
JOHN U. TREFNY, B.S., Fordham College; Ph.D., Rutgers
PHILLIP ROMIG III, 1999-B.A., Nebraska Wesleyan Uni-
University; Emeritus President, Professor of Physics
versity; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Nebraska; Network
JOHN F. ABEL, JR. E.M., M.Sc., E.Sc., Colorado School of
Engineer and Security Specialist
Mines; Emeritus Professor of Mining Engineering
ANDREA SALAZAR, 1999-B.A., Colorado State University;
R. BRUCE ALLISON, B.S., State University of New York at
Assistant Director of Admissions
Cortland; M.S., State University of New York at Albany;
SYDNEY SANDROCK, 1995-Assistant to the Vice President
Emeritus Professor of Physical Education and Athletics
for Finance and Operations
WILLIAM R. ASTLE, B.A., State University of New York at
ERIC SCARBRO, 1991-B.S., University of South Carolina;
New Paltz; M.A., Columbia University; M.A., University of
M.S., Colorado School of Mines; Financial Systems Manager
Illinois; Emeritus Professor of Mathematical and Computer
Sciences
JAHI SIMBAI, 2000-B.S., M.B.A., University of Colorado at
Boulder; Director of Graduate Recruiting and Admissions
ROBERT M. BALDWIN, B.S., M.S., Iowa State University;
Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Emeritus Professor of
SANDRA SIMS, 2004-B.S., Pennsylvania State University,
Chemical Engineering
M.S., Florida Institute of Technology, PsyD, Florida Institute
of Technology; Counselor
BARBARA B. BATH, B.A., M.A., University of Kansas;
Ph.D., American University; Emerita Associate Professor of
THOMAS E. SPICER, 2004-B.S., Fort Hays State Univer-
Mathematical and Computer Sciences
sity; M.S., Fort Hays State University; Director of Athletics
and Head of Physical Education Department
RAMON E. BISQUE, B.S., St. Norbert’s College; M.S.
Chemistry, M.S. Geology, Ph.D., Iowa State College;
KRISTIN STOLSMARK, 2005-B.A., Dakota State Univer-
Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
sity; Campus ID Card Manager
NORMAN BLEISTEIN, B.S., Brooklyn College; M.S.,
KIRSTEN VOLPI, 2005-B.S., University of Colorado; CPA;
Ph.D., New York University; University Emeritus Professor
Associate Vice President for Finance and Operations and
of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Controller
ARDEL J. BOES, B.A., St. Ambrose College; M.S., Ph.D.,
ANNE STARK WALKER, 1999-B.S., Northwestern Univer-
Purdue University; Emeritus Professor of Mathematical and
sity; J.D., University of Denver; General Counsel
Computer Sciences
CAROL L. WARD, 1993-B.S., Ohio State University; M.A.,
AUSTIN R. BROWN, B.A., Grinnell College; M.A., Ph.D.,
Denver University; Computer Support Engineer
Yale University; Emeritus Professor of Mathematical and
HOLLY WILKINSON, 2005-B.S., Union College, M.S.,
Computer Sciences
Norwich University; Assistant Director of the Career Center
158
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

JAMES T. BROWN, B.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado;
KENNETH W. EDWARDS, B.S., University of Michigan;
Emeritus Professor of Physics
M.A., Dartmouth College; Ph.D., University of Colorado;
W. REX BULL, B.Sc., App. Diploma in Mineral Dressing,
Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
Leeds University; Ph.D., University of Queensland; Emeritus
JOHN C. EMERICK, B.S., University of Washington; M.A.,
Professor of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
Ph.D., University of Colorado; Emeritus Associate Professor
ANNETTE L. BUNGE, B.S., State University of New York
of Environmental Science and Engineering
at Buffalo; Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley;
EDWARD G. FISHER, B.S., M.A., University of Illinois;
Emeritus Professor of Chemical Engineering
Emeritus Professor of English
BETTY J. CANNON, B.A., M.A., University of Alabama;
DAVID E. FLETCHER, B.S., M.A., Colorado College;
Ph.D., University of Colorado; Emeritus Associate Professor
M.S.B.A., Ph.D., University of Denver; Emeritus Professor
of Liberal Arts and International Studies
of Economics and Business
F. EDWARD CECIL, B.S., University of Maryland; M.A.,
ROBERT H. FROST, Met.E. Ph.D., Colorado School of
Ph.D., Princeton University; Emeritus Professor of Physics
Mines; S.M.,M.E., Massachusetts Institute of Technology;
W. JOHN CIESLEWICZ, B.A., St. Francis College; M.A.,
Emeritus Associate Professor of Metallurgical and Materials
M.S., University of Colorado; Emeritus Associate Professor
Engineering
of Slavic Studies and Foreign Languages
S. DALE FOREMAN, B.S., Texas Technological College;
JOHN A. CORDES, B.A., J.D., M.A., University of Iowa;
M.S., Ph.D., University of Colorado; Emeritus Professor of
Ph.D., Colorado State University; Emeritus Associate Pro-
Civil Engineering, P.E.
fessor of Economics and Business
JAMES H. GARY B.S., M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute;
TIMOTHY A. CROSS, B.A., Oberlin College; M.S., Univer-
Ph.D., University of Florida; Emeritus Professor of Chemical
sity of Michigan; Ph.D., University of Southern California;
Engineering
Emeritus Associate Professor of Geology and Geological En-
DONALD W. GENTRY, B.S., University of Illinois; M.S.,
gineering
University of Nevada; Ph.D., University of Arizona; Emeritus
STEPHEN R. DANIEL, Min. Eng.- Chem., M.S., Ph.D.,
Professor of Mining Engineering, P.E.
Colorado School of Mines; Emeritus Professor of Chemistry
JOHN O. GOLDEN, B.E., M.S., Vanderbilt University;
and Geochemistry
Ph.D., Iowa State University; Emeritus Professor of
GERALD L. DEPOORTER, B.S., University of Washing-
Chemical Engineering
ton; M.S., Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley;
JOAN P. GOSINK, B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technol-
Emeritus Associate Professor of Metallurgical and Materials
ogy; M.S., Old Dominion University; Ph.D., University of
Engineering
California - Berkeley; Emerita Professor of Engineering
RICHARD H. DeVOTO, A.B., Dartmouth College; M.Sc.,
THOMAS L. T. GROSE, B.S., M.S., University of Washing-
Thayer School of Engineering Dartmouth College; D.Sc., Colo-
ton; Ph.D., Stanford University; Emeritus Professor of Geol-
rado School of Mines; Emeritus Professor of Geology, P.E.
ogy and Geological Engineering
DEAN W. DICKERHOOF, B.S., University of Akron; M.S.,
RAYMOND R. GUTZMAN, A.B., Fort Hays State College;
Ph.D., University of Illinois; Professor Emeritus of Chem-
M.S., State University of Iowa; Emeritus Professor of Mathe-
istry and Geochemistry
matical and Computer Sciences
DONALD I. DICKINSON, B.A., Colorado State University;
FRANK A. HADSELL, B.S., M.S., University of Wyoming;
M.A., University of New Mexico; Emeritus Professor of Lib-
D.Sc., Colorado School of Mines; Emeritus Professor of
eral Arts and International Studies
Geophysics
J. PATRICK DYER, B.P.E., Purdue University; Emeritus
JOHN P. HAGER, B.S., Montana School of Mines; M.S., Mis-
Associate Professor of Physical Education and Athletics
souri School of Mines; Sc.D., Massachusetts Institute of
WILTON E. ECKLEY, A.B., Mount Union College; M.A.,
Technology; Emeritus Hazen Research Professor of Extrac-
The Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., Case Western
tive Metallurgy; Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
Reserve University; Emeritus Professor of Liberal Arts and
FRANK G. HAGIN, B.A., Bethany Nazarene College; M.A.,
International Studies
Southern Methodist University; Ph.D., University of Colorado;
GLEN R. EDWARDS, Met. Engr., Colorado School of
Emeritus Professor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Mines; M.S., University of New Mexico; Ph.D., Stanford
JOHN W. HANCOCK, A.B., Colorado State College; Emeritus
University; University Emeritus Professor of Metallurgical
Professor of Physical Education and Athletics
and Materials Engineering
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
159

ROBERT C. HANSEN, E.M., Colorado School of Mines;
RONALD W. KLUSMAN, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Indiana Uni-
M.S.M.E., Bradley University; Ph.D., University of Illinois;
versity; Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
Emeritus Professor of Engineering, P.E.
R. EDWARD KNIGHT. B.S., University of Tulsa; M.A.,
PETER HARTLEY, B.A., M.A., University of Colorado;
University of Denver; Emeritus Professor of Engineering
Ph.D., University of New Mexico; Emeritus Associate Pro-
KENNETH E. KOLM, B.S., Lehigh University; M.S., Ph.D.,
fessor of Liberal Arts and International Studies
University of Wyoming; Emeritus Associate Professor of En-
JOHN D. HAUN, A.B., Berea College; M.A., Ph.D., Univer-
vironmental Science and Engineering
sity of Wyoming; Emeritus Professor of Geology, P.E.
GEORGE KRAUSS, B.S., Lehigh University; M.S., Sc.D.,
T. GRAHAM HEREFORD, B.A., Ph.D. University of
Massachusetts Institute of Technology; University Emeritus
Virginia; Emeritus Professor of Liberal Arts and Inter-
Professor of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, P.E.
national Studies
DONALD LANGMUIR, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Harvard Univer-
JOHN A. HOGAN, B.S., University of Cincinnati; M.A.,
sity; Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry and
Lehigh University; Emeritus Professor of Liberal Arts and
Emeritus Professor of Environmental Science & Engineering
International Studies
KENNETH L. LARNER, B.S., Colorado School of Mines;
GREGORY S. HOLDEN, B.S., University of Redlands;
Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; University
M.S.,Washington State University; Ph.D., University of
Emeritus Professor of Geophysics
Wyoming; Emeritus Associate Professor of Geology and Ge-
WILLIAM B. LAW, B.Sc., University of Nevada; Ph.D., Ohio
ological Engineering
State University; Emeritus Associate Professor of Physics
MATTHEW J. HREBAR, III, B.S., The Pennsylvania State
KEENAN LEE, B.S., M.S., Louisiana State University;
University; M.S., University of Arizona; Ph.D., Colorado
Ph.D., Stanford University; Emeritus Professor of Geology
School of Mines; Emeritus Associate Professor of Mining
Engineering
V. ALLEN LONG, A.B., McPherson College; A.M., Univer-
sity of Nebraska; Ph.D., University of Colorado; Emeritus
WILLIAM A. HUSTRULID, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University
Professor of Physics
of Minnesota; Emeritus Professor of Mining Engineering
GEORGE B. LUCAS, B.S., Tulane University; Ph.D., Iowa
RICHARD W. HUTCHINSON, B.Sc., University of Western
State University; Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and Geo-
Ontario; M.Sc., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Charles
chemistry
Franklin Fogarty Professor in Economic Geology; Emeritus
Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
MAURICE W. MAJOR, B.A., Denison University; Ph.D.,
Columbia University; Emeritus Professor of Geophysics
ABDELWAHID IBRAHIM, B.S., University of Cairo; M.S.,
University of Kansas; Ph.D., Michigan State University;
DONALD C.B. MARSH, B.S., M.S., University of Arizona;
Emeritus Associate Professor of Geophysics
Ph.D., University of Colorado; Emeritus Professor of Mathe-
matical and Computer Sciences
JAMES G. JOHNSTONE, Geol.E., Colorado School of
Mines; M.S., Purdue University; (Professional Engineer);
SCOTT J. MARSHALL, B.S., University of Denver; Emeritus
Emeritus Professor of Civil Engineering
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, P.E.
ALEXANDER A. KAUFMAN, Ph.D., Institute of Physics of
JEAN P. MATHER, B.S.C., M.B.A., University of Denver;
the Earth, Moscow; D.T.Sc., Siberian Branch Academy; Emer-
M.A., Princeton University; Emeritus Professor of Mineral
itus Professor of Geophysics
Economics
MARVIN L. KAY, E.M., Colorado School of Mines; Emeritus
FRANK S. MATHEWS, B.A., M.A., University of British
Director of Athletics
Columbia; Ph.D., Oregon State University; Emeritus Profes-
sor of Physics
GEORGE KELLER, B.S., M.S., Ph. D., Pennsylvania State
University, Emeritus Professor of Geophysics
RUTH A. MAURER, B.S., M.S., Colorado State University;
Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Emerita Associate Profes-
THOMAS A. KELLY, B.S., C.E., University of Colorado;
sor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Emeritus Professor of Basic Engineering, P.E.
ROBERT S. McCANDLESS, B.A., Colorado State College;
GEORGE H. KENNEDY, B.S., University of Oregon; M.S.,
Emeritus Professor of Physical Education and Athletics
Ph.D., Oregon State University; Emeritus Professor of
Chemistry and Geochemistry
MICHAEL B. McGRATH, B.S.M.E., M.S., University of
Notre Dame; Ph.D., University of Colorado; Emeritus Pro-
ARTHUR J. KIDNAY, P.R.E., D.Sc., Colorado School of
fessor of Engineering
Mines; M.S., University of Colorado; Emeritus Professor of
Chemical Engineering
BILL J. MITCHELL, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Okla-
homa; Emeritus Professor of Petroleum Engineering
160
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

