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Colorado School of Mines

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Graduate Bulletin
2007-08
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GrdaauteB uelint

Colorado
School of Mines
2007–2008
Graduate Bulletin

To CSM Graduate Students:
This Bulletin is for your use as a source of continuing
reference. Please save it.
Published by
Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401
Address correspondence to:
Office of Graduate Studies
Colorado School of Mines
1500 Illinois Street
Golden, CO 80401-1887
Main Telephone: 303-273-3247
Toll Free: 1-800-446-9488
grad-school@mines.edu
2
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

Table of Contents
Academic Calendar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Auditing Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
University Administration / Useful Contacts . . 5
Off Campus Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Office of Graduate Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
General Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Student Housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Graduate School Bulletin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Curriculum Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
International Student Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
General Policies of Student Conduct. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Registrar’s Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Student Honor Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Graduate Student Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Academic Integrity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Academic Departments & Divisions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Resolution of Conflicting Bulletin Provisions . . . . . . . . 28
General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Unsatisfactory Academic Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Mission and Goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Exceptions and Appeals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Institutional Values and Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Public Access to the Graduate Thesis. . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
History of CSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Making up Undergraduate Deficiencies. . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Graduate Students in Undergraduate Courses . . . . . . 30
Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Independent Study. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
The Graduate School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Course and Research Grades. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Unique Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Grade Appeal Process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Graduate Degrees Offered . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Graduation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Accreditation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Withdrawing from School. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Admission to the Graduate School . . . . . . . . 11
Nondegree Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Admission Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Veterans’ Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Categories of Admission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Grading System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Admission Procedure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Access to Student Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Financial Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Tuition, Fees, Financial Assistance. . . . . . . . 35
Application Review Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Tuition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Health Record and Additional Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Fees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
International Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Payments and Refunds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Student Life at CSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Graduate Degrees and Requirements. . . . . . 37
Housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
I. Professional Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Student Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
II. Master of Science and Engineering Programs . . . . 38
Military Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
III. Doctor of Philosophy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Student Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
IV. Individualized, Interdisciplinary Graduate
Facilities and Academic Support. . . . . . . . . . 18
Degrees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Arthur Lakes Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
V. Combined Undergraduate/Graduate Programs . . . . 43
Academic Computing and Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Graduate Degree Programs and Description
Copy Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
of Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
CSM Alumni Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Chemical Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Environmental Health and Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Chemistry and Geochemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Green Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Economics and Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
INTERLINK Language Center (ESL). . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
LAIS Writing Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Environmental Science and Engineering. . . . . . . . . . . 84
Off Campus Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Geochemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Office of International Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Geology and Geological Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Office of Technology Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Geophysics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Public Relations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Hydrologic Sciences and Engineering. . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Registrar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Liberal Arts and International Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Research Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Materials Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Special Programs and Continuing Education
Mathematical and Computer Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . 142
(SPACE). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering . . . . . . . . . . 149
Telecommunications Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Mining Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Women in Science, Engineering and Mathematics
Nuclear Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
(WISEM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Petroleum Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Registration and Tuition Classification. . . . . 22
Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
General Registration Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Research Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Research Centers and Institutes . . . . . . . . . 181
Eligibility for Thesis Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Directory of the School. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Graduation Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Policies and Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Full-time Status - Required Course Load . . . . . . . . . . 22
Affirmative Action. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Late Registration Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Unlawful Discrimination Policy & Complaint Procedure . 201
Leave of Absence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Sexual Harassment Policy & Complaint Procedure . . . . 204
Reciprocal Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Personal Relationships Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
In-State Tuition Classification Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208
Dropping and Adding Courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
3

Academic Calendar
Fall Semester 2007
Confirmation deadline
Aug. 20, Monday
Faculty Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aug. 20, Monday
Classes start (1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aug. 21, Tuesday
Graduate Students—last day to register without late fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aug. 26, Sunday
Labor Day (Classes held) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sept. 3, Monday
Last day to register, add or drop courses without a “W” (Census Day). . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sept. 5, Wednesday
Fall Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oct. 15 & 16, Monday & Tuesday
Midterm grades due . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oct. 15, Monday
Last day to withdraw from a course—Continuing students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oct. 30, Tuesday
Priority Registration Spring Semester . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nov. 12-16, Monday–Friday
Non-class day pior to Thanksgiving Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nov. 21, Wednesday
Thanksgiving Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nov. 22 –Nov. 25, Thursday–Sunday
Last day to withdraw from a course—New students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nov. 30, Friday
Last day to completely withdraw from CSM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 6, Thursday
Classes end. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 6, Thursday
Dead Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 7, Friday
Graduating students’ lowest possible grades due. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 11, Tuesday
Final exams. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 8, 10-13 , Saturday, Monday–Thursday
Semester ends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 14, Friday
Midyear Degree Convocation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 14, Friday
Final grades due. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 17, Monday
Winter Recess . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 15 –Jan. 8, Saturday–Tuesday
Spring Semester 2008
Confirmation deadline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jan. 8, Tuesday
Classes start (1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jan. 9, Wednesday
Grad Students—last day to register without late fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jan. 13, Sunday
Last day to register, add or drop courses without a “W” (Census Day) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jan. 24, Thursday
Non-class day - Presidents’ Day. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feb. 18, Monday
Midterms grades due. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 3, Monday
Spring Break. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 8-16, Saturday–Sunday
Last day to withdraw from a course—Continuing students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 25, Tuesday
E-Days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 3-5, Thursday–Saturday
Priority Registration, Field, Summer and Fall Term. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 7-11, Monday–Friday
Last day to withdraw from a course—New students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 25, Friday
Last day to completely withdraw from CSM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 1, Thursday
Classes end. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 1, Thursday
Dead Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 2, Friday
Graduating students’ lower possible grades due . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 6, Tuesday
Final exams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 3, May 5-8 Saturday, Monday–Thursday
Semester ends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 9, Friday
Commencement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 9, Friday
Final grades due . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 12, Monday
Field/Summer Sessions 2008
First Field Term First Day of Class and Summer Research, Registration (1) . . . . . . . . . . . May 12, Monday
Last day to register, add or drop courses without a “W”—Field Term and Summer Research (Census Day). . May 16, Friday
Memorial Day (Holiday—No classes held). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 26, Monday
Last day to withdraw from First Field Term. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 6, Friday
First Field Term ends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 20, Friday
Field Term grades due . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 23, Monday
Summer School First Day of Class, Registration (1). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 16, Monday
Last day to register, add or drop courses without a “W”—Summer School . . . . . . . . . . . . June 24, Tuesday
Independence Day (Holiday—No classes held) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 4, Friday
Second Field Term begins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 7, Monday
Last day to register, add or drop courses without a “W”—Second Field Term. . . . . . . . . . . . July 11, Friday
Last day to withdraw from Summer School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 11, Friday
Last day to withdraw from Second Field Term . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . August 1, Friday
Summer School ends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aug. 8, Friday
Summer School grades due . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aug. 11, Monday
Second Field Term ends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aug. 15, Friday
Second Field Term grades due . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aug. 18, Monday
(1) Petition for changes in tuition classification due in the Registrar’s office for this term.
4
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

University Administration / Useful Contacts
Office of Graduate Studies
Graduate Student Association
Mailing address
Rob Applegate
303 273-2101
1500 Illinois Street
President
Golden, CO 80401-1887
Academic Departments & Divisions
Telephone
FAX
The address for all CSM academic departments
303 273-3247
303 273-3244
and divisions is
John M. Poate
303-384-2375
1500 Illinois Street
Vice President for Research
Golden, Colorado 80401-1887
and Technology Transfer
World Wide Web address: http://www.mines.edu/
Lisa Kinzel
303-384-2470
Academic department and division telephone numbers are
Executive Assistant to the Vice
President for Research and
Chemical Engineering
Technology Transfer
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3720
Thomas M. Boyd
303-273-3522
Chemistry and Geochemistry
Dean of Graduate Studies
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3610
Jahi Simbai
303-384-2221
Economics and Business
Director of Graduate Recruiting
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3482
and Admissions
jsimbai@mines.edu
Engineering
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3650
Linda L. Powell
303-273-3348
Graduate Admissions Officer
Environmental Science and Engineering
lpowell@mines.edu
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3427
Brenda Neely
303-273-3412
Geology and Geological Engineering
Student Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3800
bneely@mines.edu
Geophysics
Kay Leaman
303-273-3249
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3450
Admissions Coordinator
Liberal Arts and International Studies
Student Housing
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3750
Kathy Rice
303-273-3351
Materials Science
Apartment Housing Coordinator
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3660
Financial Aid
Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Roger Koester
303-273-3207
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3860
Director of Financial Aid
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
Christina Jensen
303-273-3229
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3770
Graduate Student Financial Aid Advisor
Mining Engineering
International Student Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3701
Leslie Olsen
303-273-3210
International Student Advisor
Nuclear Engineering
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303-273-3618
Registrar’s Office
Petroleum Engineering
Registrar
303-273-3200
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3740
Physics
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3830
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2006–2007
5

General Information
Mission and Goals
The Colorado School of Mines is consequently committed
Colorado School of Mines is a public research university
to serving the people of Colorado, the nation, and the global
devoted to engineering and applied science related to re-
community by promoting stewardship of the Earth upon
sources. It is one of the leading institutions in the nation and
which all life and development depend. (Colorado School of
the world in these areas. It has the highest admission stan-
Mines Board of Trustees, 2000)
dards of any university in Colorado and among the highest of
Institutional Values and Principles
any public university in the U.S. CSM has dedicated itself to
Graduate Education
responsible stewardship of the earth and its resources. It is
The Colorado School of Mines (CSM) is dedicated to
one of a very few institutions in the world having broad ex-
serving the people of Colorado, the nation and the global
pertise in resource exploration, extraction, production and
community by providing high quality educational and re-
utilization which can be brought to bear on the world's press-
search experiences to students in science, engineering and re-
ing resource-related environmental problems. As such, it oc-
lated areas that support the institutional mission. Recognizing
cupies a unique position among the world's institutions of
the importance of responsible earth stewardship, CSM places
higher education.
particular emphasis on those fields related to the discovery,
The school's role and mission has remained constant and is
production and utilization of resources needed to improve the
written in the Colorado statutes as: The Colorado School of
quality of life of the world's inhabitants and to sustain the
Mines shall be a specialized baccalaureate and graduate re-
earth system upon which all life and development depend. To
search institution with high admission standards. The Col-
this end, CSM is devoted to creating a learning community
orado School of Mines shall have a unique mission in energy,
which provides students with perspectives informed by the
mineral, and materials science and engineering and associ-
humanities and social sciences, perspectives which also en-
ated engineering and science fields. The school shall be the
hance students' understanding of themselves and their role in
primary institution of higher education offering energy, min-
contemporary society. CSM therefore seeks to instill in all
eral and materials science and mineral engineering degrees
graduate students a broad class of developmental and educa-
at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. (Colorado re-
tional attributes:
vised Statutes, Section 23-41-105)
uAn in-depth knowledge in an area of specialization, en-
Throughout the school's 127 year history, the translation of
hanced by hands-on experiential learning, and breadth in
its mission into educational programs has been influenced by
allied fields, including:
the needs of society. Those needs are now focused more
1. the background and skills to be able to recognize, define
clearly than ever before. We believe that the world faces a
and solve problems by applying sound scientific and en-
crisis in balancing resource availability with environmental
gineering principles, and
protection and that CSM and its programs are central to the
2. for thesis-based students, experience in conducting orig-
solution to that crisis. Therefore the school's mission is elab-
inal scientific research and engineering design at the
orated upon as follows:
forefront of their particular area of specialization.
Colorado School of Mines is dedicated to educating stu-
uThe ability to function effectively in an information-based
dents and professionals in the applied sciences, engineering,
economy and society, including:
and associated fields related to
1. written, oral and graphical communications skills that
uthe discovery and recovery of the Earth's resources,
enable effective transmission of concepts and ideas as
u their conversion to materials and energy,
well as technical information, and
utheir utilization in advanced processes and products,
2. expertise in finding, retrieving, evaluating, storing and
and
disseminating information in ways that enhance their
uthe economic and social systems necessary to ensure
leadership role in society and their profession.
their prudent and provident use in a sustainable global
uPreparation for leadership in a team-based milieu, includ-
society.
ing:
This mission will be achieved by the creation, integration,
1. the flexibility to adjust to an ever-changing professional
and exchange of knowledge in engineering, the natural sci-
environment and to appreciate diverse approaches to un-
ences, the social sciences, the humanities, business and their
derstanding and solving professional and societal prob-
union to create processes and products to enhance the qual-
lems,
ity of life of the world's inhabitants.
2. the creativity, resourcefulness, receptivity and breadth
of interests to think critically about a wide range of
cross-disciplinary issues,
6
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

3. a strong work ethic that inspires commitment and loy-
uThe State requires all public colleges and universities in
alty on the part of colleagues,
Colorado, in concert, to provide appropriate educational
4. interpersonal skills and attitudes which promote cooper-
opportunities in rural areas which are under-served by
ation and enable leadership, and
traditional residential institutions.
5. acceptance of responsibility for their own growth
In addition to these philosophical goals, Professional Out-
through life-long learning.
reach can make an important pragmatic contribution to the
university by:
uThe capability of adapting to, appreciating and working ef-
fectively in an international environment, including:
uDeveloping and sustaining programs which address the
lifelong education needs of individuals in professions
1. being able to succeed in an increasingly interdependent
associated with science, mathematics, engineering, and
world where borders between cultures and economies
technology.
are becoming less distinct, and
uRecruiting high-quality students for the traditional resi-
2. appreciating the traditions and languages of other cul-
dential programs
tures, as well as valuing and supporting diversity in their
own society.
uSpreading and enhancing the reputation of Mines
throughout the world
uHigh standards of integrity expressed through ethical be-
havior and acceptance of the obligation to enhance their
uGenerating revenues that help support the residential
profession and society through service and leadership.
and research missions of the university
Professional Education
Research
A central purpose of a university is the widespread and
The creation and dissemination of new knowledge are pri-
open distribution of the special knowledge created by, and
mary responsibilities of all members of the university com-
reposing in, the expertise of the faculty. At CSM, that special
munity. Public institutions have an additional responsibility
knowledge falls into several broad categories:
to use that knowledge to contribute to the economic growth
and public welfare of the society from which they receive
uA mature body of knowledge, in areas of historic leader-
their charter and support. As a public institution of higher ed-
ship, which is of great value to professionals in those
ucation, a fundamental responsibility of CSM is to provide
fields throughout the world.
an environment which enables contribution to the public
uCreative advances in emerging fields of science and en-
good by encouraging creative research and ensuring the free
gineering, developed in Mines' leading-edge research
exchange of ideas, information, and results. To that end, the
laboratories, which can contribute to the economic and
institution acknowledges the following responsibilities:
physical well-being of people in Colorado and the na-
uTo insure that these activities are conducted in an envi-
tion.
ronment of minimum influence and bias, it is essential
uExpertise in problem-solving methodologies, including
that CSM protect the academic freedom of all members
engineering design and structured decision-making,
of its community.
which is of growing importance in all technical-social-
uTo provide the mechanisms for creation and dissemina-
political realms as our global society becomes increas-
tion of knowledge, the institution recognizes that access
ingly complex and interdependent.
to information and information technology (e.g. library,
uLeadership in the development of innovative educa-
computing and internet resources) are part of the basic
tional tools and techniques which can help people-
infrastructure support to which every member of the
young and old-to be better prepared to succeed in
community is entitled.
advanced education, productive careers, and satisfying
uTo promote the utilization and application of knowl-
personal lives.
edge, it is incumbent upon CSM to define and protect
Additional outreach responsibilities are imposed by the
the intellectual-property rights and responsibilities of
special role and nature of Mines:
faculty members, students, as well as the institution.
uCSM is committed to inculcating in its traditional resi-
The following principles derive from these values and re-
dential undergraduate and graduate students an appreci-
sponsibilities:
ation for and commitment to life-long learning and
uThe institution exists to bring faculty and students to-
inquiry. This imposes on Mines a responsibility to create
gether to form a community of scholars.
and support Professional Outreach programs that will
expose students to self-directed learning experiences
uFaculty members have unique relationship with the in-
while still in residence, and provide opportunities for
stitution because of their special responsibility to create
continued intellectual growth after they graduate.
and disseminate knowledge independent of oversight or
direction from the institution.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
7

uStudents have a dual role as creators and recipients of
uThe institution exists to bring faculty and students to-
knowledge.
gether to form a community of scholars.
uThe institution and the faculty share responsibility for
uFaculty members have a unique relationship with the in-
facilitating the advancement of students in their chosen
stitution because faculty create and disseminate knowl-
discipline.
edge independent of oversight or direction from the
uThe institution and the faculty are mutually dependent
institution.
upon each other, and share the responsibility for the rep-
uFaculty activities must be driven by academic needs re-
utation of both the university and the individual.
lating to the creation and dissemination of knowledge
uAlthough research objectives should be informed by the
rather than commercial opportunities.
institution's responsibility (as a public institution) to
uThe institution and the faculty share responsibility for
contribute to economic growth and societal well-being,
facilitating the advancement of students in their chosen
research priorities must be driven by academic needs re-
discipline. Students are the independent creators of the
lating to the creation, development and dissemination of
expression of ideas in their theses, but may have a dual
knowledge.
role as both an independent creator of an expression of
uResearch policies and practices must conform to the
ideas and as directed employees.
state non-competition law which requires that all re-
uThe institution and the faculty are mutually dependent
search projects have an educational component through
upon each other, and share the responsibility for the rep-
the involvement of students and/or post-doctoral fel-
utation of both the university and the individual.
lows.
uBoth the creator and the institution have an interest in,
uBoth the creator and the institution have interest in, and
and a responsibility to promote, the dissemination and
a responsibility to promote, the dissemination and uti-
utilization of knowledge for the public good.
lization of new knowledge for public good through pub-
uAlthough commercialization is not a primary responsi-
lication and commercialization.
bility of the university community, it is sometimes the
uAlthough commercialization is not a primary responsi-
result of technology transfer.
bility of the university community, it is a common result
uThe creator and the institution should share in the poten-
of technology transfer. The creator and the institution
tial benefits and risks in proportion to their contributions
may each have an interest in the commercialization of
and/or agreed assumption of benefits and risks.
intellectual property and should share in the potential
benefits and risks based on their contributions.
uAll members of the CSM community will demonstrate
the highest level of integrity in their activities associated
Intellectual Property
with intellectual property.
The creation and dissemination of knowledge are primary
responsibilities of all members of the university community.
As an institution of higher education, a fundamental mission
of CSM is to provide an environment that motivates the fac-
ulty and promotes the creation, dissemination, and applica-
tion of knowledge through the timely and free exchange of
ideas, information, and research results for the public good.
To insure that these activities are conducted in an environ-
ment of minimum influence and bias, so as to benefit society
and the people of Colorado, it is essential that CSM protect
the academic freedom of all members of its community. It is
incumbent upon CSM to help promote the utilization and ap-
plication of knowledge by defining and protecting the rights
and responsibilities of faculty members, students and the in-
stitution, with respect to intellectual property which may be
created while an individual is employed as a faculty member
or enrolled as a student. The following principles, derived
from these responsibilities and values, govern the develop-
ment and implementation of CSM's Intellectual Property
Policies.
8
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

History of CSM
Location
In 1865, only six years after gold and silver were discov-
Golden, Colorado, has always been the home of CSM. Lo-
ered in the Colorado Territory, the fledgling mining industry
cated in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains 20 minutes
was in trouble. The nuggets had been picked out of streams
west of Denver, this community of 15,000 also serves as
and the rich veins had been worked, and new methods of ex-
home to the Coors Brewing Company, the National Renew-
ploration, mining, and recovery were needed.
able Energy Laboratory, and a major U.S. Geological Survey
Early pioneers like W.A.H. Loveland, E.L. Berthoud,
facility that also contains the National Earthquake Center.
Arthur Lakes, George West and Episcopal Bishop George M.
The seat of government for Jefferson County, Golden once
Randall proposed a school of mines. In 1874 the Territorial
served as the territorial capital of Colorado. Skiing is an hour
Legislature appropriated $5,000 and commissioned Loveland
away to the west.
and a Board of Trustees to found the Territorial School of
Administration
Mines in or near Golden. Governor Routt signed the Bill on
By State statute, the school is managed by a seven-mem-
February 9, 1874, and when Colorado became a state in
ber board of trustees appointed by the governor, and the stu-
1876, the Colorado School of Mines was constitutionally es-
dent body elects a nonvoting student board member each
tablished. The first diploma was awarded in 1883.
year. The school is supported financially by student tuition
As CSM grew, its mission expanded from the rather nar-
and fees and by the State through annual appropriations.
row initial focus on nonfuel minerals to programs in petro-
These funds are augmented by government and privately
leum production and refining as well. Recently it has added
sponsored research, and private gift support from alumni,
programs in materials science and engineering, energy and
corporations, foundations and other friends.
environmental engineering, and a broad range of other engi-
neering and applied science disciplines. CSM sees its mis-
sion as education and research in engineering and applied
science with a special focus on the earth science disciplines
in the context of responsible stewardship of the earth and its
resources.
CSM long has had an international reputation. Students
have come from nearly every nation, and alumni can be
found in every corner of the globe.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
9

The Graduate School
Unique Programs
Accreditation
Because of its special focus, Colorado School of Mines
Colorado School of Mines is accredited through the level of
has unique programs in many fields. For example, CSM is
the doctoral degree by the Higher Learning Commission of the
the only institution in the world that offers doctoral programs
North Central Association, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400,
in all five of the major earth science disciplines: Geology and
Chicago, Illinois 60602-2504 - telephone (312) 263-0456.
Geological Engineering, Geophysics, Geochemistry, Mining
The Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accredita-
Engineering, and Petroleum Engineering. It also has one of
tion Board for Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Place,
the few Metallurgical and Materials Engineering programs in
Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 - telephone (410) 347-
the country that still focuses on the complete materials cycle
7700, accredits undergraduate degree programs in chemical en-
from mineral processing to finished advanced materials.
gineering, engineering, engineering physics, geological
In addition to the traditional programs defining the institu-
engineering, geophysical engineering, metallurgical and materi-
tional focus, CSM is pioneering both undergraduate and
als engineering, mining engineering and petroleum engineering.
graduate interdisciplinary programs. The School understands
The American Chemical Society has approved the degree pro-
that solutions to the complex problems involving global
gram in the Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry.
processes and quality of life issues require cooperation
among scientists, engineers, economists, and the humanities.
Degree Programs
Prof. M.S. M.E. Ph.D.
CSM offers interdisciplinary programs in areas such as
Applied Physics
n
n
materials science, environmental science and engineering,
Chemical Engineering
n
n
management and public policy, engineering systems, hydrol-
Chemistry
n
ogy, and geochemistry. These programs make interdiscipli-
nary connections between traditional fields of engineering,
Applied Chemistry
n
physical science and social science, emphasizing a broad ex-
Engineering
n
n
posure to fundamental principles while cross-linking infor-
Engineering & Technology
mation from traditional disciplines to create the insight
n
Management
needed for breakthroughs in the solution of modern prob-
Environmental Geochemistry
n
lems.
Environmental Science &
To provide flexibility in meeting new challenges, CSM
n
n
Engineering
also provides students the opportunity to develop individual-
Geochemistry
n
n
ized, interdisciplinary graduate research programs at both the
Master and PhD level. This program allows students to earn
Geological Engineering
n
n
n
degrees which have one of the following titles:
Geology
n
n
Doctor of Philosophy (Interdisciplinary)
Geophysical Engineering
n
n
Master of Science (Interdisciplinary)
Geophysics
n
n
Master of Engineering (Interdisciplinary)
Hydrology
n
n
When the need arises, CSM also offers interdisciplinary,
International Political Economy
o
non-thesis Professional Master degrees to meet the career
& Resources
needs of working professionals in CSM's focus areas.
Materials Science
n
n
Coordinated by the several departments involved, these in-
Mathematical & Computer
n
n
terdisciplinary programs contribute to CSM's leadership role
Science
in addressing the problems and developing solutions that will
Metallurgical & Materials
n
n
n
enhance the quality of life for all of earth's inhabitants in the
Engineering
next century.
Mineral Economics
n
n
Graduate Degrees Offered
Mineral Exploration & Mining
n
CSM offers professional masters, master of science
Geosciences
(M.S.), master of engineering (M.E.) and doctor of philoso-
Mining & Earth Systems
n
n
n
phy (Ph.D.) degrees in the disciplines listed in the chart at
Engineering
right.
Nuclear Engineering
n
n
In addition to masters and Ph.D. degrees, departments and
Petroleum Engineering
n
n
n
divisions can also offer graduate certificates. Graduate cer-
Petroleum Reservoir Systems
n
tificates are designed to have selective focus, short time to
completion and consist of course work only.
o Master of International Political Economy of Resources
10
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

Admission to the Graduate School
Admission Requirements
who subsequently decides to pursue a regular degree pro-
The Graduate School of Colorado School of Mines is open
gram must apply and gain admission to the Graduate School.
to graduates from four-year programs at recognized colleges
All credits earned as a nondegree student may be transferred
or universities. Admission to all graduate programs is com-
into the regular degree program if the student's graduate
petitive, based on an evaluation of prior academic perform-
committee and department head approve.
ance, test scores and references. The academic background of
Combined Undergraduate/Graduate Programs
each applicant is evaluated according to the requirements of
Several degree programs offer CSM undergraduate stu-
each department outlined later in this section of the Bulletin.
dents the opportunity to begin work on a Graduate Certifi-
To be a candidate for a graduate degree, students must
cate, Professional Degree, or Master Degree while
have completed an appropriate undergraduate degree pro-
completing the requirements for their Bachelor Degree.
gram. Undergraduate students in the Combined Degree Pro-
These programs can give students a head start on graduate
gram may, however, work toward completion of graduate
education. An overview of these combined programs and de-
degree requirements prior to completing undergraduate de-
scription of the admission process and requirements are
gree requirements. See the Combined Undergraduate/Gradu-
found in the Graduate Degrees and Requirements section of
ate Degree section of the Graduate Bulletin for details of this
this Bulletin.
program.
Admission Procedure
Categories of Admission
Applying for Admission
There are three categories of admission to graduate studies
Apply electronically for admission on the World Wide
at Colorado School of Mines: regular, provisional, and spe-
Web. Our Web address is
cial graduate nondegree.
http://www.mines.edu/Admiss/grad
Regular Degree Students
Follow the procedure outlined below.
Applicants who meet all the necessary qualifications as de-
1. Application: Go to the online application form at
termined by the program to which they have applied are ad-
www.mines.edu/Admiss/grad/graduate_admissions.html. You
mitted as regular graduate students.
may download a paper copy of the application from our web-
Provisional Degree Students
site or contact 303-273-3247 or grad-school@Mines.edu to
Applicants who are not qualified to enter the regular de-
have one sent my mail. Students wishing to apply for gradu-
gree program directly may be admitted as provisional degree
ate school should submit completed applications by the fol-
students for a trial period not longer than 12 months. During
lowing dates:
this period students must demonstrate their ability to work
for Fall admission
for an advanced degree as specified by the admitting degree
program. After the first semester, the student may request
January 15 - Priority consideration for financial support*
that the department review his or her progress and make a
April 1 - International student deadline
decision concerning full degree status. With department ap-
July 1 - Domestic student deadline**
proval, the credits earned under the provisional status can be
applied towards the advanced degree.
for Spring Admission
International Special Graduate Students
September 1 - International student deadline
Applicants who wish to study as non-degree students for
November 1 - Domestic student deadline
one or two semesters may apply for Special Graduate status.
*March 1 for Chemistry and Applied Chemistry applicants
Special Graduate student status is available to a limited num-
ber of applicants from abroad. All such students who attend
**March 15 for Geology and Geological Engineering ap-
class or audit courses at Colorado School of Mines must reg-
plicants
ister and pay the appropriate nonresident tuition and fees for
Students wishing to submit applications beyond the final
the credits taken.
deadline should make a request to the individual academic
Nondegree Students
department.
Practicing professionals may wish to update their profes-
2. Transcripts: Send to the Graduate School two official
sional knowledge or broaden their areas of competence with-
transcripts from each school previously attended. The tran-
out committing themselves to a degree program. They may
scripts may accompany the application or may be sent di-
enroll for regular courses as nondegree students. Inquiries
rectly by the institution attended. International students'
and applications should be made to the Registrar's Office,
transcripts must be in English or have an official English
CSM, Golden, CO 80401-0028. Phone: 303-273-3200; FAX
translation attached.
303-384-2253. A person admitted as a nondegree student
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
11

3. Letters of Recommendation: Three (3) letters of recom-
Financial Assistance
mendation are required. Individuals who know your personal
To apply for CSM financial assistance, check the box in
qualities and scholastic or professional abilities can use the
the Financial Information section of the online graduate ap-
online application system to submit letters of recommenda-
plication or complete the Financial Assistance section on the
tion on your behalf. Letters can also be mailed directly to the
paper application.
Graduate School. At least two letters should be from individ-
Application Review Process
uals acquainted with your scholastic abilities.
When application materials are received by the Graduate
4. Graduate Record Examination: Most departments re-
School, they are processed and sent to the desired degree
quire the General test of the Graduate Record Examination
program for review. The review is conducted according to
for applicants seeking admission to their programs. Refer to
the process developed and approved by the faculty of that de-
the section Graduate Degree Programs and Courses by De-
gree program. The degree program transmits its decision to
partment or the Graduate School application packet to find
the Dean of the Graduate School, who then notifies the appli-
out if you must take the GRE examination. For information
cant. The decision of the degree program is final and may not
about the test, write to Graduate Record Examinations, Edu-
be appealed.
cational Testing Service, PO Box 6000, Princeton, NJ 08541-
Health Record and Additional Steps
6000 (Telephone 609-771-7670), or visit online at
www.gre.org.
When students first enroll at CSM, they must complete the
student health record form which is sent to them when they
5. English Language Requirement: Applicants whose na-
are accepted for enrollment. Students must submit the stu-
tive language is not English must complete the TOEFL ex-
dent health record, including health history, medical exami-
amination (Test of English as a Foreign Language), and have
nation, and record of immunization, in order to complete
the results sent to the Graduate School as part of the admis-
registration.
sion process. The institution has minimum TOEFL examina-
tion requirements. These may be found at
Questions can be addressed to the Coulter Student Health
http://www.mines.edu/admiss/grad/intl_stu_admission_app.html.
Center, 1225 17th Street, Golden, CO 80401-1869. The
Contact local American embassies or write to TOEFL Ser-
Health Center telephone numbers are 303-273-3381 and 303-
vices, Educational Testing Service, P.O. Box 6151, Princeton,
279-3155.
NJ 08541-6151, USA, (Telephone 609-771-7100) for infor-
International Students
mation about the TOEFL examination. You may also visit
Qualifying international students (see Admission Require-
online at www.toefl.org. If a TOEFL exam score indicates
ments above) apply for graduate study by following steps
that the applicant will be handicapped academically, as a
one through six listed in this section.
condition for admission the applicant may be required to en-
roll in the INTERLINK Language program at CSM until the
required proficiency is achieved.
The INTERLINK Language program offers intensive Eng-
lish language instruction and skills development for aca-
demic success. See the detailed description of INTERLINK
on page 15 of this catalog.
6. Additional instructions for admission to graduate school
specific to individual departments are contained in the appli-
cation for admission.
12
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

Student Life at CSM
Housing
Student Recreation Center
Mines Park
Completed in May, 2007, the 108,000 square foot Student
The Mines Park apartment complex is located west of the
Recreation Center, located at the corner of 16th and Maple
6th Avenue and 19th Street intersection on 55 acres owned
Streets in the heart of campus, provides a wide array of facilities
by CSM. The complex houses some freshmen, upper class
and programs designed to meet student's recreational and leisure
students, graduate students, and families. Residents must be
needs while providing for a healthy lifestyle. The Center con-
full-time students.
tains a state-of-the-art climbing wall, an eight-lane, 25 meter
swimming and diving pool, a cardiovascular and weight room,
Units are complete with refrigerators, stoves, dishwashers,
two multi-purpose rooms designed and equipped for aerobics,
cable television, campus phone lines and T-1 connections to
dance, martial arts programs and other similar activities, a com-
the campus network system. There are two community cen-
petition gymnasium containing three full-size basketball courts
ters which contain the laundry facilities, recreational/study
as well as seating for 2500 people, a separate recreation gymna-
space, and a convenience store.
sium designed specifically for a wide variety of recreational pro-
2007-08 Rates are as follows:
grams, extensive locker room and shower facilities, and a large
Family Housing
lounge and juice bar facility intended for relaxing, playing
1 bedroom
$650/mo
games or watching television. In addition to housing the Out-
2 bedroom
$750/mo
door Recreation Program as well as the Intramurals and Club
Sports Programs, the Center serves as the competition venue for
Apartment Housing
the Intercollegiate Men and Women's Basketball Programs, the
1 bedroom
$650/mo
Intercollegiate Volleyball Program and the Men and Women's In-
2 bedroom
$878/mo
tercollegiate Swimming and Diving Program.
3 bedroom
$1,170/mo
Office for Student Development and Academic
For an application to any of the campus housing options,
Services
please contact the housing office at (303) 273-3350 or visit
The Student Development and Academic Services Office
the Student Life office in the Ben Parker Student Center,
(SDAS), located in the Student Center, serves as the per-
Room 218.
sonal, academic and career counseling center. Through its
Campus Residence Halls
various services, the center acts as a comprehensive resource
Four of the residence halls located on campus have the tra-
for the personal growth and life skills development of our
ditional double rooms and common bathrooms, and our fifth
students. SDAS houses a library of over 300 books and other
Residence Hall, Weaver Towers, has suites for seven to eight
materials for checkout, and is home to CSM's Engineers
people with two private bathrooms and a common living
Choosing Health Options (ECHO) program, promoting wise
room.
and healthy decision making regarding students' use of alco-
hol and other drugs.
Residence hall rooms are contracted for the entire aca-
demic year; costs range from $3,880 for a traditional double
Counseling: Experienced, professional counselors offer
room to $4,810 for a single in Weaver Towers. All students in
assistance in a variety of areas. Personal counseling for stress
residence halls must also choose a dining hall meal plan.
management, relationship issues, wellness education and/or
Meal plans are $3,455 per year, and students can choose
improved self image are a few of the areas often requested.
from options available for residence hall students.
Assertiveness, stress management, time management, gender
issues, personal security, and compatibility with roommates
Student Services
are also popular interactive presentations. SDAS works
Ben H. Parker Student Center
closely with other student life departments to address other
The Ben H. Parker Student Center has recently undergone a
issues.
four million dollar renovation and addition. The building con-
Academic Services: The staff often conducts workshops
tains the offices for the Vice President of Student Life and Dean
in areas of interest to college students, such as time manage-
of Students, the Director of Student Life, Housing, Conferences
ment, learning skills, test taking, preparing for finals and col-
Reservation Office, Student Activities and Greek Advisor,
lege adjustment. Advising on individual learning skills is also
ASCSM Offices, and Student Groups. The Student Center also
available. Additional learning resources are provided on the
contains the student dining hall, the I-Club, a food court, game
department website.
room, bookstore, and student lounges and TV room. There are
Tutoring and Academic Excellence Workshops: Gradu-
also a number of meeting rooms and banquet facilities in the Stu-
ate students are welcome to avail themselves of free walk-in
dent Center. Another addition was completed during the summer
tutoring and/or weekly workshops in introductory calculus,
of 2001 which contains meeting rooms and banquet facilities as
chemistry, and physics.
well as the offices of Admissions/Financial Aid, Cashier, Student
Development and Academic Services/Services for Students with
Office of Services for Students with Disabilities
Disabilities, International Student Services, Career Services and
(OSSD): This office serves students with documented dis-
Registrar.
abilities who are seeking academic accommodations or ad-
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
13

justments. OSSD coordinates CSM's efforts to comply with
condition of enrollment for all CSM students, regardless of
the broad mandates of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act
full-time or part-time status. For students without health in-
of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.
surance coverage, the School offers an insurance plan. Addi-
International Student Services
tional coverage for spouses and children is also available.
The International Student Office advises international stu-
All international students are, however, required to enroll
dents, coordinates the Host Family Program, and holds orien-
in the CSM Plan, regardless of the existence of their own
tation programs for new foreign students at the beginning of
personal health coverage. There are two exceptions to this re-
each semester. The international student advisor processes
quirement: (1) the international student has an insurance pol-
student visas and work permits.
icy approved by the CSM International Student Office; or (2)
the international student is receiving benefits for a health in-
For more information, call the International Student Ser-
surance claim that would otherwise be pre-existing under the
vices office at 303-273-3210 or FAX 303-273-3099.
CSM Plan. Additional coverage for spouses and children is
Identification Cards (BLASTER CARD)
also available.
Blaster cards are made in the Student Life Office in the
NOTE: The Coulter Student Health Center fee and re-
Parker Student Center, and all new students must have a card
quired health insurance are two separate programs.
made as soon as possible after they enroll. Each semester the
Student Activities Office issues validation stickers for student
Motor Vehicles, Parking
ID's, and students can replace lost, stolen, or damaged
All motor vehicles on campus must be registered with the
Blaster Cards for a small fee.
campus Department of Public Safety, 1812 Illinois Street,
and must display the CSM permit. Vehicles must be regis-
The Blaster Card can be used as a debit card to make pur-
tered at the beginning of each semester or within 10 days of
chases from all campus vending machines, at all campus
bringing the vehicle onto campus, and updated whenever you
food service facilities, at the campus bookstore, to use any
change your address.
campus laundry facility as well as any campus copying ma-
chine, to check material out of the CSM Library and to make
Career Center
purchases at participating golden area businesses. It will also
The CSM Career Center mission is to assist students in de-
serve as an access card to the campus residence halls and
veloping, evaluating, and/or implementing career, education,
may be required to attend various CSM campus activities.
and employment decisions and plans. Career development is
Please visit the website at http://www.is.mines.edu/
integral to the success of CSM graduates and to the mission
BlasterCard for more information.
of CSM. All Colorado School of Mines graduates will be
able to acquire the necessary skills to enable them to success-
Student Health Center
fully take personal responsibility for the management of their
The Student Health Center, located at 17th and Elm, pro-
own careers.
vides primary health care to CSM students and their spouses.
In order to accomplish our mission, we provide a compre-
Students pay a $46.50 fee each semester which entitles them
hensive array of career services:
to unlimited visits with a physician or nurse as well as lim-
ited prescription and over-the-counter medications. Spouses
Career Advice and Counseling
of enrolled students may also pay the fee and receive the
Resources to help choose a major
same services. The health center also provides dental serv-
Individual resume and cover letter critiques
ices, wellness education, immunizations, allergy shots, flu
shots, nutrition counseling and information regarding a wide
Individual job search advice
range of health concerns. Staff members are also available to
Practice video-taped interviews
provide health-promotion events for students groups and res-
Career Planning Services
idence hall program.
Online resources for exploring careers and employers
The Student Health Center is open Monday through Friday
8-12 and 1-4:45 P.M. It is staffed by RN's throughout the day.
"Career Digger" online - short bios describe what recent
Physician's coverage is provided by family practice physi-
grads are doing on their jobs
cians who are on site for two hours daily and on-call at all
"Career Manual" online - resume writing, resume and
times. Dental services are also provided on a scheduled basis.
cover letter examples, and job search tips
To be eligible for care, students must be enrolled currently;
Job Search Workshops - successful company research,
have paid the Health Center fee if they are part time and have
interviewing, networking skills
a completed Health History Form on file at the Health Cen-
ter.
Salary and "placement" information
Supervised by Vice President and Dean of Student Life.
Company contact information
Phone: (303) 273-3381; FAX: (303) 279-3155.
Grad school information
Mandatory Health Insurance
Career resource library
Colorado School of Mines requires health insurance as a
14
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

Job Resources
Student Activities
Career Day (Fall and Spring)
Student government committees, professional societies,
Online summer, part-time, and full-time entry-level
living group organizations, special events, honor societies,
job postings at www.diggernet.net
and interest group organizations add a balance to the CSM
community and offer participants the chance to develop lead-
On-campus interviewing - industry and government rep-
ership and management skills. The Student Activities office
resentatives visit the campus to interview students and
can give you an up-to-date list of recognized campus organi-
explain employment opportunities
zations and more information about them.
Resume referrals
Student Government
Employer searching resource
The Graduate Student Association was formed in 1991 and
Continued services up to 18 months after graduation
is recognized by CSM and the National Association of Grad-
uate-Professional Students (NSGPS). GSA's primary goal is
Oredigger Student Newspaper
to improve the quality of a graduate education, offer aca-
The Oredigger student newspaper, published on a regular
demic support for graduate students, and provide social inter-
basis during the school year, contains news, features, sports,
action.
letters, and editorials of interest to students, faculty, and the
Golden community.
GSA takes an active role in university affairs and promotes
the rights and responsibilities of graduate students. GSA also
Veterans' Benefits
serves to develop university responsibility to non-academic
The Registrar's Office offers veterans counseling services
concerns of graduate students. GSA is funded through and
for students attending the School and using educational bene-
works with Associated Students of the Colorado School of
fits from the Veterans Administration.
Mines and is presently represented on the Faculty Senate
Military Science Army ROTC (AROTC)
Graduate Council and Associated Students of CSM. Phone:
303-273-3094.
The Military Science Program at the Colorado School of
Mines (CSM) is offered in conjunction with the University of
The Associated Students of the Colorado School of Mines
Colorado at Boulder (CU-B). The Department of Military
works to advance the interest and promote the welfare of
Science offers programs leading to an officer's commission
CSM and of all students, and to foster and maintain harmony
in the active Army, Army Reserve, or National Guard in con-
among those connected with or interested in the school, in-
junction with an undergraduate or graduate degree. Military
cluding students, alumni, faculty, trustees, and friends.
science courses are designed to supplement a regular degree
Through funds collected as student fees, ASCSM strives to
program by offering practical leadership and management
ensure a full social and academic life for all students with its
experience. Students attend classes at the Colorado School of
organizations, publications, and social events.
Mines in Golden.
The Mines Activity Council (MAC) serves the ASCSM as
Two-Year Program
the campus special events board. Most student events on
The two-year program consists of the advanced course,
campus are planned by the MAC committees. Committees
preceded by attending the Leaders Training course (a four-
are the Friday Afternoon Club (FAC) committee, which
week summer ROTC basic course at Ft. Knox, Kentucky).
brings comedians and other performers to campus on most
Veterans or Active Army Reserve/Army National Guard Sol-
Fridays in the academic year; the Special Events committee,
diers, are eligible to enroll in the advanced course without at-
which coordinates events like the annual Back-to-School
tending the Leaders Training Course. Inquiries on advanced
Bash, Discount Sport Nights at professional sporting events,
placement should be directed to the Department of Military
and one-time specialty entertainment; the E-Days committee;
Science. Advanced course students must obtain permission
and the Homecoming committee.
from the Professor of Military Science (PMS) at 303-492-
The Mines Activity Council (MAC) serves the ASCSM as
6495.
the campus special events board. Most student events on
Registration and AROTC Course Credit
campus are planned by the MAC committees. Committees
Army ROTC serves as elective credit in most departments.
are the Friday Afternoon Club (FAC) committee, which
Elective course credit toward your degree for AROTC
brings comedians and other performers to campus on most
classes will be determined by your individual academic advi-
Fridays in the academic year; the Special Events committee,
sor. AROTC classes begin with the MSGN prefix.
which coordinates events like the annual Back-to-School
Bash, Discount Sport Nights at professional sporting events,
For more information, contact the CU-Boulder Army
and one-time specialty entertainment; the E-Days committee;
ROTC Enrollment and Scholarship Officer at 303-492-3549
and the Homecoming committee.
or 303-492-6495. You can also go to
http://www.colorado.edu/AROTC. For information about
CSM, call 303-273-3398 or 303-273-3380.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
15

Special Events
Interest Organizations
Research Fair: GSA presently co-sponsors a graduate
Interest organizations meet the special and unique needs of
paper competition with Sigma XI during CSM's spring se-
the CSM student body by providing specific co-curricular ac-
mester Engineering Days (E-Days). The fair is designed to
tivities. These organizations are:
give graduate students the opportunity to make a presentation
Association of Geoscience Students (AGS)
in a professional conference setting about research they have
Band
been working on. At the conclusion of the event, cash prizes
are awarded to graduate students whose papers exhibit out-
Bioengineering Club
standing contributions to their areas of study.
Campus Crusade for Christ
International Day is planned and conducted by the Inter-
College Republicans
national Student Organization. It includes exhibits and pro-
Chorus
grams designed to further the cause of understanding among
CSM Ambassadors
the countries of the world. The international dinner, including
Earthworks
entertainment and samples of foods from countries all over
Fellowship of Christian Athletes
the world, is one of the top campus social events of the year.
Hawaii Club
Winter Carnival, sponsored by Blue Key, is an all-school
Math Club
ski day held each year at one of the nearby ski slopes.
Mines Little Theatre
Homecoming weekend is one of the high points of the en-
Non-Traditional Students
tire year's activities. Events include a football rally and game,
Students for Creative Anachronism
campus decorations, election of Homecoming queen and
beast, parade, burro race, and other contests.
Young Democrats
Engineer Days are held each spring. The three-day affair
International & Minority Organizations
is organized entirely by students. Contests are held in
International and minority organizations provide the op-
drilling, hand-spiking, mucking, oil-field olympics, and soft-
portunity to experience different cultures while at Mines and
ball, to name a few. Additional events include a fireworks
help the students from those cultures adjust to Mines campus
display, an E-Day concert, and the traditional orecart push.
life. These organizations include
GSA Fall and Spring Blowout: GSA sponsors parties
Afro-Caribbean Students Union
twice a year for graduate students. Held in the late spring and
Chinese Student Association
early fall at local parks, they let graduate students take a
International Student Organization (ISO)
break from studying.
Japanese Student Association (JSA)
Honor Societies
Muslim Student Association (MSA)
Honor societies recognize the outstanding achievements of
Taiwanese Student Association
their members in scholarship, leadership, and service. Each
American Indians in Science & Engineering (AISES)
of the CSM honor societies recognizes different achieve-
ments by our students. The Colorado School of Mines honor
Asian Student Association (ASA)
societies, and their representative areas, are as follows:
National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE)
Alpha Phi Omega
Service
Hispanic Professional Engineers & Scientists (SHPES)
Alpha Sigma Mu
Metals
Professional Societies
Blue Key
Service, Scholarship, Activities
Professional societies are generally student chapters of the
national professional societies. As student chapters, the pro-
Kappa Kappa Psi
Band
fessional societies offer a chance for additional professional
Kappa Mu Epsilon
Mathematics
development outside the classroom through guest speakers,
National Society of Pershing Rifles
Military Science
trips, and interactive discussions about the current activities
Order of Omega
Greek Scholarship
in the profession. Many of the organizations also offer intern-
Pi Epsilon Tau
Petroleum Engineering
ships, fellowships, and scholarships. The Colorado School of
Sigma Pi Sigma
Physics
Mines chapters are as follows:
Tau Beta Pi
Engineering
American Association of Drilling Engineers (AADE)
American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
American Institute of Professional Geologists (AIPG)
American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE)
American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical & Petroleum
16
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

Engineers (AIME)
Recreational Organizations
American Ceramic Society (Am. Cer. Soc.)
Recreational organizations give students with similar
recreational interests the chance to participate as a group in
American Chemical Society (ACS)
the activities. Most of the recreational organizations compete
American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
on both the local and regional levels at tournaments during
American Society of Metals (ASM International)
the school year. These clubs are:
American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
Billiards Club
American Welding Society
Caving Club
Association of Engineering Geologists (AEG)
Cheerleading
Association of General Contractors (AGC)
Kayak Club
Institute of Electrical & Electronic Engineers (IEEE)
Racquetball Club
International Society for Measurement and Control (ISA)
Rugby Club
Society of American Military Engineers (SAME)
Shooting Club
Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE)
Ski Club/Team
Society of Economic Geologists (SEG)
Men's Volleyball
Society of Mining Engineers (SME)
Women's Soccer
Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE)
BMOC (Big Men on Campus)
Society of Physics Students (SPS)
Society of Graduate Geophysics Students (SGGS)
Society of Women Engineers (SWE)
The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society of AIME
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
17