KARL R. NELSON, Geol.E., M.S., Colorado School of
MAYNARD SLAUGHTER, B.S., Ohio University; M.A.,
Mines; Ph.D., University of Colorado; Emeritus Associate
University of Missouri; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh;
Professor of Engineering, P.E.
Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
GABRIEL M. NEUNZERT, B.S., M.Sc., Colorado School of
JOSEPH D. SNEED, B.A., Rice University; M.S., University
Mines; (Professional Land Surveyor); Emeritus Associate
of Illinois; Ph.D., Stanford University; Emeritus Professor of
Professor of Engineering
Liberal Arts and International Studies
KATHLEEN H. OCHS, B.A., University of Oregon;
CHARLES W. STARKS, Met.E., M.Met.E, Colorado School
M.A.T.,Wesleyan University; M.A., Ph.D., University of
of Mines; Emeritus Associate Professor of Chemistry, P.E.
Toronto; Emerita Associate Professor of Liberal Arts and
FRANKLIN J. STERMOLE, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State
International Studies
University; Emeritus Professor of Chemical Engineering/
MICHAEL J. PAVELICH, B.S., University of Notre Dame;
Mineral Economics; P.E.
Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo; Emeritus
ROBERT J. TAYLOR, BAE School of the Art Institute;
Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
M.A., University of Denver; Emeritus Associate Professor of
ROBERT W. PEARSON, P.E., Colorado School of Mines;
Engineering
Emeritus Associate Professor of Physical Education and
JOHN E. TILTON, B.A., Princeton University; M.A.,
Athletics and Head Soccer Coach
Ph.D.,Yale University; University Emeritus Professor of
ANTON G. PEGIS, B.A.,Western State College; M.A.,
Economics and Business
Ph.D., University of Denver; Emeritus Professor of English
A. KEITH TURNER, B.Sc., Queen’s University, Kingston,
HARRY C. PETERSON, B.S.M.E., Colorado State Univer-
Ontario; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Purdue Univer-
sity; M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University; Emeritus Professor of
sity; Emeritus Professor of Geology and Geological Engi-
Engineering
neering, P.E.
ALFRED PETRICK, JR., A.B., B.S., M.S., Columbia Uni-
ROBERT G. UNDERWOOD, B.S., University of North Car-
versity; M.B.A., University of Denver; Ph.D., University of
olina; Ph.D., University of Virginia; Emeritus Associate Pro-
Colorado; Emeritus Professor of Mineral Economics, P.E.
fessor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
THOMAS PHILIPOSE, B.A., M.A., Presidency College-
FUN-DEN WANG, B.S., Taiwan Provincial Cheng-Kung
University of Madras; Ph.D., University of Denver; Univer-
University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana;
sity Emeritus Professor of Liberal Arts and International
Emeritus Professor of Mining Engineering
Studies
JOHN E. WARME, B.A., Augustana College; Ph.D., Univer-
STEVEN A. PRUESS, B.S., Iowa State University; M.S.,
sity of California at Los Angeles; Emeritus Professor of Ge-
Ph.D., Purdue University; Emeritus Professor of Mathematical
ology and Geological Engineering
and Computer Sciences
ROBERT J. WEIMER, B.A., M.A., University of Wyoming;
DENNIS W. READEY, B.S., University of Notre Dame;
Ph.D., Stanford University; Emeritus Professor of Geology
Sc.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Emeritus Her-
and Geological Engineering, P.E.
man F. Coors Distinguished Professor of Ceramic Engineer-
WALTER W. WHITMAN, B.E., Ph.D., Cornell University;
ing; Emeritus Professor of Metallurgical and Materials
Emeritus Professor of Geophysics
Engineering
RONALD V. WIEDENHOEFT, B.C.E., Cornell University;
PHILLIP R. ROMIG, JR., B.S., University of Notre Dame;
M.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., Columbia University;
M.S., Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Emeritus Professor
Emeritus Professor of Liberal Arts and International Studies
of Geophysics
THOMAS R. WILDEMAN, B.S., College of St. Thomas;
ODED RUDAWSKY, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Emeritus Professor of
State University; Emeritus Professor of Mineral Economics
Chemistry and Geochemistry
ARTHUR Y. SAKAKURA, B.S., M.S., Massachusetts Insti-
KAREN B. WILEY, 1981-B.A., Mills College; M.A., Ph.D.,
tute of Technology; Ph.D., University of Colorado; Emeritus
University of Colorado; Emerita Associate Professor of Lib-
Associate Professor of Physics
eral Arts and International Studies
MIKLOS D. G. SALAMON, Dipl.Eng., Polytechnical Uni-
JOHN T. WILLIAMS, B.S., Hamline University; M.S., Uni-
versity, Hungary; Ph.D., University of Durham, England;
versity of Minnesota; Ph.D., Iowa State College; Emeritus
Emeritus Professor of Mining Engineering
Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
FRANKLIN D. SCHOWENGERDT, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Uni-
DON L. WILLIAMSON, B.S., Lamar University; M.S., Ph.D.,
versity of Missouri at Rolla; Emeritus Professor of Physics
University of Washington; Emeritus Professor of Physics
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
161

ROBERT D. WITTERS, B.A., University of Colorado;
RODERICK G. EGGERT, 1986-A.B., Dartmouth College;
Ph.D., Montana State College; Emeritus Professor of Chem-
M.S., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University; Professor of
istry and Geochemistry
Economics and Business and Division Director
ROBERT E. D. WOOLSEY, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of
JAMES F. ELY, 1981-B.S., Butler University; Ph.D., Indiana
Texas at Austin; Emeritus Professor of Economics and Busi-
University; Professor of Chemical Engineering and Head of
ness and of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Department
BAKI YARAR, B.Sc., M.Sc., Middle East Technical Univer-
GRAEME FAIRWEATHER, 1994-B.Sc., Ph.D., University
sity, Ankara; Ph.D., University of London; Emeritus Profes-
of St. Andrews Scotland; Professor of Mathematical and
sor of Mining Engineering
Computer Sciences and Head of Department
F. RICHARD YEATTS, B.S., The Pennsylvania State Univer-
JOHN R. FANCHI, 1998-B.S. University of Denver; M.S.,
sity; M.S., Ph.D., University of Arizona; Emeritus Professor
University of Mississippi; Ph.D., University of Houston;
of Physics
Professor of Petroleum Engineering
VICTOR F. YESAVAGE, B.Ch.E., The Cooper Union;
THOMAS E. FURTAK, 1986-B.S., University of Nebraska;
M.S.E., Ph.D., University of Michigan; Emeritus Professor
Ph.D., Iowa State University; Professor of Physics
of Chemical Engineering
MAHADEVAN GANESH, 2003- Ph.D., Indian Institute of
PROFESSORS
Technology; Professor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
BERNARD BIALECKI, 1995-M.S., University of Warsaw,
RAMONA M. GRAVES, 1981-B.S., Kearney State College;
Poland; Ph.D., University of Utah; Professor of Mathemati-
Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Professor of Petroleum
cal and Computer Sciences
Engineering
REUBEN T. COLLINS, 1994-B.A., University of Northern
D. VAUGHAN GRIFFITHS, 1994-B.Sc., Ph.D., D.Sc.,
Iowa; M.S., Ph.D., California Institute of Technology; Pro-
University of Manchester; M.S., University of California
fessor of Physics
Berkeley; Professor of Engineering
JOHN T. CUDDINGTON, 2005-B.A., University of Regina;
DAVE HALE, 2004-B.S., Texas A&M University; M.S.,
M.A., Simon Fraser University; M.S., Ph.D., University of
Ph.D., Stanford University; Charles Henry Green Professor
Wisconsin; William J. Coulter Professor of Mineral Econom-
of Exploration Geophysics
ics and Professor of Economics and Business
WENDY J. HARRISON, 1988-B.S., Ph.D., University of
JOHN B. CURTIS, 1990-B.A., M.S., Miami University;
Manchester; Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
Ph.D., The Ohio State University; Professor of Geology and
WILLY A. M. HEREMAN, 1989-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., State
Geological Engineering
University of Ghent, Belgium; Professor of Mathematical
KADRI DAGDELEN, 1992-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Colorado
and Computer Sciences
School of Mines; Professor of Mining Engineering
MURRAY W. HITZMAN, 1996-A.B., Dartmouth College;
CAROL DAHL, 1991-B.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D.,
M.S., University of Washington; Ph.D., Stanford University;
University of Minnesota; Professor of Economics and Business
Charles Franklin Fogarty Distinguished Chair in Economic
GRAHAM A. DAVIS, 1993-B.S., Queen's University at
Geology; Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
Kingston; M.B.A., University of Cape Town; Ph.D., The
and Head of Department
Pennsylvania State University; Professor of Economics and
BRUCE D. HONEYMAN, 1992-B.S., M.S., Ph.D, Stanford
Business
University; Professor of Environmental Science and Engi-
THOMAS L. DAVIS, 1980-B.E., University of Saskatchewan;
neering
M.Sc., University of Calgary; Ph.D., Colorado School of
TISSA ILLANGASEKARE, 1998-B.Sc., University of Cey-
Mines; Professor of Geophysics
lon, Peradeniya; M. Eng., Asian Institute of Technology;
ANTHONY DEAN, 2000-B.S., Springhill College; A.M.,
Ph.D., Colorado State University; Professor and AMAX Distin-
Ph.D., Harvard University; William K. Coors Distinguished
guished Chair in Environmental Science and Engineering, P.E.
Chair in Chemical Engineering and Professor of Chemical
PAUL W. JAGODZINSKI, 2001-B.S., Polytechnic Institute
Engineering
of Brooklyn; Ph. D., Texas A&M; Professor of Chemistry
JOHN A. DeSANTO, 1983-B.S., M.A., Villanova Univer-
and Geochemistry
sity; M.S., Ph.D., University of Michigan; Professor of Math-
HOSSEIN KAZEMI, 2004-B.S.,University of Texas at
ematical and Computer Sciences
Austin; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin; Chesebro' Dis-
JOHN R. DORGAN, 1992-B.S., University of Massachusetts
tinguished Chair in Petroleum Engineering; Professor of Pe-
Amherst; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Profes-
troleum Engineering
sor of Chemical Engineering
162
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