Facilities and Academic Support
Arthur Lakes Library
located in the Computer Commons, CTLM, Writing Center,
JOANNE V. LERUD-HECK, Librarian and Library Director
and Library. In addition, AC&N's academic department sup-
LISA G. DUNN, Librarian
port services group provides support services for many de-
LAURA A. GUY, Librarian
partmental servers, laboratories, and desktops.
ROBERT K. SORGENFREI, Librarian
Central computing accounts and services are available to
LISA S. NICKUM, Associate Librarian
CHRISTOPHER THIRY, Associate Librarian
registered students and current faculty and staff members. In-
PATRICIA E. ANDERSEN, Assistant Librarian
formation about hours, services, and the activation of new
CHRISTINE BAKER, Assistant Librarian
accounts is available on the web site at
PAMELA M. BLOME, Assistant Librarian
http://www.mines.edu/academic/computer/, directly from the
MEGAN TOMEO, Assistant Librarian
Help Desk in the Computer Commons or by calling (303)
HEATHER L. WHITEHEAD, Assistant Librarian
273-3431.
Arthur Lakes Library is a regional information center for
Workrooms in several locations on campus contain net-
engineering, energy, minerals, materials, and associated engi-
worked PCs and workstations. Printers, scanners, digitizers,
neering and science fields. The Library supports education
and other specialized resources are available for use in some
and research programs at CSM and is committed to meeting
of the locations.
the information needs of the CSM community and all library
In addition to central server and facilities operations, serv-
users.
ices provided to the campus community include e-mail,
The Library has over 140,000 visitors a year and is a cam-
wired and wireless network operation and support, modem
pus center for learning, study and research. Facilities include
pools, access to the commodity Internet, Internet 2, and Na-
meeting space, a campus computer lab, and individual and
tional Lambda Rail, network security, volume and site licens-
group study space. We host many cultural events during the
ing of software, on-line training modules, videoconferencing,
year, including concerts and art shows.
and campus web site and central systems administration and
The librarians provide personalized help and instruction,
support. In addition, support and administration is provided
and assist with research. The Library's collections include
for some academic department servers, laboratories, and
more than 500,000 books; thousands of print and electronic
desktops. AC&N manages and supports the central course
journals; hundreds of databases; one of the largest map col-
management system (Blackboard), calendaring services,
lections in the West; an archive on CSM and western mining
printing, short-term equipment loan, and room scheduling for
history; and several special collections. The Library is a se-
some general computer teaching classrooms.
lective U.S. and Colorado state depository with over 600,000
All major campus buildings are connected to the comput-
government publications.
ing network operated by AC&N and most areas of the cam-
Catalyst, the Library's Web-based catalog, provides access
pus are covered by the wireless network. All residence halls
to Library collections and your user account. Our databases
and the Mines Park housing complex are wired for network
allow users to find publications for general use, classroom
access and some fraternity and sorority houses are also di-
assignments or research. Students and faculty can use most
rectly connected to the network.
of the Library's electronic databases and publications from
All users of Colorado School of Mines computing and net-
any computer on the campus network, including those in net-
working resources are expected to comply with all policies
worked CSM residential facilities. Dial-up and Internet ac-
related to the use of these resources. Policies are posted at
cess are available out of network.
http://www.mines.edu/academic/computer/policies/.
Arthur Lakes Library is a member of the Colorado Al-
For more information about AC&N, see the web pages at
liance. Students and faculty can use their library cards at
http://www.mines.edu/academic/computer/
other Alliance libraries, or can order materials directly using
Prospector, a regional Web-based catalog. Materials can also
Copy Center
be requested from anywhere in the world through interlibrary
Located on the first floor of Guggenheim Hall, the Copy
loan.
Center offers on-line binding, printed tabs, and halftones.
Printing can be done on all paper sizes from odd-sized origi-
Academic Computing and Networking
nals. Some of the other services offered are GBC and Velo
DEREK WILSON, Director & CIO
Binding, folding, sorting and collating, reduction and en-
PHIL ROMIG, III, Associate Director
largement, two sided copying, and color copying. We have
Academic Computing and Networking (AC&N) provides
a variety of paper colors, special resume paper and CSM
computing and networking services to meet the instructional,
watermark for thesis copying. These services are available to
research, and networking infrastructure needs of the campus.
students, faculty, and staff. The Copy Center campus exten-
AC&N manages and operates the campus network along
sion is 3202.
with central academic computing systems and laboratories
18
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007-2008

CSM Alumni Association
Friedhoff Hall contains a dance floor and an informal
(CSMAA) The Colorado School of Mines Alumni Associ-
stage. Approximately 600 persons can be accommodated at
ation, established in 1895, serves the Colorado School of
tables for banquets or dinners. Auditorium seating can be
Mines and its alumni. Services and benefits of membership
arranged for up to 450 people.
include:
Petroleum Hall and Metals Hall are lecture rooms seating
Mines, a quarterly publication covering campus and
123 and 310, respectively. Each room has audio visual equip-
alumni news; an online directory of all Mines alumni for net-
ment. In addition, the Green Center houses the modern Com-
working purposes; on-line job listings; section activities that
puting Center and the Department of Geophysics.
provide social and networking connections to the campus and
INTERLINK Language Center (ESL)
other Mines alumni around the world; invitations to local and
The INTERLINK Language program combines intensive
annual alumni meetings, reunions, golf tournaments and
English language instruction (ESL) with academic training
other special events on and off campus; awards, including the
and cultural orientation to prepare students for their studies at
opportunity to nominate outstanding fellow alumni and be
CSM. Designed for international students in engineering and
nominated yourself; CSM library privileges for Colorado res-
the sciences, the program prepares students for a successful
idents; access to career service aids, including High Impact
transition to their new academic and cultural environment.
Job Search; and discounts with partner vendors.
The curriculum focuses on individual student needs, utilizing
Benefits for current Colorado School of Mines students are
experiential learning projects, media technology (video, film,
legacy grants for children or grandchildren of alumni; the
computers, TV, radio, the Internet) and various sources and
Student Financial Assistance Program; recognition banquets
resources in the surrounding community. Successful comple-
for graduating seniors/graduate students; the CSMAA Men-
tion of the program may entitle academically qualified stu-
torship program, pairing students with alumni for profes-
dents to begin their academic studies without a TOEFL score.
sional development; assistance and support of School events
The program is open to adults who have completed sec-
such as Homecoming; alumni volunteer assistance in student
ondary school in good standing (grade point average of C+
recruiting; Order of the Engineer ceremonies; and various
or above) and are able to meet their educational and living
other programs that enrich students' lives via alumni involve-
expenses. For further information contact INTERLINK Lan-
ment.
guage Center (ESL) at:
For further information, call 303-273-3295, FAX 303-273-
INTERLINK Language Center (ESL)
3583, e-mail csmaa@mines.edu, or write Mines Alumni As-
Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401
sociation, 1600 Arapahoe Street, P.O. Box 1410, Golden, CO
http://www.eslus.com
80402-1410.
http://www.mines.edu/Outreach/interlink
Environmental Health and Safety
Email: interlinkcsm@mines.edu
The Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) Department
Tele: 303-279-9389
is located in Chauvenet Hall room 194. The Department pro-
Fax: 303-278-4055
vides a variety of services to students, staff and faculty mem-
LAIS Writing Center
bers. Functions of the Department include: hazardous waste
Located in room 311 Stratton Hall (phone: 303-273-3085),
collection and disposal; chemical procurement and distribu-
the LAIS Writing Center is a teaching facility providing all
tion; chemical spill response; assessment of air and water
CSM students, faculty, and staff with an opportunity to
quality; fire safety; laboratory safety; industrial hygiene; ra-
enhance their writing abilities. The LAIS Writing Center
diation safety; biosafety; and recycling. Staff is available to
faculty are experienced technical and professional writing
consult on issues such as chemical exposure control, hazard
instructors who are prepared to assist writers with every-
identification, safety systems design, personal protective
thing from course assignments to scholarship and job appli-
equipment, or regulatory compliance. Stop by our office or
cations. This service is free to CSM students, faculty, and
call 303 273-3316. The EHS telephone is monitored nights
staff and entails one-to-one tutoring and online resources (at
and weekends to respond to spills and environmental emer-
http://www.mines.edu/academic/lais/wc/).
gencies.
Off-Campus Study
Green Center
A student must enroll in an official CSM course for any
Completed in 1971, the Cecil H. and Ida Green Graduate
period of off-campus, course-related study, whether U.S. or
and Professional Center is named in honor of Dr. and Mrs.
foreign, including faculty-led short courses, study abroad, or
Green, major contributors to the funding of the building.
any off-campus trip sponsored by CSM or led by a CSM fac-
Bunker Memorial Auditorium, which seats 1,386, has a large
ulty member. The registration must occur in the same term
stage that may be used for lectures, concerts, drama productions,
that the off-campus study takes place. In addition, the stu-
or for any occasion when a large attendance is expected.
dent must complete the necessary release, waiver, and emer-
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
19

gency contact forms, transfer credit pre-approvals, and
(5) Utilize OTT opportunities to advance high-quality
FERPA release, and provide adequate proof of current health
faculty and students;
insurance prior to departure. For additional information con-
(6) Generate a new source of revenue for CSM to
cerning study abroad requirements, contact the Office of In-
expand the school’s research and education.
ternational Programs at (303) 384-2121; for other
information, contact the Registrar’s Office.
Public Relations
Office of International Programs
The communications staff in the President's Office is re-
sponsible for public relations and marketing initiatives at
The Office of International Programs (OIP) fosters and
Mines. For information about the School's publications
facilitates international education, research and outreach at
guidelines, including the use of Mines logos and for media-
CSM. OIP is administered by the Office of Academic Affairs.
related requests, contact Marsha Williams, Director of Inte-
OIP is located in 109 Stratton Hall. For more specific
grated Marketing Communications, at 303-273-3326 or
information about study abroad and other international
marswill@mines.edu; or Karen Gilbert, Public Relations
programs, contact OIP at 384-2121 or visit the OIP web page
Specialist, at 303-273-3541 or Karen.Gilbert@is.mines.edu.
(http://www.mines.edu/Academic/lais/OIP/).
Registrar
The office works with the departments and divisions of the
LARA MEDLEY, Registrar
School to: (1) help develop and facilitate study abroad oppor-
TRICIA DOUTHIT-PAULSON, Associate Registrar
tunities for CSM undergraduate and graduate students and
DAHL GRAYCKOWSKI, Assistant Registrar
serve as an informational and advising resource for them;
JUDYWESTLEY, Records Specialist
(2) assist in attracting new international students to CSM;
ADRIENEE BRITO, Registration Specialist
(3) serve as an information resource for faculty and scholars
The Office of the Registrar supports the academic mission
of the CSM community, promoting faculty exchanges and
of the Colorado School of Mines by providing service to our
the pursuit of collaborative international research activities;
current and former students, faculty, staff, and administra-
(4) foster international outreach and technology transfer pro-
tion. These services include maintaining and protecting the
grams; (5) facilitate arrangements for official international
integrity and security of the official academic record, regis-
visitors to CSM; and (6) in general, help promote the interna-
tration, degree verification, scheduling and reporting. Our
tionalization of CSM’s curricular programs and activities.
office routinely reviews policy, makes recommendations for
Graduate students may apply for participation in dual de-
change, and coordinates the implementation of approved pol-
gree programs offered by CSM and its partners. Generally
icy revisions.
these programs require the preparation and defense of one
The Office of the Registrar seeks to fulfill this mission
jointly supervised thesis project and the completion of degree
through a commitment to high quality service provided in a
requirements at each participating university.
professional, efficient and courteous manner. Our specific
Office of Technology Transfer
services include but are not limited to:
The purpose of the Office of Technology Transfer (OTT)
l Enrollment and degree verifications
is to reward innovation and entrepreneurial activity by stu-
l Transcripts
dents, faculty and staff, recognize the value and preserve
l Degree auditing and diplomas (undergraduate)
ownership of CSM's intellectual property, and contribute to
l Transfer credit entry and verification
local and national the economic growth. OTT reports directly
l Veteran's Administration Certifying Official services
to the Vice President of Research and Technology Transfer
l Registration setup and execution
and works closely with the school's office of Legal Services
l Course and room scheduling
to coordinate activities. Through its internal technical review
l Academic and enrollment reporting
team and external Advisory Board, OTT strives to:
l Residency for current students
(1) Initiate and stimulate entrepreneurship and develop-
l Grade collection, reporting and changes
ment of mechanisms for effective investment of
CSM’s intellectual capital;
Management of the Registrar's Office adheres to the guide-
lines on professional practices and ethical standards devel-
(2) Secure CSM’s intellectual properties generated by
oped by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars
faculty, students, and staff;
and Admissions Officers (AACRAO). Our office also com-
(3) Contribute to the economic growth of the communi-
plies with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of
ty, state, and nation through facilitating technology
1974 (FERPA), Colorado Department of Higher Education
transfer to the commercial sector;
rules and policies, and the Colorado School of Mines policies
(4) Retain and motivate faculty by rewarding entrepre-
on confidentiality and directory information.
neurship;
20
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007-2008

The Registrar's Office is located in the Student Center,
Telecommunications
Room 31. Hours of operation are Monday through Friday,
The Telecommunications Office is located in the CTLM
8am - 5pm. The office phone number is (303) 273-3200.
building 2nd floor east end room 256 and provides telephone
The fax number is (303) 384-2253. Lara Medley represents
services to the campus. Local telephone service is provided,
Colorado School of Mines as the Registrar. She is normally
as part of the housing rates (optional for Mines Park resi-
available on a walk-in basis (when not in meetings) if a stu-
dence). The Telecommunications Office provides mainte-
dent or other client has an issue that needs special attention.
nance for telephone lines and services. Students will need to
Appointments are also welcomed.
bring or purchase their own calling line ID device if they
Research Administration
choose to take advantage of this feature.
The Office of Research Administration (ORA), under the
Telecommunications Office provides long distance serv-
Associate Vice President for Finance and Operations and
ices for the Residence Halls, Sigma Nu house, Fiji house,
Controller, provides administrative support in proposal
PI PHI House, ALPHA PHI House, SIGMA KAPPA House
preparation and contract and grant administration, which in-
and Mines Park housing areas through individual account
cludes negotiation, account set-up, and close out of expired
codes. Long distance rates for domestic calling are 0.05 cents
agreements. Information on any of these areas of research
per minute, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. International
and specific forms can be accessed on our web site at
rates are available at the Telecommunications Office or through
www.is.mines.edu/ors.
the Web at http://www.is.mines.edu/telecomm/Students/
Special Programs and Continuing
StudRate.asp. Accounts are issued by request at any time.
Monthly long distance charges are assessed to the student
Education (SPACE)
accounts by the 5th of each month for calls made the prior
The SPACE Office offers short courses, special programs,
month, and invoices are mailed directly to students at their
and professional outreach programs to practicing engineers
campus address. Questions regarding the above services
and other working professionals. Short courses, offered both
should be directed to the Telecommunications Office by
on the CSM campus and throughout the US, provide con-
calling (303) 273-3000 or 1-800-446-9488 and saying Tele-
centrated instruction in specialized areas and are taught by
communications, or via the Web at http://www.is.mines.edu/
faculty members, adjuncts, and other experienced profes-
telecomm/.
sionals. The Office offers a broad array of programming for
K-12 teachers and students through its Teacher Enhancement
Women in Science, Engineering and
Program, and the Denver Earth Science Project. The Office
Mathematics (WISEM) Program
also coordinates educational programs for international cor-
The mission of WISEM is to enhance opportunities for
porations and governments through the International Insti-
women in science and engineering careers, to increase reten-
tute for Professional Advancement and hosts the Mine Safety
tion of women at CSM, and to promote equity and diversity
and Health Training Program. A separate bulletin lists the ed-
in higher education. The office sponsors programs and services
ucational programs offered by the SPACE Office, CSM,
for the CSM community regarding gender and equity issues.
1600 Arapahoe St., Golden, CO 80401. Phone: 303 273-
For further information, contact: Debra K. Lasich, Executive
3321; FAX 303 273-3314; email space@mines.edu; website
Director of Women in Science, Engineering and Mathe-
www.mines.edu/Outreach/Cont_Ed.
matics, Colorado School of Mines, 1133 17th Street, Golden,
CO 80401-1869, or call (303) 273-3097; dlasich@mines.edu
or www.mines.edu/Academic/affairs/wisem
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
21

Registration and Tuition Classification
General Registration Requirements
summer semester and working on campus must pay thesis re-
The normal full load for graduate students is 9 credit hours
search fees for summer semester.
per term. Special cases outlined below include first-year in-
Eligibility for Reduced Registration
ternational students who must receive special instruction to
Students enrolled in thesis-based degree programs who
improve their language skills, and students who have com-
have completed the minimum course and research require-
pleted of their credit-hour requirements and are working full
ments for their degree are eligible to pursue their graduate
time on their thesis.
program full time at a reduced registration level. In order to
Full-time graduate students may register for an overload of
be considered for this reduced, full-time registration cate-
up to 6 credit hours (up to 15 credit hours total) per term at
gory, students must satisfy the following requirements:
no increase in tuition. Subject to written approval by their
1. For M.S./M.E. students, completion of 36 hours of
advisor and department head or division director, students
course and research credits combined
may register for more than 15 credit hours per term by pay-
ing additional tuition at the regular part-time rate for all
2. For Ph.D. students, completion of 72 hours of course
hours over 15. The maximum number of credits for which a
and research credits combined
student can register during the summer is 12.
3. For all students, an approved Admission to Candidacy
Students may register at less than the required full-time
form must be on file in the Graduate Office within the first
registration, except for students meeting any of the following
week of the semester you are applying for reduced thesis
conditions.
registration.
u International students subject to immigration require-
4. Candidates for thesis-based degrees may not use more
ments. This applies to international students holding
than 12 credit hours per semester in determining eligibility
J-1 and F-1 visas.
for reduced, full-time registration.
u Students receiving financial assistance in the form of
Transfer credits that have been accepted toward the degree
graduate teaching assistantships, research assistant-
count toward the 36 or 72 hour requirement. Students who
ships, fellowships or hourly contracts.
are eligible for reduced, full-time registration will be consid-
ered full time if they are registered for 4 credit hours of re-
u Students enrolled in academic programs that require
search under course numbers 704 (M.E.), 705 (M.S.) or 706
full-time registration. Refer to the degree program sec-
(Ph.D.) as appropriate. Faculty will assign research grades
tions of this bulletin to see if this applies to a particular
indicating satisfactory or unsatisfactory progress based on
program.
their evaluation of the student’s work.
Students for whom any one of these conditions apply must
register at the appropriate full-time credit hour requirement.
Graduation Requirements
To graduate, students must be registered during the term in
If not required to register full-time, to remain in good
which they complete their program. In enforcing this regis-
standing, students must register continuously each fall and
tration requirement, the Graduate School allows students to
spring semester. Summer registration is not required for stu-
complete their checkout requirements past the end of the
dents to remain in good standing.
semester. Late checkout is accepted by the Graduate School
Students who continue to work on degree programs and
through the last day of registration in the semester immedi-
utilize CSM facilities during the summer, however, must
ately following the semester in which a student has com-
register. Students registered during the summer pay full
pleted his or her academic degree requirements; the Spring
summer fees.
for Fall completion, the Summer for Spring completion, and
Research Registration
Fall for Summer completion. Students not meeting this check-
out deadline are required to register for an additional semes-
In addition to completing prescribed course work and
ter before the Graduate School will process their checkout
defending a thesis, students in thesis-based degree programs
request. Refer to page 32 for additional information or
must complete a research or engineering design experience
www.mines.edu/admiss/grad/graduation.htm
under the direct supervision of their faculty advisor. Master
students must complete a minimum of 6 hours of research
Full-time Status - Required
credit, and doctoral students must complete a minimum of 24
Course Load
hours of research credit at CSM. While completing this
To be deemed full-time during the fall and spring semesters,
experience, students will register for research credit under
students must register for at least 9 credit hours. However,
course numbers 704 (M.E.), 705 (M.S.) or 706 (Ph.D.) as
international students need only register for 6 credit hours
appropriate. Faculty will assign grades indicating satisfactory
per semester during their first year, if they are required to
or unsatisfactory progress based on their evaluation of the
take special language instruction or are accepted in Provi-
student’s work. Students registered for research during the
sional Status. In the event a thesis-based student has com-
22
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007-2008

pleted his or her required course work and research credits
and space availability. Request forms are available from the
and is eligible for reduced, full-time registration, the student
Registrar’s office.
will be deemed full-time if he or she is registered for at least
4 credit hours of research credit.
In-State Tuition Classification Status
General Information
To be deemed full-time during the summer semester, stu-
The State of Colorado partially subsidizes the cost of tui-
dents must register for a minimum of 3 credit hours.
tion for all students whose domicile, or permanent legal resi-
Late Registration Fee
dence, is in Colorado. Each CSM student is classified as
Students must complete their registration by the date
either an “in-state resident” or a “non-resident” at the time
specified in the Academic Calendar. Students who fail to
of matriculation. These classifications, which are governed
complete their registration during this time will be assessed
by Colorado law, are based upon information furnished by
a $100 late registration fee and will not receive any tuition
each student on his or her application for admission to CSM.
fellowships for which they might otherwise be eligible.
A student who willfully furnishes incorrect information to
CSM to evade payment of non-resident tuition shall be sub-
Leave of Absence
ject to serious disciplinary action.
Leaves of absence will be granted only when unanticipated
circumstances make it temporarily impossible for students to
It is in the interest of each graduate student who is a U.S.
continue to work toward a degree. Leave of absence requests
citizen and who is supported on an assistantship or fellow-
for the current semester must be received by the Dean of
ship to become a legal resident of Colorado at the earliest
Graduate Studies prior to the last day of classes. Leave of
opportunity. Typically, tuition at the non-resident rate will
absence requests for prior semesters will not be considered.
be paid by CSM for these students during their first year of
study only. After the first year of study, these students may
Any request for a leave of absence must have the prior
be responsible for paying the difference between resident and
approval of the student’s faculty advisor, the department
non-resident tuition.
head or division or program director and the Dean of Gradu-
ate Studies. The request for a leave of absence must be in
Requirements for Establishing In-State Residency
writing and must include (1) the reasons why the student
The specific requirements for establishing residency for
must interrupt his or her studies and (2) a plan (including a
tuition classification purposes are prescribed by state law
timeline and deadlines) for resuming and completing the
(Colorado Revised Statutes, Title 23, Article 7). Because
work toward the degree in a timely fashion.
Colorado residency status is governed solely by Colorado
law, the fact that a student might not qualify for in-state
Students on leaves of absence will remain in good stand-
status in any other state does not guarantee in-state status in
ing even though they are not registered for any course or re-
Colorado. The tuition classification statute places the burden
search credits.
of proof on the student to provide clear and convincing evi-
Thesis-based students will not have access to CSM resources
dence of eligibility.
while on a leave of absence. This includes, but is not limited
In-state or resident status generally requires domicile in
to, office space, computational facilities, library and faculty.
Colorado for the year immediately preceding the beginning
Students who fail to register and who are not on approved
of the semester in which in-state status is sought. “Domicile”
leaves of absence have their degree programs terminated.
is “a person’s true, fixed and permanent home and place of
Students who wish to return to graduate school after an
habitation.” An unemancipated minor is eligible for in-state
unauthorized leave of absence must apply for readmission
status if at least one parent (or his or her court-appointed
and pay a $200 readmission fee.
guardian) has been domiciled in Colorado for at least one
The financial impact of requesting a leave of absence for
year. If neither of the student’s parents are domiciliaries of
the current semester is covered in the section on “Payments
Colorado, the student must be a qualified person to begin the
and Refunds” on page 35.
one-year domiciliary period. A “qualified person” is someone
who is at least twenty-two years old, married, or emanci-
Reciprocal Registration
pated. A student may prove emancipation if: (1) the student’s
Under the Exchange Agreement Between the State Sup-
parents have entirely surrendered the right to the student’s
ported Institutions in Northern Colorado, CSM graduate
custody and earnings; (2) the student’s parents are no longer
students who are paying full-time tuition may take courses at
under any duty to financially support the student; and (3) the
Colorado State University, University of Northern Colorado,
student’s parents have made no provision for the continuing
and University of Colorado (Boulder, Denver, Colorado
support of the student.
Springs, and the Health Sciences Center) at no charge by
To begin the one-year domiciliary period, a qualified per-
completing the request form and meeting the required con-
son must be living in Colorado with the present intention to
ditions on registration and tuition, course load, and course
reside permanently in Colorado. Although none of the follow-
ing indicia are determinative, voter registration, driver’s
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
23

license, vehicle registration, state income tax filings, real
field course, or the first six school days of an eight-week
property interests, and permanent employment (or acceptance
summer term.
of future employment) in Colorado will be considered in de-
After the 11th day of classes through the 10th week, con-
termining whether a student has the requisite intention to per-
tinuing students may drop any course for any reason with a
manently reside in Colorado. Once a student’s legal residence
grade of “W”. Graduate students in their first semester at
has been permanently established in Colorado, he or she may
CSM have through the 14th week of that semester to drop a
continue to be classified as a resident student so long as such
course. A student must process a form and pay a $4.00 fee for
residence is maintained, even though circumstances may re-
any change in class schedule after the first 11 days of class,
quire extended temporary absences from Colorado.
except in cases beyond the student’s control or withdrawal
For more information about the requirements for establish-
from school. Forms are available in the Registrar’s Office.
ing in-state residency, please contact the Registrar’s Office.
After the 10th (or 14th) week, no drops are permitted
Petitioning for In-State Tuition Classification
except in case of withdrawal from school or for extenuating
A continuing, non-resident student who believes that he
circumstances. To request consideration of extenuating cir-
or she has become eligible for in-state resident tuition due to
cumstances, a student must submit a written request to the
events that have occurred subsequent to his or her initial en-
Graduate Dean, which includes the following:
rollment may file a Petition for In-State Tuition Classifica-
1. A list of the courses from which they wish to with-
tion with the Registrar’s Office. This petition is due in the
draw. This must include all courses for which they are
Registrar’s Office no later than the first day of the semester for
registered.
which the student is requesting in-state resident status. Upon
receipt of the petition, the Registrar will initially decide
2. Documentation of the problem which is the basis for
whether the student should be granted in-state residency sta-
the request.
tus. The Registrar’s decision may be appealed by petition to
3. If the problem involves a medical condition, the docu-
the Tuition Classification Review Committee. For more in-
mentation must be signed by a licensed medical doctor
formation about this process, please contact the Registrar’s
or a representative of the CSM Counseling Office.
Office.
4. Signatures indicating approval by the student’s advisor
In-State Tuition Classification for WICHE Program
and department head or division director.
Participants
A student who is allowed to withdraw from courses under
WICHE, the Western Interstate Commission for Higher
this policy will receive a grade of “W” for each course and
Education, promotes the sharing of higher education re-
will be placed on automatic leave of absence. In order to
sources among the participating western states. Under this
resume their graduate program, they must submit a written
program, residents of Alaska, Arizona, Hawaii, Idaho, Mon-
application that includes documentation that the problems
tana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South
which caused the withdrawal have been corrected. The stu-
Dakota, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming who are enrolled
dent will be reinstated to active status upon approval of their
in qualifying graduate programs may be eligible for in-state
application by their advisor and their department head or di-
tuition classification. Current qualifying programs include:
vision director.
Applied Chemistry (Ph.D.)
The financial impact of a withdrawal is covered in the sec-
Chemistry (M.S.)
tion on “Payments and Refunds.”
Engineering Systems (M.S. and Ph.D.)
Environmental Science & Engineering (M.S. and Ph.D.)
Auditing Courses
Geochemistry (M.S. and Ph.D.)
As part of the maximum of 15 semester hours of graduate
Geological Engineering (M.S., M.E., and Ph.D.)
work, students may enroll for no credit (NC) in a course with
Hydrology (M.S. and Ph.D.)
the permission of the instructor. Tuition charges are the same
Mineral Economics (M.S. and Ph.D.)
for no credit as for credit enrollment.
Mining and Earth Systems Engineering (M.S. and Ph.D.)
Students must enroll for no credit before the last day of
Petroleum Engineering (M.S. and Ph.D.)
registration. The form to enroll for a course for no credit is
Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more informa-
available in the Registrar’s Office. NC designation is awarded
tion about WICHE.
only if all conditions stipulated by course instructors are met.
Dropping and Adding Courses
Mines requires that all U.S. students who are being sup-
ported by the institution register full time, and federal finan-
Students may drop or add courses through web registra-
cial aid regulations prohibit us from counting NC registration
tion without paying a fee during the first 11 school days of a
in determining financial aid eligibility. In addition, the INS
regular semester, the first four school days of a six-week
requires that international students register full time, and re-
cent anti-terrorism proposals discourage us from counting
24
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007-2008

NC registration toward that requirement. Furthermore, there
Off-Campus Study
are no consistent standards for expectations of students who
A student must enroll in an official CSM course for any
register for NC in a course. Therefore, in order to treat all
period of off-campus, course-related study, whether U.S. or
CSM students consistently, NC registration will not count
foreign, including faculty-led short courses, study abroad, or
toward the minimum number of hours for which students are
any off-campus trip sponsored by CSM or led by a CSM fac-
required to register. This includes the minimum continuous
ulty member. The registration must occur in the same term
registration requirement of part-time students and the 3-, or
that the off-campus study takes place. In addition, the stu-
9-hour requirement for students who must register full time.
dent must complete the necessary release, waiver, and emer-
The reduced registration policy is based on the principle
gency contact forms, transfer credit pre-approvals, and
that the minimum degree requirement (36 or 72 hours) would
FERPA release, and provide adequate proof of current health
include only the credits applied toward that degree. Defi-
insurance prior to departure. For additional information con-
ciency and extra courses are above and beyond that mini-
cerning study abroad requirements, contact the Office of In-
mum. NC courses fall into the latter category and may not be
ternational Programs at (303) 384-2121; for other
applied toward the degree. Therefore, NC registration will
information, contact the Registrar’s Office.
not count toward the number of hours required to be eligible
for reduced thesis registration.
NC registration may involve additional effort on the part
of faculty to give and/or grade assignments or exams, so it is
the institution’s policy to charge tuition for NC courses.
Therefore, NC registration will count toward the maximum
number of credits for which a graduate student may be al-
lowed to register. This includes a tuition surcharge for credits
taken over 15.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
25

General Regulations
Graduate School Bulletin
Drug Use
It is the responsibility of the graduate student to become
Recognizing the threat to health and welfare from the use
informed and to observe all regulations and procedures
of illegal drugs. this policy requires CSM students to obey all
required by the program the student is pursuing. Ignorance
Colorado and Federal laws concerning the manufacture, pos-
of a rule does not constitute a basis for waiving that rule.
session, sale, and use of drugs.
The Graduate Bulletin current when a graduate student first
Drug Free Schools & Communities Act
enrolls gives the academic requirements the student must
This policy informs CSM students of community stan-
meet to graduate. However, with department consent, a stu-
dards and potential consequences (the legal sanctions) for
dent can change to the requirements in a later catalog pub-
using alcohol or drugs illegally.
lished while the student
is enrolled in the graduate school. Changes to administrative
Firearms, Explosives, and Other Weapons
policies and procedures become effective for all students as
Covered in this policy are the general ban on campus of
soon as the campus community is notified of the changes.
firearms, explosives, and other weapons, exceptions to the
ban, and the firearm storage procedures.
The Graduate Bulletin is available to students in both print
and electronic forms. Print bulletins are updated annually.
Distribution of Literature
Electronic versions of the Graduate Bulletin may be updated
Given in this policy are the restrictions on distributing
more frequently to reflect changes approved by the campus
(including the selling of) literature, newspapers, and maga-
community. As such, students are encouraged to refer to the
zines on school property; the limit on distributing advertising
most recently available electronic version of the Graduate
or commercial material (for example, handbills); the require-
Bulletin. This version is available at the CSM website. The
ments for soliciting and vending on school property; and the
electronic version of the Graduate Bulletin is considered the
right to picket or demonstrate on campus.
official version of this document. In case of disagreement be-
Student Honor Code
tween the electronic and print versions, the electronic version
The Associated Students of the Colorado School of Mines
takes precedence.
(ASCSM) passed the new CSM Student Honor Code in a
Curriculum Changes
vote held in March 2003.
The CSM Board of Trustees reserves the right to change
Preamble
any course of study or any part of the curriculum to respond
The students of Colorado School of Mines have adopted
to educational and scientific developments. No statement in
the following Student Honor Code in order to establish a
this Bulletin or in the registration of any student shall be con-
high standard of student behavior at CSM. The Honor Code
sidered as a contract between Colorado School of Mines and
may only be amended through a student referendum sup-
the student.
ported by a majority vote of the Mines student body.
General Policies of Student Conduct
Code
In addition to the student conduct policies described in
Mines students believe it is our responsibility to promote
detail in this section of the Graduate Bulletin, the Colorado
and maintain high ethical standards in order to ensure our
School of Mines has a number of policies which govern stu-
safety, welfare, and enjoyment of a successful learning envi-
dent behavior on campus. Following is a list of those impor-
ronment. Each of us, under this Code, shall assume responsi-
tant policies with a brief definition or description of each.
bility for our behavior in the area of academic integrity. As a
Copies of the complete text describing each policy are avail-
Mines student, I am expected to adhere to the highest stan-
able from the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs.
dards of academic excellence and personal integrity regard-
Campus Security
ing my schoolwork, exams, academic projects, and research
This policy is intended to improve security and reduce
endeavors. I will act honestly, responsibly, and above all,
crime on campus. It includes the publishing of campus crime
with honor and integrity in all aspects of my academic en-
statistics and procedures for reporting crimes.
deavors at Mines. I will not misrepresent the work of others
as my own, nor will I give or receive unauthorized assistance
Alcohol Use
in the performance of academic coursework. I will conduct
This policy conforms to state and local laws on alcohol
myself in an ethical manner in my use of the library, comput-
use, distribution, and consumption. The text restates the legal
ing center, and all other school facilities and resources. By
drinking age, designates campus locations for consuming
practicing these principles, I will strive to uphold the princi-
alcoholic beverages, explains procedures for planning stu-
ples of integrity and academic excellence at Mines. I will not
dent events at which alcohol is served, and gives the penal-
participate in or tolerate any form of discrimination or mis-
ties for violating the policy.
treatment of another individual.
26Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007-2008

Academic Integrity
5. Cheating – giving, using, or attempting to give or use,
Policy on Violation of Academic Integrity
unauthorized materials or aid with the intent of demon-
In an academic setting, student misconduct is broadly
strating academic performance through fraudulent means.
defined as behavior that erodes the basis of mutual trust on
Examples include copying from another student’s paper
which scholarly exchanges rest, undermines the Institution’s
or receiving unauthorized assistance on a quiz, test or
ability to fairly and effectively evaluate a student’s academic
examination; using books, notes or other devices such as
achievements, and restricts the Institution’s ability to accom-
calculators, unless explicitly authorized; acquiring with-
plish its scholarly objectives and educational mission. Because
out authorization copies of examinations before the
of the serious institutional ramifications, student misconduct
scheduled examination; and copying reports, laboratory
of the type and nature described below is not tolerated at
work or computer files from other students. Authorized
CSM. If a student is found to have engaged in these activities
materials are those generally regarded as being appropri-
sanctions ranging from a disciplinary change of grade, to loss
ate in an academic setting, unless specific exceptions
of institutional privileges or, in extreme cases, to academic
have been articulated by the instructor.
suspension or dismissal may be imposed by the Institution.
6. Impeding – negatively impacting the ability of other stu-
Some of the more common forms of misconduct are listed
dents to successfully complete course or degree require-
below as a guide. This list is not intended to be exhaustive,
ments. Examples include removing materials from the
but rather illustrative of the practices the CSM community
library that are placed on reserve for general use; failing
has deemed inappropriate.
to provide team members necessary materials or assis-
tance; and knowingly disseminating false information
1. Dishonest Conduct – general conduct unbecoming of a
about the nature of a test or examination.
scholar. Examples include issuing misleading statements;
withholding pertinent information; not fulfilling, in a
Procedures for Addressing Academic Misconduct
timely fashion, previously agreed to projects or activities;
If a member of the CSM community has reasonable
and verifying as true things that are known to the student
grounds for suspecting that a student or students have en-
not to be true or verifiable.
gaged in academically dishonest conduct, they have an obli-
gation to act on this suspicion in an appropriate fashion.
2. Plagiarism – presenting the work of another as one’s
Faculty who suspect student(s) should inform the student(s)
own. This is usually accomplished through omission of
of the allegations, and attempt to resolve the issue directly.
acknowledgment. Examples include submitting as one’s
Students who suspect other students of academically dishon-
own work the work of another student, a ghost writer, or
est conduct should inform the course instructor, research ad-
a commercial writing service; quoting, either directly or
visor or division/department head, whichever is most
paraphrased, a source without appropriate acknowledg-
appropriate for the particular case and let them followup on
ment; and using figures, charts, graphs or facts without
the allegation. In cases where allegations are associated with
appropriate acknowledgment. Inadvertent or unintentional
the research activities vital to a student's thesis or disserta-
misuse or appropriation of another’s work is still consid-
tion, the student's thesis committee must be made aware of
ered plagiarism.
the allegations, and the thesis committee is charged with at-
3. Falsification/Fabrication – inventing or altering informa-
tempting to resolve the issue.
tion. Examples include inventing or manipulating data or
Faculty members and thesis committees have the responsi-
research procedures to report, suggest, or imply that par-
bility to address and resolve misconduct matters in a manner
ticular results were achieved from procedures when such
that is commensurate with the infraction and consistent with
procedures were not actually undertaken or when such re-
the values of the Institution, and have the responsibility to
sults were not actually supported by the pertinent data;
follow due process in cases where students appeal an accusa-
false citation of source materials; reporting false informa-
tion of misconduct. This includes imposition of appropriate
tion about practical, laboratory, or clinical experiences;
academic sanctions for students involved in academically
submitting false excuses for absence, tardiness, or missed
dishonest behavior. While faculty members will make rea-
deadlines; and altering previously submitted examinations.
sonable efforts to maintain the confidentiality of the parties
4. Tampering – interfering with, altering or attempting to
involved, if academic sanctions are to be imposed a written
alter university records, grades, assignments, or other
summary of the suspected infraction and the sanction to be
documents without authorization. Examples include using
imposed must be provided the accused student, the student's
a computer or a false-written document to change a
Department Head/Division Director and the Graduate Dean
recorded grade; altering, deleting, or manufacturing any
within 10 business days of disclosure of the accusation.
academic record; gaining unauthorized access to a univer-
Students who disagree with the accusation or penalty im-
sity record by any means.
posed may, or in case where faculty believe that a non-aca-
demic response (e.g., suspension, dismissal, or revocation of
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
27

specific campus privileges) is appropriate must appeal to the
uate Studies in a timely manner by the department head or
Graduate Dean. Appeals to the Graduate Dean must be in
division/program director.
writing and must be delivered within 20 business days of the
Probation and Discretionary Dismissal
initial disclosure of the accusation.
Procedures
The Graduate Dean will review the accusation and deter-
If a student is subject to academic probation as a result of
mine the appropriate appeal process. In most instances, ap-
an initial indication of unsatisfactory academic progress, the
peals of accusations that are related to research misconduct
Dean of Graduate Studies shall notify the student of his or
associated with a student's thesis or dissertation will be
her probationary status in a timely manner.
processed according to the Institution's Research Integrity
Policy. The Research Integrity Policy is availability as sec-
If a student is subject to discretionary dismissal by one of
tion 10.11 of the Faculty Handbook. Appeals of accusations
the mechanisms defined above, the Dean shall notify the
related to misconduct in most other areas of a student's aca-
student and invite him or her to submit a written remedial
demic program will be processed through the Student Judi-
plan, including performance milestones and deadlines, to
cial Panel. A description of this process is available in the
correct the deficiencies that caused or contributed to the stu-
Colorado School of Mines Student Handbook.
dent’s unsatisfactory academic progress. The remedial plan,
(http://www.mines.edu/stu)life/activities/rules.shtml)
which must be approved by the student’s faculty advisor and
the department head, division or program director, shall be
Resolution of Conflicting Bulletin
submitted to the Dean no later than 15 business days from
Provisions
the date of official notification. If the Dean concludes that the
If a conflict or inconsistency is found to exist between
remedial plan is likely to lead to successful completion of all
these policies and any other provision of the CSM Graduate
degree requirements within an acceptable time frame, the
Bulletin, the provisions of these policies shall govern the
Dean may halt the discretionary dismissal process and allow
resolution of such conflict or inconsistency.
the student to continue working toward his or her degree.
If the Dean concludes that the remedial plan is inadequate,
Unsatisfactory Academic Performance or that it is unlikely to lead to successful completion of all
Unsatisfactory Academic Progress Resulting in
degree requirements within an acceptable time frame, the
Probation or Discretionary Dismissal
Dean shall notify the student of his or her discretionary dis-
A student’s progress toward successful completion of a
missal and inform the student of his or her right to appeal the
graduate degree shall be deemed unsatisfactory if any of the
dismissal as outlined below.
following conditions occur:
Unsatisfactory Academic Performance Resulting
u Failure to maintain a cumulative grade point average of
in Mandatory Dismissal
3.0 or greater (see Grading System section);
Unsatisfactory performance as gauged by any of the
u Receipt of an “In-Progress-Unsatisfactory” grade for
following measures shall result in immediate, mandatory
research; or
dismissal of a graduate student: (1) failure to successfully
defend the thesis after two attempts; (2) failure to be admit-
u Receipt of an “Unsatisfactory Progress” recommenda-
ted to candidacy; or (3) failure by a student subject to discre-
tion from: (1) the head or director of the student’s home
tionary dismissal to achieve a performance milestone or meet
department or division, (2) the student’s thesis commit-
a deadline contained in his or her remedial plan. The Dean of
tee, or (3) a departmental committee charged with the
Graduate Studies shall be notified promptly of any situation
responsibility of monitoring the student’s progress.
that may subject a student to mandatory dismissal. In this
Unsatisfactory academic progress on the part of a graduate
event, the Dean shall notify the student of his or her dis-
student shall be reported to the Dean of Graduate Studies in a
missal and inform the student of his or her right to appeal
timely manner. Students making unsatisfactory progress by
the dismissal as outlined below.
any of the measures listed above shall be placed on academic
Students who have been notified of mandatory dismissal
probation upon the first occurrence of such indication. Upon
will be placed in non-degree status. They may request re-
the second occurrence of an unsatisfactory progress indica-
admission to either the same or a different degree program
tion, the Dean shall notify the student that he or she is subject
by submitting a full application for admission to the Gradu-
to discretionary dismissal according to the procedure out-
ate Office. The application will be reviewed through the nor-
lined below.
mal admission process.
In addition, students in thesis-based degree programs who
If a student who has been reinstated or readmitted to their
are not admitted to candidacy within the time limits specified
former degree program subsequently is found to be making
in this Bulletin may be subject to immediate mandatory dis-
unsatisfactory progress, they immediately will be subject to
missal according to the procedure outlined below. Failure to
mandatory dismissal.
fulfill this requirement must be reported to the Dean of Grad-
28
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007-2008