ROBERT J. KEE, 1996-B.S., University of Idaho; M.S.
NIGEL T. MIDDLETON, 1990-B.Sc., Ph.D., University of
Stanford University; Ph.D., University of California at Davis;
the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg; Executive Vice President
George R. Brown Distinguished Professor of Engineering
for Academic Affairs and Dean of Faculty; Professor of En-
ROBERT H. KING, 1981-B.S., University of Utah; M.S., Ph.D.,
gineering, P.E., S. Africa
The Pennsylvania State University; Professor of Engineering
RONALD L. MILLER, 1986-B.S., M.S., University of
DANIEL M. KNAUSS, 1996-B.S., The Pennsylvania State
Wyoming; Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Professor of
University; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State
Chemical Engineering
University; Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
BRAJENDRA MISHRA, 1997-B. Tech. Indian Institute of
FRANK V. KOWALSKI, 1980-B.S., University of Puget
Technology; M.S., Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Professor
Sound; Ph.D., Stanford University; Professor of Physics
of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
STEPHEN LIU, 1987-B.S., M.S., Universitdade Federal de
CARL MITCHAM, 1999-B.A., M.A., University of Colo-
MG, Brazil; Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Professor of
rado; Ph.D., Fordham University; Professor of Liberal Arts
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, CEng, U.K.
and International Studies
NING LU, 1997-B.S. Wuhan University of Technology; M.S.,
JOHN J. MOORE, 1989-B.Sc., University of Surrey, England;
Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University; Professor of Engineering
Ph.D., D. Eng.,University of Birmingham, England; Trustees
Professor of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, and
MARK T. LUSK, 1994-B.S., United States Naval Academy;
Head of Department
M.S., Colorado State University; Ph.D., California Institute
of Technology; Professor of Engineering
KEVIN L. MOORE, 2005-B.S.E.E., Louisiana State Univer-
sity; M.S.E.E., University of Southern California; Ph.D.E.E.,
DONALD L. MACALADY, 1982-B.S., The Pennsylvania
Texas A&M University; Gerard August Dobelman Chair &
State University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison;
Professor of Engineering
Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
GRAHAM G. W. MUSTOE, 1987-B.S., M.Sc., University
PATRICK MacCARTHY, 1976-B.Sc., M.Sc., University
of Aston; Ph.D., University College Swansea; Professor of
College, Galway, Ireland; M.S., Northwestern University;
Engineering
Ph.D., University of Cincinnati; Professor of Chemistry and
Geochemistry
WILLIAM C. NAVIDI, 1996-B.A., New College; M.A.,
Michigan State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Cali-
DAVID W.M. MARR, 1995-B.S., University of California,
fornia at Berkeley; Professor of Mathematical and Computer
Berkeley; M.S., Ph.D., Stanford University; Professor of
Sciences
Chemical Engineering
BARBARA M. OLDS, 1984-B.A., Stanford University;
PAUL A. MARTIN, 1999-B.S., University of Bristol; M.S.,
M.A., Ph.D., University of Denver; Associate Vice President
Ph.D., University of Manchester; Professor of Mathematical
for Educational Innovation; Professor of Liberal Arts and In-
and Computer Sciences
ternational Studies
GERARD P. MARTINS, 1969-B.Sc., University of London;
GARY R. OLHOEFT, 1994-B.S.E.E., M.S.E.E, Massachu-
Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo; Professor of
setts Institute of Technology; Ph.D., University of Toronto;
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
Professor of Geophysics
DAVID K. MATLOCK, 1972-B.S., University of Texas at
DAVID L. OLSON, 1972-B.S.,Washington State University;
Austin; M.S., Ph.D., Stanford University; Charles F. Fogarty
Ph.D., Cornell University; John H. Moore Distinguished Pro-
Professor of Metallurgical Engineering sponsored by the
fessor of Physical Metallurgy; Professor of Metallurgical and
ARMCO Foundation; Professor of Metallurgical and
Materials Engineering, P.E.
Materials Engineering, P.E.
UGUR OZBAY, 1998-B.S., Middle East Technical Univer-
J. THOMAS McKINNON, 1991-B.S., Cornell University;
sity of Ankara; M.S., Ph.D., University of the Witwatersrand;
Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Professor of
Professor of Mining Engineering
Chemical Engineering
LEVENT OZDEMIR, 1977-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Colorado
JAMES A. McNEIL, 1986-B.S., Lafayette College; M.S.,
School of Mines; Director of Excavation Engineering and Earth
Ph.D., University of Maryland; Professor of Physics and
Mechanics Institute and Professor of Mining Engineering, P.E.
Head of Department
ERDAL OZKAN, 1998-B.S., M.Sc., Istanbul Technical Uni-
DINESH MEHTA, 2000-B.Tech., Indian Institute of Tech-
versity; Ph.D., University of Tulsa; Professor of Petroleum
nology; M.S., University of Minnesota; Ph.D., University of
Engineering
Florida; Professor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
163

EUL-SOO PANG, 1986-B.A., Marshall University; M.A.,
JOHN U. TREFNY, 1977-B.S., Fordham College; Ph.D.,
Ohio University; Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley;
Rutgers University; Professor of Physics
Professor of Liberal Arts and International Studies
ILYA D. TSVANKIN, 1992-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Moscow State
TERENCE E. PARKER, 1994-B.S., M.S., Stanford Univer-
University; Professor of Geophysics
sity; Ph.D., University of California Berkeley; Professor of
CHESTER J. VAN TYNE, 1988-B.A., B.S., M.S., Ph.D.,
Engineering and Division Director of Engineering
Lehigh University; FIERF Professor and Professor of Metal-
EILEEN P. POETER, 1987-B.S., Lehigh University; M.S.,
lurgical and Materials Engineering, P.E., PA
Ph.D.,Washington State University; Professor of Geology
CRAIG W. VAN KIRK, 1978-B.S., M.S., University of South-
and Geological Engineering, P.E.
ern California; Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Professor
IVAR E. REIMANIS, 1994-B.S., Cornell University; M.S.,
of Petroleum Engineering and Head of Department, P.E.
University of California Berkeley; Ph.D., University of
KENT J. VOORHEES, 1978-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Utah State
California Santa Barbara; Professor of Metallurgical and
University; Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
Materials Engineering
MICHAEL R. WALLS, 1992-B.S.,Western Kentucky Uni-
SAMUEL B. ROMBERGER, 1974-B.S., Ph.D., The Penn-
versity; M.B.A., Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin;
sylvania State University; Professor of Geology and Geo-
Professor of Economics and Business
logical Engineering
J. DOUGLAS WAY, 1994-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of
TIBOR G. ROZGONYI, 1995-B.S., Eger Teachers College,
Colorado; Professor of Chemical Engineering
Hungary; M.S., Ph.D., Technical University of Miskolc,
Hungary; Professor of Mining Engineering and Head of
RICHARD F. WENDLANDT, 1987-B.A., Dartmouth College;
Department
Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University; Professor of Geol-
ogy and Geological Engineering
ARTHUR B. SACKS, 1993-B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A.,
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Associate Vice
TERENCE K. YOUNG, 1979-1982, 2000-B.A., Stanford
President for Academic and Faculty Affairs; Professor of
University; M.S., Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Profes-
Liberal Arts and International Studies
sor of Geophysics and Head of Department
JOHN A. SCALES, 1992-B.S., University of Delaware;
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS
Ph.D., University of Colorado; Professor of Physics
HUSSEIN A. AMERY, 1997-B.A., University of Calgary;
PANKAJ K. (PK) SEN, 2000-B.S., Jadavpur University; M.E.,
M.A.,Wilfrid Laurier University; Ph.D., McMaster University;
Ph.D., Technical University of Nova Scotia. P.E., Professor
Associate Professor of Liberal Arts and International Studies
of Engineering
JOEL M. BACH, 2001-B.S., SUNY Buffalo; Ph.D., Univer-
ROBERT L. SIEGRIST, 1997-B.S., M.S., Ph.D. University
sity of California at Davis; Associate Professor of Engineering
of Wisconsin-Madison; Professor of Environmental Science
DAVID A. BENSON, 2005-B.S., New Mexico State Univer-
and Engineering and Division Director, P.E.
sity; M.S., San Diego State University; Ph.D., University of
E. DENDY SLOAN, JR., 1976-B.S.Ch.E., M.S., Ph.D.,
Nevada, Reno; Associate Professor of Geology and Geologi-
Clemson University; Weaver Distinguished Professor in
cal Engineering
Chemical Engineering and Professor of Chemical Engineering
JOHN R. BERGER, 1994-B.S., M. S., Ph.D., University of
ROEL K. SNIEDER, 2000-Drs., Utrecht University; M.A.,
Maryland; Associate Professor of Engineering
Princeton University; Ph.D., Utrecht University; W.M. Keck
THOMAS M. BOYD, 1993-B.S., M.S., Virginia Polytechnic
Foundation Distinguished Chair in Exploration Science and
Institute and State University; Ph.D., Columbia University;
Professor of Geophysics
Dean of Graduate Studies; Associate Professor of Geo-
JOHN G. SPEER, 1997-B.S., Lehigh University; Ph.D.,
physics
Oxford University; Professor of Metallurgical and Materials
TRACY CAMP, 1998-B.A. Kalamazoo College; M.S. Michi-
Engineering
gan State University; Ph.D. College of William and Mary;
JEFF SQUIER, 2002-B.S., M.S., Colorado School of Mines;
Associate Professor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Ph.D., University of Rochester; Professor of Physics
LARRY G. CHORN, 2003-B.S., Kansas State University;
P. CRAIG TAYLOR, 2005-A.B., Carleton College; Ph.D.,
M.B.A., Southern Methodist University; M.S., Ph.D., Univer-
Brown University; Professor of Physics
sity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Associate Professor of
Petroleum Engineering
PATRICK TAYLOR, 2003-B.S., Ph.D., Colorado School of
Mines; George S. Ansell Distinguished Chair in Metallurgy
RICHARD L. CHRISTIANSEN, 1990-B.S.Ch.E., University
and Professor of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering
of Utah; Ph.D.Ch.E., University of Wisconsin-Madison;
Associate Professor of Petroleum Engineering
164Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

L. GRAHAM CLOSS, 1978-A.B., Colgate University; M.S.,
YAOGUO LI, 1999-B.S.,Wuhan College of Geology, China;
University of Vermont; Ph.D., Queen’s University, Kingston,
Ph.D., University of British Columbia; Associate Professor
Ontario; Associate Professor of Geology and Geological
of Geophysics
Engineering, P.E.
JUAN C. LUCENA, 2002-B.S., M.S., Rensselaer Polytech-
RONALD R. H. COHEN, 1985-B.A., Temple University;
nic Institute; Ph.D., Virginia Tech; Associate Professor of
Ph.D., University of Virginia; Associate Professor of Envi-
Liberal Arts and International Studies
ronmental Science and Engineering
KEVIN W. MANDERNACK, 1996-B.S., University of Wis-
SCOTT W. COWLEY, 1979-B.S., M.S., Utah State Univer-
consin at Madison; Ph.D., University of California San
sity; Ph.D., Southern Illinois University; Associate Professor
Diego; Associate Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
of Chemistry and Geochemistry
JOHN E. McCRAY, 1998-B.S.,West Virginia University; M.S.
JÖRG DREWES, 2001-Ingenieur cand., Dipl. Ing., Ph.D.,
Clemson University; Ph.D., University of Arizona; Associate
Technical University of Berlin; Associate Professor of Envi-
Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering
ronmental Science and Engineering
HUGH B. MILLER, 2005-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Colorado
CHARLES G. DURFEE, III, 1999-B.S.,Yale University;
School of Mines; Associate Professor of Mining Engineering
Ph.D., University of Maryland; Associate Professor of Physics
MICHAEL MOONEY, 2003-B.S.,Washburn University;
MARK EBERHART, 1998 - B.S., M.S. University of Colo-
M.S., University of California, Irvine; Ph.D., Northwestern
rado; Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Associate
University; Associate Professor of Engineering
Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
BARBARA MOSKAL, 1999-B.S., Duquesne University;
ALFRED W. EUSTES III, 1996-B.S., Louisiana Tech
M.S., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Associate Professor of
University; M.S., University of Colorado at Boulder; Ph.D.,
Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Colorado School of Mines; Associate Professor of Petroleum
JUNKO MUNAKATA MARR, 1996-B.S., California Insti-
Engineering, P.E.
tute of Technology; M.S., Ph.D., Stanford University; Asso-
LINDA A. FIGUEROA, 1990-B.S., University of Southern
ciate Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering
California; M.S., Ph.D., University of Colorado; Associate
DAVID R. MUÑOZ, 1986-B.S.M.E., University of New
Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering, P.E.
Mexico; M.S.M.E., Ph.D., Purdue University; Associate
UWE GREIFE, 1999-M.S., University of Munster; Ph.D.,
Professor of Engineering
University of Bochum; Associate Professor of Physics
MASAMI NAKAGAWA, 1996-B.E., M.S., University of
ANDREW M. HERRING, 2006-Bs.C., Ph.D., University of
Minnesota; Ph.D., Cornell University; Associate Professor of
Leeds; Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering
Mining Engineering
JERRY D. HIGGINS, 1986-B.S., Southwest Missouri State
ERIC P. NELSON, 1981-B.S., California State University at
University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Missouri at Rolla;
Northridge; M.A., Rice University; M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia
Associate Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
University; Associate Professor of Geology and Geological
WILLIAM A. HOFF, 1994-B.S., Illinois Institute of Technol-
Engineering
ogy; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois-Champaign/Urbana;
ALEXANDRA NEWMAN, 2000-B.S., University of
Associate Professor of Engineering and Assistant Division
Chicago; M.S., Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley;
Director of Engineering
Associate Professor of Economics and Business
JOHN D. HUMPHREY, 1991-B.S., University of Vermont;
TIMOTHY R. OHNO, 1992-B.S., University of Alberta;
M.S., Ph.D., Brown University; Associate Professor of Geol-
Ph.D., University of Maryland; Associate Professor of Physics
ogy and Geological Engineering
LAURA J. PANG, 1985-B.A., University of Colorado; M.A.,
JAMES V. JESUDASON, 2002-B.A.,Wesleyan University;
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University; Associate Professor of Liberal
M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University; Associate Professor of
Arts and International Studies, and Division Director
Liberal Arts and International Studies
PAUL PAPAS, 2003-B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology;
PANOS KIOUSIS, 1999-Ph.D., Louisiana State University;
M.A., Ph.D., Princeton, University; Associate Professor of
Associate Professor of Engineering
Engineering.
CAROLYN KOH, 2006-B.S., Ph.D., University of West
PIRET PLINK-BJORKLUND, 2006-B.S., M.S., Tartu Uni-
London, Brunel; Associate Professor of Chemical Engineer-
versity; Ph.D. Goteborg University, Associate Professor of
ing
Geology and Geological Engineering
MARK E. KUCHTA, 1999- B.S. M.S., Colorado School of
JAMES F. RANVILLE, 2004-B.S. Lake Superior State Uni-
Mines; Ph.D., Lulea University of Technology, Sweden; Asso-
versity; M.S., PhD., Colorado School of Mines; Associate
ciate Professor of Mining Engineering
Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
165

PAUL M. SANTI, 2001-B.S., Duke University; M.S., Texas
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS
A&M University; Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Asso-
SUMIT AGARWAL, 2005-B.S., Banaras Hindu University,
ciate Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
India; M.S., University of New Mexico; Ph.D., University of
GEORGE WILLIAM SHERK, 2005-B.A., M.A., Colorado
California, Santa Barbara; Assistant Professor of Chemical
State University; M.A., J.D., University of Denver; D.Sc.,
Engineering
George Washington University; Associate Research Profes-
EDWARD J. BALISTRERI, 2004-B.A., Arizona State Uni-
sor of Liberal Arts and International Studies
versity; M.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado; Assistant Pro-
E. CRAIG SIMMONS, 1977-B.S., University of Kansas;
fessor of Economics and Business
M.S., Ph.D., State University of New York at Stony Brook;
STEPHEN G. BOYES, 2005-B.S., Ph.D., University of New
Associate Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
South Wales; Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Geo-
MARCELO G. SIMOES, 2000-B.E., M.S., Ph.D., University
chemistry
of Sao Paulo; Associate Professor of Engineering
LINCOLN D. CARR, 2005-B.A., University of California at
CATHERINE A. SKOKAN, 1982-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Colo-
Berkeley; M.S., Ph.D., University of Washington; Assistant
rado School of Mines; Associate Professor of Engineering
Professor of Physics
JOHN P. H. STEELE, 1988-B.S., New Mexico State Univer-
TZAHI CATH, 2006-B.S., Tel Aviv University; M.S., Ph.D.,
sity; M.S., Ph.D., University of New Mexico; Associate Pro-
University of Nevada; Assistant Professor of Environmental
fessor of Engineering, P.E.
Science and Engineering
LUIS TENORIO, 1997-B.A., University of California, Santa
LIZET B. CHRISTIANSEN, 2006-B.S., University of Mary-
Cruz; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Associate
land; M.S., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University; Assistant Pro-
Professor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
fessor of Geophysics
STEVEN W. THOMPSON, 1989-B.S., Ph.D., The Pennsyl-
CRISTIAN CIOBANU, 2004-B.S., University of Bucharest;
vania State University; Associate Professor of Metallurgical
M.S., Ph.D., Ohio State University; Assistant Professor of
and Materials Engineering
Engineering
BRUCE TRUDGILL, 2003 -B.S., University of Wales; Ph.D.,
MICHAEL COLAGROSSO, 1999-B.S., Colorado School of
Imperial College; Associate Professor of Geology and Geo-
Mines; M.S., Ph.D., University of Colorado; Assistant Pro-
logical Engineering
fessor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
TYRONE VINCENT, 1998-B.S. University of Arizona;
REINHARD FURRER, 2005-B.S.,College Spiritus Sanctus;
M.S., Ph.D. University of Michigan; Associate Professor of
Ph.D., Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne;
Engineering
Assistant Professor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
BETTINA M. VOELKER, 2004-B.S., M.S., Massachusetts
SYLVIA GAYLORD, 2007-B.A.and M.A., The Johns Hop-
Institute of Technology; Ph.D., Swiss Federal Institute of Tech-
kins University; Ph.D., Northwestern University; Assistant
nology; Associate Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
Professor of Liberal Arts and International Studies
KIM R. WILLIAMS, 1997-B.Sc., McGill University; Ph.D.,
TINA L. GIANQUITTO, 2003-B.A., M.A., and Ph.D., Co-
Michigan State University; Associate Professor of Chemistry
lumbia University; Assistant Professor of Liberal Arts and In-
and Geochemistry
ternational Studies
COLIN WOLDEN, 1997-B.S., University of Minnesota;
MICHAEL N. GOOSEFF, 2004-B.S., Georgia Institute of
M.S., Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Asso-
Technology; M.S., Ph.D., University of Colorado; Assistant
ciate Professor of Chemical Engineering
Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
DAVID M. WOOD, 1989-B.A., Princeton University; M.S.,
CIGDEM Z. GURGUR, 2003-B.S., Middle East Technical
Ph.D., Cornell University; Associate Professor of Physics
University; M.S., Rutgers University; M.S., University of
DAVID TAI-WEI WU, 1996-A.B., Harvard University;
Warwick; Ph.D., Rutgers University; Assistant Professor of
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Associate Profes-
Economics and Business
sor of Chemistry and Geochemistry/Chemical Engineering
QI HAN, 2005-B.S., Yanshan University of China; M.S.,
TURHAN YILDIZ, 2001-B.S., Istanbul Technical Univer-
Huazhong University of Science and Technology China;
sity; M.S., Ph.D., Louisiana State University; Associate Pro-
Ph.D., University of California, Irvine; Assistant Professor of
fessor of Petroleum Engineering
Mathematical and Computer Science
RAY RUICHONG ZHANG, 1997-B.S., M.S., Tongji Univer-
MICHAEL B. HEELEY, 2004-B.S., The Camborne School
sity; Ph.D., Florida Atlantic University; Associate Professor
of Mines; M.S., University of Nevada; M.S., Ph.D., Univer-
of Engineering
sity of Washington; Assistant Professor of Economics and
Business
166
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

JOHN R. HEILBRUNN, 2001-B.A., University of California,
YADVIGA SEMIKOLENOVA, 2006-B.A., Simferopol State
Berkeley; M.A., Boston University, University of California,
University (now Tauric National University); M.A., National
Los Angeles; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles;
University of Kiev-Mohyla Academy; Ph.D., University of
Assistant Professor of Liberal Arts and International Studies
Pittsburgh; Assistant Professor of Economics and Business
KATHRYN JOHNSON, 2005-B.S., Clarkson University;
JOHN R. SPEAR, 2005-B.A., University of California, San
M.S., Ph.D., University of Colorado; Clare Boothe Luce As-
Diego; M.S. and Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Assistant
sistant Professor of Engineering
Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering
IRINA KHINDANOVA, 2000-B.S., Irkutsk State University;
JAMES D. STRAKER, 2005-B.A., University of Notre Dame;
M.A.,Williams College; Ph.D. University of California at
M.A., Ohio State University; Ph.D., Emory University; Assis-
Santa Barbara; Assistant Professor of Economics and Business
tant Professor of Liberal Arts and International Studies
SCOTT KIEFFER, 2002-B.A., University of California at
NEAL SULLIVAN, 2004-B.S., University of Massachusetts;
Santa Cruz; M.S., Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley;
M.S., Ph.D., University of Colorado; Assistant Professor of
Assistant Professor of Mining Engineering
Engineering
JAE YOUNG LEE, 2001-B.S., Seoul National University;
MONEESH UPMANYU, 2002-B.S., M.S., University of
M.S., Ph.D., University of Texas at Arlington; Assistant Pro-
Michigan; Ph.D., University of Michigan, Princeton Uni-
fessor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
versity; Assistant Professor of Engineering
JON LEYDENS, 2004-B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Colorado State
EDGAR VIDAL, 2005-B.S., M.S., Simon Bolivar Univer-
University; Assistant Professor of Liberal Arts and Inter-
sity; Ph.D., University of Idaho; Assistant Professor of Met-
national Studies
allurgical and Materials Engineering
MATTHEW LIBERATORE, 2005-B.S., University of
MANOJA WEISS, 2003-B.S. Grove City College, M.S.
Chicago; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana
Pennsylvania State University, Ph.D. University of Colorado,
Champaign; Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering
Assistant Professor of Engineering
XIAOWEN (JASON) LIU, 2004-B.S., Beijing Polytechnic
SENIOR LECTURERS
University; M.S., College of William and Mary; Ph.D., Dart-
MANOHAR ARORA, 2006-B.S., University of Roorkee;
mouth College; Assistant Professor of Mathematical and
M.S., University of Burdwan; Ph.D., University of Missis-
Computer Sciences
sippi; Senior Lecturer of Mining Engineering
PATRICIO MENDEZ, 2004-B.S., University of Buenos Aires;
HUGH KING, 1993-B.S., Iowa State University; M.S., New
M.S., Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Assistant
York University; M.D., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D.,
Professor of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
University of Colorado; Senior Lecturer of Mathematical and
CARSTEN R. MEHRING, 2006-M.S., Ph.D., University of
Computer Sciences
California, Irvine; Assistant Professor of Engineering
RICHARD PASSAMANECK, 2004-B.S., M.S., University
JENNIFER L. MISKIMINS, 2002 – B.S., Montana College
of California, Los Angeles; Ph.D., University of Southern
of Mineral Science and Technology; M.S., Ph.D., Colorado
California; Senior Lecturer of Engineering
School of Mines; Assistant Professor of Petroleum Engineering
CYNDI RADER, 1991-B.S., M.S., Wright State University;
SUZANNE M. MOON, 2002-B.S., Auburn University; M.S.,
Ph.D., University of Colorado; Senior Lecturer of Mathemat-
Duke University; Ph.D., Cornell University; Assistant Pro-
ical and Computer Sciences
fessor of Liberal Arts and International Studies
TODD RUSKELL, 1999-B.A., Lawrence University; M.S.,
RYAN O’HAYRE, 2006-B.S., Colorado School of Mines;
Ph.D., University of Arizona; Senior Lecturer of Physics
M.S., Ph.D., Stanford University; Assistant Professor of Met-
SANDY WOODSON, 1999-B.A., North Carolina State Uni-
allurgical and Materials Engineering
versity; M.A., Colorado State University; M.F.A., University
ANTHONY J. PETRELLA, 2006-B.S., M.S., Purdue Uni-
of Montana; Senior Lecturer of Liberal Arts and International
versity; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Assistant Professor
Studies
of Engineering
MATTHEW YOUNG, 2004-B.S., Ph.D., University of
FRÉDÉRIC SARAZIN, 2003-Ph.D., GANIL-Caen, France;
Rochester; Senior Lecturer of Physics
Assistant Professor of Physics
LECTURERS
PAUL SAVA, 2006-B.S., University of Bucharest; M.S.,
SANAA ABDEL AZIM, 1989-B.S., Cairo University; M.S.,
Ph.D., Stanford University; Assistant Professor of Geophysics
Ph.D., McMaster University; Lecturer of Engineering
RAVEL F. AMMERMAN, 2004-B.S., Colorado School of
Mines; M.S., University of Colorado; Lecturer of Engineering
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
167