Appeal Procedures
1. Contact the Graduate Office to determine whether a stan-
Both mandatory and discretionary dismissals may be ap-
dard form exists. If so, complete the form. If a standard
pealed by a graduate student pursuant to this procedure. To
form does not exist, prepare a memo with a statement of
trigger review hereunder, an appeal must: (1) be in writing;
the request and a discussion of the reasons why a waiver
(2) contain a succinct description of the matter being appealed;
or exception would be justified.
and (3) be filed with the Office of the Dean of Graduate
2. Have the memo or the form approved by the student’s
Studies no later than 20 business days from the date upon
advisor and department head or division director, then
which the student received official notification from the
submit it to the Dean of Graduate Studies.
Dean regarding his or her dismissal.
3. If the request involves academic policies or requirements,
Upon receipt of a timely appeal of a discretionary or
the Dean of Graduate Studies will request Graduate Coun-
mandatory dismissal, the Dean shall appoint a review com-
cil approval at their next regularly scheduled meeting.
mittee composed of three tenured faculty members who are
not members of the student’s home or minor department or
4. The Dean of Graduate Studies will notify the student of
division. The review committee shall review the student’s
the decision. The student may file a written appeal with
appeal and issue a written recommendation thereon to the
the Executive Vice-President for Academic Affairs within
Dean within 20 business days. During the course of perform-
10 business days of being notified of the decision. The
ing this function, the committee may: (1) interview the stu-
EVPAA will investigate as appropriate to the issue under
dent, the student’s advisor, and, if appropriate, the student’s
consideration and render a decision. The decision of the
thesis committee; (2) review all documentation related to the
EVPAA is final.
appeal under consideration; (3) secure the assistance of out-
5. At the next graduate Council meeting, the Dean will
side expertise, if needed; and (4) obtain any other informa-
notify the Graduate Council of the request, the decision
tion necessary to properly consider the appeal.
and the reasons for the decision. If the Graduate Council
The authority to render a final decision regarding all grad-
endorses the decision, then any other student in the same
uate student appeals filed hereunder shall rest with the Dean
situation having the same justification can expect the
of Graduate Studies.
same decision.
Exceptions and Appeals
Public Access to the Graduate Thesis
Academic Policies and Requirements
The award of a thesis-based graduate degree is conditioned
on the student’s deposit of his or her completed thesis in the
Academic policies and requirements are included in the
CSM library to ensure its availability to the public. Although
Bulletin on the authority of the CSM Board of Trustees as
the student retains the copyright in the thesis, by depositing
delegated to the Faculty Senate. These include matters such
the thesis with the library, the student assigns a perpetual,
as degree requirements, grading systems, thesis and disserta-
non-exclusive, royalty-free license to CSM to permit CSM to
tion standards, admission standards and new and modified
copy the thesis and allow the public reasonable access to it.
degree programs, certificates, minors and courses. No CSM
administrator, faculty or staff member may change, waive or
Under special circumstances, CSM may agree to include
grant exceptions to such academic policies and requirements
proprietary research in a graduate student’s thesis. The nature
without approval of the Graduate Council, the Senate and/or
and extent of the proprietary research reported in the thesis
the Board of Trustees as appropriate.
must be agreed upon in writing by the principal investigator,
student and Dean of Graduate Studies. In some cases, the
Administrative Policies and Procedures
proprietary nature of the underlying research may require
Administrative Policies and Procedures are included in
the school to delay public access to the completed thesis for
this Bulletin on the authority of the CSM Board of Trustees
a limited period of time. In no case will public access to the
as delegated to the appropriate administrative office. These
thesis be denied for more than12 months from the date the
include (but are not limited to) matters such as student record
Statement of Work Completion form is submitted to the
keeping, thesis and dissertation formats and deadlines, regis-
Graduate School.
tration requirements and procedures, assessment of tuition
and fees, and allocation of financial aid. The Dean of Gradu-
Making up Undergraduate Deficiencies
ate Studies may waive or grant exceptions to such adminis-
If the department or division decides that new students do
trative policies and procedures as warranted by the
not have the necessary background to complete an advanced
circumstances of individual cases.
degree, they will be required to enroll in courses for which
Any graduate student may request a waiver or exception
they will receive no credit toward their graduate degree, or
by the following process:
complete supervised readings, or both. Students are notified
of their apparent deficiency areas in their acceptance letter
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
29

from the Graduate School or in their first interview with their
Grade Appeal Process
department advisor.
CSM faculty have the responsibility, and sole authority
Graduate students must attain a B average in deficiency
for, assigning grades. As instructors, this responsibility in-
courses, and any student receiving a grade of D in a defi-
cludes clearly stating the instructional objectives of a course,
ciency course will be required to repeat the course. Grades
defining how grades will be assigned in a way that is con-
for these deficiency courses are recorded on the student’s
sistent with these objectives, and then assigning grades. It is
transcript, become part of the student’s permanent record,
the student’s responsibility to understand the grading criteria
and are calculated into the overall GPA. Students whose under-
and then maintain the standards of academic performance
graduate records are deficient should remove all deficiencies
established for each course in which he or she is enrolled.
as soon as possible after they enroll for graduate studies.
If a student believes he or she has been unfairly graded,
Graduate Students in Undergraduate
the student may appeal the grade to the Faculty Affairs Com-
Courses
mittee of the Faculty Senate. The Faculty Affairs Committee
is the faculty body authorized to review and modify course
Students may receive graduate credit for a maximum
grades, in appropriate circumstances. Any decision made by
of nine semester hours of department-approved 400-level
the Faculty Affairs Committee is final. In evaluating a grade
course work not taken to remove deficiencies upon the rec-
appeal, the Faculty Affairs Committee will place the burden
ommendation of the graduate committee and the approval of
of proof on the student. For a grade to be revised by the Fac-
the Graduate Dean.
ulty Affairs Committee, the student must demonstrate that
Students may receive graduate credit for 300-level courses
the grading decision was unfair by documenting that one or
only in those programs which have been recommended by
more of the following conditions applied:
the department and have been approved by the Graduate
1. The grading decision was based on something other than
Council before the students enroll in the course. In that case
course performance; unless the grade was a result of
a maximum of nine total hours of 300- and 400-level courses
penalty for academic dishonesty or the grade was WI
will be accepted for graduate credit.
(withdrawn involuntarily).
Independent Study
2. The grading decision was based on standards that were
For each semester credit hour awarded for independent
unreasonably different from those applied to other stu-
study a student is expected to invest approximately 45 hours
dents in the same section of that course.
of effort in educational activity. To register for independent
3. The grading decision was based on standards that differed
study or for a “special topics” course, a student should get
substantially and unreasonably from those previously ar-
from the Registrar’s Office the form provided for that pur-
ticulated by the instructor.
pose, have it completed by the instructor involved and appro-
priate department/division head, and return it to the
To appeal a grade, the student must proceed as follows:
Registrar’s Office.
1. The student must prepare a written appeal of the grade re-
Course and Research Grades
ceived in the course. This appeal must clearly define the
basis for the appeal and must present all relevant evidence
All candidates for graduate degrees must maintain a cumu-
supporting the student’s case.
lative grade point average of at least 3.0 in all courses taken
after acceptance into a degree program. This includes both
2. After preparing the written appeal, the student must de-
graduate and undergraduate courses. Any grade lower than
liver this appeal to the course instructor and attempt to re-
“C-” is unsatisfactory and is not acceptable for credit toward
solve the issue directly with the instructor. Written grade
graduate degree requirements or graduate deficiencies.
appeals must be delivered to the instructor no later than
10 business days after the start of the regular (fall or
For research credits, students receive either an “In
spring) semester immediately following the semester in
Progress-Satisfactory” or an “In Progress-Unsatisfactory”
which the contested grade was received. In the event that
grade based on their faculty advisor’s evaluation of their
the course instructor is unavailable, the course coordina-
work. Research grades do not enter into the calculation of the
tor (first) or the Department Head/Division Director (sec-
student’s grade point average.
ond) will represent the instructor.
Students who fail to maintain a grade point average of at
3. If after discussion with the instructor, the student is still
least 3.0, or who receive an In Progress-Unsatisfactory re-
dissatisfied, he or she can proceed with the appeal by sub-
search grade are placed on academic probation by the Gradu-
mitting three copies of the written appeal plus three
ate Dean and may be subject to discretionary dismissal as
copies of a summary of the instructor/student meetings
defined by the Unsatisfactory Academic Performance section
held in connection with the previous step to the President
of this Bulletin (see page 28).
of the Faculty Senate. These must be submitted to the
President of the Faculty Senate no later than 25 business
30
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007-2008

days after the start of the regular semester immediately
Graduation
following the semester in which the contested grade was
All students expecting to graduate must submit a
received. The President of the Faculty Senate will for-
graduation application to the Office of Graduate
ward the student's appeal and supporting documents to
the Faculty Affairs Committee, the course instructor's De-
Studies.
partment Head/Division Director, and the instructor.
Graduation application deadlines are scheduled well in
advance of the date of Commencement to allow time for
4. The Faculty Affairs Committee will request a response to
engraving diplomas and for printing graduation invitations
the appeal from the instructor and begin an investigation
and programs. Students who submit applications after the
of the student's allegations and basis for appealing the
stated deadline cannot be guaranteed a diploma dated for that
grade. During the course of performing its investigation,
graduation, and cannot be assured inclusion in the graduation
the Committee may: 1) interview the student, the student's
program or ceremony.
advisor, the course instructor and other witnesses deemed
relevant to the investigation; 2) review all documentation
All graduating students must officially check out of their
related to the appeal under consideration; 3) secure the as-
degree program, including paying the mandatory graduation
sistance of outside expertise, if needed; and 4) obtain any
fee. Checkout cards may be obtained from the Graduate
other information deemed necessary to consider and re-
Office and must be completed and returned by the estab-
solve the appeal.
lished deadline. Students must register for the next term
unless the graduation checkout process is completed by the
Upon request, the Faculty Affairs Committee may share
last day of registration for the following semester.
summaries of testimony and other information examined
by the Committee with both the student and the instructor.
The awarding of a degree is contingent upon the student’s
Certain information, however, may be redacted from ma-
successful completion of all program requirements with at
terials forwarded to the student and instructor to maintain
least a 3.0 GPA before the date of graduation. Students who
other students' rights subject to protection under the Fam-
fail to graduate at the time originally anticipated must re-
ily Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), or other
apply for the next graduation before the appropriate deadline
state and federal law.
date stated in the Graduate Handbook.
Based on its investigation, the Faculty Affairs Committee
Students who have completed all of their degree require-
will determine whether the grade should be revised. The
ments before the specific graduation date, but who have not
decision rendered will be either: 1) the original grading
applied for graduation can, if necessary, request a letter from
decision is upheld, or 2) sufficient evidence exists to indi-
the Graduate Office certifying the completion of their pro-
cate a grade has been assigned unfairly. In this latter case,
grams. The student should apply for the next graduation, and
the Faculty Affairs Committee will assign the student a
the diploma will show the date of that graduation.
new grade for the course. The Committee's written deci-
Graduation exercises are held in December and May.
sion and supporting documentation will be delivered to
Students eligible to graduate at these times are expected to
the President of the Faculty Senate, the office of the
attend their respective graduation exercises. Students in
EVPAA, the student, the instructor, and the instructor's
thesis-based degree programs may not, under any circum-
Department Head/Division Director no later than 25 busi-
stances, attend graduation exercises before completing all
ness days following the Senate's receipt of the grade ap-
degree requirements.
peal. The Faculty Affairs Committee's decision shall
Diplomas, transcripts, and letters of completion will not
constitute the final decision of the grade appeal. There is
be released by the School for any student or graduate who
no further internal appeal available to the parties.
has an unsettled obligation of any kind to the School.
The schedule, but not the process, outlined above may be
Withdrawing from School
modified upon mutual agreement of the student, the instruc-
To officially withdraw from CSM, a graduate student
tor, and the Faculty Affairs Committee
must process a withdrawal form through the Graduate Office.
When the form is completed, the student will receive grades
of W in courses in progress. If the student does not officially
withdraw the course grades are recorded as F’s. Leaving
school without having paid tuition and fees will result in the
encumbrance of the transcript.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
31

Nondegree Students
Graduate students enrolled in undergraduate-level courses
A nondegree student is one who has not applied to pursue a
(400-level and below) are graded using the undergraduate
degree program at CSM but wishes to take courses regularly
grading system. See the CSM Undergraduate Bulletin for a
offered on campus. Nondegree students register for courses
description of this system.
through the Registrar’s office after degree students have reg-
In addition to these performance symbols, the following is
istered. Such students may take any course for which they
a list of additional registration symbols that may appear on a
have the prerequisites as listed in the CSM Bulletin or have
CSM transcript.
the permission of the instructor. Transcripts or evidence of
WI:
Involuntarily Withdrawn
the prerequisites are required. Nondegree students pay all
W:
Withdrew, No Penalty
applicable tuition, but do not pay student fees except for the
T:
Transfer Credit
technology fee.
NC:
Not for Credit
Veterans’ Benefits
Z:
Grade not yet Submitted
Colorado School of Mines is approved by the Colorado
Incomplete Grade
State Approving Agency for Veteran Benefits under chapters
If a graduate student fails to complete a course because of
30, 31, 32, 35, and 1606. Graduate students must register for
illness or other reasonable excuse, the student receives a
and maintain nine hours of graduate work in any semester to
grade of Incomplete, a temporary grade which indicates a de-
be certified as a full-time student for full-time benefits. Any
ficiency in the quantity of work done. A graduate student
hours taken under the full-time category will decrease the
must remove all Incomplete grades within the first four
benefits to 3/4 time, 1/2 time, or tuition payment only.
weeks of the first semester of attendance following that in
Students receiving benefits must report all changes in
which the grade was received. If not removed within the four
hours, addresses, marital status, or dependents to the Veter-
weeks, the Incomplete will become an F.
ans’ Counseling Office located in the Registrar’s Office as
Satisfactory Progress Grades
soon as possible to avoid overpayment or underpayment.
A graduate student may receive a grade of Satisfactory
Veterans must see the Veterans’ Counselor each semester to
Progress, PRG, in either one of two possible situations: 1) as
be certified for any benefits for which they may be eligible.
a grade for a course extending more than one semester and 2)
In order for veterans to continue to receive benefits, they
as a grade indicating completion of research credit hours.
must make satisfactory progress as defined by CSM.
For students completing independent study, or seminar
Graduate Grading System
courses that extend for more than one semester, the progress
Grades
grade has no point value and is used only for multi-semester
When a student registers in a graduate (500 and 600 level )
courses, or for special sections of one-semester courses that
course, one of the following grades will appear on the aca-
are spread over two terms. In such cases, the student receives
demic record. Grades are based on the level of performance
a grade of PRG, which indicates that the work is not com-
and represent the extent of the student's demonstrated mas-
pleted. This grade is replaced by a letter grade when the
tery of the material listed in the course outline and achieve-
course work is completed.
ment of the stated course objectives. These are CSM's grade
The student must register again in the same course in the
symbols and their qualitative interpretations:
next semester of attendance. If a progress grade is received
A and A-:
Excellent
for a course taken in the second semester of the school year,
B+, B and B-:
Good
the student may, with the permission of the department head,
C +, C and C-:
Satisfactory
re-register in that course in the summer session, in which
D+, D and D-:
Unsatisfactory (not acceptable case the letter grade must be given at the end of the summer
for graduate credit)
session.
F:
Failed
When applied to research credits, the Satisfactory Progress
S Satisfactory:
C- or better, used only as a
grade, PRG, also has no point value toward a student's GPA,
mid-term grade
but indicates satisfactory progress toward completion of the
U Unsatisfactory:
below C-, used only as a mid-
research component of a student's thesis-based degree pro-
term grade
gram. In this situation, a grade of PRU, Unsatisfactory
INC:
Incomplete
Progress, may be given, and if given, indicates that a student
PRG:
Satisfactory Progress
has not made satisfactory progress toward the research com-
PRU:
Unsatisfactory Progress
ponent of a thesis-based degree program. In this case, receipt
of a grade of PRU may trigger academic disciplinary pro-
ceedings as described in the Unsatisfactory Academic Perfor-
mance portion of this Bulletin (see page 28).
32
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007-2008

Unless faculty submit change of grade forms to the Regis-
Grade-Point Averages
trar, grades of PRU delivered for unsatisfactory research per-
Grade-Point Averages shall be specified, recorded, re-
formance, are not changed to PRG upon the successful
ported, and used to three figures following the decimal point
completion of a student's degree program.
for any and all purposes to which said averages may apply.
NC Grade
Overall Grade-Point Average
For special reasons and with the instructor's permission, a
The overall grade-point average includes all attempts at
student may register in a course for no credit (NC). To have
courses taken at Colorado School of Mines with the excep-
the grade NC appear on the transcript, the student must enroll
tion of courses which fall under the repeat policy imple-
at registration time as a NC student in the course and comply
mented during the 2007-2008 academic year.
with all conditions stipulated by the course instructor. If a
If a course completed during the Fall 2007 term or after is
student registered as NC fails to satisfy all conditions, no
a repeat of a course completed in any previous term and the
record of this registration in the course will be made.
course is not repeatable for credit, the grade and credit hours
Quality Hours and Quality Points
earned for the most recent occurrence of the course will
For graduation a student must successfully complete a cer-
count toward the student's grade-point average and the stu-
tain number of required semester hours and must maintain
dent's degree requirements. The most recent course occur-
grades at a satisfactory level. Numerical values assigned to
rence must be an exact match to the previous course
each letter grade are given in the table below.
completed (subject and number). The most recent grade will
be applied to the overall grade-point average even if the pre-
vious grade is higher.
Numerical
Courses from other institutions transferred to Colorado
Grade
Value
School of Mines are not counted in any grade-point average,
A
4.000
and cannot be used under this repeat policy. Only courses
A-
3.700
originally completed and subsequently repeated at Colorado
B+
3.300
School of Mines during Fall 2007 or after with the same sub-
ject code and number apply to this repeat policy.
B
3.000
B-
2.700
For courses that may be repeated for credit such as special
topics courses, credit is awarded and grades are counted in
C+
2.300
the grade-point average up to the maximum hours allowed
C
2.000
for the course.
C-
1.700
All occurrences of every course taken at Colorado School
D+
1.300
of Mines will appear on the official transcript along with the
D
1.000
associated grade.
D-
0.700
Access to Student Records
F
0.000
Students at the Colorado School of Mines are protected by
the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as
amended. This Act was designed to protect the privacy of
The number of quality points earned in any course is the
education records, to establish the right of students to inspect
number of semester hours assigned to that course multiplied
and review their education records, and to provide guidelines
by the numerical value of the grade received. The quality
for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through
hours earned are the number of semester hours in which
informal and formal hearings. Students also have the right to
grades are awarded. To compute a grade-point average, the
file complaints with The Family Educational Rights and Pri-
number of cumulative quality hours is divided into the cumu-
vacy Act Office (FERPA) concerning alleged failures by the
lative quality points earned. Grades of W, WI, INC, PRG,
institution to comply with the Act. Copies of local policy can
PRU, or NC are not counted in quality hours.
be found in the Registrar’s Office. Contact information for
Semester Hours
FERPA complaints is
The number of times a class meets during a week (for
Family Policy Compliance Office
lecture, recitation, or laboratory) determines the number of
U.S. Department of Education
semester hours assigned to that course. Class sessions are
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
normally 50 minutes long and represent one hour of credit
Washington, D. C. 20202-4605
for each hour meeting. Two to four hours of laboratory work
per week are equivalent to 1-semester hour of credit. For the
average student, each hour of lecture and recitation requires
at least two hours of preparation.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
33

Directory Information. The school maintains lists of
Challenge of the Record. If the student wishes to chal-
information which may be considered directory information
lenge any part of the record, the Dean will be so notified in
as defined by the regulations. This information includes
writing. The Dean may then (l) remove and destroy the dis-
name, current and permanent addresses and phone numbers,
puted document, or (2) inform the student that it is his deci-
date of birth, major field of study, dates of attendance, de-
sion that the document represents a necessary part of the
grees awarded, last school attended, participation in officially
record; and, if the student wishes to appeal, (3) convene a
recognized activities and sports, class, and academic honors.
meeting of the student and the document originator (if rea-
Students who desire that this information not be printed or
sonably available) in the presence of the Executive Vice
released must so inform the Registrar before the end of the
President for Academic Affairs as mediator, whose decision
first two weeks of the fall semester for which the student is
will be final.
registered. Information will be withheld for the entire aca-
Destruction of Records. Records may be destroyed at any
demic year unless the student changes this request. The stu-
time by the responsible official if not otherwise precluded by
dent’s signature is required to make any changes for the
law except that no record may be destroyed between the
current academic year. The request must be renewed each fall
dates of access request and the viewing of the record. If dur-
term for the upcoming year. The following student records
ing the viewing of the record any item is in dispute, it may
are maintained by Colorado School of Mines at the various
not be destroyed.
offices listed below:
Access to Records by Other Parties. Colorado School of
1. General Records: Registrar and Graduate Dean
Mines will not permit access to student records by persons
2. Transcript of Grades: Registrar
outside the School except as follows:
3. Computer Grade Lists: Registrar
1. In the case of open record information as specified in
4. Encumbrance List: Controller and Registrar
the section under Directory Information.
2. To those people specifically designated by the student.
5. Academic Probation/Suspension List: Graduate Dean
Examples would include request for transcript to be
6. Advisor File: Academic Advisor
sent to graduate school or prospective employer.
7. Option/Advisor/Enrolled/ Minority/Foreign List:
3. Information required by a state or federal agency for
Registrar, Dean of Students, and Graduate Dean
the purpose of establishing eligibility for financial aid.
4. Accreditation agencies during their on-campus review.
8. Externally Generated SAT/GRE Score Lists:
5. In compliance with a judicial order or lawfully issued
Graduate Dean
subpoena after the student has been notified of the in-
9. Financial Aid File: Financial Aid (closed records)
tended compliance.
10. Medical History File: School Physician (closed records)
6. Any institutional information for statistical purposes
which is not identifiable with a particular student.
Student Access to Records. The graduate student wishing
7. In compliance with any applicable statue now in effect
access to his or her educational records will make a written
or later enacted. Each individual record (general, tran-
request to the Graduate Dean. This request will include the
script, advisor, and medical) will include a log of those
student’s name, date of request and type of record to be re-
persons not employed by Colorado School of Mines
viewed. It will be the responsibility of the Dean to arrange a
who have requested or obtained access to the student
mutually satisfactory time for review. This time will be as
record and the legitimate interest that the person has in
soon as practical but is not to be later than 30 business days
making the request.
from receipt of the request. The record will be reviewed in
the presence of the Dean or designated representative. If the
record involves a list including other students, steps will be
taken to preclude the viewing of the other student name and
information.
34
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007-2008

Tuition, Fees, Financial Assistance
Tuition and fees are established by the Board of Trustees
The amount of tuition and fee assessment is based pri-
of the Colorado School of Mines following the annual budget
marily on each student’s enrolled courses. In the event a
process and action by the Colorado General Assembly and
student withdraws from a course or courses, assessments
Governor.
will be adjusted as follows:
Graduate Tuition
P If the withdrawal is made prior to the end of the
The official tuition and approved charges for the 2007-
add/drop period for the term of enrollment, as deter-
2008 academic year will be available prior to the start of the
mined by the Registrar, tuition and fees will be ad-
2007-2008 academic year located at
justed to the new course level without penalty.
http://www.is.mines.edu/budget/budget_current/tuition_rates.pdf
P If the withdrawal from a course or courses is made
Fees
after the add/drop period, and the student does not of-
ficially withdraw from school, no adjustment in
The official fees, approved charges, and fee descriptions
charges will be made.
for the 2007-2008 academic year will be available prior to
the start of the 2007-2008 academic year and can be found
P If the withdrawal from courses is made after the
at: http://www.is.mines.edu/budget/budget_current/fees.pdf
add/drop period, and the student withdraws from
school, tuition and fee assessments will be reduced ac-
Please note that graduate students who register for under-
cording to the following schedule:
graduate courses to satisfy deficiencies may be assessed the
same fee that an undergraduate student would pay.
P Within the 7 calendar days following the end of
the add/drop period, 60 percent reduction in
Payments and Refunds
charges.
Payment Information
P Within the next following 7 calendar days, a 40
A student is expected to complete the registration process,
percent reduction in charges.
including the payment of tuition and fees, before attending
class. Students should mail their payments to: Cashier
P Within the next following 7 calendar days, a 20
Colorado School of Mines 1500 Illinois St. Golden, CO
percent reduction in charges.
80401-1869 or pay at the Cashier’s Office in The Ben Parker
P After that period, no reduction of charges will be
Student Center. Please write your student ID on payment.
made.
Late Payment Penalties
The schedule above applies to the Fall and Spring semes-
A penalty will be assessed against a student if payment is
ters. The time periods for the Summer sessions - Field and
not received in full by the official day of registration. The
Summer - will be adjusted in proportion to the reduced num-
penalty is described in the schedule of courses for each
ber of days in these semesters.
semester. If payment is not completed by the sixth week of
Room and board refunds are pro-rated to the date of
class, the student may be officially withdrawn from classes.
checkout from the Residence Hall. Arrangements must be
Financial Responsibility
made with the Housing Office. Student health insurance
Registration for classes at CSM implies an obligation by
charges are not refundable. The insurance remains in effect
the student to meet all related financial responsibilities in a
for the entire semester.
timely manner. Students who do not fulfill their financial
PLEASE NOTE: Students receiving federal financial aid
obligations according to published deadlines are subject to
under the Title IV programs may have a different refund de-
the following: late payment penalties accrued on any out-
termined as required by federal law or regulations.
standing balance, and the withholding of transcripts. Past due
accounts will be turned over to Colorado Central Collection
Financial Assistance for Graduate Studies
Services in accordance with Colorado law. Collection costs
Graduate study is a considerable investment of time,
will be added to the student’s account, and delinquencies
energy, and money by serious students who expect a substan-
may be reported to national credit bureaus.
tial return not only in satisfaction but also in future earnings.
Applicants are expected to weigh carefully the investment
Encumbrances
they are willing to make against expected benefits before
A student will not be permitted to register for future
applying for admission.
classes, to graduate, or to get an official transcript of his
academic record while indebted in any way to CSM.
Students are also expected to make full use of any resources
available, including personal and loan funds, to cover expenses,
Refunds
and the School can offer some students financial aid through
Refunds for tuition and fees are made according to the
graduate research and teaching assistantships and through
following policy:
industry, state, and federal fellowships.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
35

Purpose of Financial Aid
Aid Application Forms.
The Graduate School’s limited financial aid is used
New students interested in applying for financial aid are
1. To give equal access to graduate study by assisting stu-
encouraged to apply early. Financial aid forms are included
dents with limited personal resources;
in Graduate School application packets and may be filled out
and returned with the other application papers.
2. To compensate graduate students who teach and do re-
search;
Graduate Fellowships.
The departments and divisions award Colorado Fellow-
3. To give an incentive to exceptional students who can
ships based on the student’s academic performance.
provide academic leadership for continually improving grad-
uate programs.
Graduate Student Loans.
Employment Restrictions and Agreements
Need-based federal student loans are available for gradu-
ate students who need additional funding beyond their own
Students who are employed full time or who are enrolled
resources and any assistantships or fellowships they may re-
part time are not eligible for financial aid through the Gradu-
ceive. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid
ate School.
(FAFSA) must be completed to apply for these loan funds.
Students who are awarded assistantships must sign an
Specific information and procedures for filing the FAFSA
appointment agreement, which gives the terms of appoint-
can be found on the Financial Aid Office web site at www.fi-
ment and specifies the amount and type of work required.
naid.mines.edu. The Financial Aid Office telephone number
Graduate assistants who hold regular appointments are ex-
is 303-273-3220, and the e-mail address is
pected to devote all of their efforts to their educational pro-
finaid@mines.edu.
gram and may not be otherwise employed without the written
permission of their supervisor and the Graduate Dean. Stu-
dents with assistantships during the academic year must be
registered as full time. During the summer session they must
be registered for a minimum of three credit hours, unless
they qualify for the summer research registration exception.
Please see http://www.mines.edu/admiss/grad/grad_con-
tracts.html for details on summer registration exception eligi-
bility.
36Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007-2008

Graduate Degrees and Requirements
Colorado School of Mines offers post-baccalaureate pro-
2. Admission to Candidacy
grams leading to the awarding of Graduate Certificates, Pro-
Full-time students must complete the following require-
fessional Masters degrees, thesis and non-thesis Master of
ments within the first semester after enrolling into a Graduate
Science and Master of Engineering degrees, and Doctor of
Certificate degree program.
Philosophy degrees. This section describes these degrees and
u complete all prerequisites and core curriculum course
explains the minimum institutional requirements for each.
requirements of their program, and
Students may apply to, and be admitted in, multiple grad-
u be admitted into full candidacy for the certificate.
uate degrees simultaneously. In this case, a student may
use the same graduate course credits to satisfy the degree
A list of prerequisites and core curriculum requirements
requirements for each degree. Before the Graduate School
for Graduate Certificate degrees is published by each pro-
will count these credits toward each degree requirement,
gram. When a student is admitted with deficiencies, the
however, the student must obtain written permission to do so
appropriate department head, division director or program
from each department, division or program granting degree.
director will provide the student with a written list of courses
This permission should be submitted with the student’s Ad-
required to remove these deficiencies. This list will be given
mission to Candidacy forms and should clearly indicate that
to the student no later than one week after the start of classes
each degree program is aware that credits are being counted
of his/her first semester in order to allow for adding/dropping
toward the requirements of multiple degrees. For thesis-based
courses as necessary.
students this permission should be provided by the student’s
Upon completion of the above-defined requirements, a
thesis committee. For non-thesis and certificate programs,
student must submit an Admission to Candidacy and a State-
permission should be obtained from program coordinators or
ment of Work Completion forms documenting satisfactory
department/division chairs.
completion of the prerequisites and core curriculum require-
I. Professional Programs
ments. The form must have the written approval of the pro-
gram offering the Graduate Certificate.
A. Graduate Certificate Program
Graduate Certificate Programs at CSM are designed to
B. Professional Master’s Program
have selective focus, short time to completion and consist
CSM awards specialized, career-oriented non-thesis Master
of course work only. For more information about specific
degrees with the title of “Professional Master (descriptive
professional programs, please refer to the “Graduate Degree
title).” These are custom-designed, interdisciplinary degrees,
Programs and Description of Courses” portion of this Bul-
each with a curriculum meeting the career advancement needs
letin.
of a particular group of professionals in a field that is part of
CSM’s role and mission. For more information about these
1. Academic Requirements
programs, please refer to the “Graduate Degree Programs and
Each Graduate Certificate requires a minimum of 12 total
Description of Courses” portion of this Bulletin.
credit hours. No more than 3 credit hours at the 400 level
may be applied toward the minimum credit-hours require-
1. Academic Requirements
ment. All other credits must be at or above the 500 level.
Each Professional Master’s degree consists of a minimum
Students may not, on an individual basis, request credit hours
of 30 total credit hours. Students must complete at least 21
be transferred from other institutions as part of the Certificate
credit hours at CSM in the degree program. The remaining
requirements. Some Graduate Certificates, however, may
hours may be transfered into the program. Requests for
allow the application of specific, pre-approved transfer
transfer credit must be approved by the faculty according to a
credits, or credits from other institutions with whom CSM
process defined by the student’s home department or divi-
has formal agreements for this purpose toward fulfilling the
sion. Transfer credits must not have been used as credit to-
requirements of the Certificate. All courses applied to a
ward a Bachelor degree. The transfer limit includes CSM
Graduate Certificate are subject to approval by the program
distance learning courses. Up to six credit hours of Special
offering the certificate.
Topic or Independent Study may be in the form of project
credits done on the job as an employee or as a graduate in-
If a student has earned a Graduate Certificate and subse-
tern. If project credits are to be used, the project proposal and
quently applies, and is accepted into a Master's or PhD pro-
final report must be approved by a CSM faculty advisor, al-
gram at CSM, credits earned in the Certificate Program may,
though direct supervision may be provided by the employer.
with the approval of the advanced degree program, be ap-
Students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of
plied to the advanced degree subject to all the applicable re-
3.0 or better in CSM course work.
strictions on credit hours that may be applied toward
fulfilling the requirements of the advanced degree.
2. Admission to Candidacy
Full-time students must complete the following require-
ments within the first calendar year after enrolling into a
Professional Master's degree program.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
37

u complete all prerequisite and core curriculum course
addition to the requirements described above, either have
requirements of their program, and
a Bachelor’s degree in engineering, or complete no fewer
u be admitted into full candidacy for the degree.
than 16 credit hours of engineering courses as part of their
Master’s program. Courses satisfying the engineering course
Each program publishes a list of prerequisites and core
requirement are determined by the department/division host-
curriculum requirements for Professional Master's degrees.
ing the degree.
When a student is admitted with deficiencies, the appropriate
department head, division director or program director will
2. Minor Programs
provide the student with a written list of courses required
Students may choose to have a minor program or pro-
to remove these deficiencies. This list will be given to the
grams at the Master’s level. A minor program may not be
student no later than one week after the start of classes of
taken in the student’s major area of study. A designated
his/her first semester in order to allow for adding/dropping
minor requires a minimum of 9 semester hours of course
courses as necessary.
work and must be approved by the student’s advisor, home
department head, and a faculty representative of the minor
Upon completion of the above-defined requirements, a
area of study.
student must submit an Admission to Candidacy form docu-
menting satisfactory completion of the prerequisites and
3. Admission to Candidacy
core curriculum requirements. The form must have the writ-
Full-time students must complete the following require-
ten approval of the program offering the Professional Mas-
ments within the first calendar year after enrolling into the
ters degree.
Master’s degree program.
II. Master of Science and Engineering
u have a thesis committee appointment form on file in
the Graduate Office;
Programs
u complete all prerequisite and core curriculum course
A. General Requirements
requirements of their department, division or program;
Graduate study at CSM can lead to one of a number of the-
and
sis and non-thesis based Master’s degrees, depending on the
interests of the student. All Master’s degree programs share
u be admitted into full candidacy for the degree.
the same academic requirements for grades, definition of
Each degree program publishes a list of prerequisite and
minor programs, and the need to apply for admission to can-
core curriculum requirements for that degree. If students are
didacy.
admitted with deficiencies, the appropriate department heads,
1. Academic Requirements
division directors or program directors will provide the stu-
A Master’s degree at CSM requires a minimum of 30 total
dents written lists of courses required to remove the deficien-
credit hours. As part of this 30 hours, departments and divi-
cies. These lists will be given to the students no later than
sions are required to include a research or design experience
one week after the start of classes of their first semester in
supervised by CSM faculty. For more information about the
order to allow them to add/drop courses as necessary.
specific research/design requirements, please refer to the ap-
Upon completion of the above defined requirements, stu-
propriate department/division section of the “Graduate
dents must submit an Admission to Candidacy form docu-
Degree Programs and Description of Courses” portion of this
menting satisfactory completion of the prerequisite and core
Bulletin.
curriculum requirements and granting permission to begin
For non-thesis Master's degrees, students must complete at
Master’s level research. The form must have the written ap-
least 21 credit hours at CSM in the degree program. All other
proval of all members of the advisor and thesis committee, if
credits may be completed as transfer credits into the degree
appropriate.
program. For thesis Master's degrees, no more than 9 credits
B. Non-thesis Option
may transfer. The transfer credit limit includes CSM distance
Non-thesis Master’s degrees are offered by a number of
learning courses. Transfer credits must not have been used as
departments, divisions and programs. In lieu of preparing a
credit toward a Bachelor degree. Requests for transfer credit
thesis, non-thesis master’s program students are required to
must be approved by the faculty according to the process de-
complete a research or design experience taken as a special
fined by a student's home department or division. All credits
problem or as an independent study course. See the depart-
applied toward degree, except transfer credits, must be
ment/division section of the “Graduate Degree Programs and
earned on campus. Students must maintain a cumulative
Description of Courses” portion of this Bulletin for more
grade point average of 3.0 or better in CSM course work.
information. Although non-thesis master’s students are not
Students are normally admitted into the Master of Science
assigned a Thesis Committee, students in this program do
degree program in the department/division to which they
select a faculty advisor, subject to the approval of the stu-
have applied. If, however, a candidate would like to obtain
dent’s home department.
the Master of Engineering degree, the candidate must, in
38
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007-2008

C. Thesis Option
ment must be added to the committee. Students who choose
Thesis-based Master of Science and Master of Engineering
to have a minor program at the Master’s level must select a
degrees require completion of a satisfactory thesis and suc-
representative from their minor area of study to serve on the
cessful oral defense of this thesis. Academic credit toward
Thesis Committee. Minor representatives must be full-time
completion of the thesis must include successful completion
members of the CSM faculty.
of no fewer than 6 credit hours of masters-level research
A Thesis Committee Chairperson is designated by the
credit. The Master of Science thesis is expected to report on
student at the time he/she requests the formation of his/her
original research that results in new knowledge and/or tech-
thesis committee. The chairperson is responsible for leading
niques. The Master of Engineering thesis is expected to re-
all meetings of the thesis committee and for directing the
port on creative engineering design that applies
student’s thesis defense. In selecting a Thesis Committee
state-of-the-art knowledge and techniques to solve an impor-
chairperson, the following guidelines must be met: 1) the
tant problem. In both cases, the thesis should be an exem-
chairperson cannot be the student’s advisor or co-advisor and
plary product that meets the rigorous scholarship standards of
2) the chairperson must be a full-time CSM faculty member.
the Colorado School of Mines. The student's faculty advisor
and the Master's Thesis Committee must approve the pro-
Shortly after its appointment, the Committee will meet
gram of study and the topic for the thesis. The format of the
with the student to hear a presentation of the proposed course
thesis must comply with the appropriate guidelines promul-
of study and thesis topic. The Committee and the student
gated by the Graduate School.
must agree on a satisfactory program and the student must
obtain the Committee approval of the written thesis proposal
1. Faculty Advisor Appointment
at least one semester prior to the thesis defense. The student’s
Each thesis-based Master’s student must select a faculty
faculty advisor assumes the primary responsibility for moni-
advisor to provide advice regarding the student’s thesis direc-
toring the program and directing the thesis work. The award
tion, research and selection of courses by the middle of their
of the thesis-based Master’s degree is contingent upon the
second semester at CSM. The faculty advisor will serve as a
student’s researching and writing a thesis acceptable to the
voting member of the student’s Thesis Committee. The stu-
student’s faculty advisor and Thesis Committee.
dent’s department head or division director and the Graduate
Dean must approve all faculty advisor appointments.
3. Thesis Defense
The student submits an initial draft of his or her thesis to
Advisors must be full-time members of the CSM faculty
the faculty advisor, who will work with the student on neces-
and must hold the rank of professor, associate professor, as-
sary revisions. Upon approval of the student’s advisor, the
sistant professor, research professor, associate research pro-
revised thesis is circulated to the Thesis Committee members
fessor or assistant research professor. Upon approval by the
at least one week prior to the oral defense of the thesis. The
Graduate Dean, adjunct professors and off-campus represen-
oral defense of the thesis is scheduled during the student’s
tatives may be designated co-advisors. When appropriate and
final semester of study. Students must be registered to de-
upon approval by the Graduate Dean, faculty members out-
fend. This defense session, which may include an examina-
side the student’s home department may serve as the student’s
tion of material covered in the student’s course work, will be
faculty co-advisor. In either of these cases, a co-advisor must
open to the public.
be selected from the student’s home department.
Following the defense, the Thesis Committee will meet
2. Thesis Committee
privately to vote on whether the student has successfully de-
The Graduate Dean appoints a Thesis Committee whose
fended the thesis. Three outcomes are possible: the student
members have been recommended by the student, the stu-
may pass the oral defense; the student may fail the defense;
dent’s faculty advisor, and the student’s department head.
or the Committee may vote to adjourn the defense to allow
Students should have a thesis committee appointed by the
the student more time to address and remove weaknesses or
end of their second semester. This Committee will have a
inadequacies in the thesis or underlying research. Two nega-
minimum of three voting members, including the student’s
tive votes will constitute a failure regardless of the number
advisor, who are familiar with the student’s area of study. Of
of Committee members present at the thesis defense. In the
these Committee members, two must be from the home de-
event of either failure or adjournment, the Chair of the Thesis
partment or, in the case of interdisciplinary degree programs,
Committee will prepare a written statement indicating the
an allied department. Off-campus members can be assigned
reasons for this action and will distribute copies to the stu-
to the Committee to serve either with full voting status or in a
dent, the Thesis Committee members, the student’s depart-
non-voting capacity. Off-campus members with voting status
ment head and the Graduate Dean. In the case of failure or
assume all of the responsibilities of on-campus Committee
adjournment, the student may request a re-examination,
members with respect to attendance of Committee meetings,
which must be scheduled no less than one week after the
review of thesis drafts and participation in oral examinations
original defense. A second failure to defend the thesis satis-
and thesis defense sessions. If a thesis co-advisor is assigned,
factorily will result in the termination of the student’s gradu-
an additional faculty member from the home or allied depart-
ate program.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
39

Upon passing the oral defense of thesis or report, the stu-
department head and the Graduate Dean must approve all
dent must make any corrections in the thesis required by the
faculty advisor appointments.
Thesis Committee. The final, corrected copy and an executed
Advisors must be full-time members of the CSM faculty
signature page indicating approval by the student’s advisor
and must hold the rank of professor, associate professor, as-
and department head must be submitted to the Office of
sistant professor, research professor, associate research pro-
Graduate Studies for format approval. (Format instructions
fessor or assistant research professor. Upon approval by the
are available in the Office of Graduate Studies and should be
Graduate Dean, adjunct professors and off-campus represen-
obtained before beginning work on the thesis.)
tatives may be designated co-advisors. When appropriate and
III. Doctor of Philosophy
upon approval by the Graduate Dean, faculty members out-
A. Credits, Academic and Campus Residence
side the student’s home department may serve as the student’s
Requirements
faculty co-advisor. In either of these cases, a co-advisor must
The Doctor of Philosophy degree requires completion of a
be selected from the student’s home department.
minimum of 72 semester hours beyond the Bachelor degree.
D. Minor Programs
At least 24 semester hours must be research credits earned
Students may choose a minor program or programs at the
under the supervision of a CSM faculty advisor and at least
PhD level consisting of 12 course credits in the minor pro-
18 credit hours of course work must be applied to the degree
gram. The student's faculty advisor and Doctoral Thesis
program. Course requirements for each department or divi-
Committee, including an appropriate minor committee mem-
sion are contained in the "Graduate Degree Programs and
ber as described below, approve the course selection and se-
Description of Courses" section of this Bulletin.
quence in the selected minor program. Students may choose
The degree also requires completion of a satisfactory doc-
to complete multiple minor programs. Each program must
toral thesis and successful oral defense of this thesis. The
consist of at least 12 credit hours approved by the faculty ad-
Doctoral Thesis is expected to report on original research
visor and Doctoral Thesis Committee, including the appro-
that results in a significant contribution of new knowledge
priate minor committee members.
and/or techniques. The student’s faculty advisor and the Doc-
E. Doctoral Thesis Committees
toral Thesis Committee must approve the program of study
The Graduate Dean appoints a Doctoral Thesis Committee
and the topic for the thesis.
whose members have been recommended by the student’s
Doctoral students must complete at least two semesters of
home department or division. Students should have a thesis
full-time residence at CSM (as defined in the Registration
committee appointed by the end of their second semester.
and Residency section above) during the course of their grad-
This Committee must have a minimum of five voting mem-
uate studies.
bers that fulfill the following criteria:
B. Transfer of Credits
1. The Committee must include an advisor who is assigned
Up to 24 semester hours of graduate-level course work
responsibility for directing the research. If two advisors
may be transferred from other institutions toward the PhD
are appointed, they both shall be considered co-advisors
degree subject to the restriction that those courses must not
and shall be voting members of the Committee.
have been used as credit toward a Bachelor degree. Requests
2. Either the advisor or at least one co-advisor must be a
for transfer credit must be approved by the faculty according
full-time permanent faculty member in the home de-
to a process defined by the student’s home department or di-
partment, division or program in order to ensure com-
vision. Transfer credits are not included in calculating the
pliance with degree requirements.
student’s grade point average at CSM.
3. The Committee must have at least four other voting
In lieu of transfer credit for individual courses, students
members in addition to the advisor and co-advisors,
who enter the PhD program with a thesis-based master de-
and a majority of the voting members (including the
gree from another institution may transfer up to 36 semester
advisor or co-advisors) must be full-time permanent
hours in recognition of the course work and research com-
CSM faculty members.
pleted for that degree. The request must be approved by the
4. At least two of the “additional” committee members
faculty according to a process defined by the student’s home
must be knowledgeable in the technical areas of the
department or division.
thesis, and at least one of them must be a member of
C. Faculty Advisor Appointments
the student’s home or allied department, division or
Each doctoral student must select a faculty advisor to ad-
program.
vise with respect to the student’s thesis direction and research
5. If a minor field is designated, the third "additional"
and selection of courses by the middle of their second semes-
committee member must be an expert in that field. In
ter at CSM. The faculty advisor will serve as a voting mem-
the case of an interdisciplinary degree, the third com-
ber of the student’s Doctoral Thesis Committee. The student’s
mittee member must be an expert in one of the fields
40
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007-2008

represented in the research. Minor representatives
one week after the start of classes of their first semester in
must be full-time members of the CSM faculty. If mul-
order to allow them to add/drop courses as necessary. Each
tiple minor programs are bing pursued, each must have
program also defines the process for determining whether its
a committee representative as defined above.
students have demonstrated adequate preparation for, and
6. The fourth “additional” committee member must be
have satisfactory ability to do, high-quality, independent doc-
from outside the home and allied departments or divi-
toral research in their specialties. These requirements and
sions and the minor field if applicable.
processes are described under the appropriate program head-
ings in the section of this Bulletin on Graduate Degree Pro-
7. If off-campus members are nominated for voting status,
grams and Description of Courses.
the committee request form must include a brief resume
of their education and/or experience that demonstrates
Upon completion of these requirements, students must
their competence to judge the quality and validity of
submit an Admission to Candidacy form documenting satis-
the thesis. Such members also must agree to assume
factory completion of the prerequisite and core curriculum
the same responsibilities expected of on-campus
requirements and granting permission to begin doctoral re-
Committee members including, but not limited to,
search. The form must have the written approval of all mem-
attendance at Committee meetings, review of thesis
bers of the Ph.D. Committee.
proposals and drafts, and participation in oral exami-
G. Thesis Defense
nations and defenses.
The doctoral thesis must be based on original research
A Thesis Committee Chairperson is designated by the stu-
of excellent quality in a suitable technical field, and it must
dent at the time he/she requests the formation of his/her the-
exhibit satisfactory literary merit. In addition, the format of
sis committee. The chairperson is responsible for leading all
the thesis must comply with guidelines promulgated by the
meetings of the thesis committee and for directing the stu-
Office of Graduate Studies. (Students should obtain a copy
dent's thesis defense. In selecting a Thesis Committee chair-
of these guidelines from the Office of Graduate Studies be-
person, the following guidelines must be met: 1) the
fore beginning work on the thesis.)
chairperson cannot be the student's advisor or co-advisor, 2)
The thesis topic must be submitted in the form of a written
the chairperson must be a full-time CSM faculty member,
proposal to the student’s faculty advisor and the Committee.
and 3) the chairperson must be from outside the student's
The Committee must approve the proposal at least one year
home department, division or program and, if possible,
before the thesis defense.
should not be a representative of a minor program of study.
The student’s faculty advisor is responsible for supervising
Shortly after its appointment, the Doctoral Thesis Commit-
the student’s research work and consulting with other Doc-
tee meets with the student to hear a presentation of the pro-
toral Thesis Committee members on the progress of the
posed course of study and thesis topic. The Committee and
work. The advisor must consult with the Committee on any
student must agree on a satisfactory program. The student’s
significant change in the nature of the work. The student sub-
faculty advisor then assumes the primary responsibility for
mits an initial draft of his or her thesis to the advisor, who
monitoring the program, directing the thesis work, arranging
will work with the student on necessary revisions. Upon ap-
qualifying examinations, and scheduling the thesis defense.
proval of the student’s advisor, the revised thesis is distrib-
F. Admission to Candidacy
uted to the other members of the Committee at least one
Full-time students must complete the following require-
week prior to the oral defense of the thesis.
ments within the first two calendar years after enrolling into
The student must pass an oral defense of his or her thesis
the PhD program.
during the final semester of studies. Students must be regis-
u have a thesis committee appointment form on file in
tered to defend. This oral defense may include an examina-
the Graduate Office;
tion of material covered in the student’s course work. The
defense will be open to the public.
u complete all prerequisite and core curriculum course
requirements of their department, division or program;
Following the defense, the Doctoral Thesis Committee
will meet privately to vote on whether the student has suc-
u demonstrate adequate preparation for, and satisfactory
cessfully defended the thesis. Three outcomes are possible:
ability to conduct, doctoral research; and
the student may pass the oral defense; the student may fail
u be admitted into full candidacy for the degree.
the defense; or the Committee may vote to adjourn the de-
Each degree program publishes a list of prerequisite and
fense to allow the student more time to address and remove
core curriculum requirements for that degree. If students are
weaknesses or inadequacies in the thesis or underlying re-
admitted with deficiencies, the appropriate department heads,
search. Two negative votes will constitute a failure regardless
division directors or program directors will provide the stu-
of the number of Committee members present at the thesis
dents written lists of courses required to remove the deficien-
defense. In the event of either failure or adjournment, the
cies. These lists will be given to the students no later than
Chair of the Doctoral Thesis Committee will prepare a writ-
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
41

ten statement indicating the reasons for this action and will
Once an application package has been completed and sub-
distribute copies to the student, the Thesis Committee mem-
mitted to the IIG Coordinator, it will be circulated for com-
bers, the student’s department head and the Graduate Dean.
mentary to the student’s existing home department or
In the case of failure, the student may request a re-examina-
division (if the student is already enrolled in a CSM graduate
tion, which must be scheduled no less than one week after
program) and to the departments or divisions of the potential
the original defense. A second failure to defend the thesis sat-
co-advisors. For currently enrolled students, advisors and
isfactorily will result in the termination of the student’s grad-
home department heads or division directors may veto an IIG
uate program.
application.
Upon passing the oral defense of thesis, the student must
The application package together with commentary from
make any corrections in the thesis required by the Doctoral
the relevant departments or divisions is then forwarded to the
Thesis Committee. The final, corrected copy and an executed
IIG Studies Committee, which is chaired by the IIG Coordi-
signature page indicating approval by the student’s advisor
nator. Admissions decisions made by the IIG Studies Com-
and department head must be submitted to the Office of
mittee take into account the following considerations:
Graduate Studies for format approval.
1. the interdisciplinary scope of the proposal,
IV. Individualized, Interdisciplinary
2. the relation of the program to the Mines mission,
Graduate Degrees1
3. educational and research resources at Mines,
A. General
4. the quality of the proposed course of study and re-
In addition to its traditional graduate degree programs,
search,
CSM offers students the opportunity to earn research degrees
by solving problems that fit Mines’ institutional role and mis-
5. the qualifications of the student, and
sion but would not easily be addressed solely within a single
6. the recommendations of the department heads or divi-
discipline or existing degree program. Each student in the
sion directors.
Individualized, Interdisciplinary Graduate (IIG) Program
C. Graduation Requirements
will work with faculty advisors from two departments or
Candidates for IIG degrees must meet all graduation re-
divisions at Mines, and the composition of the thesis com-
quirements in the general section of the CSM Graduate Bul-
mittee will reflect the fields involved in the research. Upon
letin. During their course of study they must also participate
satisfactory completion of the program, they will be awarded
in a required interdisciplinary seminar. In addition, as a con-
the appropriate degree (MS, ME, or PhD) bearing the name
dition of their endorsement of admission to the IIG program,
Interdisciplinary.
the heads or directors of both departments or divisions may
B. Admission Process
recommend that the candidates be required to meet some or
Before applying, prospective candidates for IIG degrees
all of their department or division requirements. The IIG
should meet with the IIG Program Coordinator to explore the
Thesis Committee will nevertheless make the final decision
match between their interdisciplinary interests and existing
on the course of study for each student, taking into consider-
programs available on campus. The IIG Coordinator will
ation the department or division recommendations and the
provide feedback with recommendations about the applica-
technical content of the proposed research program.
tion. However, it is the responsibility of the student to seek
D. Transfer Credits
out faculty members willing to serve as co-advisors and other
Transfer of credits from other institutions will be allowed
members of a potential thesis committee.
as indicated in the section of this Bulletin for the equivalent
An application package will include a cover page listing
disciplinary degree (MS, ME or PhD), except that approval
the potential thesis committee, a summary of the proposed
authority shall rest with the IIG Thesis Committee.
research and course of study, along with a justification for
E. Minor Programs
how this research and course of study fits with the Mines
A minor program is not required for an IIG degree.
scope, mission, and resources (Further specifications are
available from the IIG Coordinator). If the student is not al-
F. Thesis Advisors
ready enrolled in a graduate program at CSM, the application
Each IIG program student must have two co-advisors. At
package must also include the standard application for ad-
least one co-advisor must be a full-time member of the CSM
mission to the Graduate School. It is also customary to have
faculty holding the rank of professor, associate professor, as-
a provisional meeting of the thesis committee as part of the
sistant professor, research professor, associate research pro-
application development process.
fessor, or assistant research professor. With the approval of
the Dean of Graduate Studies, the other co-advisor may be
from outside CSM.
1Degree program is currently under review. No new ad-
missions are being accepted at this time.
42
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007-2008

G. Thesis Committees
4. Early assignment of graduate advisors permits students
The Dean of Graduate Studies will appoint a Thesis Com-
to plan optimum course selection and scheduling in
mittee based on recommendations from the student and the
order to complete their graduate program quickly.
director of the IIG program. The composition, authority and
5. Early acceptance into a Combined Degree Program
operation of the Committee will be as indicated in the Board-
leading to a Graduate Certificate, Professional Mas-
approved policy available from the Graduate Office.
ter’s Degree, or Non-Thesis Master’s Degree assures
H. Admission to Candidacy
students of automatic acceptance into full graduate
Requirements and procedures for admission to candidacy
status if they maintain good standing while in early-
will be as indicated in the section of this Bulletin for the
acceptance status.
equivalent disciplinary degree.
6. In many cases, students will be able to complete both
I. Thesis Defense
Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees in five years of total
Requirements and procedures for defense of thesis will be
enrollment at CSM.
as indicated in the section of this Bulletin for the equivalent
Certain graduate programs may allow Combined Degree
disciplinary degree.
Program students to fulfill part of the requirements of their
J. For More Information
graduate degree by including up to six hours of specified
For more information about admission or requirements, or
course credits which also were used in fulfilling the require-
for the name of the IIG Coordinator, contact the Graduate
ments of their undergraduate degree. These courses may only
Office at grad-school@mines.edu or 303-273-3248.
be applied toward fulfilling Master's degree requirements be-
yond the institutional minimum Master's degree requirement
V. Combined Undergraduate/Graduate
of 30 credit hours. Courses must meet all requirements for
Degree Programs
graduate credit, but their grades are not included in calculat-
A. Overview
ing the graduate GPA. Check the departmental section of the
Many degree programs offer CSM undergraduate students
Bulletin to determine which programs provide this opportu-
the opportunity to begin work on a Graduate Certificate,
nity.
Professional Master’s Degree, or Master’s Degree while
B. Admission Process
completing the requirements for their Bachelor’s Degree.
A student interested in applying into a graduate degree
These combined Bachelors-Masters programs have been
program as a Combined Degree Program student should first
created by CSM faculty in those situations where they have
contact the department or division hosting the graduate de-
deemed it academically advantageous to treat BS and MS
gree program into which he/she wishes to apply. Initial in-
degree programs as a continuous and integrated process.
quiries may be made at any time, but initial contacts made
These are accelerated programs that can be valuable in fields
soon after completion of the first semester, Sophomore year
of engineering and applied science where advanced educa-
are recommended. Following this initial inquiry, departments/
tion in technology and/or management provides the opportu-
divisions will provide initial counseling on degree applica-
nity to be on a fast track for advancement to leadership
tion procedures, admissions standards and degree completion
positions. These programs also can be valuable for students
requirements.
who want to get a head start on graduate education.
Admission into a graduate degree program as a Combined
The combined programs at CSM offer several advantages
Degree Program student can occur as early as the first semes-
to students who choose to enroll in them:
ter, Junior year, and must be granted no later than the end of
1. Students can earn a graduate degree in their undergrad-
registration, last semester Senior year. Once admitted into a
uate major or in a field that complements their under-
graduate degree program, students may enroll in 500-level
graduate major.
courses and apply these directly to their graduate degree. To
apply, students must submit the standard graduate application
2. Students who plan to go directly into industry leave
package for the graduate portion of their Combined Degree
CSM with additional specialized knowledge and skills
Program. Upon admission into a graduate degree program,
which may allow them to enter their career path at a
students are assigned graduate advisors. Prior to registration
higher level and advance more rapidly. Alternatively,
for the next semester, students and their graduate advisors
students planning on attending graduate school can get
should meet and plan a strategy for completing both the
a head start on their graduate education.
undergraduate and graduate programs as efficiently as pos-
3. Students can plan their undergraduate electives to sat-
sible. Until their undergraduate degree requirements are com-
isfy prerequisites, thus ensuring adequate preparation
pleted, students continue to have undergraduate advisors in
for their graduate program.
the home department or division of their Bachelor’s Degrees.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
43

C. Requirements
D. Enrolling in Graduate Courses as a Senior in a
Combined Degree Program students are considered under-
Combined Program
graduate students until such time as they complete their
As described in the Undergraduate Bulletin, seniors may
undergraduate degree requirements. Combined Degree Pro-
enroll in 500-level courses. In addition, undergraduate sen-
gram students who are still considered undergraduates by this
iors who have been granted admission through the Combined
definition have all of the privileges and are subject to all ex-
Degree Program into thesis-based MS degree programs may,
pectations of both their undergraduate and graduate programs.
with graduate advisor approval, register for 700-level research
These students may enroll in both undergraduate and gradu-
credits appropriate to Masters-level degree programs. With
ate courses (see section D below), may have access to depart-
this single exception, while a Combined Degree Program
mental assistance available through both programs, and may
student is still completing his/her undergraduate degree, all
be eligible for undergraduate financial aid as determined by
of the conditions described in the Undergraduate Bulletin for
the Office of Financial Aid. Upon completion of their under-
undergraduate enrollment in graduate-level courses apply.
graduate degree requirements, a Combined Degree Program
700-level research credits are always applied to a student’s
student is considered enrolled full-time in his/her graduate
graduate degree program. If an undergraduate Combined
program. Once having done so, the student is no longer eligi-
Degree Program student would like to enroll in a 500-level
ble for undergraduate financial aid, but may now be eligible
course and apply this course to his/her graduate degree,
for graduate financial aid. To complete their graduate degree,
he/she must notify the Registrar of the intent to do so at the
each Combined Degree Program student must register as a
time of enrollment in the course. The Registrar will forward
graduate student for at least one semester.
this information to Financial Aid for appropriate action. If
Once fully admitted into a graduate program, under-
prior consent is not received, all 500-level graduate courses
graduate Combined Program students must maintain good
taken as an undergraduate Combined Degree Program stu-
standing in the Combined Program by maintaining a mini-
dent will be applied to the student’s undergraduate degree
mum semester GPA of 3.0 in all courses taken. Students not
transcript.
meeting this requirement are deemed to be making unsatis-
factory academic progress in the Combined Degree Program.
Students for whom this is the case are subject to probation
and, if occurring over two semesters, subject to discretionary
dismissal from the graduate portion of their program as de-
fined in the Unsatisfactory Academic Performance section of
this Bulletin.
Upon completion of the undergraduate degree requirements,
Combined Degree Program students are subject to all require-
ments (e.g., course requirements, departmental approval of
transfer credits, research credits, minimum GPA, etc.) appro-
priate to the graduate program in which they are enrolled.
44
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007-2008

Graduate Degree Programs and
Description of Courses
In addition to the general degree requirements described in
Prerequisites:
the previous pages, the following specific department, divi-
The program outlined here assumes that the candidate for
sion, or program requirements must also be met:
an advanced degree has a background in chemistry, mathe-
Chemical Engineering
matics, and physics equivalent to that required for the B.S.
JAMES F. ELY, Professor and Head of Department
degree in Chemical Engineering at the Colorado School of
ANTHONY M. DEAN,W. K. Coors Distinguished Professor
Mines. Undergraduate course deficiencies must be removed
JOHN R. DORGAN, Professor
prior to enrollment in graduate coursework.
DAVID W. M. MARR, Professor
The essential undergraduate courses include ChEN201,
J. THOMAS MCKINNON, Professor
ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN357, ChEN375, and ChEN418.
RONALD L. MILLER, Professor
E. DENDY SLOAN, Jr., Weaver Distinguished Professor
Required Curriculum:
J. DOUGLAS WAY, Professor
Master of Science Program:
ANDREW M. HERRING, Associate Professor
Students entering the Master of Science (with thesis) pro-
CAROLYN A. KOH, Associate Professor
gram with an acceptable undergraduate degree in chemical
COLIN A. WOLDEN, Associate Professor
engineering are required to take a minimum of 18 semester
DAVID T. WU, Associate Professor (also Chemistry)
hours of coursework. All students must complete the four
SUMIT AGARWAL, Assistant Professor
chemical engineering core graduate courses (ChEN507,
MATTHEW W. LIBERATORE, Assistant Professor
TRACY Q. GARDNER, Lecturer
ChEN509, ChEN516, and ChEN518) and an additional six
JOHN M. PERSICHETTI, Lecturer
hours of approved electives. Student must take a minimum of
ROBERT J. EVANS, Research Professor
6 research credits. In addition, students must take a mini-
MICHAEL FRENKEL, Research Professor
mum of 6 research credits, complete, and defend an accept-
ROBERT D. KNECHT, Research Professor, Director of EPICS
able Masters dissertation. Between coursework and research
ANGEL ABBUD-MADRID, Research Associate Professor
credits a student must earn a minimum of 30 total semester
HANS HEINRICH-CARSTENSEN, Research Associate Professor
hours. Full-time Masters students must enroll in graduate
SERGEI KISELEV, Research Associate Professor
colloquium (ChEN605) each semester that they are in resi-
KELLY T. MILLER, Research Associate Professor
dence.
GLENN MURRAY, Research Assistant Professor
JOHN OAKEY, Research Assistant Professor
Students entering the Master of Science (non-thesis) pro-
BRIAN OPANSKY, Research Assistant Professor
gram with an acceptable undergraduate degree in chemical
WAYNE ROMONCHUK, Research Assistant Professor
engineering are required to take a minimum of 30 semester
EUN-JAE SHIN, Research Assistant Professor
hours of coursework. All students must complete the four
BERTHE STEMPFER, Research Assistant Professor
chemical engineering core graduate courses (ChEN507,
PAUL M. THOEN, Research Assistant Professor
ChEN509, ChEN516, and ChEN518) and at least an addi-
ROBERT M. BALDWIN, Professor Emeritus
tional 18 hours of approved electives. Students may complete
ANNETTE L. BUNGE, Professor Emeritus
an acceptable engineering report for up to six hours of aca-
JAMES H. GARY, Professor Emeritus
JOHN O. GOLDEN, Professor Emeritus
demic credit. Full-time Masters students must enroll in grad-
ARTHUR J. KIDNAY, Professor Emeritus
uate colloquium (ChEN605) each semester they are in
VICTOR F. YESAVAGE, Professor Emeritus
residence.
CSM undergraduates enrolled in the combined BS/MS de-
Degrees Offered:
gree program must meet the requirements described above
Master of Science (Chemical Engineering)
for the MS portion of their degree (both thesis and non-the-
Doctor of Philosophy (Chemical Engineering)
sis). Students accepted into the combined program may take
Program Description:
graduate coursework and/or research credits as an undergrad-
The program of study for an advanced degree in chemical
uate and have them applied to their MS degree.
engineering is selected by the student in consultation with
Doctor of Philosophy Program:
his/her advisor and with the approval of the thesis committee.
The course of study for the Ph.D. degree consists of a min-
Upon approval of the thesis committee, graduate credit may
imum of 30 semester hours of coursework. All Ph.D. students
be earned for selected 400-level courses. All full-time gradu-
must complete the four core courses (ChEN507, ChEN509,
ate students are required to enroll for colloquium (ChEN605)
ChEN518, and ChEN516) and an additional 18 hours of ap-
for each semester that they are in residence at CSM.
proved electives. Students are required to complete a minor
Program Requirements:
in a discipline outside of the department (minimum of 12 se-
See Required Curriculum below.
mester hours of graduate coursework). In addition, students
must complete and defend an acceptable Doctoral disserta-
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
45

tion. Full-time Ph.D. students must enroll in graduate collo-
student must submit a written request for postponement that
quium (ChEN605) each semester they are in residence.
describes the circumstances and proposes a new date. Requests
Students in the Ph.D. program are required to pass both a
for postponement must be presented to the thesis committee
Qualifying Exam and the Ph.D. Proposal Defense. These re-
no later than two weeks before the end of the semester in
quirements are described below:
which the exam would normally have been taken.
Ph.D. Qualifying Examination
Description of Courses
The Ph.D. qualifying examination will be offered twice
ChEN402. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN Process
each year, at the start and end of the Spring semester. All
simulation and process optimization. Prerequisite: ChEN201,
students who have entered the Ph.D. program must take the
ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN357, ChEN375, ChEN418, or con-
qualifying examination at the first possible opportunity. A
sent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
student may retake the examination once if he/she fails the
ChEN403. PROCESS DYNAMICS AND CONTROL Mathe-
first time; however, the examination must be retaken at the
matical modeling and analysis of transient systems. Applications
next regularly scheduled examination time. Failure of the
of control theory to response of dynamic chemical engineering
Ph.D. qualifying examination does not disqualify a student
systems and processes. Prerequisite: ChEN307, ChEN308,
for the M.S. degree, although failure may affect the student’s
ChEN375, MATH225, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
financial aid status.
semester hours.
The qualifying examination will cover the traditional areas
ChEN408. NATURAL GAS PROCESSING Application of
of Chemical Engineering, and will consist of two sections: a
chemical engineering principles to the processing of natural gas.
written section and an oral section. The written section will
Emphasis on using thermodynamics and mass transfer opera-
contain six questions, three at the undergraduate level (cover-
tions to analyze existing plants. Relevant aspects of computer-
ing fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and mass transfer/material
aided process simulation. Prerequisites: ChEN201, ChEN307,
and energy balances) and three at the graduate level (cover-
ChEN308, ChEN357, ChEN375, or consent of instructor. 3
ing applied engineering mathematics, reaction kinetics, and
hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
thermodynamics). The qualifying examination is open-book
ChEN409. PETROLEUM PROCESSES Application of chemi-
and students are free to use any reference books or course
cal engineering principles to petroleum refining. Thermodynam-
notes during the written examination. The oral examination
ics and reaction engineering of complex hydrocarbon systems.
will consist of a presentation by the student on a technical
Relevant aspects of computer-aided process simulation for com-
paper from the chemical engineering literature. Students will
plex mixtures. Prerequisite: CHGN221, CHGN351 and 353,
choose a paper in one of four areas (thermodynamics, kinetics,
ChEN201, ChEN357, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
transport, and materials) from a list determined by the faculty.
semester hours.
The student is required to present an oral critique of the
paper of approximately 20 minutes followed by questions
ChEN415. POLYMER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
from the faculty. Papers for the oral examination will be dis-
Chemistry and thermodynamics of polymers and polymer solu-
tributed well in advance of the oral portion of the exam so
tions. Reaction engineering of polymerization. Characterization
students have sufficient time to prepare their presentations.
techniques based on solution properties. Materials science of
polymers in varying physical states. Processing operations for
Ph.D. Proposal Defense
polymeric materials and use in separations. Prerequisite:
After passing the Qualifying Exam, all Ph.D. candidates
CHGN221, MATH225, ChEN357, or consent of instructor. 3
are required to prepare a detailed written proposal on the sub-
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ject of their Ph.D. research topic. An oral examination con-
sisting of a defense of the thesis proposal must be completed
ChEN416. POLYMER ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY
within approximately one year of passing the Qualifying
Polymer fluid mechanics, polymer rheological response, and
Examination. Written proposals must be submitted to the
polymer shape forming. Definition and measurement of material
student’s thesis committee no later than one week prior to
properties. Interrelationships between response functions and
the scheduled oral examination.
correlation of data and material response. Theoretical approaches
for prediction of polymer properties. Processing operations for
Two negative votes from the doctoral committee members
polymeric materials; melt and flow instabilities. Prerequisite:
are required for failure of the Ph.D. Proposal Defense. In the
ChEN307, MATH225, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
case of failure, one re-examination will be allowed upon peti-
semester hours.
tion to the Department Head. Failure to complete the Ph.D.
Proposal Defense within the allotted time without an approved
ChEN418. REACTION ENGINEERING Applications of the
postponement will result in failure. Under extenuating cir-
fundamentals of thermodynamics, physical chemistry, and or-
cumstances a student may postpone the exam with approval
ganic chemistry to the engineering of reactive processes. Reactor
of the Graduate Affairs committee, based on the recommen-
design; acquisition and analysis of rate data; heterogeneous
dation of the student’s thesis committee. In such cases, a
catalysis. Relevant aspects of computer-aided process simula-
46
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

tion. Prerequisite: ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN357, MATH225,
algebra, ordinary differential equations, and special emphasis on
CHGN221, CHGN353, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture;
partial differential equations. Emphasis on application of numer-
3 semester hours.
ical methods to chemical engineering problems which cannot be
ChEN420. MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN CHEMICAL EN-
solved by analytical methods. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
GINEERING Formulation and solution of chemical engineering
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
problems using exact analytical solution methods. Set-up and so-
ChEN507. APPLIED MATHEMATICS IN CHEMICAL ENGI-
lution of ordinary and partial differential equations for typical
NEERING This course stresses the application of mathematics
chemical engineering systems and transport processes. Prerequi-
to problems drawn from chemical engineering fundamentals
site: MATH225, ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN375, or consent of
such as material and energy balances, transport phenomena and
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
kinetics. Formulation and solution of ordinary and partial differ-
ChEN421. ENGINEERING ECONOMICS Economic analysis
ential equations arising in chemical engineering or related
of engineering processes and systems. Interest, annuity, present
processes or operations are discussed. Mathematical approaches
value, depreciation, cost accounting, investment accounting and
are restricted to analytical solutions or techniques for producing
financing of engineering enterprises along with taxation, market
problems amenable to analytical solutions. Prerequisite: Under-
evaluation and break-even analysis. Prerequisite: consent of in-
graduate differential equations course; undergraduate chemical
structor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
engineering courses covering reaction kinetics, and heat, mass
and momentum transfer. 3 hours lecture-discussion; 3 semester
ChEN430. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA Theory and chemical
hours.
engineering applications of momentum, heat, and mass transport.
Set up and solution of problems involving equations of motion
ChEN508. ADVANCED FLUID MECHANICS Development
and energy. Prerequisite: ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN357,
of basic conservation equations for momentum transfer. Consti-
ChEN375, MATH225, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
tutive equations for Newtonian and elementary non-Newtonian
semester hours.
fluids. Exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. Ordering
and approximations. Applications to low and high Reynolds
ChEN440. MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVES IN CHEMICAL
number flows. Prerequisite: ChEN516 or consent of instructor. 3
ENGINEERING Applications of statistical and quantum me-
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
chanics to understanding and prediction of equilibrium and
transport properties and processes. Relations between micro-
ChEN509. ADVANCED CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THER-
scopic properties of materials and systems to macroscopic be-
MODYNAMICS Extension and amplification of undergraduate
havior. Prerequisite: ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN357, ChEN375,
chemical engineering thermodynamics. Topics will include the
CHGN351 and 353, CHGN221 and 222, MATH225, or consent
laws of thermodynamics, thermodynamic properties of pure flu-
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ids and fluid mixtures, phase equilibria, and chemical reaction
equilibria. Prerequisite: ChEN357 or equivalent or consent of in-
Graduate Courses
structor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
500-level courses are open to qualified seniors with permis-
sion of the department and the Dean of the Graduate School.
ChEN510. CHEMICAL REACTOR ANALYSIS AND DESIGN
Non-ideal flow effects on reactor design. Stability of stirred tank
The 600-level courses are open only to students enrolled in
and tubular flow reactors. Mass and heat transfer effects. Model-
the Graduate School.
ing of heterogeneous chemical reactors. Fluidized bed reactors.
ChEN501. ADVANCED HEAT TRANSFER Formulation of
Prerequisite: ChEN418 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
the laws governing the transport of energy. Transient and steady-
hours.
state analysis for heat conduction. The transport of thermal en-
ChEN511. INDIVIDUAL STUDIES Individual theoretical or
ergy in fluids in motion; free and forced convection in laminar
experimental studies under the direction of a department faculty
and turbulent flow over surfaces and within conduits. Prerequi-
member, but not leading to a thesis. Course may be repeated for
site: ChEN516 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture-discus-
credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours;
sion; 3 semester hours.
6 semester hours maximum credit. Repeatable for credit to a
ChEN504. ADVANCED PROCESS ENGINEERING ECO-
maximum of 6 hours.
NOMICS Advanced engineering economic principles applied to
ChEN513. SELECTED TOPICS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEER-
original and alternate investments. Analysis of chemical and pe-
ING Selected topics chosen from special interests of instructor
troleum processes relative to marketing and return on invest-
and students. Course may be repeated for credit on different top-
ments. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
ics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours lec-
semester hours.
ture/discussion; 1 to 3 semester hours.
ChEN505. NUMERICAL METHODS IN CHEMICAL ENGI-
ChEN514. ADVANCED STAGED SEPARATIONS Principles
NEERING Engineering applications of numerical methods. Nu-
of stagewise separations with major emphasis on multicompo-
merical integration, solution of algebraic equations, matrix
nent processes for distillation, absorption, and extraction. Topics
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
47

include brief review of ideal phase separations, classical stage-
ChEN521. CRYOGENIC ENGINEERING Thermodynamic
by-stage multicomponent methods, modern successive approxi-
analysis of cryogenic systems. Survey of the properties of cryo-
mation methods for multicomponents, general short-cut
genic fluids. Analysis of heat transfer, fluid flow, and separation
methods, tray hydraulics and efficiency. Prerequisite: ChEN375
processes at low temperatures. Introduction to superconductivity
or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and superfluidity. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
ChEN515. ADVANCED MASS TRANSFER Fundamental
lecture; 3 semester hours.
principles of mass transfer with application to design of mass
ChEN523. ENGINEERING AND THE ENVIRONMENT Dis-
transfer processes. Theory of diffusion in gases and liquids for
cussion of the many engineering problems that arise when man
single and multicomponent species. Mass transfer in laminar and
interacts with his environment. Comprehensive treatment of top-
turbulent flows. Transport analogies, simultaneous heat and mass
ics such as pollution, thermal pollution, treatment of industrial
transfer, with examples of drying and humidification processes.
and municipal wastes, solid waste treatment, and the disposal of
Mass transfer with chemical reaction; examples of slow, inter-
radioactive wastes. Economic and legislative aspects of these
mediate, and fast reactions with application to design of mass
problems will also be considered. Prerequisite: Consent of in-
contractors. Interfacial mass transfer and mass transfer in two-
structor. 3 semester hours.
phase flows. Design of packed beds and columns, gas-sparged
ChEN524. COMPUTER-AIDED PROCESS SIMULATION
reactors. Prerequisite: Graduate course in transport phenomena
Advanced concepts in computer-aided process simulation are
(ChEN516). 3 hours lecture-discussion; 3 semester hours.
covered. Topics include optimization, heat exchanger networks,
ChEN516. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA Principles of momen-
data regression analysis, and separations systems. Use of indus-
tum, heat, and mass transfer with application to chemical
try-standard process simulation software (Aspen Plus) is
processes. Flow in ducts and around submerged objects. Heat
stressed. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
conduction and molecular diffusion. Convective heat and mass
semester hours.
transfer. Heat- and mass-transfer coefficients. Transport analo-
ChEN525. SELECTED TOPICS IN EMERGING CHEMICAL
gies and correlations. Prerequisite: ChEN507. 3 hours lecture-
ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY An introduction to new
discussion; 3 semester hours.
chemical engineering technologies. Current examples include
ChEN517. PETROLEUM REFINERY PROCESSING Composi-
biotechnology, supercritical fluid extraction and biomedical en-
tion and evaluation of petroleum crude oils and other hydro-
gineering. Emphasis is on providing students with appropriate
carbons. Basic refinery processes, including operating
terminologies, identifying new applications of chemical engi-
conditions, chemical reactions, catalysts, economics, and pollu-
neering principles and potential areas of research. Prerequisite:
tion control. Emphasis on needs for refinery processes, such as:
Consent of instructor. Lecture and/or laboratory; 1 to 3 semester
distillation, desulfurization, coking, solvent extraction, hydrofin-
hours.
ing, hydrocracking, catalytic cracking, reforming, isomerization,
ChEN527. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY This course pro-
polymerization. New process requirements for meeting fuel
vides students the opportunity to explore technical aspects of
specifications. Prerequisite: ChEN409 or consent of instructor. 3
many important recent topics in air pollution. The course in-
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
cludes the chemistry, monitoring, health and environmental ef-
ChEN518. REACTION KINETICS AND CATALYSIS Homo-
fects of air pollution including ozone layer depletion, acid rain,
geneous and heterogeneous rate expressions. Fundamental theo-
and global climate change. Technical aspects of environmental
ries of reaction rates. Analysis of rate data and complex reaction
regulations and policy are included along with interpretation of
networks. Properties of solid catalysts. Mass and heat transfer
laboratory experiments, field measurements, and computer mod-
with chemical reaction. Heterogeneous non-catalytic reactions.
eling. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
Prerequisite: ChEN418 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
mester hours.
hours.
ChEN535/PHGN535/MLGN535. INTERDISCIPLINARY MI-
ChEN519. SYNTHETIC FUEL PROCESSES Processes that
CROELECTRONICS PROCESSING LABORATORY (II) Ap-
generate hydrocarbons from coal, tar sands, and oil shale. Other
plication of science and engineering principles to the design,
energy sources as well as direct conversion processes will also
fabrication, and testing of microelectronic devices. Emphasis on
be considered in view of supply and economics. Prerequisite:
specific unit operations and the interrelation among processing
Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
steps. Consent of instructor 1 hour lecture, 4 hours lab; 3 semes-
ChEN520. THERMODYNAMICS OF PHASE EQUILIBRIA
ter hours.
Application of current theories in multicomponent phase equilib-
ChEN545. SIMULATION AND MODELING IN CHEMICAL
ria to the solution of engineering problems. Topics include: in-
PROCESS INDUSTRIES Application of basic principles of
troduction to the theory of intermolecular forces, theory of
physics, chemistry, transport phenomena and reaction kinetics to
corresponding states, fugacities in gas and liquid mixtures, intro-
real systems. The philosophy of process modeling at different
duction to the theory of liquids. Prerequisite: ChEN509 or con-
levels of complexity is developed and numerous examples based
sent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
48
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

on the chemical process industry and naturally occurring
ChEN604. TOPICAL RESEARCH SEMINARS Lectures, re-
processes are used. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
ports, and discussions on current research in chemical engineer-
lecture; 3 semester hours.
ing, usually related to the student’s thesis topic. Sections are
ChEN550. MEMBRANE SEPARATION TECHNOLOGY This
operated independently and are directed toward different re-
course is an introduction to the fabrication, characterization, and
search topics. Course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite:
application of synthetic membranes for gas and liquid separa-
Consent of instructor. 1 hour lecture-discussion; 1 semester hour.
tions. Industrial membrane processes such as reverse osmosis,
Repeatable for credit to a maximum of 3 hours.
filtration, pervaporation, and gas separations will be covered as
ChEN605. COLLOQUIUM Students will attend a series of lec-
well as new applications from the research literature. The course
tures by speakers from industry, academia, and government. Pri-
will include lecture, experimental, and computational (molecular
mary emphasis will be on current research in chemical
simulation) laboratory components. Prerequisites: ChEN375,
engineering and related disciplines, with secondary emphasis on
ChEN430 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
ethical, philosophical, and career-related issues of importance to
hours.
the chemical engineering profession. Prerequisite: Graduate sta-
ChEN568. INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
tus. 1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour. Repeatable for credit to a
RESEARCH Students will be expected to apply chemical engi-
maximum of 10 hours.
neering principles to critically analyze theoretical and experi-
ChEN607. ADVANCED TOPICS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEER-
mental research results in the chemical engineering literature,
ING MATHEMATICS In-depth analysis of selected topics in
placing it in the context of the related literature. Skills to be de-
applied mathematics with special emphasis on chemical engi-
veloped and discussed include oral presentations, technical writ-
neering applications. Prerequisite: ChEN507 or consent of in-
ing, critical reviews, ethics, research documentation (the
structor. 1 to 3 hours lecture-discussion; 1 to 3 semester hours.
laboratory notebook), research funding, types of research, devel-
ChEN608. ADVANCED TOPICS IN FLUID MECHANICS In-
oping research, and problem solving. Students will use state-of-
depth analysis of selected topics in fluid mechanics with special
the-art tools to explore the literature and develop
emphasis on chemical engineering applications. Prerequisite:
well-documented research proposals and presentations. Prerequi-
ChEN508 or consent of instructor. 1 to 3 hours lecture-
site: Graduate student in Chemical Engineering in good standing
discussion; 1 to 3 semester hours.
or consent of instructor. 3 semester hours.
ChEN609. ADVANCED TOPICS IN THERMODYNAMICS
ChEN584. (CHGN584). FUNDAMENTALS OF CATALYSIS
Advanced study of thermodynamic theory and application of
The basic principles involved in the preparation, charac-
thermodynamic principles. Possible topics include stability, criti-
terization, testing and theory of heterogeneous and homogeneous
cal phenomena, chemical thermodynamics, thermodynamics of
catalysts are discussed. Topics include chemisorption, adsorption
polymer solutions and thermodynamics of aqueous and ionic so-
isotherms, diffusion, surface kinetics, promoters, poisons, cata-
lutions. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester
lyst theory and design, acid base catalysis and soluble transition
hours.
metal complexes. Examples of important industrial applications
are given. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
ChEN610. APPLIED STATISTICAL THERMODYNAMICS
semester hours.
Principles of relating behavior to microscopic properties. Topics
include element of probability, ensemble theory, application to
ChEN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
gases and solids, distribution theories of fluids, and transport
Pilot course of special topics course. Topics chosen from special
properties. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is of-
semester hours.
fered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit;
1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.
ChEN611. APPLIED STATISTICAL MECHANICS Con-
tinuation of ChEN610. Advanced applications of statistical ther-
ChEN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY Individual research or
modynamics and statistical mechanics including perturbation
special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also,
and integral equation theory, computer simulation and theory of
when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content,
electrolytes. Introduction to theory of nonequilibrium systems
and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form must
including Chapman-Enskog, Brownian motion and time correla-
be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to
tion functions. Prerequisite: ChEN610 or equivalent; ChEN507
6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
or equivalent; ChEN509. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ChEN601. ADVANCED TOPICS IN HEAT TRANSFER In-
ChEN612. ADVANCED INDIVIDUAL STUDIES Advanced
depth analysis of selected topics in heat transfer with special em-
theoretical or experimental studies on chemical engineering sub-
phasis on chemical engineering applications. Prerequisite:
jects not currently covered in other department courses. Course
ChEN501 or consent of instructor. 1 to 3 hours lecture-
may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1
discussion; 1 to 3 semester hours.
to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit to a maximum of 6
hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
49

ChEN615. ADVANCED TOPICS IN MASS TRANSFER In-
ChEN698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
depth analysis of selected topics in mass transfer with special
Pilot course of special topics course. Topics chosen from special
emphasis on chemical engineering applications. Possible topics
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Prerequisite: Instructor
include ion-exchange or adsorption chromatography, theories of
consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for
interfacial mass transfer, mass transfer with reaction, and simul-
credit under different titles.
taneous heat and mass transfer. Prerequisite: Graduate mass
ChEN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY Individual research or
transfer course (ChEN515). 1 to 3 hours lecture-discussion; 1 to
special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also,
3 semester hours.
when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content,
ChEN618. ADVANCED TOPICS IN REACTION KINETICS
and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form must
Fundamental theories of reaction rates. Basic principles of chem-
be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to
ical kinetics in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems. Reac-
6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
tions in solution, reactions on surfaces, and composite reactions.
ChEN705. GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT: MASTER OF
Homogeneous catalysis, and isotope effects in reaction dynam-
SCIENCE Research credit hours required for completion of the
ics. Photochemical reactions. Prerequisite: Graduate reaction en-
degree Master of Science - thesis. Research must be carried out
gineering course (ChEN518). 1 to 3 hours lecture-discussion; 1
under the direct supervision of the graduate student’s faculty ad-
to 3 semester hours.
visor. Repeatable for credit.
ChEN625/CHGN625/MLGN625. MOLECULAR SIMULA-
ChEN706. GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT: DOCTOR OF
TION Principles and practice of modern computer simulation
PHILOSOPHY Research credit hours required for completion
techniques used to understand solids, liquids, and gases. Review
of the degree Doctor of Philosophy. Research must be carried
of the statistical foundation of thermodynamics followed by in-
out under direct supervision of the graduate student’s faculty ad-
depth discussion of Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics tech-
visor. Repeatable for credit.
niques. Discussion of intermolecular potentials, extended
ensembles, and mathematical algorithms used in molecular sim-
SYGN600. FUNDAMENTALS OF COLLEGE TEACHING
ulations. ChEN509 or equivalent; ChEN610 or equivalent rec-
Principles of learning and teaching in a college setting. Methods
ommended. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
to foster and assess higher order thinking. Effective design, de-
livery, and assessment of college courses or presentations. Pre-
ChEN690. SUPERVISED TEACHING OF CHEMICAL ENGI-
requisite: Graduate standing, or consent of instructor. 2 semester
NEERING Individual participation in teaching activities. Dis-
hours.
cussion, problem review and development, guidance of
laboratory experiments, course development, supervised practice
teaching. Course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Gradu-
ate standing, appointment as a graduate student instructor, or
consent of instructor. 6 to 10 hours supervised teaching; 2 se-
mester hours.
50
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

Chemistry and Geochemistry
that program. Undergraduate deficiencies will be established
DANIEL M. KNAUSS, Professor and Interim Department Head
through interviews and/or placement examinations at the be-
PAUL W. JAGODZINSKI, Professor
ginning of the student’s first semester of graduate work.
PATRICK MACCARTHY, Professor
Prerequisites:
KENT J. VOORHEES, Professor
SCOTT W. COWLEY, Associate Professor
A candidate for an advanced degree in the chemistry pro-
MARK E. EBERHART, Associate Professor
gram should have completed an undergraduate program in
KEVIN W. MANDERNACK, Associate Professor
chemistry which is essentially equivalent to that offered by
JAMES F. RANVILLE, Associate Professor
the Department of Chemistry & Geochemistry at the Colo-
RYAN RICHARDS, Associate Professor
rado School of Mines. A candidate for an advanced degree in
E. CRAIG SIMMONS, Associate Professor
Geochemistry should have completed an undergraduate de-
BETTINA M. VOELKER, Associate Professor
gree in chemistry or geology which is equivalent to that re-
KIM R. WILLIAMS, Associate Professor
quired for a bachelor’s degree from an accredited university.
DAVID T. WU, Associate Professor
Deficiencies in one or both of these areas will be determined
STEPHEN G. BOYES, Assistant Professor
on an individual basis.
STEVEN F. DEC, Lecturer
BRAD HERRICK, Lecturer
Required Curriculum:
EDWARD A. DEMPSEY, Instructor
Chemistry:
RAMON E. BISQUE, Professor Emeritus
A student in the chemistry program, in consultation with
STEPHEN R. DANIEL, Professor Emeritus
the advisor and thesis committee, selects the program of
DEAN W. DICKERHOOF, Professor Emeritus
study. Initially, before a thesis advisor and thesis committee
KENNETH W. EDWARDS, Professor Emeritus
GEORGE H. KENNEDY, Professor Emeritus
have been chosen, the student is advised by the Graduate
RONALD W. KLUSMAN, Professor Emeritus
Affairs Committee in the Department of Chemistry & Geo-
DONALD LANGMUIR, Professor Emeritus
chemistry. The following four graduate courses are desig-
GEORGE B. LUCAS, Professor Emeritus
nated as core courses in the Department of Chemistry and
DONALD L. MACALADY, Professor Emeritus
Geochemistry: CHGN502 (inorganic), CHGN503 (physical),
MICHAEL J. PAVELICH, Professor Emeritus
CHGN505 (organic), and CHGN507 (analytical).
MAYNARD SLAUGHTER, Professor Emeritus
M.S. Degree (chemistry, thesis option): The program of
THOMAS R. WILDEMAN, Professor Emeritus
JOHN T. WILLIAMS, Professor Emeritus
study includes the four core courses: (CHGN502, CHGN503,
ROBERT D. WITTERS, Professor Emeritus
CHGN505, and CHGN507), the M.S.-level seminar
CHARLES W. STARKS, Associate Professor Emeritus
(CHGN560), research, and the preparation and oral defense
Degrees Offered:
of an MS thesis based on the student’s research. Students
must be enrolled in CHGN560 for each Fall and Spring
Master of Science (Chemistry; thesis and non-thesis option)
semester that they are in residence at CSM. A minimum of
Doctor of Philosophy (Applied Chemistry)
36 semester hours, including at least 24 semester hours of
Master of Science (Geochemistry; thesis)
course work, are required. At least 15 of the required 24 se-
mester hours of course work must be taken in the Department
Professional Masters in Environmental Geochemistry
of Chemistry & Geochemistry at CSM. The student’s thesis
(non-thesis)
committee makes decisions on transfer credit. Up to 9 semes-
Doctor of Philosophy (Geochemistry)
ter hours of graduate courses may be transferred from other
All graduate degree programs in the Department of Chem-
institutions, provided that those courses have not been used
istry & Geochemistry have been admitted to the Western
as credit toward a Bachelor degree.
Regional Graduate Program (WICHE). This program allows
Research-Intensive MS Degree: CSM undergraduates who
residents of Alaska, Arizona, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada,
enter the graduate program through the combined BS/MS
New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah,
program may use this option (thesis-based MS) to acquire a
Washington, and Wyoming to register at Colorado resident
research-intensive MS degree by minimizing the time spent
tuition rates.
on coursework. This option requires a minimum of 12 hours
Program Description:
of coursework up to six hours of which may be double
The Department of Chemistry & Geochemistry offers grad-
counted from the student's undergraduate studies at CSM.
uate degrees in chemistry and in geochemistry. For students
Undergraduate courses that are eligible for dual counting to-
entering the Chemistry Program, undergraduate deficiencies
ward the M.S. degree in this option are: CHGN401,
will be determined by faculty in the Department of Chemistry
CHGN410, CHGN403, CHGN422, CHGN428, CHGN430,
& Geochemistry. Faculty from the Geochemistry Program
CHGN475 and CHGN498 (with approval of faculty advisor
will determine undergraduate deficiencies of students entering
and committee). Any 500 level lecture course taken as an un-
dergraduate may also be counted as part of the six hours that
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
51

can be double counted from the undergraduate program (with
at CSM. The Ph.D.-level seminar must be based on the stu-
approval of faculty advisor and committee).
dent’s Ph.D. research and must include detailed research
M.S. Degree (chemistry, non-thesis option): The non-
findings and interpretation thereof. This CHGN 660 seminar
thesis M.S. degree requires 36 semester hours of course
must be presented close to, but before, the student’s oral de-
credit, composed of 30 semester hours of course work and
fense of the thesis. The minor requirement consists of a mini-
6 hours of independent study. The program of study includes
mum of 12 hours of graduate courses intended to provide a
the four core courses: (CHGN502, CHGN503, CHGN505,
breadth of knowledge in support of the student’s principal re-
and CHGN507), the M.S.-level seminar (CHGN560), inde-
search interests. The minor may comprise courses taken:
pendent study on a topic determined by the student and the
(i) solely within the Department of Chemistry & Geochem-
student’s faculty advisor, and the preparation of a report
istry, (ii) solely within another department or division out-
based on the student’s study topic. Students must be enrolled
side of the Department of Chemistry & Geochemistry, or
in CHGN560 for each Fall and Spring semester that they are
(iii) from a combination of departments/divisions, including
in residence at CSM. At least 21 of the required 36 semester
transfer credit from another institution. In all cases the minor
hours of course work must be taken as a registered master’s
must constitute a coherent set of courses that supports, and
degree student at CSM. The student’s committee makes deci-
adds breadth to, the student’s principal research interests. Up
sions on courses to be taken, transfer credit, and examines
to two, but no more than two, of the core courses may, with
the student’s written report. Up to 15 semester hours of grad-
thesis committee approval, be used to fulfill the minor re-
uate courses may be transferred from other institutions, pro-
quirement. The student’s thesis committee must approve the
vided that those courses have not been used as credit toward
combination of courses that constitutes the minor. The com-
a Bachelor degree.
prehensive examination comprises a written non-thesis pro-
posal wherein the student prepares an original proposal on a
CSM undergraduates may use the non-thesis option as part
chemistry topic distinctly different from the student’s princi-
of a combined B.S./M.S. program in chemistry and count six
pal area of research. The student must orally defend the non-
hours from their undergraduate studies toward the M.S. de-
thesis proposal before the thesis committee. The non-thesis
gree. The undergraduate courses that are eligible for dual
proposal requirement must be completed prior to the end of
counting toward the M.S. degree are: CHGN401, CHGN410,
the student’s second year of graduate studies. A student’s the-
CHGN403, CHGN422, CHGN428, CHGN430, CHGN475,
sis committee may, at its discretion, require additional com-
and CHGN498 (with approval of faculty advisor and com-
ponents to the comprehensive examination process such as
mittee). Any 500 level lecture course taken as an undergradu-
inclusion of cumulative examinations, or other examinations.
ate may also be counted as part of the six hours from the
undergraduate program.
Geochemistry:
The program of study is selected by the student in con-
Ph.D. Degree (Applied Chemistry): The program of
sultation with his or her advisor and thesis committee. Stu-
study for the Ph.D. degree in Applied Chemistry includes
dents entering with backgrounds in chemistry will take more
at least three of the departmental core courses (CHGN502,
coursework in geology to strengthen their backgrounds in
CHGN503, CHGN505, and CHGN507), the M.S.-level
this discipline; the converse is true for students with a back-
seminar (CHGN560), the Ph.D.-level seminar (CHGN660),
ground in geology. Deficiencies are determined at an entrance
a minor, a comprehensive examination, research, and the
interview by members of the Geochemistry faculty. A thesis
preparation and oral defense of a Ph.D. thesis based on the
is required for the M.S. degree and a dissertation for the Ph.D.
student’s research. The total hours of course work required
for the Ph.D. degree is determined on an individual basis by
The Geochemistry program comprises a core group of
the student’s thesis committee. Up to 24 semester hours of
courses, required of all students unless individually exempted
graduate-level course work may be transferred from other
by the “Committee of the Whole” based on previous back-
institutions toward the Ph.D. degree provided that those
ground. The core courses for M.S. students are CHGC503 -
courses have not been used by the student toward a Bache-
Introduction to Geochemistry, CHGC504 - Methods in Geo-
lor’s degree. The student’s thesis committee may set addi-
chemistry, and a one hour laboratory course selected from
tional course requirements and will make decisions on
several available. In addition, M.S. degree students must take
requests for transfer credit. Ph.D. students may base their
two courses selected from the following list;
M.S.-level seminar on any chemistry-related topic including
CHGC509/GEGN509 - Introduction to Aqueous Geochem-
the proposed thesis research. The M.S.-level seminar require-
istry, CHGC610 - Nuclear and Isotopic Geochemistry,
ment must be completed no later than the end of the student’s
CHGN503 Advanced Physical Chemistry, GEOL512 - Min-
second year of graduate studies at CSM. After completion of
eralogy and Crystal Chemistry. Ph.D. degree students must
the CHGN560 seminar, students must enroll in CHGN660.
take four core courses CHGC503, CHGC504, CHGN503,
Students must be enrolled in either CHGN560 or CHGN660
and a one hour laboratory course, and two additional courses
for each Fall and Spring semester that they are in residence
selected from the list in the previous sentence.
52
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

The doctoral student’s dissertation committee approves the
individual, but may be tailored to professional objectives.
number of course and research credits required for graduation,
Up to 15 of the 36 credits may be transfer-credit. The transfer
as well as the specific courses beyond the above requirements.
limit includes CSM distance learning courses. No fewer than
The Ph.D. in Geochemistry requires a minimum of 72 credit
21 credits must be earned on campus. Up to six of these
hours, of which at least 24 hours must be research credit. Up
credit hours may be in the form of project credits performed
to 24 hours of course credits may be transferred from previ-
on the job as an employee or as a graduate intern. If project
ous graduate-level work, upon approval of the dissertation
credits are to be used, the project proposal and final report
committee. Research credits may not be transferred. Stu-
must be approved by a CSM faculty advisor. Direct supervi-
dents who enter the Ph.D. program with a thesis-based mas-
sion may be provided by the employer.
ter degree from another institution may transfer up to 36
CSM students who intend to follow the BS/MS format for
semester hours, upon approval of the dissertation committee,
this degree may tdouble count 6 credits of 400-level or above
in recognition of the course work and research completed for
courses (with grades of B or higher) taken as part of their un-
that degree.
dergraduate curriculum, provided those courses:
Professional Masters Degree in Environmental
u fit into the overall professional objectives of the
Geochemistry (non-thesis)
individual;
The Professional Masters Degree in Environmental Geo-
chemistry is a custom-designed, interdisciplinary degree, with
u complement the course program below; and,
a curriculum that is intended to meet the career advancement
u meet the approval of the Geochemistry Committee of
needs of professional geochemists. This degree, which is ad-
the Whole.
ministered through the Geochemistry Program, is intended
No more than 9 credit hours of 400-level courses may be
for two classes of students:
included in the 36 hour minimum credit requirement.
u CSM undergraduate students who wish to continue at
A 17 credit-hour core program for this degree consists of:
CSM for an additional year beyond their baccalaureate
degree as part of a Combined BS/MS Degree program;
CHGC505 Introduction to Environmental Chemistry
and
(3 hrs, Fall)
GEGN467* Ground-Water Engineering (4 hrs, Fall)
u Individuals who already hold an appropriate undergrad-
CHGC503 Introduction to Geochemistry (4 hrs, Fall)
uate or advanced degree (from any institution) and are
GEGN509 Aqueous Geochemistry (3 hrs, Fall)
interested in a geochemistry graduate program that
GEOL530 Clay Characterization (1 hr, Fall)
does not have the traditional research requirement.
CHGC504 Methods in Geochemistry (2 hrs, Spring)
The program consists primarily of coursework in geo-
*If this course is transferred from the undergraduate pro-
chemistry and allied fields, with an emphasis on environmen-
gram, an advanced hydrogeology course may be substituted
tal applications. No research is required though the program
from the list below.
does allow for independent study, professional development,
internship and coop experience.
An additional 12 credit-hours of course work must be se-
lected from the following list.
Application to Professional M.S. Degree Program in
Environmental Geochemistry
CHGC530 Environmental Chemistry and Geochemistry
Undergraduate students at CSM who are interested in this
(3 hrs, Spring)
program must declare an interest during their third year at
CHGC555 Environmental Organic Chemistry (3 hrs, Spring)
CSM to allow for planning of coursework that will apply
CHGC562 Microbiology and the Environment (3 hrs, Spring)
towards the program; these students must have an overall
CHGC563 Environmental Microbiology Laboratory
GPA of at least 3.0. Students majoring in other departments
(2 hrs, Fall)
besides Chemistry & Geochemistry and Geology & Geologi-
CHGC564 Biogeochemistry and Geomicrobiology (3 hrs, Fall)
cal Engineering may want to decide on the BS/MS option
CHGC610 Nuclear and Isotopic Geochemistry (3 hrs, Spring)
earlier to ensure that prerequisites are satisfied. Applicants
CHGC640 Soil Gas Geochemistry (3 hrs, Spring)
other than CSM undergraduates who are applying for the
CHGN503 Advanced Physical Chemistry (3 hrs, Fall)
Professional M.S. in Environmental Geochemistry must follow
GEGN527 Organic Geochemistry of fossil fuels & ore deposits
the same procedures that all prospective graduate students fol-
(3hrs, Spring)
low; however, the requirement of the general GRE may be
GEGN532 Geological Data Analysis (3 hrs, Fall)
waived.
GEGN575 Applications of Geographic Information Systems
(3 hrs, Spring)
A minimum of 36 credit hours are required, with an over-
GEGN581 Advanced Ground-Water Engineering (3 hrs, Fall)
all GPA of at least 3.0 in CSM coursework. The overall
GEGN582 Contaminant Hydrogeology (3 hrs, Spring) –
course requirements will depend on the background of the
proposed
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
53