TERRY BRIDGMAN, 2003-B.S., Furman University; M.S.,
JOHN STERMOLE, 1988-B.S., University of Denver; M.S.,
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Lecturer of
Colorado School of Mines; Lecturer of Economics and Business
Mathematical and Computer Sciences
CANDACE S. SULZBACH, 1983-B.S., Colorado School of
JOHN P. CHANDLER, 2006-B.A., Transylvania University;
Mines; Lecturer of Engineering
M.A., East Carolina University; Ph.D., Penn State Univer-
ROBERT D. SUTTON (DOUGLAS), 2004-B.S., Colorado
sity; Lecturer of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
State University; M.B.A., University of Colorado; Lecturer
CARA COAD, 2005-B.S. M.S. University of California,
of Engineering
Berkeley; Lecturer of Engineering
ROMAN TANKELEVICH, 2003-B.S., M.S., Moscow
ANITA B. CORN, 2003- B.S., Ohio State University; M.S.,
Physics Engineering Institute; Ph.D., Moscow Energy Insti-
Ph.D., University of Denver; Lecturer of Physics
tute; Lecturer of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
JOSEPH P. CROCKER, 2004-B.S., M.S., Oklahoma State
SUSAN J. TYBURSKI, 2005-B.A., M.A., J.D., University of
University; Ph.D., University of Utah; Lecturer of Engineering
Denver; Lecturer of Liberal Arts and International Studies
ALEX T. FLOURNOY, 2006-B.S., Georgia Institute of Tech-
INSTRUCTORS
nology, M.S., Ph.D. University of Colorado, Boulder; Lec-
SUE BERGER, 1993-B.S., Kansas State Teacher’s College;
turer of Physics
M.S., Colorado School of Mines; M.S., University of Missis-
TRACY Q. GARDNER, 1996-B.Sc., 1998-M.Sc., Colorado
sippi; Instructor of Physics
School of Mines; Ph.D., University of Colorado at Boulder,
ANN DOZORETZ, 2004-B.S., University of Denver; M.S.,
Lecturer of Chemical Engineering
Colorado School of Mines; Instructor of Economics and
G. GUSTAVE GREIVEL, 1994-B.S., M.S., Colorado School
Business
of Mines; Lecturer of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
P. DAVID FLAMMER, 2001-B.S., M.S., Colorado School of
THOMAS P. GROVER, 2004-B.S., Massachusetts Institute of
Mines; Instructor of Physics
Technology; M.S., California Institute of Technology; Ph.D.,
CHRISTOPHER M. KELSO, 2003- B.S., Colorado School
University of California, Berkeley; Lecturer of Engineering
of Mines; M.S., University of Colorado; Instructor of Physics
BRAD J. HERRICK, 2005-B.S., University of San Fran-
CHRISTIAN V. SHOREY, 2005- B.S., University of Texas at
cisco; M.S., Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin; Lecturer of
Austin; Ph.D., University of Iowa; Instructor of Geology and
Chemistry and Geochemistry
Geological Engineering
ROBERT KLIMEK, 1996-B.A., St. Mary’s of the Barrens
SCOTT STRONG, 2003-B.S., Colorado School of Mines; In-
College; M.Div., DeAndreis Theological Institute; M.A.,
structor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
University of Denver; D.A., University of Northern Colo-
rado; Lecturer of Liberal Arts and International Studies
COACHES/ATHLETICS FACULTY
H. VINCENT KUO, 2006-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of
KEVIN FICKES, 2005-B.A., University of North Carolina,
Minnesota; Lecturer of Physics
Charlotte, Assistant Men’s Soccer Coach and Instructor
TONI LEFTON, 1998-B.A., Florida State University; M.A.,
MARTY HEATON, 2006-B.A., Adams State Colege, M.S.
Northern Arizona University; Lecturer of Liberal Arts and
University of Northern Colorado; Instructor and Football De-
International Studies
fensive Coordinator
MARTIN MATAYA, 2006-B.S., M.A., Michigan Tech. Uni-
DAVID HUGHES, 2005-B.A., Ball State University, Head
versity; Ph.D., Marquette University; MSBA, University of
Men and Women’s Swimming and Diving Coach and In-
Northern Colorado, Lecturer of Metallurgical and Materials
structor
Engineering
MIKE JACOBSMA, 2004-B.A., M.S., Wayne State College,
ROSE A. PASS, 2006-A.B, M.A. Boston College; Lecturer
Assistant Women’s Basketball Coach, Administrative Assis-
of Liberal Arts and International Studies
tant, Compliance and Instructor
JOHN PERSICHETTI, 1997-B.S., University of Colorado;
GREGORY JENSEN, 2000-B.S., M.S., Colorado State Uni-
M.S., Colorado School of Mines; Lecturer of Chemical
versity; Instructor and Assistant Trainer
Engineering
RACHELE JOHNSON, 2003- B.S., M.S.,Wayne State College;
JENNIFER SCHNEIDER, 2004-B.A., Albertson College of
Instructor and Head Volleyball Coach
Idaho; M.A., Ph.D., Claremont Graduate University; Lecturer
STEVE KIMPEL, 2002-B.S., USC; M.S., Fort Hays State;
of Liberal Arts and International Studies
Ph.D., University of Idaho, Instructor and Head Wrestling
CHRISTIAN SHOREY, 2005-B.S., Ph.D., University of
Coach, Director of Physical Education
Iowa; Lecturer of Geology and Geological Engineering
168
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

FRANK KOHLENSTEIN, 1998-B.S., Florida State Univer-
LIBRARY FACULTY
sity; M.S., Montana State University; Instructor and Head
PATRICIA E. ANDERSEN, 2002-Associate Diploma of the
Soccer Coach
Library Association of Australia, Sydney, Australia; Assistant
JASON KOLTZ, 2002-B.A., Northeast Missouri State;
Librarian
Instructor and Assistant Football and Track Coach
PAMELA M. BLOME, 2002-B.A., University of Nebraska;
PAULA KRUEGER, 1995-B.S, 1996 M.S. Northern State
M.A.L.S., University of Arizona, Tucson; Assistant Librarian
University Head Women’s Basketball Coach
LISA DUNN, 1991-B.S., University of Wisconsin-Superior;
BRANDON LEIMBACH, 2002-B.A., M.A., St. Mary’s
M.A.,Washington University; M.L.S., Indiana University;
College; Adjunct Instructor and Recreational Sports Director
Librarian
DAN R. LEWIS, 1977-B.S., California State University;
LAURA A. GUY, 2000-B.A., University of Minnesota;
Associate Athletics Director
M.L.S., University of Wisconsin; Associate Librarian
JENNIFER MCINTOSH, 1996-B.S., Russell Sage College,
JOANNE V. LERUD-HECK, 1989-B.S.G.E., M.S., Univer-
M.S., Chapman University; Athletic Trainer
sity of North Dakota; M.A., University of Denver; Librarian
JASON MUNOZ, 2006-B.A., Oklahoma AState University;
and Director of Library
Instructor and Football Offensive Coordinator
LISA S. NICKUM, 1994-B.A., University of New Mexico;
GREG MURPHY, 2002-B.A., John Carroll; M.A.,William
M.S.L.S., University of North Carolina; Associate Librarian
and Lee; Sports Information Director
ROBERT K. SORGENFREI, 1991-B.A., University of Cali-
PRYOR ORSER, 2002- B.S., M.A., Montana State Univer-
fornia; M.L.S., University of Arizona; Librarian
sity; Instructor and Head Men’s Basketball Coach
CHRISTOPHER J. J. THIRY, 1995-B.A., M.I.L.S., Univer-
SCOTT PELUSO, 2004-B.A.; Point Loma Nazareen Univer-
sity of Michigan; Associate Librarian
sity, Assistant Women’s Volleyball Coach and Instructor
MEGAN TOMEO, 2005-B.E.T., Pennsylvania College of
ARTHUR SIEMERS, 2004-B.S., Illinois State University-
Technology; M.S.L.S., Clarion University of Pennsylvania;
Normal, M.S., University of Colorado-Boulder, Head Men
Assistant Librarian
and Women’s Track and Field Coach, and Instructor
HEATHER WHITEHEAD, 2001-B.S., University of Alberta;
LINDSEY SOSOVEC, 2006-B.S., National American Uni-
M.L.I.S., University of Western Ontario; Assistant Librarian
versity, M.S. South Dakota State University; Instructor and
Women’s Assistant Soccer Coach
JAMIE STEVENS, 1998 B.S., 2001 MSU Billings, Assistant
Men’s Basketball Coach
ROBERT A. STITT, 2000- B.A., Doane College; M.A., Uni-
versity of Northern Colorado; Instructor and Head Football
Coach
ROB THOMPSON, 2004-B.A., Bowling Green State Uni-
versity, M.A., Bowling Green State University
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
169