GEGN583 Mathematical Modeling of Ground-Water Systems
Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity of inorganic and
(3 hrs, Spring)
organometallic complexes with regard to bonding, struc-
GEGN681 Vadose Zone Hydrology (3 hrs, Spring)
ture, and catalysis.
GEGN683 Advanced Ground- Water Modeling (3 hrs, Spring)
Description of Courses
GEOL512 Mineralogy and Crystal Chemistry (3 hrs, Fall)
CHGN401. THEORETICAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (II)
GEOL684 Chemical Modeling of Aqueous Systems
Periodic properties of the elements. Bonding in ionic
(3 hrs, Spring)
and metallic crystals. Acid-base theories. Inorganic stereochem-
GXGN571 Geochemical Exploration (3 hrs, Fall and Spring)
istry. Nonaqueous solvents. Coordination chemistry and ligand
An additional 7 credit-hours of free electives may be se-
field theory. Prerequisite: CHGN341 or consent of instructor. 3
lected to complete the 36 total credit-hour requirement. Free
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
electives may be selected from the list above, and may also
CHGN402. BONDING THEORY AND SYMMETRY (II) In-
be independent study credits (CHGN599, GEGN599 or
troduction to valence bond and molecular orbital theories, sym-
GEOL599) taken to fulfill a research, cooperative, or other
metry; introduction to group theory; applications of group theory
professional development experience. A course program will
and symmetry concepts to molecular orbital
be designed in advance through consultation between the stu-
and ligand field theories. Prerequisite: CHGN401 or consent of
dent and an advisor from the Geochemistry Committee of the
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Whole.
CHGN410/MLGN510. SURFACE CHEMISTRY (II) Introduc-
Fields of Research:
tion to colloid systems, capillarity, surface tension and contact
Heterogeneous catalysis, surface chemistry.
angle, adsorption from solution, micelles and microemulsions,
Organic and analytical chemistry of hydrocarbon fuels; envi-
the solid/gas interface, surface analytical techniques, van der
ronmental analytical chemistry of organic compounds;
Waal forces, electrical properties and colloid stability, some spe-
coordination chemistry with organic ligands.
cific colloid systems (clays, foams and emulsions). Students en-
Theoretical and descriptive inorganic chemistry; bonding and
rolled for graduate credit in MLGN510 must complete a special
symmetry; chemistry of materials; use of computers in
project. Prerequisite: DCGN209 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
chemistry.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
Applied aspects of trace element, environmental, and aqueous
CHGN422. POLYMER CHEMISTRY LABORATORY (I) Pre-
geochemistry.
requisites: CHGN221. 3 hours lab; 1 hour credit.
Applications of soil gas to petroleum and mineral exploration
CHGN428. INTRODUCTORY BIOCHEMISTRY (I) Introduc-
and environmental problems; water quality and modeling
tory study of the major molecules of biochemistry, including
of biogeochemical processes in constructed wetlands used
amino acids, proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, lipids, and sac-
for treatment of acid drainage; sampling design in large-
charides- their structure, chemistry, biological function, and
scale environmental studies.
biosynthesis. Stresses bioenergetics and the cell as a biological
unit of organization. Discussion of classical genetics, molecular
Environmental microbiology, biogeochemistry of aquatic and
genetics, and protein synthesis. Prerequisite: CHGN221 or per-
terrestrial environment, stable isotope geochemistry.
mission of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Peat and humic substances; analytical chemistry. Geochem-
CHGN430/MLGN530. INTRODUCTION TO POLYMER SCI-
istry of igneous rocks; associated ore deposits.
ENCE (I) An introduction to the chemistry and physics of macro-
Polymer synthesis and characterization, thermal stability,
molecules. Topics include the properties and statistics of polymer
thermal degradation mechanisms of polymers; mass spec-
solutions, measurements of molecular weights, molecular weight
troscopy; chemometrics and chromatography.
distributions, properties of bulk polymers, mechanisms of polymer
Development and evaluation of teaching methods that foster
formation, and properties of thermosets and thermoplasts includ-
higher-level thinking abilities.
ing elastomers. Prerequisite: CHGN221 or permission of instruc-
tor. 3 hour lecture, 3 semester hours.
Chemistry and geochemistry of pollutant organics in aqueous
systems; chemical and physical transformations of such
CHGN475. COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY (II) Pre-
pollutants; surface interactions in aqueous systems.
requisites: CHGN351, CHGN402. 3 hours lecture; 3 credit
hours.
Theory and simulation of complex materials including poly-
mers and powders, complex fluids, phase equilibria, con-
CHGN490. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION (S)
trolled self-assembly.
Advanced methods of organic and inorganic synthesis; high-tem-
perature, high-pressure, inert-atmosphere, vacuum-line, and elec-
Separations; field flow fractionation; polymer, colloid, and
trolytic methods. Prerequisites: CHGN323, CHGN341. 6-week
particulate characterization; new separation surfaces.
summer field session; 6 credit hours.
Computational methods for design of materials.
54
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

CHGN495. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (I, II, S) Indi-
techniques focus on standard methods for the measurement of
vidual research project under direction of a member of the De-
inorganic and organic constituents in water samples. Methods of
partmental faculty. Prerequisites: Completion of chemistry
data analysis are also presented. Prerequisite: Introductory
curriculum through the junior year or permission of the depart-
chemistry or consent of instructor. 3 hours laboratory; 1 semester
ment head. 1-6 credit hours.
hour.
CHGN497. INTERNSHIP (I, II, S) Individual internship experi-
CHGN507. ADVANCED ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY (I) Re-
ence with an industrial, academic, or governmental host super-
view of fundamentals of analytical chemistry. Literature of ana-
vised by a Departmental faculty member. Prerequisites:
lytical chemistry and statistical treatment of data. Manipulation
Completion of chemistry curriculum through the junior year or
of real substances; sampling, storage, decomposition or dissolu-
permission of the department head. 1-6 credit hours.
tion, and analysis. Detailed treatment of chemical equilibrium as
CHGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (I, II) Topics
related to precipitation, acid-base, complexation and redox titra-
chosen from special interests of instructor and students. Prerequi-
tions. Potentiometry and UV-visible absorption spectrophotome-
site: Consent of head of department. 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeat-
try. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
able for credit under different titles.
semester hours.
CHGN499. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (I, II) Individ-
CHGN508. ANALYTICAL SPECTROSCOPY (II) Detailed
ual investigational problems under the direction of members of
study of classical and modern spectroscopic methods; emphasis
the chemistry staff. Written report on research required for
on instrumentation and application to analytical chemistry prob-
credit. Prerequisite: Consent of head of department. 1 to 3 se-
lems. Topics include: UV-visible spectroscopy, infrared spec-
mester hours. Repeatable for credit.
troscopy, fluorescence and phosphorescence, Raman
spectroscopy, arc and spark emission spectroscopy, flame meth-
Graduate Courses
ods, nephelometry and turbidimetry, reflectance methods,
The following courses are offered at the graduate level. They
Fourier transform methods in spectroscopy, photoacoustic spec-
will be given if sufficient qualified students register. Some 500-
troscopy, rapid-scanning spectroscopy. Prerequisite: Consent of
level courses are open to qualified seniors with the permission of
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate
the department and Dean of the Graduate School. 600-level
years.
courses are open only to students enrolled in the Graduate
School. Geochemistry courses are listed after Chemistry courses.
CHGN510. CHEMICAL SEPARATIONS (II) Survey of separa-
tion methods, thermodynamics of phase equilibria, thermody-
Chemistry Courses
namics of liquid-liquid partitioning, various types of
CHGN502. ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (II) De-
chromatography, ion exchange, electrophoresis, zone refining,
tailed examination of topics such as ligand field theory, reaction
use of inclusion compounds for separation, application of sepa-
mechanisms, chemical bonding, and structure of inorganic com-
ration technology for determining physical constants, e.g., stabil-
pounds. Emphasis is placed on the correlations of the chemical
ity constants of complexes. Prerequisite: CHGN507 or consent of
reactions of the elements with periodic trends and reactivities.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
years.
hours.
CHGN515/MLGN503. CHEMICAL BONDING IN MATERI-
CHGN503. ADVANCED PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I (I)
ALS (I) Introduction to chemical bonding theories and calcula-
Quantum chemistry of classical systems. Principles of chemical
tions and their applications to solids of interest to materials
thermodynamics. Statistical mechanics with statistical calcula-
science. The relationship between a material’s properties and the
tion of thermodynamic properties. Theories of chemical kinetics.
bonding of its atoms will be examined for a variety of materials.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester
Includes an introduction to organic polymers. Computer pro-
hours.
grams will be used for calculating bonding parameters. Prerequi-
CHGN505. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (I)
site: Consent of department. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Detailed discussion of the more important mechanisms of
CHGN523/MLGN509. SOLID STATE CHEMISTRY (I) De-
organic reaction. Structural effects and reactivity. The applica-
pendence of properties of solids on chemical bonding and struc-
tion of reaction mechanisms to synthesis and structure proof.
ture; principles of crystal growth, crystal imperfections,
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
reactions and diffusion in solids, and the theory of conductors
hours.
and semiconductors. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
CHGN506. WATER ANALYSIS LABORATORY (I) Instrumen-
lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
tal analysis of water samples using spectroscopy and chromatog-
CHGN536/MLGN536. ADVANCED POLYMER SYNTHESIS
raphy. Methods for field collection of water samples and field
(II) An advanced course in the synthesis of macromolecules.
measurements. The development of laboratory skills for the use
Various methods of polymerization will be discussed with an
of ICP-AES, HPLC, ion chromatography, and GC. Laboratory
emphasis on the specifics concerning the syntheses of different
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
55

classes of organic and inorganic polymers. Prerequisite:
CHGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (I, II) Pilot
CHGN430, ChEN415, MLGN530 or consent of instructor. 3
course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special inter-
hours lecture, 3 semester hours
ests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered
CHGN560. GRADUATE SEMINAR, M.S. (I, II) Required for
only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6
all candidates for the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in chemistry and
credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.
geochemistry. M.S. students must register for the course during
CHGN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual research
each semester of residency. Ph.D. students must register each se-
or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member,
mester until a grade is received satisfying the prerequisites for
also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter,
CHGN660. Presentation of a graded non-thesis seminar and at-
content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study”
tendance at all departmental seminars are required. Prerequisite:
form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable
Graduate student status. 1 semester hour.
credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
CHGN580/MLGN501. STRUCTURE OF MATERIALS (II)
CHGN660. GRADUATE SEMINAR, Ph.D. (I, II) Required of
Application of X-ray diffraction techniques for crystal and mo-
all candidates for the doctoral degree in chemistry or geochem-
lecular structure determination of minerals, inorganic and
istry. Students must register for this course each semester after
organometallic compounds. Topics include the heavy atom
completing CHGN560. Presentation of a graded nonthesis semi-
method, data collection by moving film techniques and by dif-
nar and attendance at all department seminars are required. Pre-
fractometers, Fourier methods, interpretation of Patterson maps,
requisite: CHGN560 or equivalent. 1 semester hour.
refinement methods, direct methods. Prerequisite: Consent of in-
CHGN698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (I, II) Pilot
structor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate
course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special inter-
years.
ests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered
CHGN581. ELECTROCHEMISTRY (I) Introduction to theory
only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6
and practice of electrochemistry. Electrode potentials, reversible
credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.
and irreversible cells, activity concept. Interionic attraction the-
CHGN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual research
ory, proton transfer theory of acids and bases, mechanisms and
or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member,
fates of electrode reactions. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3
also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter,
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study”
CHGN583/MLGN583. PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS
form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable
OF SURFACE ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES (II) Instrumental
credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
techniques for the characterization of surfaces of solid materials;
CHGN705. GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT: MASTER OF
Applications of such techniques to polymers, corrosion, metal-
SCIENCE Research credit hours required for completion of the
lurgy, adhesion science, microelectronics. Methods of analysis
degree Master of Science - thesis. Research must be carried out
discussed: x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), auger elec-
under the direct supervision of the graduate student’s faculty ad-
tron spectroscopy (AES), ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS), sec-
visor. Repeatable for credit.
ondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), Rutherford
backscattering (RBS), scanning and transmission electron mi-
CHGN706. GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT: DOCTOR OF
croscopy (SEM, TEM), energy and wavelength dispersive x-ray
PHILOSOPHY Research credit hours required for completion
analysis; principles of these methods, quantification, instrumen-
of the degree Doctor of Philosophy. Research must be carried
tation, sample preparation. Prerequisite: B.S. in Metallurgy,
out under direct supervision of the graduate student’s faculty ad-
Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Physics, or consent of in-
visor. Repeatable for credit.
structor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
SYGN600. FUNDAMENTALS OF COLLEGE TEACHING
CHGN584/ChEN584. FUNDAMENTALS OF CATALYSIS (II)
Principles of learning and teaching in a college setting. Methods
The basic principles involved in the preparation, characteriza-
to foster and assess higher order thinking. Effective design, de-
tion, testing and theory of heterogeneous and homogeneous cata-
livery, and assessment of college courses or presentations. Pre-
lysts are discussed. Topics include chemisorption, adsorption
requisite: Graduate standing, or consent of instructor. 2 semester
isotherms, diffusion, surface kinetics, promoters, poisons, cata-
hours.
lyst theory and design, acid base catalysis and soluble transition
Geochemistry Courses
metal complexes. Examples of important industrial applications
CHGC503. INTRODUCTION TO GEOCHEMISTRY (I)
are given. Prerequisite: CHGN222 or consent of instructor. 3
A comprehensive introduction to the basic concepts and princi-
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ples of geochemistry, coupled with a thorough overview of the
CHGN585. CHEMICAL KINETICS (II) Study of kinetic phe-
related principles of thermodynamics. Topics covered include:
nomena in chemical systems. Attention devoted to various theo-
nucleosynthesis, origin of earth and solar system, chemical
retical approaches. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
bonding, mineral chemistry, elemental distributions and geo-
lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
chemical cycles, chemical equilibrium and kinetics, isotope sys-
56
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

tematics, and organic and biogeochemistry. Prerequisite: Intro-
CHGC527/GEGN527. ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY OF FOS-
ductory chemistry, mineralogy and petrology, or consent of in-
SIL FUELS AND ORE DEPOSITS (II) A study of organic car-
structor. 4 hours lecture, 4 semester hours.
bonaceous materials in relation to the genesis and modification
CHGC504. METHODS IN GEOCHEMISTRY (II) Sampling of
of fossil fuel and ore deposits. The biological origin of the or-
natural earth materials including rocks, soils, sediments, and wa-
ganic matter will be discussed with emphasis on contributions of
ters. Preparation of naturally heterogeneous materials, diges-
microorganisms to the nature of these deposits. Biochemical and
tions, and partial chemical extractions. Principles of instrumental
thermal changes which convert the organic compounds into pe-
analysis including atomic spectroscopy, mass separations, and
troleum, oil shale, tar sand, coal and other carbonaceous matter
chromatography. Quality assurance and quality control. Interpre-
will be studied. Principal analytical techniques used for the char-
tation and assessment of geochemical data using statistical meth-
acterization of organic matter in the geosphere and for evaluation
ods. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geochemistry or
of oil and gas source potential will be discussed. Laboratory ex-
environmental science and engineering. 2 hours lecture; 2 se-
ercises will emphasize source rock evaluation, and oil-source
mester hours.
rock and oil-oil correlation methods. Prerequisite: CHGN221,
GEGN438, or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab;
CHGC505. INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL
3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
CHEMISTRY (II) Processes by which natural and anthro-
pogenic chemicals interact, react, and are transformed and redis-
CHGC530. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY AND GEO-
tributed in various environmental compartments. Air, soil, and
CHEMISTRY (II) Mobility of the elements in air, water and the
aqueous (fresh and saline surface and groundwaters) environ-
surficial environment. Geochemical cycles of elements and con-
ments are covered, along with specialized environments such as
stituents of environmental interest. Plant composition, animal and
waste treatment facilities and the upper atmosphere. Meets with
human health in relation to the natural environment. Acid depo-
CHGN403. CHGN403 and CHGC505 may not both be taken for
sition and other processes affecting water quality. Environmental
credit. Prerequisites: SYGN101, CHGN 124 and DCGN209 or
aspects of fossil fuel processing. Sampling design in large scale
permission of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
environmental studies. Prerequisite: CHGC503 or ESGN500 and
ESGN501. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CHGC506. WATER ANALYSIS LABORATORY (I) Instrumen-
tal analysis of water samples using spectroscopy and chromatog-
CHGC555. ENVIRONMENTAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (II)
raphy. Methods for field collection of water samples and field
A study of the chemical and physical interactions which deter-
measurements. The development of laboratory skills for the use
mine the fate, transport and interactions of organic chemicals in
of ICP-AES, HPLC, ion chromatography, and GC. Laboratory
aquatic systems, with emphasis on chemical transformations of
techniques focus on standard methods for the measurement of
anthropogenic organic contaminants. Prerequisites: A course in
inorganic and organic constituents in water samples. Methods of
organic chemistry and CHGN503, Advanced Physical Chemistry
data analysis are also presented. Prerequisite: Introductory chem-
or its equivalent, or consent
istry, graduate standing or consent of instructor. 3 hour labora-
of instructor. Offered in alternate years. 3 hours lecture;
tory, 1 semester hour.
3 semester hours.
CHGC509/GEGN509. INTRODUCTION TO AQUEOUS GEO-
CHGC562/CHGN462. MICROBIOLOGY AND THE ENVI-
CHEMISTRY (I) Analytical, graphical and interpretive methods
RONMENT This course will cover the basic fundamentals of
applied to aqueous systems. Thermodynamic properties of water
microbiology, such as structure and function of procaryotic ver-
and aqueous solutions. Calculations and graphical expression of
sus eucaryotic cells; viruses; classification of micro-organisms;
acid-base, redox and solution-mineral equilibria. Effect of tem-
microbial metabolism, energetics, genetics, growth and diversity;
perature and kinetics on natural aqueous systems. Adsorption
microbial interactions with plants, animals, and other microbes.
and ion exchange equilibria between clays and oxide phases. Be-
Additional topics covered will include various aspects of envi-
havior of trace elements and complexation in aqueous systems.
ronmental microbiology such as global biogeochemical cycles,
Application of organic geochemistry to natural aqueous systems.
bioleaching, bioremediation, and wastewater treatment. Prereq-
Light stable and unstable isotopic studies applied to aqueous sys-
uisite: ESGN301 or consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 se-
tems. Prerequisite: DCGN209 or equivalent, or consent of
mester hours. Offered alternate years.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CHGC563. ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY (I)
CHGC511. GEOCHEMISTRY OF IGNEOUS ROCKS (II) A
An introduction to the microorganisms of major geochemical
survey of the geochemical characteristics of the various types of
importance, as well as those of primary importance in water pol-
igneous rock suites. Application of major element, trace element,
lution and waste treatment. Microbes and sedimentation, micro-
and isotope geochemistry to problems of their origin and modifi-
bial leaching of metals from ores, acid mine water pollution, and
cation. Prerequisite: Undergraduate mineralogy and petrology or
the microbial ecology of marine and freshwater habitats are cov-
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered
ered. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours
alternate years.
lab; 2 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
57

CHGC564. BIOGEOCHEMISTRY AND GEOMICRO-
Economics and Business
BIOLOGY (I) Designed to give the student an understanding of
RODERICK G. EGGERT, Professor and Division Director
the role of living things, particularly microorganisms,
JOHN T. CUDDINGTON, William J. Coulter Professor
in the shaping of the earth. Among the subjects will be the as-
CAROL A. DAHL, Professor
pects of living processes, chemical composition and characteris-
GRAHAM A. DAVIS, Professor
tics of biological material, origin of life, role of microorganisms
MICHAEL R. WALLS, Professor
in weathering of rocks and the early diagenesis of sediments, and
ALEXANDRA M. NEWMAN, Associate Professor
the origin of petroleum, oil shale, and coal. Prerequisite: Consent
EDWARD J. BALISTRERI, Assistant Professor
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CIGDEM Z. GURGUR, Assistant Professor
MICHAEL B. HEELEY, Assistant Professor
CHGC610. NUCLEAR AND ISOTOPIC GEOCHEMISTRY
DANIEL KAFFINE, Assistant Professor
(II) A study of the principles of geochronology and stable iso-
SCOTT HOUSER, Lecturer
tope distributions with an emphasis on the application of these
JOHN M. STERMOLE, Lecturer
principles to important case studies in igneous petrology and the
ANN DOZORETZ, Instructor
formation of ore deposits. U, Th, and Pb isotopes, K-Ar, Rb-Sr,
FRANKLIN J. STERMOLE, Professor Emeritus
oxygen isotopes, sulfur isotopes, and carbon isotopes included.
JOHN E. TILTON, University Emeritus Professor
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
ROBERT E. D. WOOLSEY, Professor Emeritus
hours Offered alternate years.
Degrees Offered:
CHGC640. SOIL GAS GEOCHEMISTRY AND APPLI-
Master of Science (Mineral Economics)
CATIONS IN THE EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL
Doctor of Philosophy (Mineral Economics)
SCIENCES (II) Thermal, chemical and microbiological
Master of Science (Engineering and Technology
reactions in the production of gases. Quantitative review of
Management)
transport of gaseous species in the saturated and unsaturated
zones. Sampling and analysis of soil gases. Applications of soil
Mineral Economics Program Description:
gas in the earth and environmental sciences, including explo-
In an increasingly global and technical world, government
ration, contaminant mapping and global climate change. Prereq-
and industry leaders in the mineral and energy areas require a
uisites: CHGC503, or ESGN500 and ESGN501, or consent of
strong foundation in economic and business skills. The Divi-
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
sion of Economics and Business offers such skills in unique
programs leading to M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Mineral Eco-
CHGC699A. SELECTED TOPICS IN GEOCHEMISTRY (I, II)
nomics. Course work and research in Mineral Economics
Detailed study of a geochemical topic under direction of a mem-
emphasize the application of economic principles and busi-
ber of the staff. Work on the same or a different topic may be
ness methods to mineral, energy, and related environmental
continued through later semesters and additional credits earned.
and technological issues.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
Students in the Mineral Economics Program select from
CHGC699B. SPECIAL TOPICS IN AQUEOUS AND SEDI-
one of two areas of specialization: Economics and Public
MENTARY GEOCHEMISTRY (I, II) Detailed study of a spe-
Policy (E&PP) or Quantitative Business Methods/Operations
cific topic in the area of aqueous or sedimentary geochemistry
Research (QBM/OR). The E&PP specialization focuses on
under the direction of a member of the staff. Work on the same
the optimal use of scarce energy and mineral resources with a
or a different topic may be continued through later semesters and
global perspective. It provides institutional knowledge coupled
additional credits earned. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to
with economics, mathematical and statistical tools to analyze
3 semester hours.
and understand how the world of energy and minerals works
CHGC699C. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ORGANIC AND BIOGEO-
to guide and shape industry change. The QBM/OR special-
CHEMISTRY (I, II) Detailed study of a specific topic in the
ization emphasizes the application of quantitative business
areas of organic geochemistry or biogeochemistry under the di-
methods such as optimization, simulation, decision analysis,
rection of a member of the staff. Work on the same or a different
and project management to minerals and energy related
topic may be continued through later semesters and additional
manufacturing, exploration, resource allocation, and other
credits earned. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semes-
decision-making processes.
ter hours.
Fields of Research
CHGC699D. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PETROLOGIC GEO-
Faculty members carry out applied research in a variety of
CHEMISTRY (I, II) Detailed study of a specific topic in the
areas including international trade, resource economics, envi-
area of petrologic geochemistry under the direction of a member
ronmental economics, industrial organization, metal market
of the staff. Work on the same or a different topic may be contin-
analysis, energy economics, applied microeconomics, applied
ued through later semesters and additional credits earned. Pre-
econometrics, management theory and practice, finance and
requisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
investment analysis, exploration economics, decision analy-
sis, utility theory, and corporate risk policy.
58
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

Mineral Economics Program Requirements:
Transfer Credits
M.S. Degree Students choose from either the thesis or
Non-thesis M.S. students may transfer up to 6 credits
non-thesis option in the Master of Science (M.S.) Program
(9 credits for a thesis M.S.) . The student must have achieved
and are required to complete a minimum total of 36 credits
a grade of B or better in all graduate transfer courses and the
(a typical course has 3 credits). Coursework is valid for
transfer credit must be approved by the student’s advisor and
seven years towards the M.S. degree; any exceptions must be
the Division Director. Students who enter the Ph.D. program
approved by the division director and student advisor.
may transfer up to 24 hours of graduate-level course work
Non-thesis option
from other institutions toward the Ph.D. degree subject to the
18 credits of core courses
restriction that those courses must not have been used as
12 credits from one or both specializations
credit toward a Bachelor degree. The student must have
6 credits of approved electives or a minor from another
achieved a grade of B or better in all graduate transfer
department
courses and the transfer must be approved by the student’s
Doctoral Thesis Committee and the Division Director.
Thesis option
18 credits of core courses
Combined BS/MS Program
12 research credits
Students enrolled in CSM’s Combined Undergraduate/
6 credits from one or both specializations
Graduate Program may double count 6 hours from their
undergraduate course-work towards the non-thesis graduate
Ph.D. Degree. Doctoral students develop a customized
program provided the courses satisfy the M.S. requirements.
curriculum to fit their needs. The degree requires a minimum
of 72 graduate credit hours that includes course work and a
Joint Degrees
thesis. Coursework is valid for ten years towards a Ph.D. de-
The M.S. and Ph.D. degrees may be combined with a joint
gree; any exceptions must be approved by the division direc-
degree program with the Institut Français du Pétrole (IFP) in
tor and student advisor.
Petroleum Economics and Management (see
http://www.ifp.fr)
Course work
24 credits of core courses
The Division of Economic and Business (EB) at the Col-
12 credits from one or both specializations
orado School of Mines (CSM) and the IFP School at the In-
12 credits in a minor
stitut Français du Petrole (IFP), in Paris France, together
offer an advanced collaborative international graduate degree
Research credits
program geared to meet the needs of industry and govern-
24 research credits. The student’s faculty advisor and the
ment. Our unique program trains the next generation of tech-
doctoral thesis committee must approve the student’s pro-
nical, analytical and managerial professionals vital to the
gram of study and the topic for the thesis.
future of the petroleum and energy industries.
Qualifying Examination Process
These two world-class institutions offer a rigorous and
Upon completion of the core course work, students must
challenging program in an international setting. The program
pass qualifying written examinations to become a candidate
gives a small elite group of students a solid economics foun-
for the Ph.D. degree. The qualifying exam is given in two
dation combined with quantitative business skills, the histori-
parts in August. Once qualified, the Ph.D. student is then re-
cal and institutional background, and the interpersonal and
quired to complete an additional written and oral examina-
intercultural abilities to in the fast paced, global world of oil
tion. This exam is prepared and administered by the student’s
and gas.
thesis committee and is generally related to the student’s the-
sis topic and the student’s minor field.
Degrees: After studying in English for only 16 months (8
months at CSM and 8 months at IFP) the successful student
Minor from Another Department
of Petroleum Economics and Management (PEM) receives
Non-thesis M.S. students may apply six elective credits
not 1 but 2 degrees:
towards a nine hour minor in another department. A minor is
ideal for those students who want to enhance or gain knowl-
t
Masters of Science in Mineral Economics from
edge in another field while gaining the economic and busi-
CSM and
ness skills to help them move up the career ladder. For
t
Diplôme D'Ingénieur or Mastère Spécialisé from
example, a petroleum, chemical, or mining engineer might
IFP
want to learn more about environmental engineering, a geo-
Important: Applications for admission to the joint degree
physicist or geologist might want to learn the latest tech-
program should be submitted for consideration by March 1st
niques in their profession, or an economic policy analyst
to begin the program the following fall semester in August. A
might want to learn about political risk. Students should
limited number of students are selected for the program each
check with the minor department for the opportunities and
year.
requirements for a minor.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
59

Prerequisites for the Mineral Economics
EBGN556 Network Models
Programs:
EBGN557 Integer Programming
Students must have completed the following undergradu-
EBGN559 Supply Chain Management
ate prerequisite courses with a grade of B or better:
EBGN560 Decision Analysis
1. Principles of Microeconomics (EBGN311);
EBGN561 Stochastic Models in Management Science
EBGN575 Advanced Mining and Energy Valuation
2. One semester of college-level Calculus (MATH111);
EBGN580 Exploration Economics
3. Probability and Statistics (MATH323 or MATH530)
EBGN690 Advanced Econometrics
Students entering in the fall semester must have completed
2. Ph.D. Curriculum.
the microeconomics and calculus prerequisites prior to start-
a. Common Core Courses (15 credits)
ing the program; probability and statistics must be completed
no later than the first semester of the graduate program. Stu-
EBGN509 Mathematical Economics
dents will only be allowed to enter in the spring semester if
EBGN510 Natural Resource Economics
they have completed all three prerequisites courses previously,
EBGN511 Microeconomics
as well as an undergraduate course in mathematical economics.
EBGN590 Econometrics and Forecasting
EBGN695 Research Methodology
Required Course Curriculum in Mineral
b. Extended Core Courses - Economics (9 credits)
Economics:
All M.S. and Ph.D. students in Mineral Economics are
EBGN512 Macroeconomics
required to take a set of core courses that provide basic tools
EBGN611 Advanced Microeconomics
for the more advanced and specialized courses in the program.
EBGN690 Advanced Econometrics
1. M.S. Curriculum
c. Extended Core Courses - Operations Research
a. Core Courses (18 credits)
(9 credits)
EBGN509 Mathematical Economics
EBGN528 Industrial Systems Simulation
EBGN510 Natural Resource Economics
EBGN555 Linear Programming
EBGN511 Microeconomics
EBGN560 Decision Analysis
EBGN512 Macroeconomics
EBGN525 Operations Research Methods
d. Area of Specialization Courses (12 credits)
EBGN590 Econometrics and Forecasting
Economics & Public Policy
b. Area of Specialization Courses (12 credits for M.S.
EBGN495 Economic Forecasting
non-thesis option or 6 credits for M.S. thesis option)
EBGN530 Economics of International Energy Markets
Economics & Public Policy
EBGN535 Economics of Metal Industries and Markets
EBGN495 Economic Forecasting
EBGN536 Mineral Policies and International Investment
EBGN530 Economics of International Energy Markets
EBGN541 International Trade
EBGN535 Economics of Metal Industries and Markets
EBGN542 Economic Development
EBGN536 Mineral Policies and International Investment
EBGN570 Environmental Economics
EBGN541 International Trade
EBGN610 Advanced Natural Resources
EBGN542 Economic Development
Quantitative Business Methods/Operations Research
EBGN570 Environmental Economics
EBGN504 Economic Evaluation and Investment Decision
EBGN610 Advanced Natural Resources
Methods
EBGN611 Advanced Microeconomics
EBGN505 Industrial Accounting
EBGN690 Advanced Econometrics
EBGN525 Operations Research Methods
Quantitative Business Methods/Operations Research
EBGN528 Industrial Systems Simulation
EBGN504 Economic Evaluation and Investment Decision
EBGN545 Corporate Finance
Methods
EBGN546 Investments and Portfolio Management
EBGN505 Industrial Accounting
EBGN547 Financial Risk Management
EBGN528 Industrial Systems Simulation
EBGN552 Nonlinear Programming
EBGN545 Corporate Finance
EBGN555 Linear Programming
EBGN546 Investments and Portfolio Management
EBGN556 Network Models
EBGN547 Financial Risk Management
EBGN557 Integer Programming
EBGN552 Nonlinear Programming
EBGN559 Supply Chain Management
EBGN555 Linear Programming
EBGN560 Decision Analysis
60
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

EBGN561 Stochastic Models in Management Science
Program “Executive-in-Residence” seminar series during at
EBGN575 Advanced Mining and Energy Valuation
least one semester of their attendance at CSM. The “Execu-
EBGN580 Exploration Economics
tive-in-Residence” series features executives from industry
Engineering and Technology Management
who pass on insight and knowledge to graduate students
Program Description:
preparing for positions in industry. This series facilitates ac-
The Division also offers an M.S. degree in Engineering and
tive involvement in the ETM program by industry executives
Technology Management (ETM). The ETM degree program
through teaching, student advising activities and more. Every
is designed to integrate the technical elements of engineering
fall semester the “Executive-in-Residence will present 5-7
practice with the managerial perspective of modern engineer-
one hour seminars on a variety of topics related to leadership
ing and technology management. A major focus is on the busi-
and strategy in the engineering and technology sectors. In ad-
ness and management principles related to this integration.
dition, all students are required to attend a two-day Commu-
The ETM Program provides the analytical tools and manage-
nications Seminar during their attendance in the ETM
rial perspective needed to effectively function in a highly com-
Program. The seminar will be offered at the beginning of the
petitive and technologically complex business economy.
fall semester. The seminar will provide students a compre-
hensive approach to good quality communication skills, in-
Students in the ETM Program may select from one of two
cluding presentation proficiency, organizational skills,
areas of degree specialization: Operations/Engineering
professional writing skills, meeting management, as well as
Management or Leadership and Strategy. The Operations/
other professional communication abilities. The Communica-
Engineering Management specialization emphasizes valuable
tions Seminar is designed to better prepare students for the
techniques for managing large engineering and technical
ETM learning experience, as well as their careers in industry.
projects effectively and efficiently. In addition, special em-
phasis is given to advanced operations research, optimiza-
Transfer Credits
tion, and decision making techniques applicable to a wide
Students who enter the M.S. in Engineering and Technol-
array of business and engineering problems. The Leadership
ogy Management program may transfer up to 6 graduate
and Strategy specialization teaches the correct match be-
course credits from other educational institutions. The stu-
tween organizational strategies and structures to maximize
dent must have achieved a grade of B or better in all graduate
the competitive power of technology. This specialization has
transfer courses and the transfer credit must be approved by
a particular emphasis on leadership and management issues
the student’s advisor and the Chair of the ETM Program.
associated with the modern business enterprise.
Prerequisites for ETM Program:
Engineering and Technology Management
1. Probability and Statistics (MATH323 or MATH530), and
Program Requirements:
2. Engineering Economics (EBGN321 or EBGN504).
Students choose either the thesis or non-thesis option and
Students not demonstrating satisfactory standing in these
complete a minimum of 30 credit hours. Coursework is valid
areas may be accepted; however, they will need to complete
for seven years towards the M.S. degree in ETM; any excep-
the deficiency prior to enrolling in courses that require these
tions must be approved by the division director and student
subjects as prerequisites. It is strongly suggested that students
advisor.
complete any deficiencies prior to enrolling in graduate
Non-thesis option
degree course work.
18 credits of core courses
Required Curriculum M.S. Degree Engineering
12 credits from one or both specializations
and Technology Management
Thesis option
Thesis and non-thesis students are required to complete the
18 credits of core courses
following 18 hours of core courses:
6 research credits
6 credits from one or both specializations
a. Core Courses (18 credits)
Students must receive approval from their advisor in order
EBGN505 Industrial Accounting
to apply non-EB Division courses towards their ETM degree.
EBGN515 Economics and Decision Making
Thesis students are required to complete 6 credit hours of
EBGN525 Operations Research Methods
thesis credit and complete a Master’s level thesis under the
EBGN545 Corporate Finance
direct supervision of the student’s faculty advisor.
EBGN563 Management of Technology
EBGN585 Engineering and Technology Management Cap-
Further Degree Requirements
stone (to be taken during the final semester of coursework)
All thesis and non-thesis ETM Program students have two
additional degree requirements: (1) the “Executive-in-
Residence” seminar series; and (2) the ETM Communica-
tions Seminar. All students are required to attend the ETM
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
61

b. Areas of Specialization (12 credits required for non-
mineral and energy industries. It requires both analytical as
thesis option or 6 credits required for thesis option)
well as computer solutions. At the end of the course you will
Operations/Engineering Management:
be able to appreciate and apply mathematics for better per-
sonal, economic and business decision making. Prerequisites:
EBGN528 Industrial Systems Simulation
MATH111, EBGN311; or permission of instructor.
EBGN552 Nonlinear Programming
EBGN553 Project Management
EBGN510 NATURAL RESOURCE ECONOMICS The
EBGN555 Linear Programming
threat and theory of resource exhaustion; commodity analysis
EBGN556 Network Models
and the problem of mineral market instability; cartels and the
EBGN557 Integer Programming
nature of mineral pricing; the environment; government in-
EBGN559 Supply Chain Management
volvement; mineral policy issues; and international mineral
EBGN560 Decision Analysis
trade. This course is designed for entering students in mineral
EBGN561 Stochastic Models in Management Science
economics. Prerequisites: EBGN311 or permission of in-
EBGN568 Advanced Project Analysis
structor.
EBGN511 MICROECONOMICS The first of two courses
Leadership and Strategy:
dealing with applied economic theory. This part concentrates
EBGN564 Managing New Product Development
on the behavior of individual segments of the economy, the
EBGN565 Marketing for Technology-Based Companies
theory of consumer behavior and demand, the theory of pro-
EBGN566 Technology Entrepreneurship
duction and costs, duality, welfare measures, price and out-
EBGN567 Business Law and Technology
put level determination by business firms, and the structure
EBGN571 Marketing Research
of product and input markets. Prerequisites: MATH111,
EBGN572 International Business Strategy
EBGN311, EBGN509; or permission of instructor.
EBGN574 Inventing, Patenting, and Licensing
EBGN512 MACROECONOMICS This course will provide
Course Descriptions in the Mineral Economics
an introduction to contemporary macroeconomic concepts
Program and the Engineering and Technology
and analysis. Macroeconomics is the study of the behavior of
Management Program
the economy as an aggregate. Topics include the equilibrium
level of inflation, interest rates, unemployment and the
EBGN504 ECONOMIC EVALUATION AND INVEST-
growth in national income. The impact of government fiscal
MENT DECISION METHODS Time value of money con-
and monetary policy on these variables and the business
cepts of present worth, future worth, annual worth, rate of
cycle, with particular attention to the effects on the mineral
return and break-even analysis are applied to after-tax eco-
industry. Prerequisites: MATH111, EBGN311, EBGN509; or
nomic analysis of mineral, petroleum and general investments.
permission of instructor.
Related topics emphasize proper handling of (1) inflation and
escalation, (2) leverage (borrowed money), (3) risk adjust-
EBGN515 ECONOMICS AND DECISION MAKING The
ment of analysis using expected value concepts, and (4) mu-
application of microeconomic theory to business strategy.
tually exclusive alternative analysis and service producing
Understanding the horizontal, vertical, and product bound-
alternatives. Case study analysis of a mineral or petroleum
aries of the modern firm. A framework for analyzing the na-
investment situation is required.
ture and extent of competition in a firm's dynamic business
environment. Developing strategies for creating and sustain-
EBGN505 INDUSTRIAL ACCOUNTING Concepts from
ing competitive advantage. Mineral Economics students will
both financial and managerial accounting. Preparation and
not receive degree credits for this course (except joint degree
interpretation of financial statements and the use of this finan-
IFP students, see Division Director).
cial information in evaluation and control of the organization.
Managerial concepts include the use of accounting informa-
EBGN525 OPERATIONS RESEARCH METHODS The
tion in the development and implementation of a successful
core of this course is a scientific approach to planning and
global corporate strategy, and how control systems enhance
decision-making problems that arise in business. The course
the planning process.
covers deterministic optimization models (linear program-
ming, integer programming and network modeling) and a
EBGN509 MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS This course
brief introduction to stochastic (probabilistic) models with
reviews and re-enforces the mathematical and computer tools
Monte-Carlo simulation. Applications of the models are
that are necessary to earn a graduate degree in Mineral Eco-
covered using spreadsheets. The intent of the course is to
nomics. It includes topics from differential and integral cal-
enhance logical modeling ability and to develop quantitative
culus; probability and statistics; algebra and matrix algebra;
managerial and spreadsheet skills. The models cover applica-
difference equations; and linear, mathematical and dynamic
tions in the areas of energy and mining, marketing, finance,
programming. It shows how these tools are applied in an eco-
production, transportation, logistics and work-force scheduling.
nomic and business context with applications taken from the
62
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

EBGN528 INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS SIMULATION The
local community concerns and the content of exploration and
course focuses on creating computerized models of real or
extraction agreements. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
proposed complex systems for performance evaluation. Sim-
EBGN541 INTERNATIONAL TRADE Theories and evi-
ulation provides a cost effective way of pre-testing proposed
dence on international trade and development. Determinants
systems and answering “what-if” questions before incurring
of static and dynamic comparative advantage. The arguments
the expense of actual implementations. The course is in-
for and against free trade. Economic development in non-
structed in the state-of-the-art computer lab (CTLM), where
industrialized countries. Sectoral development policies and
each student is equipped with a personal computer and inter-
industrialization. The special problems and opportunities
acts with the instructor during the lecture. Professional version
created by extensive mineral resource endowments. The
of a widely used commercial software package, “Arena”, is
impact of value-added processing and export diversification
used to build models, analyze and interpret the results. Other
on development. Prerequisites: MATH111, EBGN311,
business analysis and productivity tools that enhance the
EBGN509, EBGN511; or permission of instructor.
analysis capabilities of the simulation software are intro-
duced to show how to search for optimal solutions within the
EBGN542 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Role of energy
simulation models. Both discrete-event and continuous simu-
and minerals in the development process. Sectoral policies
lation models are covered through extensive use of appli-
and their links with macroeconomic policies. Special atten-
cations including call centers, various manufacturing
tion to issues of revenue stabilization, resource largesse
operations, production/inventory systems, bulk-material han-
effects, downstream processing, and diversification. Pre-
dling and mining, port operations, high-way traffic systems
requisites: MATH111, EBGN311, EBGN509, EBGN511,
and computer networks. Prerequisite: MATH530, 1 or per-
EBGN512; or permission of instructor.
mission of instructor.
EBGN545 CORPORATE FINANCE The fundamentals of
EBGN530 ECONOMICS OF INTERNATIONAL ENERGY
corporate finance as they pertain to the valuation of invest-
MARKETS Application of models to understand markets
ments, firms, and the securities they issue. Included are the
for oil, gas, coal, electricity, and renewable energy resources.
relevant theories associated with capital budgeting, financing
Models, modeling techniques, and issues included are supply
decisions, and dividend policy. This course provides an
and demand, market structure, transportation models, game
in-depth study of the theory and practice of corporate finan-
theory, futures markets, environmental issues, energy policy,
cial management including a study of the firm’s objectives,
energy regulation, input/output models, energy conservation,
investment decisions, long-term financing decisions, and
and dynamic optimization. The emphasis in the course is on
working capital management. Prerequisite: EBGN5052 or
the development of appropriate models and their application
permission of instructor.
to current issues in energy markets. Prerequisites: MATH111,
EBGN546 INVESTMENT AND PORTFOLIO MANAGE-
EBGN311, EBGN509, EBGN511 or permission of instructor.
MENT The theory and practice of investment, providing a
EBGN535 ECONOMICS OF METAL INDUSTRIES AND
comprehensive understanding of the dynamics of securities
MARKETS Metal supply from main product, byproduct,
markets, valuation techniques and trading strategies for
and secondary production. Metal demand and intensity of use
stocks, bonds, and derivative securities. It includes the mean-
analysis. Market organization and price formation. Public
variance efficient portfolio theory, the arbitrage pricing
policy, comparative advantage, and international metal trade.
theory, bond portfolio management, investment management
Metals and economic development in the developing coun-
functions and policies, and portfolio performance evaluation.
tries and former centrally planned economies. Environmental
Prerequisites: MATH111, EBGN311, EBGN545, EBGN505,2
policy and mining and mineral processing. Students prepare
or permission of instructor. Recommended: EBGN509,
and present a major research paper. Prerequisites: MATH111,
EBGN511.
EBGN311, EBGN510; or permission of instructor.
EBGN547 FINANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT Analysis
EBGN536 MINERAL POLICIES & INTERNATIONAL
of the sources, causes and effects of risks associated with
INVESTMENT Identification and evaluation of inter-
holding, operating and managing assets by individuals and
national mineral investment policies and company responses
organizations; evaluation of the need and importance of man-
using economic, business and legal concepts. Assessment of
aging these risks; and discussion of the methods employed
policy issues in light of stakeholder interests and needs.
and the instruments utilized to achieve risk shifting objec-
Theoretical issues are introduced and then applied to case
tives. The course concentrates on the use of derivative assets
studies, policy drafting, and negotiation exercises to assure
in the risk management process. These derivatives include
both conceptual and practical understanding of the issues.
futures, options, swaps, swaptions, caps, collars and floors.
Special attention is given to the formation of national policies
Exposure to market and credit risks will be explored and
and corporate decision making concerning fiscal regimes,
ways of handling them will be reviewed and critiqued
project financing, environmental protection, land use and
through analysis of case studies from the mineral and energy
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
63

industries. Prerequisites: MATH111, EBGN311, EBGN5052,
algorithm or two applicable to each problem class. As time
EBGN545 or EBGN546; or permission of instructor. Recom-
permits, we explore combinatorial problems that can be de-
mended: EBGN509, EBGN511.
picted on graphs, e.g., the traveling salesman problem and
EBGN552 NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING As an ad-
the Chinese postman problem, and discuss the tractability
vanced course in optimization, this course will address both
issues associated with these problems in contrast to “pure”
unconstrained and constrained nonlinear model formulation
network models. Prerequisites: EBGN555 or EBGN525 or
and corresponding algorithms (e.g., Gradient Search and
permission of the instructor.
Newton’s Method, and Lagrange Multiplier Methods and Re-
EBGN557 INTEGER PROGRAMMING As an advanced
duced Gradient Algorithms, respectively). Applications of
course in optimization, this course will address computa-
state-of-the-art hardware and software will emphasize solv-
tional performance of linear and linear-integer optimization
ing real-world problems in areas such as mining, energy,
problems, and, using state-of-the-art hardware and software,
transportation, and the military. Prerequisite: EBGN555 or
will introduce solution techniques for “difficult” optimiza-
permission of instructor.
tion problems. We will discuss such methodologies applied
EBGN553 PROJECT MANAGEMENT An introductory
to the monolith (e.g., branch-and-bound and its variations,
course focusing on analytical techniques for managing projects
cutting planes, strong formulations), as well as decomposi-
and on developing skills for effective project leadership and
tion and reformulation techniques (e.g., Lagrangian relax-
management through analysis of case studies. Topics include
ation, Benders decomposition, column generation).
project portfolio management, decomposition of project
Additional “special topics” may be introduced, as time per-
work, estimating resource requirements, planning and budget-
mits. Prerequisite: EBGN555 or permission of instructor.
ing, scheduling, analysis of uncertainty, resource loading and
EBGN559 SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT The focus of
leveling, project monitoring and control, earned value analy-
the course is to show how a firm can achieve better “supply-
sis and strategic project leadership. Guest speakers from in-
demand matching” through the implementation of rigorous
dustry discuss and amplify the relevance of course topics to
mathematical models and various operational/tactical strate-
their specific areas of application (construction, product de-
gies. We look at organizations as entities that must match the
velopment, engineering design, R&D, process development,
supply of what they produce with the demand for their prod-
etc.). Students learn Microsoft Project and complete a course
ucts. A considerable portion of the course is devoted to math-
project using this software, demonstrating proficiency ana-
ematical models that treat uncertainty in the supply-chain.
lyzing project progress and communicating project informa-
Topics include managing economies of scale for functional
tion to stakeholders. Prerequisite: EBGN5043 or permission
products, managing market-mediation costs for innovative
of instructor.
products, make-to order versus make-to-stock systems, quick
EBGN555 LINEAR PROGRAMMING This course ad-
response strategies, risk pooling strategies, supply-chain con-
dresses the formulation of linear programming models, ex-
tracts and revenue management. Additional “special topics”
amines linear programs in two dimensions, covers standard
may be introduced, such as reverse logistics issues in the
form and other basics essential to understanding the Simplex
supply-chain or contemporary operational and financial hedg-
method, the Simplex method itself, duality theory, comple-
ing strategies, as time permits. Prerequisite: MATH530,1 or
mentary slackness conditions, and sensitivity analysis. As
permission of instructor.
time permits, multi-objective programming, an introduction
EBGN560 DECISION ANALYSIS Introduction to the sci-
to linear integer programming, and the interior point method
ence of decision making and risk theory. Application of deci-
are introduced. Applications of linear programming models
sion analysis and utility theory to the analysis of strategic
discussed in this course include, but are not limited to, the
decision problems. Focuses on the application of quantitative
areas of manufacturing, finance, energy, mining, transporta-
methods to business problems characterized by risk and un-
tion and logistics, and the military. Prerequisite: MATH332
certainty. Choice problems such as decisions concerning
or EBGN509 or permission of instructor. 3 hours lecture;
major capital investments, corporate acquisitions, new prod-
3 semester hours.
uct introductions, and choices among alternative technolo-
EBGN556 NETWORK MODELS Network models are spe-
gies are conceptualized and structured using the concepts
cial cases of linear programming problems that possess spe-
introduced in this course. Prerequisite: EBGN504,3 or per-
cial mathematical structures. This course examines a variety
mission of instructor.
of network models, specifically, spanning tree problems,
EBGN561 STOCHASTIC MODELS IN MANAGEMENT
shortest path problems, maximum flow problems, minimum
SCIENCE The course introduces tools of “probabilistic
cost flow problems, and transportation and assignment prob-
analysis” that are frequently used in the formal studies of
lems. For each class of problem, we present applications in
management. We see methodologies that help to quantify the
areas such as manufacturing, finance, energy, mining, trans-
dynamic relationships of sequences of “random” events that
portation and logistics, and the military. We also discuss an
evolve over time. Topics include static and dynamic Monte-
Carlo simulation, discrete and continuous time Markov
64
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

Chains, probabilistic dynamic programming, Markov deci-
EBGN566 TECHNOLOGY ENTREPRENEURSHIP Intro-
sion processes, queuing processes and networks, Brownian
duces concepts related to starting and expanding a techno-
motion and stochastic control. Applications from a wide
logical-based corporation. Presents ideas such as developing
range of fields will be introduced including marketing, fi-
a business and financing plan, role of intellectual property,
nance, production, logistics and distribution, energy and
and the importance of a good R&D program. Prerequisite:
service systems. In addition to an intuitive understanding
Permission of instructor.
of analytical techniques to model stochastic processes, the
EBGN567 BUSINESS LAW AND TECHNOLOGY Com-
course emphasizes how to use related software packages for
puter software and hardware are the most complex and
managerial decision-making. Prerequisite: MATH530,1 or
rapidly developing intellectual creations of modern man.
permission of instructor.
Computers provide unprecedented power in accessing and
EBGN563 MANAGEMENT OF TECHNOLOGY Case
manipulating data. Computers work in complex systems that
studies and reading assignments explore strategies for profit-
require standardization and compatibility to function. Each of
ing from technology assets and technological innovation. The
these special features has engendered one or more bodies of
roles of strategy, core competencies, product and process
law. Complex intellectual creation demands comprehensive
development, manufacturing, R&D, marketing, strategic
intellectually property protection. Computer technology,
partnerships, alliances, intellectual property, organizational
however, differs fundamentally from previous objects of
architectures, leadership and politics are explored in the
intellectual property protection, and thus does not fit easily
context of technological innovation. The critical role of orga-
into traditional copyright and patent law. This course covers
nizational knowledge and learning in a firm’s ability to lever-
topics that relate to these complex special features of com-
age technological innovation to gain competitive advantage
puter and technology. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
is explored. The relationships between an innovation, the
EBGN568 ADVANCED PROJECT ANALYSIS An ad-
competencies of the innovating firm, the ease of duplication
vanced course in economic analysis that will look at more
of the innovation by outsiders, the nature of complementary
complex issues associated with valuing investments and
assets needed to successfully commercialize an innovation
projects. Discussion will focus on development and applica-
and the appropriate strategy for commercializing the inno-
tion of concepts in after-tax environments and look at other
vation are developed. Students explore the role of network
criteria and their impact in the decision-making and valuation
effects in commercialization strategies, particularly with re-
process. Applications to engineering and technology aspects
spect to standards wars aimed at establishing new dominant
will be discussed. Effective presentation of results will be an
designs. Prerequisite: EBGN5043 recommended.
important component of the course. Prerequisite: Permission
EBGN564 MANAGING NEW PRODUCT DEVELOP-
of instructor.
MENT Develops interdisciplinary skills required for suc-
EBGN570 ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS The role of
cessful product development in today’s competitive
markets and other economic considerations in controlling
marketplace. Small product development teams step through
pollution; the effect of environmental policy on resource
the new product development process in detail, learning
allocation incentives; the use of benefit/cost analysis in envi-
about available tools and techniques to execute each process
ronmental policy decisions and the associated problems with
step along the way. Each student brings his or her individual
measuring benefits and costs. Prerequisite: EBGN509 or per-
disciplinary perspective to the team effort, and must learn to
mission of instructor.
synthesize that perspective with those of the other students in
the group to develop a sound, marketable product. Prerequi-
EBGN571 MARKETING RESEARCH The purpose of this
site: EBGN563 recommended.
course is to gain a deep understanding of the marketing re-
search decisions facing product managers in technology based
EBGN565 MARKETING FOR TECHNOLOGY-BASED
companies. While the specific responsibilities of a product
COMPANIES This class explores concepts and practices
manager vary across industries and firms, three main activities
related to marketing in this unique, fast-paced environment,
common to the position are: (1) analysis of market informa-
including the defining characteristics of high-technology in-
tion, (2) marketing strategy development, and (3) implement-
dustries; different types and patterns of innovations and their
ing strategy through marketing mix decisions. In this course
marketing implications; the need for (and difficulties in)
students will develop an understanding of available market-
adopting a customer-orientation; tools used to gather market-
ing research methods and the ability to use marketing research
ing research/intelligence in technology-driven industries; use
information to make strategic and tactical decisions. Prerequi-
of strategic alliances and partnerships in marketing technol-
site: MATH5301.
ogy; adaptations to the “4 P’s”; regulatory and ethical consid-
erations in technological arenas. Prerequisite: Permission of
EBGN572 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS STRATEGY
instructor.
The purpose of this course is to gain understanding of the
complexities presented by managing businesses in an inter-
national environment. International business has grown
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
65

rapidly in recent decades due to technological expansion,
management process and competing in a web-based strategic
liberalization of government policies on trade and resource
management simulation to support the knowledge that you
movements, development of institutions needed to support
have developed.
and facilitate international transactions, and increased global
EBGN590 ECONOMETRICS AND FORECASTING
competition. Due to these factors, foreign countries increas-
Using statistical techniques to fit economic models to data.
ingly are a source of both production and sales for domestic
Topics include ordinary least squares and single equation
companies. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
regression models; two stage least squares and multiple equa-
EBGN574 INVENTING, PATENTING, AND LISCENSING
tion econometric models; specification error, serial correla-
The various forms of intellectual property, including patents,
tion, heteroskedasticity; distributive lag; applications to
trademarks, copyrights, trade secrets and unfair competition
mineral commodity markets; hypothesis testing; forecasting
are discussed; the terminology of inventing, patenting and li-
with econometric models, time series analysis, and simula-
censing is reviewed, and an overview of the complete
tion. Prerequisites: MATH111, MATH530,1 EBGN311.
process is given; the statutes most frequently encountered in
EBGN598 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS AND
dealing with patents (35 USC §101, §102, §103 and §112)
BUSINESS Pilot course or special topics course. Topics
are introduced and explained; the basics of searching the
chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s).
prior art are presented; participants 'walk through' case histo-
Usually the course is offered only once. Repeatable for
ries illustrating inventing, patenting, licensing, as well as
credit under different titles.
patent infringement and litigation; the importance of proper
documentation at all stages of the process is explained; the
EBGN599 INDEPENDENT STUDY Individual research or
"do's" and "don't" of disclosing inventions are presented; var-
special problem projects supervised by a faculty member
ious types of agreements are discussed including license
when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, con-
agreements; methods for evaluating the market potential of
tent, and credit hours. Contact the Economics and Business
new products are presented; the resources available for in-
Division office for credit limits toward the degree.
ventors are reviewed; inventing and patenting in the corpo-
EBGN610 ADVANCED NATURAL RESOURCE ECO-
rate environment are discussed; the economic impacts of
NOMICS Optimal resource use in a dynamic context using
patents are addressed. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
mathematical programming, optimal control theory and game
Offered in Field session and Summer session only.
theory. Constrained optimization techniques are used to eval-
EBGN575 ADVANCED MINING AND ENERGY VALUA-
uate the impact of capital constraints, exploration activity
TION The use of stochastic and option pricing techniques in
and environmental regulations. Offered when student de-
mineral and energy asset valuation. The Hotelling Valuation
mand is sufficient. Prerequisites: MATH111, MATH530,1
Principle. The measurement of political risk and its impact
EBGN311, EBGN509, EBGN510, EBGN511; or permission
on project value. Extensive use of real cases. Prerequisites:
of instructor.
MATH111, EBGN311, EBGN504,3 EBGN505,2 EBGN509,
EBGN611 ADVANCED MICROECONOMICS A second
EBGN510, EBGN511; or permission of instructor.
graduate course in microeconomics, emphasizing state-of-
EBGN580 EXPLORATION ECONOMICS Exploration
the-art theoretical and mathematical developments. Topics
planning and decision making for oil and gas, and metallic
include consumer theory, production theory and the use of
minerals. Risk analysis. Historical trends in exploration ac-
game theoretic and dynamic optimization tools. Prerequi-
tivity and productivity. Prerequisites: EBGN311, EBGN510;
sites: MATH111, MATH530,1 EBGN311, EBGN509,
or permission of instructor. Offered when student demand is
EBGN511; or permission of instructor.
sufficient.
EBGN690 ADVANCED ECONOMETRICS A second
EBGN585 ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY MAN-
course in econometrics. Compared to EBGN590, this course
AGEMENT CAPSTONE This course represents the culmina-
provides a more theoretical and mathematical understanding
tion of the ETM Program. This course is about the strategic
of econometrics. Matrix algebra is used and model construc-
management process – how strategies are developed and
tion and hypothesis testing are emphasized rather than fore-
implemented in organizations. It examines senior manage-
casting. Prerequisites: MATH111, MATH530,1 EBGN311,
ment’s role in formulating strategy and the role that all an
EBGN509, EBGN590; or permission of instructor. Recom-
organization’s managers play in implementing a well thought
mended: EBGN511.
out strategy. Among the topics discussed in this course are
EBGN695 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY Lectures
(1) how different industry conditions support different types
provide an overview of methods used in economic research
of strategies; (2) how industry conditions change and the
relating to EPP and QBA/OR dissertations in Mineral Eco-
implication of those changes for strategic management; and
nomics and information on how to carry out research and
(3) how organizations develop and maintain capabilities that
present research results. Students will be required to write
lead to sustained competitive advantage. This course consists
and present a research paper that will be submitted for pub-
of learning fundamental concepts associated with strategic
lication. It is expected that this paper will lead to a Ph.D.
66
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

dissertation proposal. It is a good idea for students to start
Engineering
thinking about potential dissertation topic areas as they study
TERENCE E. PARKER, Professor and Division Director
for their qualifier. This course is also recommended for stu-
WILLIAM A. HOFF, Associate Professor and Assistant Division
dents writing Master’s thesis or who want guidance in doing
Director
independent research relating to the economics and business
D. VAUGHAN GRIFFITHS, Professor
aspects of energy, minerals and related environmental and
ROBERT J. KEE, George R. Brown Distinguished Professor
technological topics. Prerequisites: MATH530,1 EBGN509,
ROBERT H. KING, Professor
EBGN510, EBGN511, EBGN590, or permission of instruc-
KEVIN MOORE, Gerard August Dobelman Chair and Professor
tor.
NING LU, Professor
MARK T. LUSK, Professor (and Professor of Physics)
EBGN698 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS AND
NIGEL T. MIDDLETON, Professor, Executive Vice President for
BUSINESS Pilot course or special topics course. Topics
Academic Affairs, and Dean of Faculty
chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s).
GRAHAM G. W. MUSTOE, Professor
Usually the course is offered only once. Repeatable for
PANKAJ K. (PK) SEN, Professor
credit under different titles.
JOEL M. BACH, Associate Professor
JOHN R. BERGER, Associate Professor
EBGN699 INDEPENDENT STUDY Individual research
PANOS D. KIOUSIS, Associate Professor
or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member
MICHAEL MOONEY, Associate Professor
when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, con-
DAVID MUNOZ, Associate Professor
tent, and credit hours. Contact the Economics and Business
PAUL PAPAS, Associate Professor
Division office for credit limits toward the degree.
MARCELO GODOY SIMOES, Associate Professor
JOHN P. H. STEELE, Associate Professor
EBGN705. GRADUATE RESEARCH: MASTER OF
CATHERINE K. SKOKAN, Associate Professor
SCIENCE Research credit hours required for completion of
TYRONE VINCENT, Associate Professor
the Master of Science with Thesis degree. Research must be
RAY RUICHONG ZHANG, Associate Professor
carried out under the direct supervision of the student’s fac-
CRISTIAN V. CIOBANU, Assistant Professor
ulty advisor. Variable class and semester hours. Repeatable
KATHRYN JOHNSON, Clare Boothe Luce Assistant Professor
for credit.
CARSTEN R. MEHRING, Assistant Professor
ANTHONY J. PETRELLA, Assistant Professor
EBGN706. GRADUATE RESEARCH: DOCTOR OF PHI-
SIDDHARTH SURYANARAYANAN, Assistant Professor
LOSOPHY Research credit hours required for completion of
NEAL SULLIVAN, Assistant Professor
the Doctor of Philosophy degree. Research must be carried
MONEESH UPMANYU, Assistant Professor
out under the direct supervision of the student’s faculty advi-
JUDITH WANG, Assistant Professor
sor. Variable class and semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
MANOJA WEISS, Assistant Professor
Notes
RICHARD PASSAMANECK, Senior Lecturer
1MATH323 may be substituted for MATH530.
SANAA ABDEL-AZIM, Lecturer
RAVEL F. AMMERMAN, Lecturer
2EBGN305 and EBGN306 together may be substituted for
CARA COAD, Lecturer
EBGN505 with permission.
JOSEPH P. CROCKER, Lecturer
3EBGN321 may be substituted for EBGN504.
TOM GROVER, Lecturer
CANDACE S. SULZBACH, Lecturer
ROBERT D. SUTTON, Lecturer
HAROLD W. OLSEN, Research Professor
CHRISTOPHER B. DRYER, Assistant Research Assistant Professor
JOAN P. GOSINK, Emerita Professor
MICHAEL B. McGRATH, Emeritus Professor
KARL R. NELSON, Emeritus Associate Professor
GABRIEL M. NEUNZERT, Emeritus Associate Professor
Note: Faculty for the environmental engineering specialty are listed in
the Environmental Science and Engineering section of this Bulletin.
Degrees Offered:
Master of Science (Engineering)
Doctor of Philosophy (Engineering)
Program Overview:
The Engineering program offers a multidisciplinary gradu-
ate education with an option to specialize in one of the
three disciplines—Civil, Electrical or Mechanical Engi-
neering. Students may also choose a more interdisciplinary
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
67

degree with a specialty title “Engineering Systems”. The
material design, and fracture mechanics. Research in this
program demands academic rigor and depth yet also ad-
area tends to have a strong computational physics component
dresses the real-world problems in advanced engineering and
covering a broad range of length and time scales that embrace
technology. The Division of Engineering has seven areas of
ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo and
research activities: (1) Sensing, Communications and Con-
continuum modeling. These tools are used to study metallic
trol, (2) Energy Systems and Power Electronics, (3) Geotech-
and ceramic systems as well as natural biomaterials. Strong
nical Engineering, (4) Structural Engineering, (5) Material
ties exist between this group and activities within the campus
Mechanics, (6) Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences and
communities of physics, materials science, mathematics and
(7) Bioengineering. Note that in many cases, individual re-
chemical engineering.
search projects encompass more than one research area.
Fluid Mechanics and Thermal Sciences is a research area
Sensing, Communications and Control is an interdiscipli-
with a wide array of multidisciplinary applications including
nary research area that encompasses the fields of control sys-
clean energy systems, materials processing, combustion, and
tems, wireless communications, signal and image processing,
bioengineering. Graduate students in this area typically spe-
robotics, and mechatronics. Focus areas include adaptive and
cialize in Mechanical Engineering but also have the oppor-
nonlinear control, intelligent and learning control systems,
tunity to specialize in interdisciplinary programs such as
fault detection and system identification, wireless communi-
Materials Science.
cation circuits, computer vision and pattern recognition, sen-
BioEngineering focuses on the application of engineering
sor development, mobile manipulation and autonomous
principles to the musculoskeletal system and other connec-
systems. Applications can be found in renewable energy and
tive tissues. Research activities include experimental, com-
power systems, materials processing, sensor and control net-
putational, and theoretical approaches with applications in
works, bio-engineering, intelligent structures, and geosys-
the areas of computer assisted surgery and medical robotics,
tems. Participating graduate students come from a variety of
medical imaging, patient specific biomechanical modeling,
backgrounds, and may specialize in civil, mechanical or elec-
intelligent prosthetics and implants, bioinstrumentation, and
trical engineering, or engineering systems.
supermolecular biomaterials. The Bioengineering group has
Energy Systems and Power Electronics is focused on both
strong research ties with other campus departments, the local
fundamental and applied research in the interrelated fields of
medical community, and industry partners.
conventional electric power systems and electric machinery,
Program Details
renewable energy and distributed generation, power electron-
The M.S. Engineering degree (Thesis or Non-Thesis Op-
ics and drives. The overall scope of research encompasses a
tion) requires 30 credit hours. Requirements for the thesis
broad spectrum of electrical energy applications including
M.S. are 24 hours of coursework and 6 hours of thesis re-
investor-owned utilities, rural electric associations, manufac-
search. The non-thesis option requires 30 hours of course-
turing facilities, regulatory agencies, and consulting engi-
work. For the M.S. degree, a maximum of 9 credits can be
neering firms.
transferred in from another institution. Graduate level
Geotechnical Engineering has current activity in compu-
courses taken at other universities for which a grade equiva-
tational and analytical geomechanics, probabilistic geotech-
lent to a "B" or better was received will be considered for
nics, experimental and theoretical investigations into coupled
transfer credit via a petition to the Division Director.
flows and unsaturated soil behavior, and intelligent geo-sys-
In addition, the Division of Engineering in collaboration
tems including geo-construction sensing and automation. The
with the Departments of Physics and Chemistry offers five-
geotechnical faculty and students work primarily within the
year programs in which students have the opportunity to ob-
Civil Specialty of the Engineering graduate programs, how-
tain specific engineering skills to complement their physics
ever strong interdisciplinary ties are maintained with other
or chemistry background. The Physics five-year program of-
groups in Engineering and with other Departments at CSM.
fers tracks in Electrical Engineering and Mechanical Engi-
Structural Engineering focuses on frontier, multidiscipli-
neering. Details on these five-year programs can be found in
nary research in the following areas: high strength and self
the CSM Undergraduate Bulletin. Course schedules for these
consolidating concrete, experimental and computational struc-
five-year programs can be obtained in the Engineering,
tural dynamics, vibration control, damage diagnosis, and
Physics and Chemistry Departmental Offices.
advanced data processing and analysis for sensory systems,
The Ph.D. Engineering degree requires 72 credit hours of
disaster assessment and mitigation, and structural non-
course work and research credits. Graduate level courses
destructive evaluation.
taken at other universities for which a grade equivalent to a
Material Mechanics investigations consider solid-state
"B" or better was received will be considered for transfer
material behavior as it relates to microstructural evolution
credit via a petition to the Division Director.
and control, nano-mechanics, functionally graded materials,
biomaterial analysis and characterization, artificial bio-
68
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

Students must have an advisor from the Engineering Divi-
ate to the degree structure, can be used to fulfill degree re-
sion Graduate Faculty to direct and monitor their academic
quirements.
plan, research and independent studies. Master of Science
Engineering Systems Specialty (EGGN)
(thesis option) students must have at least three members on
Graduate students who choose an interdisciplinary educa-
their graduate committee, two of whom must be permanent
tion in Engineering Systems may do so using the curriculum
faculty in the Engineering Division. Ph.D. graduate commit-
below.
tees must have at least five members; at least three members
must be permanent faculty in the Engineering Division, and
M.S. Degree (EGGN)
at least one member must be from the department in which
Required Core:
the student is pursuing a minor program. The minor program
EGGN501 Advanced Engineering Measurements
4 cr
of study provides breadth in the degree through formal
EGGN502 Interdisciplinary Modeling and Simulation
4 cr
coursework.
EGGN504 Engineering Systems (Any Specialty)
Seminar
1 cr
Doctoral students must pass a Qualifying Examination,
which is intended to gauge the student’s capability to pursue
Technical Electives
research in Engineering. Normally, Ph.D. students will take
(Thesis Option: Courses must be
the Qualifying Examination in their first year, but it must be
approved by the graduate thesis committee)
15 cr
taken within three semesters of entering the program. Within
(Non-Thesis Option: Courses must be
18 months after passing the Qualifying Examination, the
approved by the faculty advisor)
21 cr
Ph.D. student must prepare a written Thesis Proposal and
Thesis Research (Thesis Option)
6 cr
present it formally to the graduate committee and other inter-
ested faculty. Approval of the Thesis Proposal by the gradu-
Total
30 cr
ate thesis committee constitutes admission to candidacy for
Ph.D. Degree (EGGN)
the Ph.D. Students should endeavor to achieve this milestone
Required Core:
within twelve months of passing the Qualifying Examination.
EGGN501 Advanced Engineering Measurements
4 cr
At the conclusion of the M.S. (Thesis Option) and Ph.D.
EGGN502 Interdisciplinary Modeling and Simulation 4 cr
programs, the student will be required to make a formal pres-
EGGN504 Engineering Systems (Any Specialty)
entation and defense of her/his thesis research.
Seminar
1 cr
Prerequisites
Minor Program of Study
12 cr
The requirements for admission for the M.S., and Ph.D.
Technical Electives
degrees in Engineering are a baccalaureate degree in engi-
(must be approved by the graduate thesis committee) 27 cr
neering, computer science, a physical science, or math with a
Thesis Research
24 cr
grade-point average over 3.0/4.0; Graduate Record Examina-
tion score of 650 (math) and a TOEFL score of 550 or higher
Total
72 cr
(paper based), 213 (computer based) for applicants whose
Civil Engineering Specialty (EGGN-CE)
native language is not English. Applicants from an engi-
There are two main emphasis areas within the Civil Engi-
neering program at CSM are not required to submit
neering specialty in: (1) Geotechnical engineering, and (2)
GRE scores.
Structural engineering. However thesis research activities
The Engineering Graduate committee evaluating an appli-
will regularly overlap with the other emphasis areas within
cant may require that the student take undergraduate reme-
the Division as listed in the Program Description above. The
dial coursework to overcome technical deficiencies, which
intent is to offer a highly flexible curriculum that will be at-
does not count toward the graduate program. The committee
tractive to candidates seeking Civil Engineering careers in ei-
will decide whether to recommend to the Dean of Graduate
ther industry or academe. In addition to the Civil Engineering
Studies and Research regular or provisional admission, and
courses offered within the Engineering Division, technical
may ask the applicant to come for an interview.
electives will be available from other CSM departments such
as Environmental Science and Engineering, Geological Engi-
As stipulated by the CSM Graduate School, no more than 9
neering and Mining, as well as Electrical and Mechanical
400-level credits of course work may be counted towards any
courses from within the Engineering Division.
graduate degree. In general, the student cannot use 400 level
course credits that have been previously used to obtain the
Bachelor of Science degree. This requirement must be taken
into account as students choose courses for each degree pro-
gram detailed below. For all of the Engineering Degrees, a
maximum of 6 Independent Study course units, as appropri-
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
69

M.S. Degree (EGGN-CE)
sible after that time, a one hour meeting will be scheduled
Must take at least three courses from the list of
for the student to make his/her oral presentation. After the
Engineering (Civil Speciality) Courses.
9 cr
oral, the student will be questioned on the presentation and
on any other issues relating to the written report and take
EGGN504 Engineering (Civil) Seminar
1 cr
home examination.
Technical Electives
Electrical Engineering Specialty (EGGN-EE)
(Thesis option: Courses must be approved by the
Within the Electrical Engineering specialty, there are two
Thesis Committee)
14 cr
emphasis areas: (1) Sensing, Communications and Control,
(Non-Thesis option: Courses must be approved by
and (2) Energy Systems and Power Electronics. Students are
the Faculty Advisor)
20 cr
encouraged to decide between emphasis areas before pursu-
Non-thesis students may include up to 6 cr hours of
ing an advanced degree. Students are also encouraged to
Independent Study (EGGN 599)
speak to members of the EE graduate faculty before register-
Thesis Research (Thesis Option)
6 cr
ing for classes and to select an academic advisor as soon as
Total
30 cr
possible.
Ph.D. Degree (EGGN-CE)
M.S. Degree (EGGN-EE)
Must take at least three courses from the list of
Must take at least two courses from the list of
Civil Engineering Courses
9 cr
core Electrical Engineering Courses
6 cr
EGGN504 Engineering Systems (Civil) Seminar
1 cr
EGGN504 Engineering (Electrical) Seminar
1 cr
Minor Program of Study
12 cr
Must take at least four courses in one of
Technical Electives
the two emphasis areas
12 cr
Approved by the graduate committee
26 cr
Technical Electives
Thesis Research
24 cr
(Thesis Option: Courses must be approved
by the thesis committee)
5 cr
Total
72 cr
or
Ph.D. Qualifying Exam (Civil Specialty)
(Non-Thesis Option: Courses must be approved
Engineering (Civil Specialty) students wishing
by the faculty advisor)
11 cr
to enroll in the PhD program will be required to pass a
Thesis Research (Thesis Option)
6 cr
Qualifying Exam. Normally, PhD. students will take the
Qualifying Exam in their first year, but it must be taken
Total
30 cr
within three semesters of entering the program.
Ph.D. Degree (EGGN-EE)
The exam will have two parts:
Must take at least two courses from the list of
core Electrical Engineering Courses
6 cr
1. The Advisor will coordinate with the Civil faculty to
generate a written take-home exam based on materials
EGGN504 Engineering (Electrical) Seminar
1 cr
covered in the students area of interest. This will typically
Must take at least four courses in one of the
involve two questions, and may cover material from the
two emphasis areas
12 cr
Engineering (Civil Specialty) core courses.
Thesis Research
24 cr
2. A written report (approx 10 pages) and oral presentation
Minor Program of Study (approved by the
based on a topic that will be chosen by the graduate student’s
thesis committee)
12 cr
committee. The report will typically be a review paper on a re-
Technical Electives (must be approved by
search theme that will be related to the student’s area of inter-
the thesis committee)
17 cr
est and likely thesis topic. The purpose of this requirement, is
to examine some of the attributes expected of a successful
Total
72 cr
PhD candidate. These include, but are not restricted to:
Ph.D. Qualifying Exam (Electrical Specialty)
u The ability to perform a literature review through
Doctoral students must pass a Qualifying Examination,
libraries and internet sites;
which is intended to gauge the student's capability to pursue
research in the Electrical Engineering specialty. The Qualify-
u The ability to distill information into a written report;
ing Examination includes both written and oral sections. The
u The ability to produce a high quality written and oral
written section is based on material from the Division's under-
presentation.
graduate Engineering degree with Electrical Specialty and is
The research theme for the written report will be provided
given once per year at the beginning of the Spring semester.
at the same time as the questions in part one above. All
The oral part of the exam covers either two of the core courses
written material will be due one week later. As early as pos-
(of the student's choice) in the Electrical Specialty, or a paper
70
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

from the literature chosen by the student and the student's ad-
Ph.D. Qualifying Exam (Mechanical Specialty)
visor. The student's advisor and two additional Electrical Spe-
Doctoral students must pass a Qualifying Examination,
cialty faculty members (typically from the student's thesis
which is intended to gauge the academic qualifications of the
committee) administer the oral exam.
candidate for conducting dissertation research in Mechanical
Normally, Ph.D. students will take both parts of the Qualify-
Engineering. The Qualifying Examination tests the student
ing Examination in their first year, but they must both be taken
on instrumentation and measurement theory as well as inter-
within three semesters of entering the graduate program.
disciplinary simulation and modeling. Students are required
to take EGGN501 and EGGN502 prior to taking this exam.
Mechanical Engineering Specialty (EGGN-ME)
The exam is typically offered in May each year. Normally,
Within the Mechanical Engineering specialty, there are two
Ph.D. students will take the Qualifying Examination at the
emphasis areas: (1) Material Mechanics, and (2) Thermal
end of their first year, but they must take the exam within
Sciences. Within the material mechanics emphasis area, materi-
three semesters of entering the graduate program.
als processing, materials simulation and process control are in-
vestigated from perspectives ranging from fundamental physical
Courses Offered Under Each Of The Engineering
underpinnings to industrial application. Within the thermal sci-
Specialties:
ences emphasis area, the focus is upon energy conversion de-
Engineering (Civil Specialty)
vices as framed by traditional subjects such as fluid mechanics,
EGGN501 Advanced Engineering Measurements
4 cr
heat transfer, and combustion. Students are required to com-
EGGN502 Interdisciplinary Modeling and Simulation 4 cr
plete a set of core classes intended to prepare them for both the-
EGGN531 Soil Dynamics
3 cr
oretical and experimental aspects of research in mechanical
EGGN533 Unsaturated Soil Mechanics
3 cr
engineering. The program has strong ties to the chemical engi-
EGGN534 Soil Behavior
3 cr
neering, materials science and physics communities, and stu-
EGGN541 Advanced Structural Theory
3 cr
dents will typically take courses in one or more of these areas
EGGN542 Finite Element Methods for Engineers
3 cr
after completing the core class requirements.
EGGN547 Timber and Masonry Design
3 cr
M.S. Degree (EGGN-ME)
EGGN548 Advanced Soil Mechanics
3 cr
Required Core:
EGGN549 Advanced Design of Steel Structures
3 cr
EGGN501 Advanced Engineering Measurements
4 cr
EGGN550 Design of Reinf. Concrete Structures II
3 cr
EGGN502 Interdisciplinary Modeling and Simulation
4 cr
EGGN560 Numerical Methods for Engineers
3 cr
EGGN504 Engineering Systems (Mechanical) Seminar 1 cr
From the list of Mechanical Engineering Courses
Engineering (Electrical Specialty)
(Thesis Option: Courses must be approved by
Core classes in the Electrical Specialty
the thesis committee)
9 cr
EGGN501 Advanced Engineering Measurements
4 cr
or
EGGN502 Interdisciplinary Modeling and Simulation 4 cr
(Non-Thesis Option: Courses must be approved
EGGN503 Modern Engineering Design and Project
by the faculty advisor)
15 cr
Management
3 cr
Thesis Research (Thesis option)
6 cr
EGGN515 Mathematical Methods for Signals
and Systems
3 cr
Technical Electives (thesis option: approved by
EGGN560 Numerical Methods for Engineers
3 cr
thesis committee; non-thesis option: approved
MATH401 Real Analysis
3 cr
by faculty advisor)
6 cr
CSCI404
Artificial Intelligence
3 cr
Total
30 cr
MATH/CSCI407Introduction to Scientific Computing
3 cr
Ph.D. Degree (EGGN-ME)
MATH500 Linear Vector Spaces
3 cr
Required Core:
MATH506 Complex Analysis II
3 cr
EGGN501 Advanced Engineering Measurements
4 cr
MATH514 Applied Mathematics I
3 cr
EGGN502 Interdisciplinary Modeling and Simulation
4 cr
MATH530 Statistical Methods I
3 cr
EGGN504 Engineering (Mechanical) Seminar
1 cr
Energy Systems Track
Minor Program of Study
12 cr
EGGN521 Mechatronics
3 cr
EGGN581 Modern Adjustable Speed Electric Drives
3 cr
From the list of Mechanical Engineering Courses
18 cr
EGGN582 Renewable Energy and Distributed
Thesis Research
24 cr
Generation
3 cr
Technical Electives (must be approved by the thesis
EGGN583 Advanced Electrical Machine Dynamics
3 cr
committee)
9 cr
EGGN584 Power Distribution Systems Engineering
3 cr
EGGN585 Advanced High Power Electronics
3 cr
Total
72 cr
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
71

EGGN586 High Voltage AC and DC Power
EGGN525 Muscoloskeletal Biomechanics
3 cr
Transmission
3 cr
EGGN527 Prosthetic And Implant Engineering
3 cr
EGGN599 Independent Study (limited to 6 credits)
EGGN528 Computational Biomechanics
3 cr
EGGN683 Computer Methods in Electric Power
EGGN530 Biomedical Instrumentation
3 cr
Systems
3 cr
EGGN532 Fatigue and Fracture
3 cr
Sensing, Communications and Control Track
EGGN535 Introduction to Discrete Element Methods 3 cr
EGGN510 Image and Multidimensional Signal
EGGN540 Continuum Mechanics
3 cr
Processing
3 cr
EGGN542 Finite Element Methods for Engineers
3 cr
EGGN511 Digital Signal Processing
3 cr
EGGN544 Solid Mechanics of Nonlinear Materials
3 cr
EGGN512 Computer Vision
3 cr
EGGN545 Boundary Element Analysis
3 cr
EGGN513 Wireless Communication Systems
3 cr
EGGN546 Advanced Engineering Dynamics
3 cr
EGGN514 Advanced Robot Control
4 cr
EGGN551 Mechanics of Incompressible Fluids
3 cr
EGGN515 Mathematical Methods for Signals
EGGN552 Viscous Flow and Boundary Layers
3 cr
and Systems
3 cr
EGGN555 Kinetic Phenomena In Materials
3 cr
EGGN517 Theory and Design of Advanced Control
EGGN559 Mechanics of Particulate Media
3 cr
Systems
3 cr
EGGN560 Numerical Methods for Engineers
3 cr
EGGN519 Estimation Theory and Kalman Filtering
3 cr
EGGN564 Physical Gas Dynamics
3 cr
EGGN521 Mechatronics
3 cr
EGGN566 Combustion
3 cr
EGGN599 Independent Study (limited to 6 cr)
EGGN567 Radiation Heat Transfer
3 cr
EGGN617 Intelligent Control Systems
3 cr
EGGN569 Fuel Cell Science And Technology
3 cr
EGGN618 System Identification and Adaptive Control 3 cr
EGGN572 Multiple Phase Flows and Transport
EGGN619 Applied Intelligent Control and Failure
Phenomena with Droplets and Particles
3 cr
Diagnostics
3 cr
EGGN573 Introduction to Computational Techniques
Engineering (Mechanical Specialty)
for Fluid Dynamics and Transport
EGGN503 Modern Engineering Design and Project
Phenomena
3 cr
Management
3 cr
EGGN617 Intelligent Control
3 cr
EGGN514 Advanced Robot Control
4 cr
EGGN619 Intelligent Structures
3 cr
EGGN515 Mathematical Methods for Signals
EGGN642 Advanced Finite Element Analysis for
and Systems
3 cr
Engineers
3 cr
EGGN517 Theory and Design of Advanced Control
EGGN659 Optical Measurements in Reacting and
Systems
3 cr
Nonreacting Flow Systems
4 cr
EGGN518 Robot Mechanics: Kinematics, Dynamics
Any graduate level course taught by a member of the CSM
and Control
3 cr
Mechanical Engineering faculty is also a member of the list
EGGN520 Introduction To Biomedical Engineering
3 cr
of acceptable Mechanical Engineering Courses.
EGGN521 Mechatronics
3 cr
Table 1. Summary of courses required for the Master of Science Degree In Engineering Systems
Master of Science, Engineering
Engineering Systems
Civil
Electrical
Mechanical
EGES 501, 502, 504
EGES 504 and
EGES 504 and
EGES 501, 502, 504
Core
9 cr
choose from list
choose from list
9 cr
10 cr
7 cr
Technical Electives
Choose 14 cr (thesis),
Choose 12 cr from
Choose 9 cr (thesis),
and Other Courses
Choose 15 cr (thesis),
20 cr (non-thesis)
chosen track plus 5 cr
15 cr (non-thesis) from
with Advisor
21 cr (non-thesis)
from list and/or other
(thesis), 11 cr of other
list plus 6 cr of other
Approval
technical courses
technical courses
technical courses
(non-thesis)
Thesis Research
6 cr
6 cr
6 cr
6 cr
(thesis only)
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Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

Table 2. Summary of courses required for the Ph.D. Degree in Engineering Systems
Doctor of Philosophy, Engineering
Engineering Systems
Civil
Electrical
Mechanical
EGES 501, 502, 504
EGES 504 and
EGES 504 and
EGES 501, 502, 504
Core
9 cr
choose from list
choose from list
9 cr
10 cr
7 cr
Minor
12 cr
12 cr
12 cr
12 cr
Technical Electives
26 cr from list
Choose 12 cr from
Choose 18 cr from
and Other Courses
27 cr (non-thesis)
and/or other
chosen track plus
list plus 9 cr of other
with Advisor
technical courses
17 cr of other
technical courses
Approval
technical courses
Thesis Research
24 cr
24 cr
24 cr
24 cr
(thesis only)
Description of Courses
EGGN413. COMPUTER AIDED ENGINEERING (I, II)
EGGN400/MNGN400. INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS
This course introduces the student to the concept of com-
(II) Overview and introduction to the science and engineer-
puter-aided engineering. The major objective is to provide
ing of intelligent mobile robotics and robotic manipulators.
the student with the necessary background to use the com-
Covers guidance and force sensing, perception of the envi-
puter as a tool for engineering analysis and design. The Fi-
ronment around a mobile vehicle, reasoning about the envi-
nite Element Analysis (FEA) method and associated
ronment to identify obstacles and guidance path features and
computational engineering software have become significant
adaptively controlling and monitoring the vehicle health. A
tools in engineering analysis and design. This course is di-
lesser emphasis is placed on robot manipulator kinematics,
rected to learning the concepts of FEA and its application to
dynamics, and force and tactile sensing. Surveys manipulator
civil and mechanical engineering analysis and design. Note
and intelligent mobile robotics research and development. In-
that critical evaluation of the results of a FEA using classical
troduces principles and concepts of guidance, position, and
methods (from statics and mechanics of materials) and engi-
force sensing; vision data processing; basic path and trajec-
neering judgment is employed throughout the course. Prereq-
tory planning algorithms; and force and position control. Pre-
uisite: EGGN320. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
requisite: CSCI261, EGGN381. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
EGGN 417. MODERN CONTROL DESIGN (I) Control
hours.
system design with an emphasis on observer-based methods,
EGGN403. THERMODYNAMICS II (I, II) Thermodynamic
from initial open-loop experiments to final implementation.
relations, Maxwell’s Relations, Clapeyron equation, fugacity,
The course begins with an overview of feedback control de-
mixtures and solutions, thermodynamics of mixing, Gibbs
sign technique from the frequency domain perspective, in-
function, activity coefficient, combustion processes, first and
cluding sensitivity and fundamental limitations. State space
second law applied to reacting systems, third law of thermo-
realization theory is introduced, and system identification
dynamics, real combustion processes, phase and chemical
methods for parameter estimation are introduced. Computer-
equilibrium, Gibbs rule, equilibrium of multi-component
based methods for control system design are presented. Pre-
systems, simultaneous chemical reaction of real combustion
requisites: EGGN307. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
processes, ionization, application to real industrial problems.
EGGN422. ADVANCED MECHANICS OF MATERIALS
Prerequisite: EGGN351, EGGN371. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
(II) General theories of stress and strain; stress and strain
mester hours.
transformations, principal stresses and strains, octahedral
EGGN411. MACHINE DESIGN (I, II) Introduction to the
shear stresses, Hooke’s law for isotropic material, and failure
principles of mechanical design. Consideration of the behavior
criteria. Introduction to elasticity and energy methods. Tor-
of materials under static and cyclic loading; failure consider-
sion of noncircular and thin-walled members. Unsymmetrical
ations. Application of the basic theories of mechanics, kine-
bending and shear-center, curved beams, and beams on elastic
matics, and mechanics of materials to the design of basic
foundations. Introduction to plate theory. Thick-walled cylin-
machine elements, such as shafts, keys, and coupling; journal
ders and contact stresses. Prerequisite: EGGN320,
bearings, antifriction bearings, wire rope, gearing; brakes and
EGGN413. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
clutches, welded connections and other fastenings. Prerequi-
EGGN 425. MUSCULOSKELETAL BIOMECHANICS (II)
site: EPIC251, EGGN315, and EGGN320. 3 hours lecture;
This course is intended to provide engineering students with
3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
an introduction to musculoskeletal biomechanics. At the end
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
73

of the semester, students should have a working knowledge
columns, slabs, footings, retaining walls, and foundations.
of the special considerations necessary to apply engineering
Prerequisite: EGGN342. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
principles to the human body. The course will focus on the
EGGN 447. TIMBER AND MASONRY DESIGN (II) The
biomechanics of injury since understanding injury will re-
course develops the theory and design methods required for
quire developing an understanding of normal biomechanics.
the use of timber and masonry as structural materials. The
Prerequisite: DCGN421, EGGN320, EGGN420/BELS420,
design of walls, beams, columns, beam-columns, shear walls,
(or instructor permission). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and structural systems are covered for each material. Grav-
EGGN 430. BIOMEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION The ac-
ity, wind, snow, and seismic loads are calculated and utilized
quisition, processing, and interpretation of biological signals
for design. Prerequisite: EGGN320 or equivalent. 3 hours
present many unique challenges to the Biomedical Engineer.
lecture: 3 semester hours.
This course is intended to provide students with an introduc-
EGGN448. ADVANCED SOIL MECHANICS (I) Advanced
tion to, and appreciation for, many of these challenges. At the
soil mechanics theories and concepts as applied to analysis
end of the semester, students should have a working knowl-
and design in geotechnical engineering. Topics covered will
edge of the special considerations necessary to gathering and
include seepage, consolidation, shear strength and probabilis-
analyzing biological signal data. Prerequisite: EGGN250,
tic methods. The course will have an emphasis on numerical
DCGN381, EGGN420/BELS420, (or permission of instruc-
solution techniques to geotechnical problems by finite ele-
tor). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ments and finite differences. Prerequisite: EGGN361. 3 hour
EGGN441. ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (II)
lectures, 3 semester hours.
Introduction to advanced structural analysis concepts. Non-
EGGN450. MULTIDISCIPLINARY ENGINEERING LAB-
prismatic structures. Arches, Suspension and cable-stayed
ORATORY III (I, II) Laboratory experiments integrating
bridges. Structural optimization. Computer Methods. Struc-
electrical circuits, fluid mechanics, stress analysis, and other
tures with nonlinear materials. Internal force redistribution
engineering fundamentals using computer data acquisition
for statically indeterminate structures. Graduate credit
and transducers. Students will design experiments to gather
requires additional homework and projects. Prerequisite:
data for solving engineering problems. Examples are recom-
EGGN342. 3 hour lectures, 3 semester hours.
mending design improvements to a refrigerator, diagnosing
EGGN442. FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR ENGI-
and predicting failures in refrigerators, computer control of a
NEERS (II) A course combining finite element theory
hydraulic fluid power circuit in a fatigue test, analysis of
with practical programming experience in which the multi-
structural failures in an off-road vehicle and redesign, diag-
disciplinary nature of the finite element method as a numerical
nosis and prediction of failures in a motor/generator system.
technique for solving differential equations is emphasized.
Prerequisites: DCGN381, EGGN250, EGGN352, EGGN350,
Topics covered include simple “structural” element, solid
EGGN351, EGGN320; concurrent enrollment in EGGN407.
elasticity, steady state analysis, transient analysis. Students get
3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
a copy of all the source code published in the course textbook.
EGGN451. HYDRAULIC PROBLEMS (I) Review of fun-
Prerequisite: EGGN320. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
damentals, forces on submerged surfaces, buoyancy and
EGGN444. DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES (I) To
flotation, gravity dams, weirs, steady flow in open channels,
learn application and use the American Institute of Steel
backwater curves, hydraulic machinery, elementary hydro-
Construction (AISC) Steel Construction Manual. Course de-
dynamics, hydraulic structures. Prerequisite: EGGN351.
velops an understanding of the underlying theory for the de-
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
sign specifications. Students learn basic steel structural
EGGN460. NUMERICAL METHODS FOR ENGINEERS(S)
member design principles to select the shape and size of a
Introduction to the use of numerical methods in the solution
structural member. The design and analysis of tension mem-
of problems encountered in engineering analysis and design,
bers, compression members, flexural members, and members
e.g. linear simultaneous equations (e.g. analysis of elastic
under combined loading is included, in addition to basic
materials, steady heat flow); roots of nonlinear equations
bolted and welded connection design. Prerequisite:
(e.g. vibration problems, open channel flow); eigenvalue
EGGN342. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
problems (e.g. natural frequencies, buckling and elastic sta-
EGGN445. DESIGN OF REINFORCED CONCRETE
bility); curve fitting and differentiation (e.g. interpretation of
STRUCTURES (II) This course provides an introduction to
experimental data, estimation of gradients); integration (e.g.
the materials and principles involved in the design of rein-
summation of pressure distributions, finite element proper-
forced concrete. It will allow students to develop an under-
ties, local averaging ); ordinary differential equations (e.g.
standing of the fundamental behavior of reinforced concrete
forced vibrations, beam bending) All course participants will
under compressive, tensile, bending, and shear loadings, and
receive source code consisting of a suite of numerical meth-
gain a working knowledge of strength design theory and its
ods programs. Prerequisite: CSCI260 or 261, MATH225,
application to the design of reinforced concrete beams,
EGGN320. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
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Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
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EGGN464. FOUNDATIONS (I, II) Techniques of subsoil
design of electric power distribution systems. Prerequisite:
investigation, types of foundations and foundation problems,
EGGN389. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
selection of and basis for design of foundation types. Pre-
EGGN485. INTRODUCTION TO HIGH POWER ELEC-
requisite: EGGN461. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
TRONICS (II) Power electronics are used in a broad range
EGGN471. HEAT TRANSFER (I, II) Engineering approach
of applications from control of power flow on major trans-
to conduction, convection, and radiation, including steady-
mission lines to control of motor speeds in industrial facili-
state conduction, nonsteady-state conduction, internal heat
ties and electric vehicles, to computer power supplies. This
generation conduction in one, two, and three dimensions, and
course introduces the basic principles of analysis and design
combined conduction and convection. Free and forced con-
of circuits utilizing power electronics, including AC/DC,
vection including laminar and turbulent flow, internal and
AC/AC, DC/DC, and DC/AC conversions in their many con-
external flow. Radiation of black and grey surfaces, shape
figurations. Prerequisite: EGGN385 and EGGN389. 3 hours
factors and electrical equivalence. Prerequisite: MATH225,
lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN351, EGGN371. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN488. RELIABILITY OF ENGINEERING SYSTEMS
EGGN473. FLUID MECHANICS II (I) Review of elemen-
(I) This course addresses uncertainty modeling, reliability
tary fluid mechanics and engineering. Two-dimensional in-
analysis, risk assessment, reliability-based design, predictive
ternal and external flows. Steady and unsteady flows. Fluid
maintenance, optimization, and cost-effective retrofit of engi-
engineering problems. Compressible flow. Computer solu-
neering systems such as structural, sensory, electric, pipe-
tions of various practical problems for mechanical and re-
line, hydraulic, lifeline and environmental facilities. Topics
lated engineering disciplines. Prerequisite: EGGN351 or
include introduction of reliability of engineering systems,
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
stochastic engineering system simulation, frequency analysis
EGGN478. ENGINEERING DYNAMICS (I) Applications
of extreme events, reliability and risk evaluation of engineer-
of dynamics to design, mechanisms and machine elements.
ing systems, and optimization of engineering systems. Pre-
Kinematics and kinetics of planar linkages. Analytical and
requisite: MATH323. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
graphical methods. Four-bar linkage, slider-crank, quick-
EGGN491. SENIOR DESIGN I (I, II) The first of a two-
return mechanisms, cams, and gears. Analysis of nonplanar
semester course sequence giving the student experience in
mechanisms. Static and dynamic balancing of rotating
the engineering design process. Realistic, open-ended design
machinery. Free and forced vibrations and vibration isola-
problems are addressed at the conceptual, engineering analy-
tion. Prerequisite: EGGN315; concurrent enrollment in
sis, and the synthesis stages, and include economic and
MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ethical considerations necessary to arrive at a final design.
EGGN482. MICROCOMPUTER ARCHITECTURE AND
Several design projects are completed during the two-semester
INTERFACING (II) Microprocessor and microcontroller
sequence. The design projects are chosen to develop student
architecture focusing on hardware structures and elementary
creativity, use of design methodology and application of prior
machine and assembly language programming skills essential
course work paralleled by individual study and research. Pre-
for use of microprocessors in data acquisition, control and
requisites: permission of the Capstone Design Course Com-
instrumentation systems. Analog and digital signal condition-
mittee. 1 hour lecture; 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
ing, communication, and processing. A/D and D/A converters
EGGN492. SENIOR DESIGN II (I, II) This is the second of
for microprocessors. RS232 and other communication stan-
a two-semester course sequence to give the student experi-
dards. Laboratory study and evaluation of microcomputer
ence in the engineering design process. This course will con-
system; design and implementation of interfacing projects.
sist of a single comprehensive design project covering the
Prerequisite: EGGN384 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lec-
entire semester. Design integrity and performance are to be
ture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
demonstrated by building a prototype or model and perform-
EGGN483. ANALOG AND DIGITAL COMMUNICATION
ing pre-planned experimental tests, wherever feasible. Pre-
SYSTEMS (I) Signal classification; Fourier transform;
requisite: EGGN491. 1 hour lecture; 6 hours lab; 3 semester
filtering; sampling; signal representation; modulation;
hours.
demodulation; applications to broadcast, data transmission,
EGGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGINEERING (I, II)
and instrumentation. Prerequisite: EGGN388 or consent of
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from
department. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
special interest of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
EGGN484. POWER SYSTEMS ANALYSIS (I) 3-phase
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
power systems, per-unit calculations, modeling and equiva-
Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit
lent circuits of major components, voltage drop, fault calcu-
under different titles.
lations, symmetrical components and unsymmetrical faults,
EGGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual
system grounding, power-flow, selection of major equipment,
research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
75