Policies and Procedures
Policies and Procedures
(2) filing a complaint hereunder; (3) representing a Com-
plainant hereunder; or (4) testifying, assisting, or participat-
Affirmative Action
ing in any manner in an investigation, proceeding, hearing, or
Colorado School of Mines has instituted an affirmative
lawsuit involving unlawful discrimination; or
action plan, which is available for perusal in numerous CSM
C. The Human Resources Director or an attorney from the
offices including the Library, the Dean of Students’ Office,
Office of Legal Services, if any of these individuals deem it
and the Office of Human Resources.
to be in the best interest of CSM to do so.
Any person feeling that a violation of the following poli-
IV. Informal Complaint Resolution Process
cies has occurred should promptly refer the matter to the
At the written request of an individual who has come
Office of Human Resources, located in Guggenheim Hall
forward with a complaint alleging unlawful discrimination,
(2nd floor), for investigation.
hereinafter the “Complainant,” the Human Resources Direc-
Colorado School of Mines Unlawful
tor shall assist in an attempt to resolve the complaint in an
Discrimination Policy and Complaint
informal manner. The informal unlawful discrimination
complaint resolution process shall consist of an informal
Procedure
discussion between the Complainant and the individual or a
I. Statement of Authority and Purpose
representative of the entity accused of unlawful discrimina-
This policy is promulgated by the Board of Trustees pur-
tion, hereinafter the “Respondent.” The Human Resources
suant to the authority conferred upon it by §23-41-104(1),
Director shall act as a mediator during this process, which
C.R.S. (1998) in order to set forth a policy concerning un-
shall be calculated to bring the complaint to the attention of
lawful discrimination at CSM. This policy shall supersede
the Respondent and elicit the voluntary cooperation of the
any previously promulgated CSM policy which is in conflict
Respondent in settling the matter. By attempting to resolve
herewith.
the unlawful discrimination complaint in an informal manner
II. Unlawful Discrimination Policy
pursuant to the terms of this section, the Complainant shall
Attendance and employment at CSM are based solely on
not waive any rights to subsequently pursue the complaint
merit and fairness. Discrimination on the basis of age, gen-
through the formal complaint procedure set forth below.
der, race, ethnicity, religion, national origin, disability, and
V. Formal Complaint Procedure
military veteran status is prohibited. No discrimination in
A. Purpose
admission, application of academic standards, financial aid,
The purpose of the formal unlawful discrimination com-
scholastic awards, promotion, salary, benefits, transfers, re-
plaint procedure is to provide a formal mechanism for the
ductions in force, terminations, re-employment, professional
prompt and fair internal resolution of complaints alleging un-
development, or conditions of employment shall be permit-
lawful discrimination. The procedure outlined below shall be
ted. The remainder of this policy shall contain a complaint
the exclusive forum for the internal resolution of such com-
procedure outlining a method for reporting alleged violations
plaints at CSM.
of this policy and a review mechanism for the impartial
B. Where to file a Complaint
determination of the merits of complaints alleging unlawful
All complaints by non-students alleging unlawful discrimi-
discrimination.
nation or retaliation shall be filed in writing at the Office of
III. Persons Who May File an Unlawful
Human Resources located on the second floor of Guggen-
Discrimination Complaint
heim Hall. Complaints by students alleging unlawful dis-
An unlawful discrimination complaint may be filed by any
crimination or retaliation may be submitted to the Human
individual described in one of the categories below:
Resources Office, the Student Development Center, the Dean
A. Any member of the CSM community, including classi-
of Students, any faculty member, or any Resident Assistant.
fied staff, exempt employees, and students as well as any
Any recipient of such a student complaint shall promptly for-
applicant for employment or admission, who believes that he
ward the complaint to the Director of Human Resources for
or she has been discriminated against by CSM, a branch of
handling in accordance with the provisions set forth below.
CSM, or another member of the CSM community on account
C. Time Limits
of age, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, national origin, dis-
All complaints alleging unlawful discrimination or retalia-
ability, or military veteran status;
tion must be filed within ninety days from the date upon
B. Any person who believes that he or she has been threat-
which the incident, occurrence, or other action alleged to
ened with or subjected to duress or retaliation by CSM, a
constitute unlawful discrimination or retaliation occurred.
branch of CSM, or a member of the CSM community as a
However, if the alleged discrimination or retaliation is of a
result of (1) opposing any unlawful discriminatory practice;
continuing nature, a complaint may be filed at any time.
170
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

D. Contents of Complaint
more of the allegations contained in the complaint, the process
A complaint alleging unlawful discrimination or retaliation
shall proceed with the selection of a hearing panel as set forth
must be signed by the Complainant and set forth specific
in subsection D below. If no timely response is received, or if
factual matters believed to constitute unlawful discrimination
the response admits the allegations in their entirety, the mat-
or retaliation. The complaint shall name as Respondent the
ter shall be submitted to the President, who shall then issue a
individual or entity whom the Complainant believes to have
decision in accordance with subsection IX.D below.
committed, participated in, or encouraged the discrimination
D. Selection of Hearing Panel
or retaliation. The complaint shall also include a brief state-
An initial hearing panel of six individuals shall be selected
ment describing the relief requested by the Complainant.
in a random manner from a list of full-time CSM employees.
E. Fulfillment of Complaint Prerequisites
The Complainant and the Respondent shall each disqualify
As soon as practicable after receipt of a complaint, the
one of the initial panel members. The disqualifications to be
Human Resources Director shall submit the complaint to an
exercised by the parties shall commence with the Com-
attorney from the Office of Legal Services, who shall exam-
plainant. Of the remaining initial panel members, the one
ine it and determine if the prerequisites outlined above have
chosen last shall serve as an alternate hearing panel member.
been fulfilled. If the prerequisites have not been fulfilled, the
The other three initial panel members shall constitute the
attorney shall inform the Complainant of the specifics of such
hearing panel for the appeal. Prospective panel members may
determination in writing. Unless the time limitations set forth
be excused on account of conflict of interest, health, or un-
above have lapsed prior to the initial filing of the complaint,
avoidable absence from campus. An excused initial panel
the Complainant shall have the opportunity to correct any defi-
member shall be replaced by another initial panel member
ciencies and re-file the complaint. If the prerequisites have been
chosen in a random drawing prior to the exercise of disquali-
fulfilled, the complaint will be handled as set forth below.
fications by either party.
F. Choice of Remedies
E. Selection of Chief Panel Member
No Complainant shall be permitted to simultaneously file
After a hearing panel has been chosen, the panel members
an unlawful discrimination claim under the CSM Unlawful
shall elect a chief panel member from their number who shall
Discrimination Policy and Complaint Procedure and a sexual
preside throughout the remainder of the case.
harassment claim under the CSM Sexual Harassment Policy
1. Authority of Chief Panel Member
and Complaint Procedure against the same individual arising
out of an identical set of facts. In such a situation, a Com-
The chief panel member shall have the authority to (a) issue
plainant shall be entitled to file his or her claim under either,
orders to compel discovery; (b) make rulings on evidentiary
but not both, of the above-mentioned policies.
objections; and (c) issue any other orders necessary to con-
trol the conduct of the hearing and prohibit abusive treatment
VI. Pre-Hearing Procedures
of witnesses, including removal of disruptive individuals
A. Notification to Proceed
from the hearing room.
As soon as practicable after a determination has been
2. Role of Alternate Hearing Panel Member
made that the complaint is sufficient pursuant to subsection
V.E above, the reviewing attorney shall inform the Director
The alternate hearing panel member shall observe, but not
of Human Resources of that fact and the Director of Human
actively participate in, all of the proceedings in the case and
Resources shall proceed with the notifications specified in
be prepared to substitute for a panel member who becomes
subsection B below.
unavailable during any stage of the case due to death, illness,
or emergency.
B. Acknowledgment of Complaint and Notification of
Respondent
F. Setting of Hearing Date
As soon as practicable, the Director of Human Resources
After a chief panel member has been chosen, a hearing date
shall send a letter to the Complainant acknowledging receipt
shall be set with reasonable consideration given to the sched-
of the complaint. At the same time, the Director shall provide
ules of the participants. The chief panel member shall set a
the Respondent with a copy of the complaint and notify the
date for the hearing, which shall occur no more than ninety
Respondent in writing of the requirements set forth in sub-
days after the date upon which the formal complaint was
section C below.
filed with the Director of Human Resources. Once set, the
hearing date may be rescheduled only with the concurrence
C. Response to Complaint
of the Complainant, the Respondent, and the hearing panel.
Within ten days from the date of receipt of a copy of the
complaint, the Respondent shall file with the Director of
G. Participation of Attorneys
Human Resources a response in which the allegations con-
Either party may engage the services of an attorney to
tained in the complaint are admitted or denied. The Director
assist in document preparation or case preparation. However,
shall provide the Complainant with a copy of the response as
an attorney may not enter an appearance or formally partici-
soon as practicable. If the response contains a denial of one or
pate in the case on behalf of either party.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
171

H. Legal Advice for Hearing Panel
shall be deemed genuine and admissible unless successfully
If the hearing panel desires legal advice at any time during
challenged prior to the hearing.
the case, the chief panel member shall request such advice
D. List of Hearing Issues
from the Office of Legal Services. An attorney from the
After examining the pre-hearing statements of both parties,
Office of Legal Services shall provide the requested advice
the hearing panel shall prepare a list of issues to be resolved
unless all such attorneys are actively involved in the case on
through the hearing and distribute such list to the parties no
behalf of one of the parties. In such event, the chief panel
later than two days prior to the hearing date. The panel may
member shall request the desired legal advice from the Assis-
list issues contained in the pre-hearing statement of either
tant Attorney General assigned to CSM, whose name and
party or relevant issues not contained in the pre-hearing
telephone number shall be provided to the chief panel mem-
statement of either party. However, since the jurisdiction of
ber by the legal office.
the hearing panel is limited to hearing claims of unlawful dis-
I. Pre-Hearing Discovery
crimination, only issues directly related to the Complainant’s
Informal discovery, or the exchange between the parties
claim of unlawful discrimination may be placed on the list of
of information relevant to the case, is encouraged. If the
issues. The list of issues generated pursuant to this subpara-
parties cannot resolve such issues informally, either party
graph shall be binding upon the subsequent hearing and shall
may request the chief panel member up to ten days prior to
form the standard against which all relevancy arguments
the hearing date to enter an order compelling discovery upon
shall be weighed.
a showing of the relevance of the requested information and
E. Amendments to Pre-Hearing Statements
the necessity of such information to case preparation. The
Up to two days prior to the hearing date, either party may
other party may oppose such request by showing that the
request the chief panel member to permit amendments to his
requested information is irrelevant, unnecessary to the
or her pre-hearing statement upon a showing of good cause
requesting party’s case preparation, or privileged according
and lack of prejudice to the opposing party. Any party filing
to law.
an amended pre-hearing statement shall provide a copy
VII. Pre-Hearing Statements
thereof to the opposing party no later than the filing deadline
A. Contents of Pre-Hearing Statements
imposed by the order granting leave to amend.
Each party shall file a pre-hearing statement containing the
VIII. Hearing Procedures
following components:
A. Burden and Standard of Proof
1. Summary of the Argument: A concise statement summa-
The Complainant shall bear the burden of proof through-
rizing the case from the position of the submitting party;
out the case. The standard of proof which the Complainant
2. List of Issues: A list of the issues which the submitting
must meet to sustain the burden of proof shall be the prepon-
party wishes the hearing panel to resolve;
derance of the evidence standard. The preponderance of the
evidence standard shall be deemed met if the panel believes
3. List of Witnesses: A list of witnesses to be presented at
that it is more likely than not that the facts at issue occurred.
the hearing along with a summary of the anticipated testimony
The facts at issue shall include all facts which are required to
of each witness; and
be proven by the party bearing the burden of proof in order
4. Photocopies of Exhibits: Photocopies of each exhibit to
for such party to prevail.
be presented at the hearing.
B. Order of Presentation
B. Deadlines for Pre-Hearing Statements
Since the Complainant bears the burden of proof, that
The Complainant shall file a pre-hearing statement
party shall present his or her case first. After the Com-
with the hearing panel and provide a copy to the opposing
plainant has finished, the Respondent shall present his or
party no later than ten days prior to the hearing date. The
her case.
Respondent shall file a pre-hearing statement with the hear-
C. Outline of Hearing
ing panel and provide a copy to the opposing party no later
The hearing shall proceed according to the following gen-
than five days prior to the hearing date. If the hearing date is
eral outline:
rescheduled, these time limits shall apply to the rescheduled
hearing date.
1. Complainant’s Opening Statement
C. Limitations Imposed by Pre-Hearing Statements
2. Respondent’s Opening Statement (unless reserved)
Neither party shall make an argument during the hearing
3. Complainant’s Case
which is inconsistent with the arguments set forth in the sum-
4. Respondent’s Opening Statement (if reserved)
mary of the argument section of his or her pre-hearing state-
ment. Neither party shall introduce any witnesses or exhibits
5. Respondent’s Case
at the hearing which are not listed in his or her pre-hearing
6. Complaint’s Rebuttal Case (unless waived)
statement. All exhibits listed in the pre-hearing statements
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Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