member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
hour. Repeatable; maximum 1 hour granted toward degree
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Indepen-
requirements.
dent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
EGGN510. IMAGE AND MULTIDIMENSIONAL SIGNAL
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for
PROCESSING (I) This course provides the student with the
credit under different topics/experiences.
theoretical background to allow them to apply state of the art
Graduate Courses
image and multi-dimensional signal processing techniques. The
500-level courses are open to qualified seniors with the per-
course teaches students to solve practical problems involving
mission of the department and Dean of the Graduate School.
the processing of multidimensional data such as imagery, video
EGGN501. ADVANCED ENGINEERING MEASURE-
sequences, and volumetric data. The types of problems students
MENTS (I) Introduction to the fundamentals of measure-
are expected to solve are automated mensuration from multi-
ments within the context of engineering systems. Topics
dimensional data, and the restoration, reconstruction, or com-
that are covered include: errors and error analysis, modeling
pression of multidimensional data. The tools used in solving
of measurement systems, basic electronics, noise and noise
these problems include a variety of feature extraction methods,
reduction, and data acquisition systems. Prerequisite:
filtering techniques, segmentation techniques, and transform
EGGN250, DCGN381 or equivalent, and MATH323
methods. Students will use the techniques covered in this
or equivalent; graduate student status or consent of the in-
course to solve practical problems in projects. Prerequisite:
structor. 3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab; 4 semester hours.
EGGN388 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN502. INTERDISCIPLINARY MODELING AND
EGGN511. DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING (I) This
SIMULATION (I) Introduce modern simulation and model-
course introduces the engineering aspects of digital signal
ing techniques, as used to solve traditional and multidiscipli-
processing (DSP). It deals with the theoretical foundations of
nary engineering problems. Static and dynamic phenomena
DSP combined with applications and implementation technol-
are described in space and space-time domains as well as in
ogies. While the bulk of the course addresses one-dimensional
transform space. Analytical as well as computational solution
signals and emphasizes digital filters, there are extensions to
methods are developed and applied for linear and nonlinear
specialized and contemporary topics such as sigma-delta
systems. Simulation and modeling approaches are applied to
conversion techniques. The course will be useful to all stu-
solve multidisciplinary engineering problems. Prerequisite:
dents who are concerned with information bearing signals
This is an introductory graduate class. The student must have
and signal-processing in a wide variety of applications set-
a solid understanding of linear algebra, calculus, ordinary
tings, including sensing, instrumentation, control, communi-
differential equations, and Fourier theory. 3 hours lecture;
cations, signal interpretation and diagnostics, and imaging.
1 hour lab; 4 semester hours.
Prerequisite: EGGN483 and EGGN407 or consent of instruc-
tor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN503. MODERN ENGINEERING DESIGN AND
PROJECT MANAGEMENT (II) Contemporary technical
EGGN512. COMPUTER VISION (II) Computer vision is
and behavioral issues in engineering design and project man-
the process of using computers to acquire images, transform
agement. Implementation of project organization techniques
images, and extract symbolic descriptions from images. This
to plan thesis research projects or projects selected at the
course concentrates on how to recover the structure and
beginning of the semester. Elements of quality control in
properties of a possibly dynamic three-dimensional world
manufacturing and numerous marketing tools. Prerequisite:
from its two-dimensional images. We start with an overview
EGGN491 and EGGN492, or equivalent senior design project
of image formation and low level image processing, includ-
experience, or equivalent industrial design experience, or
ing feature extraction techniques. We then go into detail on
consent of the Engineering Division. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
the theory and techniques for estimating shape, location, mo-
mester hours.
tion, and recognizing objects. Applications and case studies
will be discussed from areas such as scientific image analy-
EGGN504. ENGINEERING SYSTEMS SEMINAR (I, II)
sis, robotics, machine vision inspection systems, photogram-
This is a seminar forum for graduate students to present their
metry, multimedia, and human interfaces (such as face and
research projects, critique others’ presentations, understand
gesture recognition). Design ability and hands-on projects
the breadth of engineering projects both within their specialty
will be emphasized, using image processing software and
area and across the Division, hear from leaders of industry
hardware systems. Prerequisite: Linear algebra, Fourier
about contemporary engineering as well as socio-economical
transforms, knowledge of C programming language. 3 hours
and marketing issues facing today’s competitive global envi-
lecture; 3 semester hours.
ronment. In order to improve communication skills, each stu-
dent is required to present a seminar in this course before
EGGN513. WIRELESS COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS (I)
his/her graduation from the Engineering graduate program.
This course explores aspects of electromagnetics, stochastic
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 1 hour seminar, 1 semester
modeling, signal processing, and RF/microwave components
as applied to the design of wireless systems. In particular,
76
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

topics on (a) physical and statistical models to represent the
systems are presented. The discrete-time Kalman Filter is
wireless channel, (b) advanced digital modulation tech-
introduced, and conditions for optimality are described.
niques, (c) temporal, spectral, code-division and spatial mul-
Implementation issues, performance prediction, and filter
tiple access techniques, (d) space diversity techniques and (d)
divergence are discussed. Adaptive estimation and nonlinear
the effects of RF/microwave components on wireless sys-
estimation are also covered. Contemporary applications will
tems will be discussed. Pre-requisite: EGGN 386, EGGN
be utilized throughout the course. Pre-requisite: EGGN407
483, and consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
and MATH323 or equivalent. Spring semester of odd years.
hours.
EGGN520. INTRODUCTION TO BIOMEDICAL ENGI-
EGGN514/MNGN. ADVANCED ROBOT CONTROL (I)
NEERING (II) The application of engineering principles and
The focus is on mobile robotic vehicles. Topics covered are:
techniques to the human body presents many unique chal-
navigation, mining applications, sensors, including vision,
lenges. The discipline of Biomedical Engineering has
problems of sensing variations in rock properties, problems
evolved over the past 50 years to address these challenges.
of representing human knowledge in control systems, ma-
Biomedical Engineering is a diverse, seemingly all-encom-
chine condition diagnostics, kinematics, and path planning
passing field that includes such areas as biomechanics, bio-
real time obstacle avoidance. Prerequisite: EGGN407 or con-
materials, bioinstrumentation, medical imaging,
sent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester
rehabilitation. This course is intended to provide an intro-
hours. Every two years.
duction to, and overview of, Biomedical Engineering. At the
EGGN515. MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR SIGNALS
end of the semester, graduate students should have a working
AND SYSTEMS (I) An introduction to mathematical meth-
knowledge of the special considerations necessary to apply
ods for modern signal processing using vector space meth-
various engineering principles to the human body. Prerequi-
ods. Topics include signal representation in Hilbert and
sites: DCGN 421 Statics, DCGN381 Circuits, EGGN 320
Banach spaces; linear operators and the geometry of linear
Mechanics of Materials, EGGN 351 Fluids I (or instructor
equations; LU, Cholesky, QR, eigen- and singular value de-
permission). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
compositions. Applications to signal processing and linear
EGGN521. MECHATRONICS (II) Fundamental design of
systems are included throughout, such as Fourier analysis,
electromechanical systems with embedded microcomputers
wavelets, adaptive filtering, signal detection, and feedback
and intelligence. Design of microprocessor based systems
control.
and their interfaces. Fundamental design of machines with
EGGN517. THEORY AND DESIGN OF ADVANCED
active sensing and adaptive response. Microcontrollers and
CONTROL SYSTEMS (II) This course will introduce and
integration of micro-sensors and micro-actuators in the de-
study the theory and design of multivariable and nonlinear
sign of electromechanical systems. Introduction to algo-
control systems. Students will learn to design multivariable
rithms for information processing appropriate for embedded
controllers that are both optimal and robust, using tools such
systems. Smart materials and their use as actuators. Students
as state space and transfer matrix models, nonlinear analysis,
will do projects involving the design and implementation of
optimal estimator and controller design, and multi-loop con-
smart-systems. Prerequisite: DCGN 381 and EGGN482 rec-
troller synthesis Prerequisite: EGGN417 or consent of in-
ommended. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Spring semes-
structor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Spring semester.
ters, every other year.
EGGN518. ROBOT MECHANICS: KINEMATICS, DY-
EGGN525. MUSCOLOSKELETAL BIOMECHANICS (I)
NAMICS, AND CONTROL (I) Mathematical representation
This course is intended to provide graduate engineering stu-
of robot structures. Mechanical analysis including kinematics,
dents with an introduction to musculoskeletal biomechanics.
dynamics, and design of robot manipulators. Representations
At the end of the semester, students should have a working
for trajectories and path planning for robots. Fundamentals of
knowledge of the special considerations necessary to apply
robot control including, linear, nonlinear and force control
engineering principles to the human body. The course will
methods. Introduction to off-line programming techniques
focus on the biomechanics of injury since understanding in-
and simulation. Prerequisite: EGGN407, EGGN400 or con-
jury will require developing an understanding of normal bio-
sent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Fall se-
mechanics. Prerequisites: DCGN421 Statics, EGGN320
mesters, ever year, or every other year, depending on interest.
Mechanics of Materials, EGGN420/BELS420 Introduction to
Biomedical Engineering (or instructor permission). 3 hours
EGGN519. ESTIMATION THEORY AND KALMAN FIL-
lecture; 3 semester hours.
TERING (II) Estimation theory considers the extraction of
useful information from raw sensor measurements in the
EGGN527. PROSTHETIC AND IMPLANT ENGINEER-
presence of signal uncertainty. Common applications include
ING (I) Prosthetics and implants for the musculoskeletal and
navigation, localization and mapping, but applications can be
other systems of the human body are becoming increasingly
found in all fields where measurements are used. Mathematic
sophisticated. From simple joint replacements to myoelectric
descriptions of random signals and the response of linear
limb replacements and functional electrical stimulation, the
engineering opportunities continue to expand. This course
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
77

builds on musculoskeletal biomechanics and other BELS
EGGN533. UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS (I) The
courses to provide engineering students with an introduction
focus of this course is on soil mechanics for unsaturated
to prosthetics and implants for the musculoskeletal system.
soils. It provides an introduction to thermodynamic potentials
At the end of the semester, students should have a working
in partially saturated soils, chemical potentials of adsorbed
knowledge of the challenges and special considerations nec-
water in partially saturated soils, phase properties and rela-
essary to apply engineering principles to augmentation or re-
tions, stress state variables, measurements of soil water
placement in the musculoskeletal system. Prerequisites:
suction, unsaturated flow laws, measurement of unsaturated
Musculoskeletal Biomechanics (EGGN/BELS425 or
permeability, volume change theory, effective stress principle,
EGGN/BELS525), 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and measurement of volume changes in partially saturated
EGGN528. COMPUTATIONAL BIOMECHANICS Compu-
soils. The course is designed for seniors and graduate stu-
tational Biomechanics provides and introduction to the appli-
dents in various branches of engineering and geology that are
cation of computer simulation to solve some fundamental
concerned with unsaturated soil’s hydrologic and mechanics
problems in biomechanics and bioengineering. Muscu-
behavior. Prerequisites: EGGN461 or consent of instructor.
loskeletal mechanics, medical image reconstruction, hard and
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
soft tissue modeling, joint mechanics, and inter-subject vari-
EGGN534. SOIL BEHAVIOR (II) The focus of this course
ability will be considered. An emphasis will be placed on un-
is on interrelationships among the composition, fabric, and
derstanding the limitations of the computer model as a
geotechnical and hydrologic properties of soils that consist
predictive tool and the need for rigorous verification and val-
partly or wholly of clay. The course will be divided into two
idation of computational techniques. Clinical application of
parts. The first part provides an introduction to the composi-
biomechanical modeling tools is highlighted and impact on
tion and fabric of natural soils, their surface and pore-fluid
patient quality of life is demonstrated. Prerequisite:
chemistry, and the physico-chemical factors that govern soil
EGGN413, EGGN420 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lec-
behavior. The second part examines what is known about
ture; 3 semester hours.
how these fundamental characteristics and factors affect ge-
EGGN530. BIOMEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION (I) The
otechnical properties, including the hydrologic properties
acquisition, processing, and interpretation of biological sig-
that govern the conduction of pore fluid and pore fluid con-
nals presents many unique challenges to the Biomedical En-
stituents, and the geomechanical properties that govern vol-
gineer. This course is intended to provide students with the
ume change, shear deformation, and shear strength. The
knowledge to understand, appreciate, and address these chal-
course is designed for graduate students in various branches
lenges. At the end of the semester, students should have a
of engineering and geology that are concerned with the engi-
working knowledge of the special considerations necessary
neering and hydrologic behavior of earth systems, including
to gathering and analyzing biological signal data. Prerequi-
geotechnical engineering, geological engineering, environ-
sites: EGGN250 MEL I, DCGN381 Introduction to Electrical
mental engineering, mining engineering, and petroleum engi-
Circuits, Electronics, and Power, EGGN420/BELS420 Intro-
neering. Prerequisites: EGGN461 Soil Mechanics or consent
duction to Biomedical Engineering (or permission of instruc-
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
tor). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN535. INTRODUCTION TO DISCRETE ELEMENT
EGGN531. SOIL DYNAMICS Dynamic phenomena in ge-
METHODS (DEMS) (II) Review of particle/rigid body
otechnical engineering, e.g., earthquakes, pile and foundation
dynamics, numerical DEM solution of equations of motion
vibrations, traffic, construction vibrations; behavior of soils
for a system of particles/rigid bodies, linear and nonlinear
under dynamic loading, e.g., small, medium and large strain
contact and impact laws dynamics, applications of DEM in
behavior, soil liquefaction; wave propagation through soil
mechanical engineering, materials processing and geo-
and rock; laboratory and field techniques to assess dynamic
mechanics. Prerequisites: EGGN320, EGGN315 and some
soil properties; analysis and design of shallow and deep
scientific programming experience in C/C++ or Fortran or
foundations subjected to dynamic loading; analysis of con-
the consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
struction vibrations. Prerequisites: EGGN361, EGGN315,
hours Spring semester of even numbered years.
EGGN464 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semes-
EGGN540. CONTINUUM MECHANICS (I) Introduction
ter hours.
to Cartesian tensor analysis; consideration of stress, strain,
EGGN532/MTGN545. FATIGUE AND FRACTURE (I)
and strain rates as tensor quantities including their transfor-
Basic fracture mechanics as applied to engineering materials,
mation laws; decomposition theorems for stress and strain;
S-N curves, the Goodman diagram, stress concentrations,
constitutive theory of materials; use of conservation princi-
residual stress effects, effect of material properties on mecha-
ples in continuum mechanics. Prerequisite: EGGN322 and
nisms of crack propagation. Prerequisite: Consent of depart-
MATH225 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semes-
ment. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Fall semesters, odd
ter hours. Fall semesters, odd numbered years.
numbered years.
78
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

EGGN541. ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (I)
Natural frequencies. Role of Damping. Importance of reso-
Introduction to advanced structural analysis concepts. Non-
nance. Modal superposition method. Prerequisite:
prismatic structures. Arches, Suspension and cable-stayed
EGGN315, 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
bridges. Structural optimization. Computer Methods. Struc-
EGGN547. TIMBER AND MASONRY DESIGN (II) The
tures with nonlinear materials. Internal force redistribution
course develops the theory and design methods required for
for statically indeterminate structures. Graduate credit re-
the use of timber and masonry as structural materials. The
quires additional homework and projects. Prerequisite:
design of walls, beams, columns, beam-columns, shear walls,
EGGN342. 3 hour lectures, 3 semester hours.
and structural systems are covered for each material. Grav-
EGGN542. FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR ENGI-
ity, wind, snow, and seismic loads are calculated and utilized
NEERS (II) A course combining finite element theory
for design. Connection design and advanced seismic analysis
with practical programming experience in which the multi-
principles are introduced. Prerequisite: EGGN342 or equiva-
disciplinary nature of the finite element method as a numerical
lent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
technique for solving differential equations is emphasized.
EGGN548. ADVANCED SOIL MECHANICS (I) Advanced
Topics covered include simple “structural” elements, beams
soil mechanics theories and concepts as applied to analysis
on elastic foundations, solid elasticity, steady state analysis
and design in geotechnical engineering. Topics covered will
and transient analysis. Some of the applications will lie in the
include seepage, consolidation, shear strength, failure criteria
general area of geomechanics, reflecting the research inter-
and constitutive models for soil. The course will have an
ests of the instructor. Students get a copy of all the source
emphasis on numerical solution techniques to geotechnical
code published in the course textbook. Prerequisite: Consent
problems by finite elements and finite differences. Prerequi-
of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
sites: A first course in soil mechanics or consent of instructor.
EGGN543. SOLID MECHANICS OF MATERIALS (II)
3 Lecture Hours, 3 semester hours.
Introduction to the algebra of vectors and tensors; coordinate
EGGN549. ADVANCED DESIGN OF STEEL STRUC-
transformations; general theories of stress and strain; princi-
TURES (II) The course extends the coverage of steel design
pal stresses and strains; octahedral stresses; Hooke’s Law
to include the topics: slender columns, beam-columns, frame
introduction to the mathematical theory of elasticity and to
behavior, bracing systems and connections, stability, moment
energy methods; failure theories for yield and fracture. Pre-
resisting connections, composite design, bolted and welded
requisite: EGGN320 or equivalent, MATH225 or equivalent.
connections under eccentric loads and tension, and semi-rigid
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
connections. Prerequisite: EGGN444 or equivalent. 3 hours
EGGN544. SOLID MECHANICS OF NONLINEAR MA-
lecture; 3 semester hours.
TERIALS (II) Introduction to the internal state variable
EGGN 550. DESIGN OF REINFORCED CONCRETE
modeling of inelastic deformation. Topics covered include:
STRUCTURES II (I) Advanced problems in the analysis
review of continuum thermomechanics; physics of plastic de-
and design of concrete structures, design of slender columns;
formation in crystalline solids and in geo-materials; vis-
biaxial bending; two-way slabs; strut and tie models; lateral
coplasticity; rate-independent plasticity; yield criteria;
and vertical load analysis of multistory buildings; introduc-
isotropic and kinematic hardening rules; numerical solution
tion to design for seismic forces; use of structural computer
of sets of internal state variable equations; numerical cou-
programs. Prerequisite: EGGN445. 3 hour lectures; 3 semes-
pling of internal state variable equations with finite element
ter hours.
models of elastic deformation. Prerequisite EGGN320 and
EGGN543 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semes-
EGGN551. MECHANICS OF INCOMPRESSIBLE FLU-
ter hours. Spring semester, even numbered years.
IDS (I) Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. Mechanics of
two- and three-dimensional viscous incompressible flows,
EGGN545. BOUNDARY ELEMENT METHODS (II)
flows of homogeneous and nonhomogeneous fluids, and en-
Development of the fundamental theory of the boundary ele-
gineering applications. Multi-phase flows. Steady and un-
ment method with applications in elasticity, heat transfer, dif-
steady Bernoulli equation. Similarity of flows. Potential
fusion, and wave propagation. Derivation of indirect and
flows and basic source-sink flows inside and around body.
direct boundary integral equations. Introduction to other
Random ocean waves. Inertia and damping forces on sub-
Green’s function based methods of analysis. Computational
merged bodies. Vortex shedding. Engineering applications
experiments in primarily two dimensions. Prerequisite:
and computer simulations. Prerequisites; EGGN351 and
EGGN502, EGGN540 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lec-
MATH225 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semes-
ture; 3 semester hours Spring Semester, odd numbered years.
ter hours.
EGGN546. ADVANCED ENGINEERING VIBRATION (I)
EGGN552. VISCOUS FLOW AND BOUNDARY LAYERS
Vibration theory as applied to single- and multi-degree-of-
(I) This course establishes the theoretical underpinnings of
freedom systems. Free and forced vibrations to different
fluid mechanics, including fluid kinematics, stress-strain
types of loading-harmonic, impulse, periodic and general.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
79

relationships, and derivation of the fluid-mechanical conser-
buckling (eigenvalue problems); interpretation of experimen-
vation equations. These include the mass-continuity and
tal data (curve fitting and differentiation); summation of
Navier-Stokes equations as well as the multi-component
pressure distributions (integration); beam deflections (bound-
energy and species-conservation equations. Fluid-mechanical
ary value problems). All course participants will receive
boundary-layer theory is developed and applied to situations
source code of all the numerical methods programs published
arising in chemically reacting flow applications including
in the course textbook which is coauthored by the instructor.
combustion, chemical processing, and thin-film materials
Prerequisite: MATH225 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lec-
processing. Prerequisite: EGGN473, or CHEN430 or consent
ture; 3 semester hours.
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN564. PHYSICAL GASDYNAMICS (I) Selected
EGGN553. ENGINEERING HYDROLOGY (I) The hydro-
topics in gas-phase thermodynamics for high speed and/or
logic cycle, precipitation and runoff relationships, and the
reacting flows: kinetic theory; transport properties; chemical
Rational Method. Hydrograph analysis and synthesis and the
equilibrium; vibrational, rotational and chemical rate processes;
unit hydrograph. Basin analysis, flood routing, urban hydrol-
statistical mechanics; and the equations of radiative transfer
ogy and design. Prerequisite: EGGN351 or consent of in-
from a microscopic viewpoint. Prerequisite: EGGN351,
structor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Fall semesters,
EGGN371 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semes-
even years.
ter hours.
EGGN554. OPEN CHANNEL FLOW (II) Fluid mechanics
EGGN566. COMBUSTION (II) An introduction to combus-
applied to flow in natural and manmade channels. The princi-
tion. Course subjects include: the development of the Chap-
ples of momentum and energy, flow resistance in uniform
man-Jouget solutions for deflagration and detonation, a brief
and non-uniform channels. Backwater and drawdown curves,
review of the fundamentals of kinetics and thermochemistry,
channel controls and transitions. Gradually, rapidly and spa-
development of solutions for diffusion flames and premixed
tially varied flow regimes. Unsteady flow and flood routing
flames, discussion of flame structure, pollutant formation, and
methods. Prerequisite: EGGN351 or consent of instructor.
combustion in practical systems. Prerequisite: EGGN473, or
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Spring semesters, odd years.
ChEN430 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semes-
EGGN555. KINETIC PHENOMENA IN MATERIALS (I)
ter hours.
Linear irreversible thermodynamics, dorce-flux couplings,
EGGN567. RADIATION HEAT TRANSFER (I) Review of
diffusion, crystalline materials, amorphous materials, defect
radiative properties, blackbody radiation, Planck’s distribu-
kinetics in crystalline materials, interface kinetics, morpho-
tion, Wien’s Displacement Law, Kirchhoff’s Law, view fac-
logical evolution of interfaces, nucleation theory, crystal
tors. Radiation exchange within enclosures with black and
growth, coarsening phenomena and grain growth, solidifica-
diffuse-gray surfaces. Radiation in absorbing, emitting and
tion, spinodal decomposition. Prerequisites: MATH225: Dif-
scattering (semi-transparent, participating) media. An engi-
ferential equations (or equivalent), MLGN504/MTGN555/
neering treatment of gas radiation in enclosures. Prerequisite:
CHEN509: Thermodynamics (or its equivalent)
EGGN471, or equivalent or consent of instructor. 3 hours
EGGN559. MECHANICS OF PARTICULATE MEDIA (I)
lecture; 3 semester hours.
This course allows students to establish fundamental knowl-
EGGN569. FUEL CELL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
edge of quasi-static and dynamic particle behavior that is
Investigate fundamentals of fuel-cell operation and electro-
beneficial to interdisciplinary material handling processes in
chemistry from a chemical-thermodynamics and materials-
the chemical, civil, materials, metallurgy, geophysics, physics,
science perspective. Review types of fuel cells,
and mining engineering. Issues of interest are the definition
fuel-processing requirements and approaches, and fuel-cell
of particle size and size distribution, particle shape, nature of
system integration. Examine current topics in fuel-cell sci-
packing, quasi-static behavior under different external load-
ence and technology. Fabricate and test operational fuel cells
ing, particle collisions, kinetic theoretical modeling of par-
in the Colorado Fuel Cell Center. 3 credit hours.
ticulate flows, molecular dynamic simulations, and a brief
EGGN572. MULTIPHASE FLOWS AND TRANSPORT
introduction of solid-fluid two-phase flows. Prerequisite:
PHENOMENA WITH DROPLETS AND PARTICLES (II)
Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Fall
Derivation of the basic heat, mass, and momentum transfer
semesters, every other year.
equations for the analysis of multiphase flows with droplets
EGGN560. NUMERICAL METHODS FOR ENGINEERS
and particles. Flow patterns in two-phase pipe flows. Analy-
(S) Introduction to the use of numerical methods in the solu-
sis of spray and particulate systems. Formation and breakup
tion of commonly encountered problems of engineering
of droplets. Particle/fluid, particle/wall, particle/particle in-
analysis. Structural/solid analysis of elastic materials (linear
teractions. Prerequisite: EGGN552 or consent of instructor.
simultaneous equations); vibrations (roots of nonlinear equa-
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Spring semesters, every
tions, initial value problems); natural frequency and beam
other year.
80
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

EGGN573. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTATIONAL
EGGN584. POWER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS ENGI-
TECHNIQUES FOR FLUID DYNAMICS AND TRANS-
NEERING (II) This course deals with the theory and appli-
PORT PHENOMENA (II) Introduction to Computational
cations of problems and solutions as related to electric power
Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for graduate students with no prior
distribution systems engineering from both ends: end-users
knowledge of this topic. Basic techniques for the numerical
like large industrial plants and electric utility companies. The
analysis of fluid flows. Acquisition of hands-on experience in
primary focus of this course in on the medium voltage (4.16
the development of numerical algorithms and codes for the
kV – 69 kV) power systems. Some references will be made
numerical modeling and simulation of flows and transport
to the LV power system. The course includes: per-unit meth-
phenomena of practical and fundamental interest. Capabili-
ods of calculations; voltage drop and voltage regulation;
ties and limitations of CFD. Prerequisite: EGGN473 or con-
power factor improvement and shunt compensation; short-
sent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
circuit calculations; theory and fundamentals of symmetrical
EGGN581. MODERN ADJUSTABLE SPEED ELECTRIC
components; unsymmetrical faults; overhead distribution
DRIVES (I) An introduction to electric drive systems for ad-
lines and power cables; basics and fundamentals of distribu-
vanced applications. The course introduces the treatment of
tion protection. Prerequisites: EGGN484 or equivalent, and/or
vector control of induction and synchronous motor drives
consent of instructor. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours.
using the concepts of general flux orientation and the feed-
EGGN585. ADVANCED HIGH POWER ELECTRONICS
forward (indirect) and feedback (direct) voltage and current
(II) Basic principles of analysis and design of circuits utiliz-
vector control. AC models in space vector complex algebra
ing high power electronics. AC/DC, DC/AC, AC/AC, and
are also developed. Other types of drives are also covered,
DC/DC conversion techniques. Laboratory project compris-
such as reluctance, stepper-motor and switched-reluctance
ing simulation and construction of a power electronics
drives. Digital computer simulations are used to evaluate
circuit. Prerequisites: EGGN385; EGGN389 or equivalent.
such implementations. Pre-requisite: Familiarity with power
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
electronics and power systems, such as covered in EGGN484
EGGN586. HIGH VOLTAGE AC AND DC POWER
and EGGN485. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours.
TRANSMISSION (II) This course deals with the theory,
EGGN582. RENEWABLE ENERGY AND DISTRIBUTED
modeling and applications of HV and EHV power transmis-
GENERATION (II) A comprehensive electrical engineering
sion systems engineering. The primary focus is on overhead
approach on the integration of alternative sources of energy.
AC transmission line and voltage ranges between 115 kV –
One of the main objectives of this course is to focus on the
500 kV. HVDC and underground transmission will also be
inter-disciplinary aspects of integration of the alternative
discussed. The details include the calculations of line param-
sources of energy which will include most common and also
eters (RLC); steady-state performance evaluation (voltage
promising types of alternative primary energy: hydropower,
drop and regulation, losses and efficiency) of short, medium
wind power, photovoltaic, fuel cells and energy storage with
and long lines; reactive power compensation; FACTS de-
the integration to the electric grid. Pre-requisite: It is assumed
vices; insulation coordination; corona; insulators; sag-tension
that students will have some basic and broad knowledge of
calculations; EMTP, traveling wave and transients; funda-
the principles of electrical machines, thermodynamics, power
mentals of transmission line design; HV and EHV power ca-
electronics, direct energy conversion, and fundamentals of
bles: solid dielectric, oil-filled and gas-filled; Fundamentals
electric power systems such as covered in basic engineering
of DC transmission systems including converter and filter.
courses plus EGGN484 and EGGN485. 3 lecture hours; 3 se-
Prerequisites: EGGN484 or equivalent, and/or consent of in-
mester hours.
structor. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours.
EGGN583. ADVANCED ELECTRICAL MACHINE DY-
EGGN588. ADVANCED RELIABILITY OF ENGINEER-
NAMICS (I) This course deals primarily with the two rotat-
ING SYSTEMS (I) This course addresses uncertainty model-
ing AC machines currently utilized in the electric power
ing, reliability analysis, risk assessment, reliability-based
industry, namely induction and synchronous machines. The
design, predictive maintenance, optimization, and cost-effective
course is divided in two halves: the first half is dedicated to
retrofit of engineering systems such as structural, sensory,
induction and synchronous machines are taught in the second
electric, pipeline, hydraulic, lifeline and environmental facili-
half. The details include the development of the theory of
ties. Topics include Introduction of Reliability of Engineer-
operation, equivalent circuit models for both steady-state and
ing Systems, Network Modeling and Evaluation of Complex
transient operations, all aspects of performance evaluation,
Engineering Systems, Stochastic Engineering System Simu-
IEEE methods of testing, and guidelines for industry applica-
lation, Frequency Analysis of Extreme Events, Reliability
tions including design and procurement. Prerequisites:
and Risk Evaluation of Engineering Systems, and Optimiza-
EGGN484 or equivalent, and/or consent of instructor.
tion of Engineering Systems. Prerequisite: MATH324. 3
3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours.
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
81

EGGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGINEERING (I, II)
power electronics, and the detection of faults in these sys-
Pilot course of special topics course. Topics chosen from
tems. Presentation of current techniques for pattern recogni-
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually
tion, signature analysis, sensor fusion, and intelligent control,
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Consent of the
including FFT, wavelets, and time-frequency analysis. Fail-
instructor. Variable credit; 1 to 6 hours. Repeatable for credit
ure modes, effects and criticality analysis. Case studies and
under different titles.
review of active research in failure prevention and predictive
EGGN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
maintenance. Use of expert systems, fuzzy logic, and neural
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
networks for intelligent machine decision making. Prerequisite:
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
EGGN411, EGGN478 or consent of instructor. EGGN617
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Indepen-
recommended. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Spring se-
dent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
mesters, every other year.
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 hours. Repeatable for credit
EGGN642. ADVANCED FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS
to a maximum of 6 hours.
FOR ENGINEERS (I) Solution of nonlinear equations, Tran-
EGGN617. INTELLIGENT CONTROL SYSTEMS (II)
sient finite element analysis, Finite elements for nonlinear
Fundamental issues related to the design on intelligent con-
material behavior, Finite elements for large deformations and
trol systems are described. Neural networks analysis for
contact problems Applications of finite elements in mechanical
engineering systems are presented. Neural-based learning,
engineering, materials processing and geomechanics. Pre-
estimation, and identification of dynamical systems are de-
requisites: EGGN320, EGGN315, EGGN542 and some sci-
scribed. Qualitative control system analysis using fuzzy logic
entific programming experience in C/C++ or Fortran, or the
is presented. Fuzzy mathematics design of rule-based control,
consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and integrated human-machine intelligent control systems are
Fall Semester of even numbered years.
covered. Real-life problems from different engineering sys-
EGGN649. HYDRODYNAMICS (II) Basic principles of
tems are analyzed. Prerequisite: EGGN517 or consent of in-
hydrodynamics treat fundamentals, basic equations, and gen-
structor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Spring semester
eral theorems. Potential solutions include hydrodynamic sin-
of even years.
gularities (sources, sinks, etc) and nonhomogeneous fluids
EGGN618. SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION AND ADAPTIVE
flows. Nonhomogeneous fluids flows related to the resources
CONTROL (II) Modeling is the first step in control design,
recovery technologies. Waves of finite amplitude in stratified
and for many processes a physical model is not appropriate
fluid. Surface waves and random waves. Motion by capilarity.
for control design, either because it is too complex, or be-
Solution methods and engineering applications with computer-
cause of unknown parameters. System identification is an
aided solutions. Prerequisites : EGGN551, MATH514 or
important tool, which with proper use can help a control de-
consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
signer develop empirical models from experimental input/
Spring semester, every third year.
output data. These models are suitable for control system
EGGN657/CHEN657. RADIATION HEAT TRANSFER (I)
design. Adaptive control systems can make use of on-line
Review of radiative properties, blackbody radiation, Planck’s
system identification to continually update the process model
distribution, Wien’s Displacement Law, Kirchhoff’s Law,
and/or control parameters. The course will begin with cover-
view factors. Radiation exchange within enclosures and
age of unconstrained optimization and maximum likelihood
black and diffuse-gray surfaces. Radiation in absorbing,
(ML) estimation. Discrete time dynamic system models are
emitting and scattering (semi-transparent, participating)
introduced, including transfer function and state space models,
media. An engineering treatment of gas radiation in enclo-
random sequences, and ARMAX and Box-Jenkins model
sures. Prerequisite: EGGN471, or equivalent or consent of
structures. State estimation and Kalman filtering is developed.
instructor. 3 lecture hours, 3 semester hours.
System identification is then an application of ML estimation
EGGN658. MOLECULAR SPECTROSCOPY FOR THE
to various model structures. The final portion of the course
THERMOSCIENCES (II) A detailed review of spectroscopy
covers adaptive control as an application of on-line system
for engineers who use it diagnostics for flowfield research.
identification. Prerequisite: EGGN517 or EGGN523 or con-
Introduction to quantum mechanics including the one-electron
sent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Spring,
atom problem, Zeeman effect and electron spin. Spectroscopy
odd numbered years.
of multi-electron atoms, with a discussion of perturbation
EGGN619. APPLIED INTELLIGENT CONTROL AND
solutions to the Schrödinger equation. Development of a
FAILURE DIAGNOSTICS (II) Application of intelligent
transition moment, and its relation to the Einstein A coeffi-
control to system diagnostics and failure prediction. Funda-
cient. Molecular spectroscopy is introduced via the harmonic
mentals of machinery condition monitoring and health as-
oscillator and rigid rotator problems. Simple infrared spec-
sessment. Survey of techniques used for signal analysis and
troscopy, with the anharmonic oscillators and non-rigid rota-
interpretation of machine condition. Experiments involving
tors. Electronic transitions & the full diatomic molecular
servo hydraulic, electromechanical drives, refrigeration, and
description. Topics such as the rate equations, the density
82
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

matrix equations, or the spectroscopy of polyatomic species.
EGGN698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGINEERING (I, II)
Prerequisite: EGGN564, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lec-
Pilot course of special topics course. Topics chosen from
ture; 3 semester hours. Spring semesters, every other year
special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually
(opposite EGGN659 Optical Measurements in Reacting and
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Consent of the
Nonreacting Flow Systems).
Instructor. Variable credit; 1 to 6 hours. Repeatable for credit
EGGN659. OPTICAL MEASUREMENTS IN REACTING
under different titles.
AND NONREACTING FLOW SYSTEMS (II) An intro-
EGES699. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
duction to passive and active optical diagnostic techniques
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
for species concentrations, gas temperature and flowfield
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
velocity. Radiation methods for particulate and molecular
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Indepen-
species. Particulate methods for velocity (e.g. Particle Image
dent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
Velocimetry). Line-of-sight measurements for both particulate
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 hours. Repeatable for credit
and molecules (e.g. Rayleigh and Mie scattering, absorption).
under different topics/experience.
Spatially resolved measurements including nonresonant scat-
EGGN705. GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT: MASTER
tering (e.g. Raman), linear resonant methods (Laser Induced
OF SCIENCE Research credit hours required for completion
Fluorescence) and nonlinear methods (e.g. Degenerate Four-
of the degree Master of Science - thesis. Research must be
Wave Mixing). Prerequisite: EGGN501, EGGN564, PH op-
carried out under the direct supervision of the graduate stu-
tics course (no number at present), or consent of instructor. 3
dent’s faculty advisor. Repeatable for credit.
hours lecture; 1hour lab; 4 semester hours. Spring semesters,
every other year (opposite Molecular Spectroscopy).
EGGN706. GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT: DOCTOR
OF PHILOSOPHY Research credit hours required for com-
EGGN683. COMPUTER METHODS IN ELECTRIC
pletion of the degree Doctor of Philosophy. Research must be
POWER SYSTEMS (I, II) This course deals with the com-
carried out under direct supervision of the graduate student’s
puter methods and numerical solution techniques applied to
faculty advisor. Repeatable for credit.
large scale power systems. Primary focus includes load flow,
short circuit, voltage stability and transient stability studies
and contingency analysis. The details include the modeling
of various devices like transformer, transmission lines,
FACTS devices, and synchronous machines. Numerical tech-
niques include solving a large set of linear or non-linear alge-
braic equations, and solving a large set of differential
equations. A number of simple case studies (as per IEEE
standard models) will be performed. Prerequisites:
EGGN583, 584 and 586 or equivalent, and/or consent of in-
structor; a strong knowledge of digital simulation techniques.
3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
83

Environmental Science and
as a Thesis or Non-Thesis M.S. in Environmental Science
Engineering
and Engineering. Please see the Combined
ROBERT L. SIEGRIST, Professor and Division Director
Undergraduate/Graduate Programs sections in the Graduate
BRUCE D. HONEYMAN, Professor
and Undergraduate Bulletins for additional information. The
TISSA ILLANGASEKARE, Professor and AMAX Distinguished
availability of daytime, evening, and summer courses allows
Chair
all students a high degree of flexibility in planning their
PHILIPPE ROSS, Professor
coursework to achieve their degrees in a timely fashion.
RONALD R.H. COHEN, Associate Professor
To achieve the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree, stu-
JÖRG DREWES, Associate Professor
dents are expected to complete a combination of coursework
LINDA A. FIGUEROA, Associate Professor
JOHN E. McCRAY, Associate Professor
and original research, under the guidance of a faculty advisor
JUNKO MUNAKATA MARR, Associate Professor
and Doctoral committee, that culminates in a significant
TZAHI Y. CATH, Assistant Professor
scholarly contribution to a specialized field in environmental
JOHN R. SPEAR. Assistant Professor
science or engineering. The Ph.D. Program may build upon
MICHAEL SEIBERT, Research Professor
one of the ESE M.S. Programs or a comparable M.S. Pro-
MARIA L. GHIRARDI, Research Associate Professor
gram at another university. Full-time enrollment is expected
MATTHIAS KOHLER, Research Associate Professor
and leads to the greatest success, although part-time enroll-
MICHELLE L CRIMI, Research Assistant Professor
ment may be allowed under special circumstances.
MATTHEW C. POSEWITZ, Research Assistant Professor
PEI XU, Research Assistant Professor
The ESE Division offers areas of emphasis for study such
KATHRYN LOWE, Senior Research Associate
as: Water Treatment, Reclamation & Reuse, Contaminant
JILL BRANNOCK, Research Associate
Hydrology & Water Resources, Applied Environmental
FREDERICO CHEEVER, Adjunct Professor
Microbiology & Biotechnology, Characterization & Risk
GEORGE W. PRING, Adjunct Professor
Analysis, and Environmental Remediation, that correspond
PAUL B. QUENEAU, Adjunct Professor
to areas of significant career opportunities for graduates as
DANIEL T. TEITELBAUM, Adjunct Professor
well as expertise and active research by members of the ESE
Degrees Offered:
faculty. Each area of emphasis is designed to give students a
Master of Science (Environmental Science and
rigorous, in-depth background in the subject matter relevant
Engineering)
to the area while allowing opportunity, through electives, for
Doctor of Philosophy (Environmental Science and
breadth and exploration of related areas. For more informa-
Engineering)
tion on ESE curriculum please refer to the Division Website
at http://www.mines.edu/academic/envsci/.
Program Description:
The Environmental Science and Engineering (ESE) Divi-
The ESE M.S. and Ph.D. Programs have been admitted to
sion offers programs of study in environmental science and
the Western Regional Graduate Program (WRGP/WICHE), a
engineering within the context of risk-based decision-making,
recognition that designates this curriculum as unique within
environmental law and policy leading to M.S. and Ph.D.
the Western United States. An important benefit of this desig-
graduate degrees as well as supporting several undergraduate
nation is that students from Alaska, Arizona, Hawaii, Idaho,
degrees. Programs are designed to prepare students to inves-
Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon,
tigate and analyze environmental systems and assess risks to
South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming are given
public health and ecosystems as well as evaluate and design
the tuition status of Colorado residents.
natural and engineered solutions to mitigate risks and enable
Combined Degree Program Option
beneficial outcomes. Programs of study are interdisciplinary
CSM undergraduate students have the opportunity to begin
in scope, and consequently the appropriate coursework may
work on a M.S. degree in Environmental Science and Engi-
be obtained from multiple departments at CSM as well as
neering while completing their Bachelor’s degree. The CSM
other local universities.
Combined Degree Program provides the vehicle for students
To achieve the Master of Science (M.S.) degree, full-time
to use undergraduate coursework as part of their Graduate
students may elect the Non-Thesis option, based exclusively
Degree curriculum. For more information please contact the
upon coursework and project activities, or the Thesis option,
ESE Office or visit http://www.mines.edu/academic/envsci/
in which laboratory and/or field research is incorporated into
ucombine.html.
the curriculum under the guidance of a faculty advisor. For
Program Requirements:
working professional or part time M.S. students the ESE
M.S. Non-Thesis Option: 30 total credit hours, consisting
Executive Program is offered, consisting of an evening
of coursework (27 h), Independent Study (ESGN599A) (3 h),
curriculum leading to a Non-Thesis M.S. degree. ESE also
and seminar .
offers a combined baccalaureate/masters degree program in
which CSM students obtain an undergraduate degree as well
84
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

M.S. Thesis Option: 30 total credit hours, consisting of
diochemical processes governing the fate and transport of
coursework (24 h), seminar, and research (6h). Students must
contaminants, and engineering these processes to achieve
also write and orally defend a research thesis.
environmental goals; 4) geological, hydrological, and bio-
Students in the ESE M.S. degree program who are not reg-
logical characterization of pristine and anthropogenically
istered full time must be enrolled in the part time ESE Exec-
disturbed natural systems, both for elucidating natural system
utive Program.
function and for informing remediation and restoration efforts;
and 5) mathematical representation and modeling of hydro-
M.S. Students entering the ESE Program in prior CSM
logical and hydrogeological phenomena in soil and water
Bulletins may not elect to change to the 2007-2008 CSM
systems. Within these areas, established research programs
Bulletin requirements.
have developed investigating the treatment of emerging
Ph.D.: 72 total credit hours, consisting of area of emphasis
organic chemicals in water and wastewater, membrane tech-
coursework (at least 18 h), seminar, and research (at least 24
nologies for water treatment, onsite and decentralized waste-
h). Students must also successfully complete written and oral
water systems, beneficial reuse of produced water, transport/
Qualifying examinations, prepare and present a dissertation
fate and treatment of pathogens in water and wastewater,
proposal, and write and defend a doctoral dissertation. PhD
transport/fate and treatment of non-aqueous phase liquids
students are also expected to submit the dissertation work for
(NAPLs), environmental adsorption chemistry, bioavailabil-
publication in scholarly journals.
ity and toxicity of metals in the environment, biotreatment of
Prerequisites:
metal- and radionuclide-containing wastes, molecular analy-
u baccalaureate degree: required, preferably in a science
sis of microbial communities, in situ remediation of soil and
or engineering discipline
groundwater systems, and evaluation of the roles of riparian
zones and wetlands in regulating water quality. In support of
u college calculus: two semesters required
these research activities, ESE has modern facilities, including
u college physics: one semester required, one year highly
state-of-the-art laboratories for water/waste treatment, envi-
recommended
ronmental radiochemistry, biotechnology, and toxicology.
u college chemistry: one year required
Specialized facilities include the Integrated Environmental
Teaching Lab complex, Center for Experimental Study of
u college statistics: one semester required
Subsurface Environmental Processes, CSM/City of Golden
u area of emphasis “recommended & required back-
Water Treatment Pilot Plant, and the Mines Park Test Site.
ground” courses
Description of Courses
Required Curriculum:
ESGN401. FUNDAMENTALS OF ECOLOGY Biological
Curriculum areas of emphasis consist of recommended
and ecological principles are discussed and industrial exam-
background courses, core courses, and electives. Students
ples of their use are given. Analysis of ecosystem processes,
will work with their academic advisors and area coordinators
such as erosion, succession, and how these processes relate
to establish plans of study that best fit their individual inter-
to engineering activities, including engineering design and
ests and goals. Each student will develop and submit, a plan
plant operation, are investigated. Criteria and performance
of study during the first semester of enrollment. Recom-
standards are analyzed for facility siting, pollution control,
mended background courses may be taken for credit while a
and mitigation of impacts. North American ecosystems are
student is enrolled in one of the ESE programs, with the limi-
analyzed. Concepts of forestry, range, and wildlife manage-
tation that only 9 credits from undergraduate-level courses
ment are integrated as they apply to all the above. Three to
may be applied toward graduate credit requirements. Area of
four weekend field trips will be arranged during the semester.
emphasis core courses are prescribed, and some elective
Prerequisite: ESGN301 or consent of the instructor. 3 hours
courses are recommended as highly suitable for particular
lecture; 3 semester hours.
areas. Other electives may be chosen freely from courses
ESGN440. ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION: SOURCES,
offered at CSM and other local universities. Please visit the
CHARACTERISTICS, TRANSPORT AND FATE This
ESE website for a complete outline of curriculum tracks and
course describes the environmental behavior of inorganic
examples of elective courses offered by the Division and at
and organic chemicals in multimedia environments, includ-
CSM (http://www.mines.edu/Academic/envsci/).
ing water, air, sediment, and biota. Sources and characteris-
Fields of Research:
tics of contaminants in the environment are discussed as
Consistent with the Division’s areas of emphasis, research
broad categories, with some specific examples from various
is focused in five main areas: 1) development of innovative
industries. Attention is focused on the persistence, reactivity,
processes for water and wastewater treatment, reclamation
and partitioning behavior of contaminants in environmental
and reuse; 2) applications of biological processes in environ-
media. Both steady and unsteady state multimedia environ-
mental remediation, water treatment, and renewable energy
mental models are developed and applied to contaminated
generation; 3) understanding fundamental chemical and ra-
sites. The principles of contaminant transport in surface
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
85

water, groundwater and air are also introduced. The course
ESGN462/MTGN527. SOLID WASTE MINIMIZATION
provides students with the conceptual basis and mathematical
AND RECYCLING The objective of this course is to place
tools for predicting the behavior of contaminants in the envi-
the student into the role of a plant manager with process re-
ronment. Prerequisite: ESGN353 or consent of the instructor.
sponsibility for waste minimization, focusing on recycling.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Emphasis is on proven and emerging solutions, especially
ESGN/EGGN453. WASTEWATER ENGINEERING The
those associated with heavy metals, as well as understanding
goal of this course is to familiarize students with the fun-
of alternative raw materials and process technologies in com-
damental phenomena involved in wastewater treatment
bination with creativity and sensitivity to economic realities.
processes (theory) and the engineering approaches used in
Prerequisites: ESGN500 or consent of the instructor. 3 hours
designing such processes (design). This course will focus on
lecture; 3 semester hours.
the physical, chemical and biological processes applied to
ESGN463 POLLUTION PREVENTION: FUNDAMEN-
liquid wastes of municipal origin. Treatment objectives will
TALS AND PRACTICE The objective of this course is to in-
be discussed as the driving force for wastewater treatment.
troduce the principles of pollution prevention,
Prerequisite: ESGN353 or consent of the instructor. 3 hours
environmentally benign products and processes, and manu-
lecture; 3 semester hours.
facturing systems. The course provides a thorough founda-
ESGN/EGGN454. WATER SUPPLY ENGINEERING This
tion in pollution prevention concepts and methods.
course presents contemporary issues relating to the supply of
Engineers and scientists are given the tools to incorporate en-
safe drinking water to the public. The theory and design of
vironmental consequences into decision-making. Sources of
conventional potable water treatment unit processes and op-
pollution and its consequences are detailed. Focus includes
erations as well as water distribution systems will be
sources and minimization of industrial pollution; methodol-
covered. Prerequisite: ESGN353 or consent of the instructor.
ogy for life-cycle assessments and developing successful pol-
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
lution prevention plans; technological means for minimizing
the use of water, energy, and reagents in manufacturing; and
ESGN455. SOLID AND HAZARDOUS WASTE ENGI-
tools for achieving a sustainable society. Materials selection,
NEERING This course provides an introduction and
process and product design, and packaging are also ad-
overview of the engineering aspects of solid and hazardous
dressed. Prerequisite: EGGN/ESGN353 or
waste management. The focus is on control technologies for
EGGN/ESGN354 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
solid wastes from common municipal and industrial sources
semester hours.
and the end-of-pipe waste streams and process residuals that
are generated in some key industries. Prerequisite:
Graduate Courses
ESGN/EGGN353 and ESGN/EGGN354. 3 hours lecture;
ESGN500. ENVIRONMENTAL WATER CHEMISTRY
3 semester hours.
This course provides an introduction to chemical equilibria
in natural waters and engineered systems. Topics covered
ESGN/EGGN456. SCIENTIFIC BASIS OF ENVIRON-
include chemical thermodynamics and kinetics, acid/base
MENTAL REGULATIONS This course offers a critical ex-
chemistry, open and closed carbonate systems, precipitation
amination of the experiments, calculations, and assumptions
reactions, coordination chemistry, adsorption and redox reac-
underpinning numerical and narrative standards contained in
tions. Prerequisites: none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
federal and state environmental regulations. Top-down inves-
tigations of the historical development of selected regulatory
ESGN500L. ENVIRONMENTAL WATER CHEMISTRY
guidelines and permitting procedures will be discussed, and
LABORATORY This course provides students with labora-
students will design improved regulations. Prerequisite:
tory exercises that complement lectures given in ESGN500.
ESGN353 or consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
Topics covered include thermodynamics, weak acids and
mester hours.
bases, buffers, metal-ion complexation and oxidation/reduc-
tion reactions. This course must be taken concurrently with
ESGN/EGGN457. SITE REMEDIATION ENGINEERING
ESGN500. Prerequisite: co-enrollment in ESGN500. 3 hours
This course describes the engineering principles and prac-
laboratory; 1 semester hour.
tices associated with the characterization and remediation of
contaminated sites. Methods for site characterization and risk
ESGN501. RISK ASSESSMENT This course evaluates
assessment will be highlighted with emphasis on remedial
the basic principles, methods, uses, and limitations of risk
action screening processes, technology principles, and con-
assessment in public and private sector decision making.
ceptual design. Common isolation and containment and in
Emphasis is on how risk assessments are made and how they
situ and ex situ treatment technology will be covered. Com-
are used in policy formation, including discussion of how
puterized decision-support tools will be used and case studies
risk assessments can be objectively and effectively com-
will be presented. Prerequisites: ESGN354 or consent of the
municated to decision makers and the public. Prerequisite:
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ESGN502 and one semester of statistics or consent of the
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
86
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