7. Respondent’s Rebuttal Case (only if Complainant
C. Issuance of Recommendation
presents a rebuttal case and unless waived)
The recommendation of the hearing panel shall be
8. Complainant’s Closing Argument
issued to the parties and delivered to the President along
with the case file within fifteen days after the conclusion
9. Respondent’s Closing Argument
of the hearing.
10. Complainant’s Rebuttal Argument (unless waived)
D. Decision of President
D. Inapplicability of Strict Evidentiary Rules
The President shall examine the case file, consider the
Strict legal evidentiary rules shall not apply during the
recommendation of the hearing panel, and issue a final
hearing. The chief panel member shall rule on the admissi-
written decision in the matter. The President shall possess
bility of disputed evidence with primary consideration given
the authority to affirm, reverse, or modify the recommenda-
to the relevance, reliability, and probative value of proffered
tion of the hearing panel or to remand the matter to the
evidence.
panel for further proceedings or consideration. In the deci-
E. Witness Examination Procedure
sion, the President may provide appropriate relief to the
Each witness shall be directly examined by the party
Complainant and may impose appropriate disciplinary action
on whose behalf the witness has appeared to testify. Upon
upon the Respondent. The decision of the President shall be
the conclusion of the direct examination of each witness,
delivered to the parties and the hearing panel within fifteen
the opposing party shall be permitted the right of cross-
days from the date of the President’s receipt of the recom-
examination. The chief panel member may permit re-direct
mendation and case file from the hearing panel, unless the
and re-cross examination. However, an identical examination
President is unavailable for a significant amount of time dur-
procedure shall be utilized for all witnesses testifying in
ing this period.
a given hearing. Hearing panel members may interject
E. Presidential Unavailability
questions at any time during the direct, cross, re-direct,
The term “unavailable,” as utilized in this subsection and
or re-cross examinations.
subsection X.D above, shall be defined to mean out of town,
IX. Post-Hearing Procedure
medically incapacitated, or engaged in important CSM busi-
A. Recommendation of the Hearing Panel
ness to the extent that sufficient time cannot be devoted to
Within a reasonable time after the conclusion of the hear-
decision making hereunder. If the President is unavailable
ing, the hearing panel shall confer among themselves and
for a significant period of time during the decision making
vote upon a recommended course of action. The panel mem-
period, a letter shall be sent to the parties advising them of
bers holding a majority point of view shall designate one of
that fact as well as the anticipated date of presidential avail-
their number to write a recommendation reflecting their
ability. In such event, the decision shall be due fifteen days
opinion. The panel members holding a minority point of
from the date upon which the President becomes available.
view, if any, may issue a dissenting recommendation in a
The President shall be the sole judge of presidential unavail-
similar fashion.
ability hereunder.
B. Contents of Recommendation
F. Appeal of Presidential Decision
The recommendation of the hearing panel shall include the
There shall be no internal appeal from the final decision
following components:
of the President. A party aggrieved by the decision of the
1. Statement Regarding Burden of Proof: A statement
President may file a complaint with the appropriate equal
regarding whether or not the hearing panel believes that
opportunity enforcement agency or pursue other available
the burden of proof borne by the Complainant has been
legal remedies.
sustained;
Promulgated by the CSM Board of Trustees on March 13,
2. Findings of Fact: A list of the relevant facts found by the
1992. Amended by the CSM Board of Trustees on June 10,
hearing panel upon which the recommendation is based;
1999. Amended by the CSM Board of Trustees on June 22,
2000.
3. Legal Conclusions: A list of the legal conclusions of the
hearing panel upon which the determination of the issue of
Colorado School Of Mines Sexual
unlawful discrimination is based; and
Harassment Policy and Complaint
4. Recommended Action: A statement regarding the relief
Procedure
for the Complainant, if any, that is being recommended by
I. Statement of Authority and Purpose
the hearing panel.
This policy is promulgated by the Board of Trustees pur-
suant to the authority conferred upon it by §23-41-104(1),
C.R.S. (1988 Repl. Vol.) in order to set forth a policy con-
cerning sexual harassment at CSM. This policy shall super-
sede any previously promulgated CSM policy which is in
conflict herewith.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
173

II. Sexual Harassment Policy
B. Any person who believes that he or she has been
A. Definition of Sexual Harassment
threatened with or subjected to duress or retaliation by a
Sexual harassment shall, without regard to the gender of
member of the CSM community as a result of (1) opposing
the alleged perpetrator or victim, consist of unwelcome
any perceived sexual harassment; (2) filing a complaint
sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal
hereunder; (3) representing a Complainant hereunder; or
or physical conduct of a sexual nature when (1) submission
(4) testifying, assisting, or participating in any manner in
to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term
an investigation, proceeding, hearing, or lawsuit involving
or condition of an individual’s employment or scholastic en-
sexual harassment; or
deavors; (2) submission to or rejection of such conduct by an
C. The Human Resources Director or an attorney from the
individual is used as the basis for employment or academic
Office of Legal Services, if any of these individuals deem it
decisions affecting the individual; or (3) such conduct has the
to be in the best interest of CSM to do so.
purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individ-
ual’s work or school performance, or creating an intimidat-
IV. Informal Complaint Resolution Process
ing, hostile, or offensive working or studying environment.
At the request of an individual who has come forward
with a sexual harassment complaint, hereinafter the “Com-
B. Policy Statement
plainant,” the Director of Human Resources shall assist in
CSM wishes to foster an environment for its students and
an attempt to resolve the complaint in an informal manner.
employees which is free from all forms of sexual harassment,
Although verbal requests to proceed with the informal com-
sexual intimidation, and sexual exploitation. Accordingly,
plaint resolution process will be honored, complainants are
CSM will not tolerate sexual harassment and will take all
strongly encouraged to put such requests in writing. The in-
necessary measures to deter such misconduct and discipline
formal sexual harassment complaint resolution process
violators of this policy with appropriate sanctions. Further-
shall consist of an informal discussion between the Com-
more, retaliation in any form against an individual for
plainant and the individual accused of sexual harassment,
reporting sexual harassment or cooperating in a sexual
hereinafter the “Respondent.” The Director of Human Re-
harassment investigation is strictly prohibited. Such retalia-
sources shall act as a mediator during this process, which
tion shall be dealt with as a separate instance of sexual
shall be calculated to bring the complaint to the attention of
harassment. The remainder of this policy shall contain a
the Respondent and elicit the voluntary cooperation of the
complaint procedure outlining a method for reporting
Respondent in settling the matter. By attempting to resolve
alleged violations of this policy and a review mechanism
the sexual harassment complaint in an informal manner pur-
for the impartial determination of the merits of complaints
suant to the terms of this section, the Complainant shall not
alleging sexual harassment.
waive any rights to subsequently pursue the complaint
C. Sanctions for Sexual Harassment
through the formal sexual harassment complaint procedure
Appropriate sanctions may be imposed upon an employee
set forth below.
or student who has sexually harassed another. The term
V. Formal Complaint Procedure
Perpetrator shall be utilized herein to refer to such a person.
A. Purpose
The sanctions may include one or more of the following:
The purpose of the formal sexual harassment complaint
verbal reprimand and warning, written reprimand and warn-
procedure is to provide a formal mechanism for the prompt
ing, student probation, suspension from registration, mone-
and fair internal resolution of complaints alleging sexual
tary fine, suspension without pay, expulsion, or termination.
harassment. The procedure outlined below shall be the
In determining appropriate sanctions for the offense, the
exclusive forum for the internal resolution of sexual harass-
decision maker shall consider the severity of the offense,
ment complaints at CSM.
aggravating and mitigating factors, and the Perpetrator’s
previous history of sexual harassment offenses. If the deci-
B. Where to file a Complaint
sion maker concludes that a lack of comprehension of the
All complaints by non-students alleging sexual harass-
concept of sexual harassment is a factor in the offense, the
ment or retaliation shall be lodged with the Human Resources
Perpetrator can also be required to attend a sexual harass-
Office located on the second floor of Guggenheim Hall.
ment seminar or workshop.
Complaints by students alleging sexual harassment or retali-
ation may be submitted to the Human Resources Office, the
III. Persons Who May File a Complaint
Student Development Center, the Dean of Students, any fac-
A sexual harassment complaint may be filed by an indi-
ulty member, or any Resident Assistant. Any recipient of a
vidual described in one of the categories below:
student sexual harassment or retaliation complaint shall
A. Any person who believes that he or she has been sexu-
promptly forward such complaint to the Director of Human
ally harassed by a member of the CSM community, including
Resources for handling in accordance with the provisions set
classified staff, exempt employees, and students;
forth below.
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Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

C. Time Limits
H. Acknowledgment of Complaint and Notification of
A complaint may be lodged at any time, but CSM
Respondent
strongly encourages individuals who feel they have been
As soon as practicable after being informed of the com-
victims of sexual harassment to come forward as soon as
plaint pursuant to subsection V.G above, the vice president
possible after the occurrence of the incident, event, or other
shall send a letter to the Complainant acknowledging receipt
action alleged to constitute sexual harassment or retaliation.
of the complaint. At the same time, the vice president shall
D. Contents of Complaint
notify the Respondent of the complaint in writing, and if the
Although a verbal sexual harassment complaint will be
complaint has been reduced to writing, the vice president
investigated, complainants are strongly encouraged to submit
shall provide the Respondent with a copy thereof. If the
sexual harassment complaints in writing. Written complaints
President is the Respondent, the President of the Board of
must be signed and must set forth specific factual matters
Trustees shall perform the above duties. If the Respondent is
believed to constitute sexual harassment or retaliation. The
a vice president, the President shall perform these duties.
Complaint shall name as Respondent each individual whom
I. Investigation Authorization Form
the Complainant believes to have committed, participated in,
Unless the complaint is initiated by an attorney from the
or encouraged the sexual harassment or retaliation. The com-
Office of Legal Services or the Director of Human Resources
plaint shall also include a brief statement describing the relief
pursuant to subsection III.C above, the Complainant shall
requested by the Complainant.
be required to execute a Sexual Harassment Complaint
E. Fulfillment of Complaint Prerequisites
Investigation Authorization Form prior to any investigation
As soon as practicable after receipt of the complaint, the
of the complaint.
Director of Human Resources shall submit the complaint to
J. Investigation of Complaint
an attorney from the Office of Legal Services, who shall
An attorney from the Office of Legal Services and the
determine if the prerequisites outlined above have been ful-
Director of Human Resources shall jointly investigate the
filled. If the prerequisites have not been fulfilled, the review-
complaint by examining relevant documents, if any, and
ing attorney shall inform the Complainant of the specifics of
interviewing witnesses and other individuals designated by
such determination in writing. The Complainant shall have
either party. The investigators will strive to conduct the
the opportunity to correct any deficiencies and re-file the
investigation in a discrete and expeditious manner with due
complaint. If the prerequisites have been fulfilled, the com-
regard to thoroughness and fairness to both parties.
plaint will be handled as set forth below.
K. Confidentiality of Investigative Materials
F. Choice of Remedies
All materials and documents prepared or compiled by
No Complainant shall be permitted to simultaneously file
the investigators during the course of investigating a sexual
an unlawful discrimination claim under the CSM Unlawful
harassment complaint hereunder shall be kept confidential to
Discrimination Policy and Complaint Procedure and a sexual
the fullest extent of the law in order to protect interviewees
harassment claim under the CSM Sexual Harassment Policy
and promote candor.
and Complaint Procedure against the same individual arising
L. Alternate Investigators
out of an identical set of facts. In such a situation, a Com-
If either an attorney from the Office of Legal Services or
plainant shall be entitled to file his or her claim under either,
the Director of Human Resources is the Complainant or the
but not both, of the above-mentioned policies.
Respondent hereunder, or is otherwise unavailable, the Presi-
G. Notification of CSM Management Personnel
dent shall appoint an alternate investigator.
As soon as practicable after a determination has been
M. Report of Findings and Confidential Recommendation
made that the complaint is sufficient pursuant to subsection
As soon as practicable after the conclusion of the investi-
V.E above, the Office of Legal Services shall notify CSM
gation, the investigating attorney shall prepare and submit a
Management Personnel of the complaint and provide them
report of findings and a confidential recommendation to
with a copy thereof. For the purpose this policy, the term
CSM Management Personnel and the Director of Human
CSM Management Personnel shall refer to the President, the
Resources. The report of findings shall be provided to the
vice president in whose area the Respondent is employed or
Complainant and Respondent within a reasonable time fol-
enrolled, and, if applicable, the Respondent’s immediate
lowing the issuance of a decision pursuant to subsection V.N
supervisor. However, if the President is the Respondent, the
below. The confidential recommendation shall not be re-
term CSM Management Personnel shall refer to the Board of
leased to the Complainant or the Respondent without written
Trustees, and if the Respondent is a vice president, the term
authorization from the President. The Director of Human
“CSM Management Personnel” shall refer to the President.
Resources shall submit a separate recommendation to CSM
Management Personnel which contains a statement of agree-
ment or disagreement with the findings and recommendation
of the investigating attorney.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
175

N. Resolution of the Complaint
tionships prohibited by this policy shall be viewed in this
Following consultations with the President, the investi-
context, and Instructors, Persons in Positions of Trust, and
gating attorney, and the Director of Human Resources, the
Supervisors should be aware that any violation of this policy
vice president shall issue a final written decision regarding
shall result in formal disciplinary action against them.
the complaint. The decision shall be addressed to the Com-
III. Definitions
plainant and shall contain a statement of whether or not
For the purposes of this policy, the following definitions
sexual harassment was found to have occurred, the remedies
shall apply:
to be provided to the Complainant, if any, and the sanctions
to be imposed upon the Respondent, if any. At approximately
A. Person in a Position of Trust: Any person occupying a
the same time, the decision shall be communicated to the
position of trust with respect to one or more students at CSM
Respondent in writing. If sanctions are to be imposed upon
such that engaging in an amorous, romantic, or sexual rela-
the Respondent, the vice president shall also notify the
tionship with any student would compromise the ability of
Respondent of that aspect of the decision in writing. If the
the employee to perform his or her duties. Examples of Per-
President is the Respondent, the President of the Board of
sons in Positions of Trust at CSM are those employed in the
Trustees shall perform the above duties. If the Respondent is
Office of the Registrar, those employed in the Student Life
a vice president, the President shall perform these duties.
Office, those employed in the Student Development Office,
those employed in Public Safety, resident assistants, and
O. Appeal of Final Decision
paper graders. The above examples are provided for illustra-
There shall be no internal appeal from the final decision
tive purposes only and are not intended to be exhaustive list-
rendered pursuant to subsection V.N above. A party aggrieved
ings or to limit the illustrated category in any manner.
by the decision may file a complaint with the appropriate
administrative agency or pursue other available legal remedies.
B. Instructor: Any person who teaches at CSM, including
academic faculty members, instructional staff, and graduate
Promulgated by the CSM Board of Trustees on March 13,
students with teaching or tutorial responsibilities.
1992. Amended by the CSM Board of Trustees on March 26,
1998. Amended by the CSM Board of Trustees on June 10,
C. Student: Any person who is pursuing a course of study
1999. Amended by the CSM Board of Trustees on June 22,
at CSM.
2000.
D. Subordinate Employee: Any person employed by CSM
Colorado School of Mines Personal
who is supervised by another employee.
Relationships Policy
E. Supervisor: Any person employed by CSM who
occupies a position of authority over another employee with
I. Statement of Authority and Purpose
regard to hiring, administering discipline, conducting
This policy is promulgated by the Board of Trustees pur-
evaluations, granting salary adjustments, or overseeing task
suant to the authority conferred upon it by §23-41-104(1),
performance.
C.R.S. (1988 Repl. Vol.) in order to set forth a policy con-
cerning certain personal relationships at CSM as addressed
IV. Policy
herein. This policy shall supersede any previously promul-
A. Personal Relations Between Instructors and Students in
gated CSM policy which is in conflict herewith.
the Instructional Context
II. Preface
No Instructor shall engage in an amorous, romantic, or
Certain amorous, romantic, or sexual relationships in
sexual relationship, consensual or otherwise, with a Student
which the parties appear to have consented, but where a
who is enrolled in a course being taught by the Instructor, or
definite power differential exists between them, are of seri-
whose academic work is being supervised by the Instructor.
ous concern to CSM. Personal relationships which might be
B. Personal Relationships Between Instructors and Stu-
appropriate in other circumstances always pose inherent dan-
dents Outside the Instructional Context
gers when they occur between an Instructor and a Student,
In a personal relationship between an Instructor and a
between a Person in a Position of Trust and a Student, and
Student for whom the Instructor has no current professional
between a Supervisor and a Subordinate Employee. Although
responsibility, the Instructor should be sensitive to the con-
both parties to the relationship may have consented at the
stant possibility that he or she may unexpectedly be placed in
outset, such relationships are fundamentally asymmetric in
a position of responsibility for the instruction or evaluation
nature. It is incumbent upon those with authority not to
of the Student. This could entail a request to write a letter of
abuse, nor appear to abuse, the power with which they are
recommendation for the Student or to serve on an admissions
entrusted. Accordingly, codes of ethics promulgated by most
or selection committee involving the Student. In addition, an
professional regulatory associations forbid professional-
awareness should be maintained that others may speculate
client amorous, romantic, or sexual relationships. The rela-
that a specific power relationship exists even when none is
176
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

present, giving rise to assumptions of inequitable academic
D. Personal Relationships Between Persons in Positions of
or professional advantage of the Student. Even if potential
Trust and Students
conflict of interest issues can be resolved, charges of sexual
No Person in a Position of Trust shall engage in an
harassment may arise. In such situations, it is the Instructor
amorous, romantic, or sexual relationship, consensual or
who, by virtue of his or her special responsibility, shall be
otherwise, with a Student.
held accountable for unprofessional behavior.
(Promulgated by the CSM Board of Trustees on February
C. Personal Relationships Between Supervisors and Sub-
14, 1992)
ordinate Employees
No Supervisor shall engage in an amorous, romantic, or
sexual relationship, consensual or otherwise, with a Subordi-
nate Employee who reports, either directly or indirectly, to
the Supervisor or is under the Supervisor’s direct or indirect
authority.
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
177

Index
A
E
Absenteeism 26
Economics and Business 48
Academic Advising 8
Encumbrances 17
Academic Calendar 4, 30
Energy Minor 134
Academic Computing and Networking 152
Engineering 55
Academic Probation and Suspension 28
Engineering Practices Introductory Course Sequence 35
Academic Regulations 25
Engineers’ Days 11
Access to Student Records 29
English as a Second Language 153
Accreditation 7
Environmental Health and Safety 153
Administration 7
Environmental Science and Engineering 68
Admission Procedures 23
EPICS 34, 35
Admission Requirements 22
ESL 153
Advanced Placement 24
Affirmative Action 170
F
AFROTC 140
Fees 15
Air Force ROTC 140
FERPA 29
Alumni Association 152
Field House 143
Apartment Housing 21
Final Examination Policy 31
Area of Special Interest 35
Financial Aid 19
Army ROTC 139
Financial Aid Policies 20
AROTC 139
Financial Responsibility 17
Foreign Language Policy 96
B
Foreign Languages 96
Bachelor of Science Degree 32
Forgiveness of ‘F’ Grade 27
Bioengineering and Life Sciences (BELS) 35, 129
Fraternities 11, 21
Blaster Cards 8
Full-Time Enrollment 32
Brooks Field 144
G
C
Geology and Geological Engineering 72
Career Center 9
Geophysics 80
Change of Bulletin 31
Good Standing 28
Chemical Engineering 39
Grade Appeal Process 27
Chemistry and Geochemistry 43
Grade-Point Averages 28
Codes of Conduct 9
Grades 26
College Opportunity Fund 18
Graduate Courses 30, 38
Communication 97
Graduation Awards 28
Copy Center 152
Graduation Requirements 32
Core Curriculum 33
Green Center 153
Counseling 8
Guy T. McBride, Jr. Honors Program 35, 136
Course Numbering 33
Gymnasium 143
Course Substitution 31
Course Withdrawals 25
H
Curriculum Changes 32, 34
History of CSM 6
Homecoming 11
D
Honor Roll and Dean’s List 28
Dead Day 31
Honor Societies 11
Dead Week 31
Honors Program in Public Affairs for Engineers 34
Dean’s List 28
Housing 16
Declaration of Option 24
Humanities 87
Deficiencies 25
Dining Facilities 21
Directory of the School 156
Distributed Core 37
178
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007

I
P
Identification Cards 8
Parking 9
Incomplete Grade 26
Part-Time Degree Students 31
Independent Study 25
Payments and Refunds 17
Intercollegiate Athletics 143
Personal Relationships Policy 176
INTERLINK Language Center (ESL) 153
Petroleum Engineering 118
Interest Organizations 11
Physical Education and Athletics 143
International Baccalureate 24
Physics 124
International Day 11
Policies & Procedures 170
International Programs 8, 20, 154
Prerequisites 25
International Student Affairs 8
Private Rooms 21
International Student Organizations 12
Probation 28
International Students 23
Professional Societies 12
Intramural Sports 143
Progress Grade 26
L
Public Relations 154
LAIS Writing Center 34, 153
Q
Late Payment Penalties 17
Quality Hours and Quality Points 28
Liberal Arts and International Studies 86
Library, Arthur Lakes 152
R
Living Groups 11
Recreational Organizations 12
Refunds 17, 20
M
Remediation 25
Materials Science 135
Research Centers and Institutes 146
Mathematical and Computer Sciences 98
Research Development and Services 154
McBride Honors Program 35, 136
Residence Halls 21
Medical Record 24
Residence Requirements, Technical Courses 32
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering 106
Residency Qualifications 18
Military Science 139
Mines Park 21
S
Mining Engineering 113
Scholarships 19
Minor Program 35
Semester Hours 28
Minority Engineering Program 10
Seniors in Grad Courses 31
Mission and Goals 5
Sexual Harassment Policy 173
Motor Vehicles 9
Social Sciences 90
Music 97
Sororities 11, 21
Special Events 11
N
Special Programs 34
Navy ROTC 140
Special Programs and Continuing Education (SPACE) 154
Nondegree Students 23
Student Center 8
O
Student Development and Academic Services 8
Student Government 11
Oceanography 79
Student Health Center 9
Off Campus Study 26, 153
Student Honor Code 6
Office of International Programs 8, 20, 154
Student Honors 12
Office of Technology Transfer 154
Student Life 33
Office of Women in Science, Engineering and
Student Publications 9
Mathematics (WISEM) 10, 154
Student Records 29
Outdoor Recreation Program 12
Study Abroad 20, 35
Summer Session 31
Suspension 29
Systems 36, 98
Colorado School of Mines
Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007
179

T
V
Telecommunications 155
Veterans 24
Transfer Credit 25, 28
Veterans Counseling 10
Transfer Students 22, 24, 25
Tuition 15
W
Tutoring 10
Winter Carnival 11
Withdrawal from School 25, 26
U
Women in Science, Engineering and Mathematics
Undergraduate Degree Requirements 32
(WISEM) 10, 154
Undergraduate Programs 33
Writing Center 34, 153
Unlawful Discrimination Policy 170
Writing Across the Curriculum 34
Use of English 31
180
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Undergraduate Bulletin
2006–2007



Document Outline