ESGN502. ENVIRONMENTAL LAW This is a compre-
Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture and laboratory; 3 se-
hensive introduction to U.S. Environmental Law, Policy, and
mester hours.
Practice, especially designed for the professional engineer,
ESGN510. ENVIRONMENTAL RADIOCHEMISTRY This
scientist, planner, manager, consultant, government regulator,
course covers the phenomena of radioactivity (e.g., modes of
and citizen. It will prepare the student to deal with the com-
decay, methods of detection and biological effects) and the
plex system of laws, regulations, court rulings, policies, and
use of naturally-occurring and artificial radionuclides as
programs governing the environment in the USA. Course
tracers for environmental processes. Discussions of tracer
coverage includes how our legal system works, sources of
applications will range from oceanic trace element scaveng-
environmental law, the major USEPA enforcement programs,
ing to contaminant transport through groundwater aquifers.
state/local matching programs, the National Environmental
Prerequisites: ESGN500 or consent of the instructor. 3 hours
Policy Act (NEPA), air and water pollution (CAA, CWA),
lecture; 3 semester hours.
EPA risk assessment training, toxic/hazardous substances
laws (RCRA, CERCLA, EPCRA, TSCA, LUST, etc.), and
ESGN513. LIMNOLOGY This course covers the natural
a brief introduction to international environmental law. Pre-
chemistry, physics, and biology of lakes as well as some basic
requisites: none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
principles concerning contamination of such water bodies.
Topics include heat budgets, water circulation and dispersal,
ESGN503. ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION: SOURCES,
sedimentation processes, organic compounds and their trans-
CHARACTERISTICS, TRANSPORT AND FATE This
formations, radionuclide limnochronology, redox reactions,
course describes the environmental behavior of inorganic and
metals and other major ions, the carbon dioxide system, oxy-
organic chemicals in multimedia environments, including
gen, nutrients; planktonic, benthic and other communities,
water, air, sediment and biota. Sources and characteristics of
light in water and lake modeling. Prerequisite: none. 3 hours
contaminants in the environment are discussed as broad cate-
lecture; 3 semester hours.
gories, with some specific examples from various industries.
Attention is focused on the persistence, reactivity, and parti-
ESGN520. SURFACE WATER QUALITY MODELING
tioning behavior of contaminants in environmental media.
This course will cover modeling of water flow and quality in
Both steady and unsteady state multimedia environmental
rivers, lakes, and reservoirs. Topics will include introduction
models are developed and applied to contaminated sites. The
to common analytical and numerical methods used in model-
principles of contaminant transport in surface water, ground-
ing surface water flow, water quality, modeling of kinetics,
water, and air are also introduced. The course provides stu-
discharge of waste water into surface systems, sedimentation,
dents with the conceptual basis and mathematical tools for
growth kinetics, dispersion, and biological changes in lakes
predicting the behavior of contaminants in the environment.
and rivers. Prerequisites: ESGN440 or ESGN503 recom-
Prerequisite: none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
mended, or consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
mester hours.
ESGN504. WATER AND WASTEWATER TREATMENT
Unit operations and processes in environmental engineering
ESGN522. SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT
are discussed in this course, including physical, chemical,
This course will investigate physical, chemical, and biological
and biological treatment processes for water and wastewater.
processes governing the transport and fate of contaminants in
Treatment objectives, process theory, and practice are con-
the saturated and unsaturated zones of the subsurface. Basic
sidered in detail. Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor.
concepts in fluid flow, groundwater hydraulics, and transport
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
will be introduced and studied. The theory and development
of models to describe these phenomena, based on analytical
ESGN505. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND ENVIRON-
and simple numerical methods, will also be discussed. Appli-
MENTAL DATA ANALYSIS This course covers experimen-
cations will include prediction of extents of contaminant mi-
tal design and analysis for studies of environmental media,
gration and assessment and design of remediation schemes.
including those involving characterization and assessment,
Prerequisites: ESGN503 or consent of the instructor. 3 hours
treatment, and remediation technologies, and compliance
lecture; 3 semester hours.
monitoring. Principal media covered are water and waste-
waters, soil and sediments, and surface and ground waters.
ESGN525. CHEMISTRY OF THE SOIL/WATER INTER-
Topics covered include properties of environmental datasets,
FACE The fate of many elements in the soil/water environ-
data quality objectives, statistical designs for data collection,
ment is regulated by sorption reactions. The content of this
methods of sample collection and analysis, data analysis and
course focuses on the physical chemistry of reactions occur-
visualization, inference making. Issues of data worth and suf-
ring at the soil-particle/water interface. The emphasis is on the
ficiency for decision making will also be addressed. Labora-
use of surface complexation models to interpret solute sorption
tory includes gravimetric, electrometric, spectrophotometric,
at the particle/water interface. Prerequisites: ESGN500 or
chromatographic, and microbiological analyses. Prerequisite:
consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
87

ESGN527. WATERSHED SYSTEMS ANALYSIS Basic
Prerequisites: ESGN500, ESGN504 or consent of the instruc-
principles of watershed systems analysis required for water
tor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
resources evaluation, watershed-scale water quality issues,
ESGN544/BELS544. AQUATIC TOXICOLOGY This
and watershed-scale pollutant transport problems. The dy-
course provides an introduction to assessment of the effects
namics of watershed-scale processes and the human impact
of toxic substances on aquatic organisms, communities, and
on natural systems, and for developing remediation strategies
ecosystems. Topics include general toxicological principles,
are studied, including terrain analysis and surface and sub-
water quality standards, sediment quality guidelines, quanti-
surface characterization procedures and analysis. Prerequi-
tative structure-activity relationships, single species and
site: none. 3 hours lecture per week; 3 semester hours.
community-level toxicity measures, regulatory issues, and
ESGN528. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF ENVIRON-
career opportunities. The course includes hands-on experi-
MENTAL SYSTEMS This is an advanced graduate-level
ence with toxicity testing and subsequent data reduction.
course designed to provide students with hands-on experi-
Prerequisite: none. 2.5 hours lecture; 1 hour laboratory;
ence in developing, implementing, testing, and using mathe-
3 semester hours.
matical models of environmental systems. The course will
ESGN545/BELS545. ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY
examine why models are needed and how they are devel-
This course provides an introduction to general concepts of
oped, tested, and used as decision-making or policy-making
ecology, biochemistry, and toxicology. The introductory
tools. Typical problems associated with environmental sys-
material will provide a foundation for understanding why, and
tems, such as spatial and temporal scale effects, dimensional-
to what extent, a variety of products and by-products of ad-
ity, variability, uncertainty, and data insufficiency, will be
vanced industrialized societies are toxic. Classes of substances
addressed. The development and application of mathematical
to be examined include metals, coal, petroleum products, or-
models will be illustrated using a theme topic such as Global
ganic compounds, pesticides, radioactive materials, and others.
Climate Change, In Situ Bioremediation, or Hydrologic Sys-
Prerequisite: none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
tems Analysis. Prerequisites: ESGN503 and knowledge of
basic statistics and computer programming. 3 hours lecture; 3
ESGN552. RECLAMATION OF DISTURBED LANDS
semester hours.
Basic principles and practices in reclaiming disturbed lands
are considered in this course, which includes an overview of
ESGN530. ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING PILOT
present legal requirements for reclamation and basic elements
PLANT LABORATORY This course provides an introduc-
of the reclamation planning process. Reclamation methods,
tion to bench and pilot-scale experimental methods used in
including recontouring, erosion control, soil preparation, plant
environmental engineering. Unit operations associated with
establishment, seed mixtures, nursery stock, and wildlife
water and wastewater treatment for real-world treatment
habitat rehabilitation, will be examined. Practitioners in the
problems are emphasized, including multi-media filtration,
field will discuss their experiences. Prerequisite: consent of
oxidation processes, membrane treatment, and disinfection
the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
processes. Investigations typically include: process assess-
ment, design and completion of bench- and pilot-scale ex-
ESGN556. MINING AND THE ENVIRONMENT The
periments, establishment of analytical methods for process
course will cover many of the environmental problems and
control, data assessment, up-scaling and cost estimation, and
solutions associated with each aspect of mining and ore
project report writing. Projects are conducted both at CSM
dressing processes. Mining is a complicated process that dif-
and at the City of Golden Water Treatment Pilot Plant
fers according to the type of mineral sought. The mining
Laboratory. Prerequisites: ESGN500 and ESGN504 or con-
process can be divided into four categories: Site Develop-
sent of the instructor. 6 hours laboratory; 4 semester hours.
ment; Extraction; Processing; Site Closure. Procedures for
hard rock metals mining; coal mining; underground and sur-
ESGN541/BELS541. MICROBIAL PROCESSES,ANALY-
face mining; and in situ mining will be covered in relation to
SIS AND MODELING Microorganisms facilitate the trans-
environmental impacts. Beneficiation, or purification of met-
formation of many organic and inorganic constituents. Tools
als will be discussed, with cyanide and gold topics empha-
for the quantitative analysis of microbial processes in natural
sized. Site closure will be focused on; stabilization of slopes;
and engineered systems are presented. Stoichiometries, ener-
process area cleanup; and protection of surface and ground
getics, mass balances and kinetic descriptions of relevant
water. After discussions of the mining and beneficiation
microbial processes allow the development of models for
processes themselves, we will look at conventional and inno-
specific microbial systems. Simple analytical models and
vative measures to mitigate or reduce environmental impact.
complex models that require computational solutions will be
presented. Systems analyzed include suspended growth and
ESGN562/MTGN527. SOLID WASTE MINIMIZATION
attached growth reactors for municipal and industrial waste-
AND RECYCLING This course will examine, using case
water treatment as well as in-situ bioremediation systems.
studies, ways in which industry applies engineering principles
to minimize waste formation and to meet solid waste recycling
challenges. Both proven and emerging solutions to solid waste
88
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

environmental problems, especially those associated with
activated sludge microbiology, biodegradation of organic
metals, will be discussed. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
contaminants, sulfate reduction in remediation of acid mine
ESGN563 POLLUTION PREVENTION: FUNDAMENTALS
drainage, and redox biotransformations of metallic contami-
AND PRACTICE The objective of this course is to introduce
nants. Prerequisite: CHGC562 or equivalent or enrollment in
the principles of pollution prevention, environmentally benign
an ESE program. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
products and processes, and manufacturing systems. The
ESGN591. ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT
course provides a thorough foundation in pollution prevention
Techniques for assessing the impact of mining and other
concepts and methods. Engineers and scientists are given the
activities on various components of the ecosystem. Training
tools to incorporate environmental consequences into decision-
in the procedures of preparing Environmental Impact State-
making. Sources of pollution and its consequences are de-
ments. Course will include a review of pertinent laws and
tailed. Focus includes sources and minimization of industrial
acts (i.e. Endangered Species Act, Coordination Act, Clean
pollution; methodology for life-cycle assessments and develop-
Air Act, etc.) that deal with environmental impacts. Prerequi-
ing successful pollution prevention plans; technological means
site: consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture, some field
for minimizing the use of water, energy, and reagents in manu-
trips; 3 semester hours.
facturing; and tools for achieving a sustainable society. Materi-
ESGN593. ENVIRONMENTAL PERMITTING AND REG-
als selection, process and product design, and packaging are
ULATORY COMPLIANCE The purpose of this course is to
also addressed. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
acquaint students with the permit writing process, developing
ESGN571. ENVIRONMENTAL PROJECT MANAGE-
information requirements for permit applications, working
MENT This course investigates environmental project man-
with ambiguous regulations, negotiating with permit writers,
agement and decision making from government, industry,
and dealing with public comment. In addition, students will
and contractor perspectives. Emphasis is on (1) economics of
develop an understanding of the process of developing an
project evaluation; (2) cost estimation methods; (3) project
economic and legally defensible regulatory compliance pro-
planning and performance monitoring; (4) and creation of
gram. Prerequisite: ESGN502 or consent of the instructor.
project teams and organizational/communications structures.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Extensive use of case studies. Prerequisite: consent of the in-
ESGN596/BELS596. MOLECULAR ENVIRONMENTAL
structor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
BIOTECHNOLOGY This course investigates applications
ESGN575. HAZARDOUS WASTE SITE REMEDIATION
of recombinant DNA technology to the development of
This course covers remediation technologies for hazardous
enzymes and organisms used for environmentally friendly
waste contaminated sites, including site characteristics and
industrial purposes. Topics include genetic engineering
conceptual model development, remedial action screening
technology, biocatalysis of industrial processes by extremo-
processes, and technology principles and conceptual design.
zymes, dye synthesis, biodegradation of aromatic compounds
Institutional control, source isolation and containment, sub-
and chlorinated solvents, biosynthesis of polymers and sus-
surface manipulation, and in situ and ex situ treatment
tainable fuels, and agricultural biotechnology. Prerequisite:
processes will be covered, including unit operations, coupled
introductory microbiology or consent of the instructor.
processes, and complete systems. Case studies will be used
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and computerized tools for process selection and design will
ESGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL
be employed. Prerequisite: ESGN500 and ESGN503, or con-
SCIENCE Topics are chosen from special interests of
sent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
instructor and students; see website for current offerings.
ESGN575L. HAZARDOUS WASTE SITE REMEDIATION:
Each topic is usually offered only once. Prerequisite: consent
TREATABILITY TESTING This laboratory module is de-
of the instructor. Variable class and semester hours. Repeat-
signed to provide hands-on experience with treatability test-
able for credit under different titles.
ing to aid selection and design of remediation technologies
ESGN598S. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND ENGI-
for a contaminated site. The course will be comprised of lab-
NEERING SEMINAR Research presentations covering
oratory exercises in Coolbaugh Hall and possibly some field
current research in a variety of environmental topics. 1.5
site work near CSM. Pre-requisite: ESGN575 or consent of
hours seminar. Repeatable for credit.
instructor. 2 hours laboratory; 1 semester hour.
ESGN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY Individual master’s level
ESGN586/BELS586. MICROBIOLOGY OF ENGINEERED
research or special project supervised by a faculty member. Pre-
ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS This course explores appli-
requisite: Independent Study form must be completed and sub-
cations of microbial physiological processes in wastewater
mitted to the Registrar. Variable class and semester hours.
treatment and bioremediation. Topics include biofilm forma-
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
tion in engineered systems, fermentation and respiration,
environmental induction of microbial activities, biological
ESGN602. INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LAW
denitrification, enhanced biological phosphorus removal,
The course covers an introductory survey of International En-
vironmental Law, including multi-nation treaties, regulations,
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
89

policies, practices, and politics governing the global environ-
ESGN622. MULTIPHASE CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT
ment. It surveys the key issues of sustainable development,
Principles of multiphase and multicomponent flow and trans-
natural resources projects, transboundary pollution, interna-
port are applied to contaminant transport in the unsaturated
tional trade, hazardous waste, climate change, and protection
and saturated zones. Focus is on immiscible phase, dissolved
of ecosystems, wildlife, and human life. New international
phase, and vapor phase transport of low solubility organic
laws are changing the rules for engineers, project managers,
contaminants in soils and aquifer materials. Topics discussed
scientists, teachers, businesspersons, and others both in the
include: capillarity, interphase mass transfer, modeling, and
US and abroad, and this course is especially designed to keep
remediation technologies. Prerequisites: ESGN500 or equiv-
professionals fully, globally informed and add to their creden-
alent, ESGN503 or ESGN522 or equivalent, or consent of
tials for international work. Prerequisites: ESGN502 or con-
the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
sent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ESGN698. ADVANCED SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENVIRON-
ESGN603. ADVANCED WATER TREATMENT ENGI-
MENTAL SCIENCE Topics chosen from special interests of
NEERING AND WATER REUSE This course presents
instructor(s) and students; see website for current offerings.
issues relating to theory, design, and operation of advanced
Each topic is usually offered only once. Prerequisite: consent
water and wastewater treatment unit processes and water
of the instructor. Variable class and semester hours. Repeat-
reuse systems. Topics include granular activated carbon
able for credit under different titles.
(GAC), advanced oxidation processes (O3/H2O2), UV disin-
ESGN699. ADVANCED INDEPENDENT STUDY Indi-
fection, pressure-driven and current-driven membranes (MF,
vidual doctoral level research or special project supervised
UF, NF, RO, and electrodialysis), and natural systems such as
by a faculty member. Prerequisite: Independent Study form
riverbank filtration (RBF) and soil-aquifer treatment (SAT).
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable
The course includes hands-on experience using bench- and
class and semester hours. Repeatable for credit under differ-
pilot-scale unit operations. Prerequisite: ESGN504 or con-
ent titles.
sent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ESGN705. GRADUATE RESEARCH: MASTER OF
ESGN 603L. ADVANCED WATER TREATMENT ENGI-
SCIENCE Research credit hours required for completion of
NEERING AND WATER RREUSE -- LABORATORY This
the Master of Science with Thesis degree. Research must be
course provides hands-on experience using bench- and pilot-
carried out under the direct supervision of the student’s fac-
scale unit operations and computer exercises using state-of-
ulty advisor. Variable class and semester hours. Repeatable
the-art software packages to design advanced water treatment
for credit.
unit processes. Topics include adsorption processes onto
powdered and granular activated carbon, advanced disinfec-
ESGN706. GRADUATE RESEARCH: DOCTOR OF PHI-
tion and oxidation processes (low- and medium pressure UV
LOSOPHY Research credit hours required for completion of
radiation; O3/H2O2), low-pressure membrane processes (mi-
the Doctor of Philosophy degree. Research must be carried
crofiltration, ultrafiltration), and high-pressure and current-
out under the direct supervision of the student’s faculty advi-
driven membrane processes (nanofiltration, reverse osmosis,
sor. Variable class and semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
and electrodialysis). Co- or Pre-requisite: ESGN 603 or con-
sent of instructor. 1 semester hour.
90
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

Geochemistry
a written examination, administered in a format to be deter-
JOHN D. HUMPHREY, Associate Professor Geology and
mined by the Doctoral Committee. Two negative votes in the
Geological Engineering and Interim Department Head
Doctoral Committee constitute failure of the examination.
JOHN B. CURTIS, Professor Geology and Geological Engineering
In case of failure of the qualifying examination, a re-
WENDY J. HARRISON, Professor Geology and Geological
examination may be given upon the recommendation of the
Engineering
MURRAY W. HITZMAN, Professor, Charles F. Fogarty Professor of
Doctoral Committee and approval of the Graduate Dean.
Economic Geology
Only one re-examination may be given.
PATRICK MACCARTHY, Professor Chemistry and Geochemistry
Prerequisites:
RICHARD F. WENDLANDT, Professor Geology and Geological
Each entering student will have an entrance interview
Engineering
with members of the Geochemistry faculty. Each department
L.GRAHAM CLOSS, Associate Professor of Geology and
Geological Engineering
recognizes that entering students may not be proficient in
KEVIN W. MANDERNACK, Associate Professor Chemistry and
both areas. A placement examination in geology and/or
Geochemistry
chemistry may be required upon the discretion of the inter-
JAMES F. RANVILLE, Associate Professor Chemistry and
viewing faculty. If a placement examination is given, the re-
Geochemistry
sults may be used to establish deficiency requirements.
E. CRAIG SIMMONS, Associate Professor Chemistry and
Credit toward a graduate degree will not be granted for
Geochemistry
courses taken to fulfill deficiencies.
BETTINA M. VOELKER, Associate Professor Chemistry and
Geochemistry
Thesis Degrees (M.S. & Ph.D.) Required
RONALD W. KLUSMAN, Professor Emeritus Chemistry and
Curriculum:
Geochemistry
A thesis is required for the M.S. degree and a dissertation
DONALD L. MACALADY, Professor Emeritus Chemistry and
for the Ph.D. The Geochemistry program comprises a core
Geochemistry
group of courses, required of all students unless individually
SAMUEL B. ROMBERGER, Professor Emertius Geology and
exempted by the “Committee of the Whole” based on previ-
Geological Engineering
ous background. The core courses for M.S. students are
THOMAS R. WILDEMAN, Professor Emeritus Chemistry and
Geochemistry
CHGC503 - Introduction to Geochemistry,
Degrees Offered:
CHGC504 - Methods in Geochemistry, and a one hour
laboratory course selected from several available.
Professional Masters in Environmental Geochemistry
In addition, MS degree students must take two courses
Master of Science (Geochemistry)
selected from the following list
Doctor of Philosophy (Geochemistry)
CHGC509/GEGN509 - Introduction to Aqueous Geo-
Program Description:
chemistry,
The Geochemistry Program is an interdisciplinary gradu-
CHGC610 - Nuclear and Isotopic Geochemistry,
ate program administered by the departments of Geology and
CHGN503 - Advanced Physical Chemistry,
Geological Engineering and Chemistry and Geochemistry.
GEOL512 - Mineralogy and Crystal Chemistry.
The geochemistry faculty from each department are responsi-
Ph.D. degree students must take four core courses
ble for the operations of the program. Students reside in ei-
CHGC503, CHGC504, CHGN503, and a one hour laboratory
ther the Department of Geology and Geological Engineering,
course, and two additional courses selected from the list in
or the Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry.
the previous sentence.
Program Requirements:
The doctoral student’s dissertation committee approves the
The program of study is selected by the student in consul-
number of course and research credits required for graduation,
tation with his or her advisor and thesis committee. Students
as well as the specific courses beyond the above requirements.
entering with backgrounds in chemistry will take more course-
The Ph.D. in Geochemistry requires a minimum of 72 credit
work in geology to strengthen their backgrounds in this disci-
hours, of which at least 24 hours must be research credit. Up
pline; the converse is true for students with a background in
to 24 hours of course credits may be transferred from previ-
geology. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of the Geochem-
ous graduate-level work upon approval of the dissertation
istry Program, students are not required to take a minor.
committee. Research credits may not be transferred. Stu-
Qualifying Examination for Ph.D. Degree
dents who enter the Ph.D. program with a thesis-based mas-
A qualifying examination must be taken. It is expected that
ter degree from another institution may transfer up to 36
this exam will be completed within three years of matricula-
semester hours, upon approval of the dissertation committee,
tion or after the bulk of course work is finished, whichever
in recognition of the course work and research completed for
occurs later. This examination will be administered by the
that degree.
student’s Doctoral committee and will consist of an oral and
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
91

Graduate students resident in the Department of Chemistry
of 400-level or above courses taken as part of their undergrad-
and Geochemistry or the Department of Geology and Geo-
uate curriculum, provided those courses fit into the overall
logical Engineering shall adhere to the seminar rules and re-
professional objectives of the individual, and compliment the
quirements of the department of residence.
course program below. Approval of those courses will be
The Geochemistry Program at CSM has been admitted to
given by the Geochemistry Committee of the Whole. No
the Western Regional Graduate Program. This entity recog-
more than 9 credits of 400-level courses may constitute the 36
nizes the CSM Geochemistry Program as unique in the re-
minimum credit requirement.
gion. Designation of the Geochemistry Program by WRGP
A 17 credit-hour core program consists of:
allows residents of western states (excluding California) to
CHGN403: Environmental Chemistry (3 hrs, Fall)
enroll in the program at Colorado resident tuition rates. Eligi-
GEGN467*: Ground-Water Engineering (4 hrs, Fall)
ble states include Alaska, Arizona, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana,
CHGC503: Introduction to Geochemistry (4 hrs, Fall)
Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota,
GEGN509: Aqueous Geochemistry (3 hrs, Fall)
Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.
GEOL530: Clay Characterization (1 hr, Fall)
Professional Masters
CHGC504: Methods in Geochemistry (2 hrs, Spring)
Introduction
*If this course is transferred from the undergraduate pro-
The Professional Masters in Environmental Geochemistry
gram, an advanced hydrogeology course may be substituted
program is intended to provide: [1] an opportunity for CSM
from the list below)
undergraduates to obtain, as part of a fifth year of study, a
An additional 12 credit-hours must be selected from the
Masters in addition to the Bachelors degree; and [2] addi-
following list.
tional education for working professionals in the area of geo-
CHGC530: Environmental Chemistry and Geochemistry
chemistry as it applies to problems relating to the
(3 hrs, Spring)
environment. This is a non-thesis masters degree program
CHGC555: Environmental Organic Chemistry
administered by the Geochemistry Program, and may be
(3 hrs, Spring)
completed as part of a combined degree program by individ-
CHGC562: Microbiology and the Environment
uals already matriculated as undergraduate students at The
(3 hrs, Spring)
Colorado School of Mines, or by individuals already holding
CHGC563: Environmental Microbiology Laboratory
undergraduate or advanced degrees and are interested in a
(2 hrs, Fall)
graduate program that does not have the traditional research
CHGC564: Biogeochemistry and Geomicrobiology
requirement. The program consists primarily of coursework
(3 hrs, Fall)
in Geochemistry and allied fields, with an emphasis on envi-
CHGC610: Nuclear and Isotopic Geochemistry
ronmental applications. No research is required though the
(3 hrs, Spring)
program does allow for independent study, professional
CHGC640: Soil Gas Geochemistry (3 hrs, Spring)
development, internship and coop experience.
CHGN503: Advanced Physical Chemistry (3 hrs, Fall)
Application
GEGN527: Organic Geochemistry of fossil fuels & ore
Undergraduate students at CSM must declare an interest
deposits (3hrs, Spring)
during their 3rd year to allow for planning of coursework that
GEGN532: Geological Data Analysis (3 hrs, Fall)
will apply towards the program; these students must have an
GEGN575: Applications of Geographic Information
overall GPA of at least 3.0. Students majoring in other de-
Systems (3 hrs, Spring)
partments besides Chemistry & Geochemistry and Geology
GEGN581: Advanced Ground- Water Engineering
& Geological Engineering may want to decide on the com-
(3 hrs, Fall)
bined degree program option earlier to be sure prerequisites
GEGN582: Contaminant Hydrogeology
are satisfied. Applicants other than CSM undergraduates who
(3 hrs, Spring) – proposed
are applying for the Environmental Geochemistry program
GEGN583: Mathematical Modeling of Ground-Water
must follow the same procedures that all prospective gradu-
Systems (3 hrs, Spring)
ate students follow; however, the requirement of the general
GEGN681: Vadose Zone Hydrology (3 hrs, Spring)
GRE may be waived.
GEGN683: Advanced Ground- Water Modeling
Requirements
(3 hrs, Spring)
A minimum of 36 credit hours are required, with an over-
GEOL512: Mineralogy and Crystal Chemistry (3 hrs, Fall)
all GPA of at least 3.0. The overall course requirements will
GEOL684: Chemical Modeling of Aqueous Systems
depend on the background of the individual, but may be tai-
(3 hrs, Spring)
lored to professional objectives.
GXGN571: Geochemical Exploration (3 hrs, Fall and
Spring)
CSM students that intend to follow the combined degree
program format may double count into the program 6 credits
An additional 7 credit-hours of free electives may be
selected to complete the 36 credit-hour requirement. Free
92
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

electives may be selected from the list above, and may also
GEOL512. MINERALOGY AND CRYSTAL CHEMISTRY
be independent study credits (CHGN599, GEGN599 or
(I) Relationships among mineral chemistry, structure, crystal-
GEOL599) taken to fulfill a research, cooperative, or other
lography, and physical properties. Systematic treatments of
professional development experience. A course program will
structural representation, defects, mineral stability and phase
be designed in advanced through consultation between the
transitions, solid solutions, substitution mechanisms, and
student and an advisor from the Geochemistry Committee of
advanced methods of mineral identification and characteriza-
the Whole.
tion. Applications of principles using petrological and envi-
Description of Courses
ronmental examples. Prerequisite: GEOL212, DCGN209, or
CHGC503. INTRODUCTION TO GEOCHEMISTRY (I) A
equivalent, or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours
comprehensive introduction to the basic concepts and princi-
lab; 3 semester hours.
ples of geochemistry, coupled with a thorough overview of
GEOL515. ADVANCED MINERAL DEPOSITS - MAG-
the related principles of thermodynamics. Topics covered
MATIC AND SYNGENETIC ORES (I) Time-space aspects
include: nucleosynthesis, origin of earth and solar system,
of metallogenesis in relation to regional and local geological
chemical bonding, mineral chemistry, elemental distributions
evolution of the Earth. Processes leading to the formation
and geochemical cycles, chemical equilibrium and kinetics,
of ore magmas and fluids within tectonic and stratigraphic
isotope systematics, and organic and biogeochemistry. Pre-
frameworks, and to the development of favorable ore-
requisite: Introductory chemistry, mineralogy and petrology,
forming environments. Emphasis will be placed on processes
or consent of instructor. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
responsible for ore genesis in magmatic systems, such as
GPGN/GEOL503. INTEGRATED EXPLORATION (I)
layered complexes, carbonatites and pegmatites, and on the
Integration of scientific data in the analysis and modeling
submarine hydrothermal processes responsible for syndepo-
of subsurface reservoir systems. Prerequisite: GPGN315 or
sitional deposits in volcanic and sedimentary terrains, in-
GEOL501 or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours
cluding massive base and precious metal sulfide ores. Ore
lab; 3 semester hours.
deposits in certain sedimentary rocks, including copper,
paleoplacer gold-uranium, marine evaporite, barite, and
CHGC504. METHODS IN GEOCHEMISTRY (II) Sampling
phosphate ores are considered in context of their generative
of natural earth materials including rocks, soils, sediments,
environments and processes. Prerequisite: GEGN401 or
and waters. Preparation of naturally heterogeneous materials,
equivalent, or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours
digestions, and partial chemical extractions. Principles of in-
lab; 3 semester hours.
strumental analysis including atomic spectroscopy, mass sep-
arations, and chromatography. Quality assurance and quality
GEOL516. ADVANCED MINERAL DEPOSITS - EPI-
control. Interpretation and assessment of geochemical data
GENETIC HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS (II) Time-space
using statistical methods. Prerequisite: Graduate standing
aspects of metallogenesis in relation to regional and local geo-
in geochemistry or environmental science and engineering.
logical evolution of the Earth. Processes leading to the gener-
2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
ation of metalliferous hydrothermal mineralizing solutions
within tectonic and lithologic frameworks, and to the devel-
CHGC509/GEGN509. INTRODUCTION TO AQUEOUS
opment of favorable ore-forming environments. Emphasis
GEOCHEMISTRY (I) Analytical, graphical, and interpre-
will be placed on processes responsible for ore genesis in
tive methods applied to aqueous systems. Thermodynamic
magmatic-hydrothermal systems such as porphyry copper-
properties of water and aqueous solutions. Calculation and
molybdenum-gold deposits, epithermal precious metal
graphical expression of acid-base, redox and solution-min-
deposits, metamorphogenetic gold deposits, volcanic and
eral equilibria. Effect of temperature and kinetics on natural
sedimentary rock-hosted epigenetic base metal ores and
aqueous systems. Adsorption and ion exchange equilibria be-
epigenetic sedimentary-rock hosted and unconformity-
tween clays and oxide phases. Behavior of trace elements
related uranium deposits. Prerequisite: GEGN401 or
and complexation in aqueous systems. Application of organic
equivalent, or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture,
geochemistry to natural aqueous systems. Light stable and
2 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
unstable isotopic studies applied to aqueous systems. Pre-
requisite: DCGN209 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
GEGN518. MINERAL EXPLORATION (I) Mineral in-
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
dustry overview, deposit economics, target selection, deposit
modeling, exploration technology, international exploration,
CHGC511. GEOCHEMISTRY OF IGNEOUS ROCKS (II)
environmental issues, program planning, proposal develop-
A survey of the geochemical characteristics of the various
ment. Team development and presentation of an exploration
types of igneous rock suites. Application of major element,
proposal. Prerequisite: GEOL515, GEOL516, or equivalent.
trace element, and isotope geochemistry to problems of their
2 hours lecture/seminar; 2 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
origin and modification. Prerequisite: Undergraduate miner-
Offered alternate years: Fall 1996.
alogy and petrology or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture;
3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
93

CHGC527/GEGN527. ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY OF
transformations of anthropogenic organic contaminants. Pre-
FOSSIL FUELS AND ORE DEPOSITS (II) A study of or-
requisites: A course in organic chemistry and CHGN503,
ganic carbonaceous materials in relation to the genesis and
Advanced Physical Chemistry or its equivalent, or consent
modification of fossil fuel and ore deposits. The biological
of instructor. Offered on demand. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
origin of the organic matter will be discussed with emphasis
hours.
on contributions of microorganisms to the nature of these de-
CHGC562/CHGN462. MICROBIOLOGY AND THE
posits. Biochemical and thermal changes which convert the
ENVIRONMENT This course will cover the basic funda-
organic compounds into petroleum, oil shale, tar sand, coal
mentals of microbiology, such as structure and function of
and other carbonaceous matter will be studied. Principal
procaryotic versus eucaryotic cells; viruses; classification of
analytical techniques used for the characterization of organic
micro-organisms; microbial metabolism, energetics, genetics,
matter in the geosphere and for evaluation of oil and gas
growth and diversity; microbial interactions with plants,
source potential will be discussed. Laboratory exercises
animals, and other microbes. Additional topics covered will
will emphasize source rock evaluation, and oil-source rock
include various aspects of environmental microbiology such
and oil-oil correlation methods. Prerequisite: CHGN221,
as global biogeochemical cycles, bioleaching, bioremedia-
GEGN438, or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours
tion, and wastewater treatment. Prerequisite: ESGN301 or
lab; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years. Spring 1999.
consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
CHGC530. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY AND GEO-
Offered alternate years.
CHEMISTRY (II) Mobility of the elements in air, water and
CHGC563. ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY (I)
the surficial environment. Geochemical cycles of elements
An introduction to the microorganisms of major geochemical
and constituents of environmental interest. Plant composi-
importance, as well as those of primary importance in water
tion, animal and human health in relation to the natural envi-
pollution and waste treatment. Microbes and sedimentation,
ronment. Acid deposition and other processes affecting water
microbial leaching of metals from ores, acid mine water pol-
quality. Environmental aspects of fossil fuel processing.
lution, and the microbial ecology of marine and freshwater
Sampling design in large scale environmental studies. Pre-
habitats are covered. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
requisite: CHGC503 or ESGN500 and ESGN501. 3 hours
1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours. Offered alter-
lecture; 3 semester hours.
nate years. Fall 1998.
GEGN530. CLAY CHARACTERIZATION (I) Clay mineral
CHGC564. BIOGEOCHEMISTRY AND GEOMICRO-
structure, chemistry and classification, physical properties
BIOLOGY (I) Designed to give the student an understand-
(flocculation and swelling, cation exchange capacity, surface
ing of the role of living things, particularly microorganisms,
area and charge), geological occurrence, controls on their
in the shaping of the earth. Among the subjects will be the
stabilities. Principles of X-ray diffraction, including sample
aspects of living processes, chemical composition and char-
preparation techniques, data collection and interpretation,
acteristics of biological material, origin of life, role of micro-
and clay separation and treatment methods. The use of scan-
organisms in weathering of rocks and the early diagenesis of
ning electron microscopy to investigate clay distribution and
sediments, and the origin of petroleum, oil shale, and coal.
morphology. Methods of measuring cation exchange capacity
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semes-
and surface area. Prerequisite: GEOL210 and GEGN306 or
ter hours.
equivalent, or consent of instructor. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours
lab; 1 semester hour.
GXGN571. GEOCHEMICAL EXPLORATION (I, II) Dis-
persion of trace metals from mineral deposits and their
GEGN532. GEOLOGICAL DATA ANALYSIS (I or II)
discovery. Laboratory consists of analysis and statistical
Techniques and strategy of data analysis in geology and geo-
interpretation of data from soils, stream sediments, vegeta-
logical engineering: basic statistics review, analysis of data
tion, and rock in connection with field problems. Term report
sequences, mapping, sampling and sample representativity,
required. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture,
univariate and multivariate statistics, geostatistics, and geo-
3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
graphic information systems (GIS). Practical experience with
geological applications via supplied software and data sets from
GEGN575. APPLICATIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC INFOR-
case histories. Prerequisites: Introductory statistics course
MATION SYSTEMS (II) An introduction to Geographic
(MATH323 or MATH530 or equivalent); and previous or con-
Information Systems (GIS) and their applications to all areas
current enrollment in MACS532 or permission of instructor.
of geology and geological engineering. Lecture topics in-
2 hours lecture/discussion; 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
clude: principles of GIS, data structures, digital elevation
models, data input and verification, data analysis and spatial
CHGC555. ENVIRONMENTAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
modeling, data quality and error propagation, methods of
(II) A study of the chemical and physical interactions which
GIS evaluation and selection. Laboratories will use Macin-
determine the fate, transport and interactions of organic
tosh and DOS-based personal computer systems for GIS
chemicals in aquatic systems, with emphasis on chemical
projects, as well as video-presentations. Visits to local GIS
94
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

laboratories, and field studies will be required. 2 hours lec-
consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester
ture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
hours. Offered on demand.
GEOL609. ADVANCED PETROLEUM GEOLOGY (II)
GEOL624. CARBONATE SEDIMENTOLOGY AND
Subjects to be covered involve consideration of basic chemi-
PETROLOGY (II) Processes involved in the deposition of
cal, physical, biological and geological processes and their
carbonate sediments with an emphasis on Recent environ-
relation to modern concepts of oil/gas generation (including
ments as analogs for ancient carbonate sequences. Carbonate
source rock deposition and maturation), and migration/
facies recognition through bio- and lithofacies analysis,
accumulation (including that occurring under hydrodynamic
three-dimensional geometries, sedimentary dynamics, sedi-
conditions). Concepts will be applied to the historic and pre-
mentary structures, and facies associations. Laboratory
dictive occurrence of oil/gas to specific Rocky Mountain
stresses identification of Recent carbonate sediments and
areas. In addition to lecture attendance, course work involves
thin section analysis of carbonate classification, textures,
review of topical papers and solution of typical problems.
non-skeletal and biogenic constituents, diagenesis, and
Prerequisite: GEGN438. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
porosity evolution. Prerequisite: GEOL221 and GEGN306
CHGC610. NUCLEAR AND ISOTOPIC GEOCHEMISTRY
or GEGN307 or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture/
(II) A study of the principles of geochronology and stable
seminar, 2 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
isotope distributions with an emphasis on the application of
GEOL625. ADVANCED METAMORPHIC PETROLOGY
these principles to important case studies in igneous petrol-
Metamorphic processes and concepts, emphasizing physical
ogy and the formation of ore deposits. U, Th, and Pb iso-
and chemical controls in the development of mineral assem-
topes, K-Ar, Rb-Sr, oxygen isotopes, sulfur isotopes, and
blages. Petrographic examination of rock suites from repre-
carbon isotopes included. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
sentative metamorphic zones and facies. Emphasis on the
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours Offered alternate years.
interrelationships of crystallization and deformation and an
Spring 1998.
interpretation of metamorphic history. Prerequisite: GEGN307
GEOL615. GEOCHEMISTRY OF HYDROTHERMAL
(or equivalent) or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture and
MINERAL DEPOSITS (I) Detailed study of the geochem-
seminar, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate
istry of selected hydrothermal mineral deposits. Theory and
years; Fall 1996.
application of stable isotopes as applied to mineral deposits.
GEOL626. ISOTOPE GEOLOGY (II) The application of
Origin and nature of hydrothermal fluids and the mechanisms
radioactive and stable isotope analysis to problems in igneous
of transport and deposition of ore minerals. Review of wall-
and metamorphic petrology and ore genesis. Studies of
rock alteration processes. Fundamental solution chemistry
polymetamorphic terrains with special reference to the
and the physical chemistry of hydrothermal fluids. Prerequi-
geochronology of the Front Range. The utilization of isotopic
site: GEGN401 or equivalent or consent of instructor. 3 hours
tracers to evaluate petrologenic models. The distribution of
lecture; 3 semester hours.
heavy radiogenic and light stable isotopes as indicators of
GEOL617. THERMODYNAMICS AND MINERAL
source terrain and subsequent evolution of mineral deposits.
PHASE EQUILIBRIA (I) Basic thermodynamics applied to
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semes-
natural geologic systems. Evaluation of mineral-vapor min-
ter hours. Offered alternate years; Spring 2003.
eral solution, mineral-melt, and solid solution equilibria with
GEOL628. ADVANCED IGNEOUS PETROLOGY (I)
special emphasis on oxide, sulfide, and silicate systems.
Igneous processes and concepts, emphasizing the genesis,
Experimental and theoretical derivation, use, and application
evolution, and emplacement of tectonically and geochemi-
of phase diagrams relevant to natural rock systems. An em-
cally diverse volcanic and plutonic occurrences. Tectonic
phasis will be placed on problem solving rather than basic
controls on igneous activity and petrochemistry. Petrographic
theory. Prerequisite: DCGN209 or equivalent or consent of
study of igneous suites, mineralized and non-mineralized,
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alter-
from diverse tectonic settings. Prerequisites: GEOL221,
nate years; Fall 1995.
GEOL212, or GEGN307. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 se-
GEOL621. PETROLOGY OF DETRITAL ROCKS (II)
mester hours. Offered alternate years; Fall 1997.
Compositions and textures of sandstones, siltstones, and
GXGN633. LITHOGEOCHEMICAL MINERAL EXPLO-
mudrocks. Relationship of compositions and textures of
RATION (II) Principles and application of primary disper-
provenance, environment of deposition, and burial history.
sion to the search for metallic mineral deposits. Evaluation
Development of porosity and permeability. Laboratory exer-
of the design, sampling, analytical, and interpretational
cises emphasize use of petrographic thin sections, x-ray
techniques used in lithogeochemical exploration. Practical
diffraction analysis, and scanning electron microscopy to
laboratory exercises. Term projects required. Prerequisite:
examine detrital rocks. A term project is required, involving
GXGN571, GEGN401 or equivalent or consent of instructor.
petrographic analysis of samples selected by student. Pre-
3 hours lecture/seminar/lab; 3 semester hours. Offered alter-
requisites: GEOL212 or 210, GEOL221 or equivalent or
nate years; Spring 1999.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
95

GXGN635. SURFICIAL EXPLORATION GEOCHEM-
groundwater evolution, contaminant geochemistry, leachate
ISTRY (II) Secondary dispersion processes (mechanical and
generation, and enhanced oil recovery treatments. Course
chemical) applied to the search for metalliferous mineral de-
ends with student presentations of a chemical modeling study
posits. A variety of sampling media, analytical procedures,
applied to a problem of their choosing. Prerequisite: GEGN585
and interpretive techniques are evaluated. Landscape geo-
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture/computer lab; 3 se-
chemistry framework for exploration program design. Pre-
mester hours.
requisite: GXGN571 or equivalent or consent of instructor.
CHGC699A. SELECTED TOPICS IN GEOCHEMISTRY
A course in geomorphology recommended. 3 hours lecture/
(I, II) Detailed study of a geochemical topic under direction
seminar/lab; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years;
of a member of the staff. Work on the same or a different
Spring 1997.
topic may be continued through later semesters and addi-
CHGC640. SOIL GAS GEOCHEMISTRY AND APPLI-
tional credits earned. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
CATIONS IN THE EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL
1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
SCIENCES (II) Thermal, chemical, and microbiological
CHGC699B. SPECIAL TOPICS IN AQUEOUS AND SEDI-
reactions in the production of gases. Quantitative review of
MENTARY GEOCHEMISTRY (I, II) Detailed study of a
transport of gaseous species in the saturated and unsaturated
specific topic in the area of aqueous or sedimentary geo-
zones. Sampling and analysis of soil gases. Applications of
chemistry under the direction of a member of the staff. Work
soil gas in the earth and environmental sciences, including
on the same or a different topic may be continued through
exploration, contaminant mapping, and global climate change.
later semesters and additional credits earned. Prerequisite:
Prerequisites: CHGC503, or ESGN500 and ESGN501, or
Consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
credit.
GEOL645. VOLCANOLOGY (II) Assigned readings and
CHGC699C. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ORGANIC AND BIO-
seminar discussions on volcanic processes and products.
GEOCHEMISTRY (I, II) Detailed study of a specific topic
Principal topics include pyroclastic rocks, craters and
in the areas of organic geochemistry or biogeochemistry
calderas, caldron subsidence, diatremes, volcanic domes,
under the direction of a member of the staff. Work on the
origin and evolution of volcanic magmas, and relation of
same or a different topic may be continued through later se-
volcanism to alteration and mineralization. Petrographic
mesters and additional credits earned. Prerequisite: Consent
study of selected suites of lava and pyroclastic rocks in the
of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
laboratory. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 hour semi-
nar, 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
CHGC699D. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PETROLOGIC GEO-
CHEMISTRY (I, II) Detailed study of a specific topic in the
GEOL653. CARBONATE DIAGENESIS AND GEO-
area of petrologic geochemistry under the direction of a
CHEMISTRY (II) Petrologic, geochemical, and isotopic
member of the staff. Work on the same or a different topic
approaches to the study of diagenetic changes in carbonate
may be continued through later semesters and additional
sediments and rocks. Topics covered include major near-
credits earned. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to 3 se-
surface diagenetic environments, subaerial exposure, dolomi-
mester hours. Repeatable for credit.
tization, burial diagenesis, carbonate aqueous equilibria, and
the carbonate geochemistry of trace elements and stable iso-
CHGC705 GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT: MASTER
topes. Laboratory stresses thin section recognition of diage-
OF SCIENCE Research credit hours required for completion
netic textures and fabrics, x-ray diffraction, and geochemical/
of the degree Master of Science - thesis. Research must be
isotopic approaches to diagenetic problems. Prerequisite:
carried out under the direct supervision of the graduate stu-
GEOL624 or equivalent or consent of instructor. 4 to 6 hours
dent’s faculty advisor. Repeatable for credit.
lecture/seminar/lab; 3 semester hours.
CHGC706 GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT: DOCTOR
GEGN684. CHEMICAL MODELING OF AQUEOUS SYS-
OF PHILOSOPHY Research credit hours required for com-
TEMS (II) Provides theoretical background and practical
pletion of the degree Doctor of Philosophy. Research must be
experience in the application of chemical equilibrium and re-
carried out under direct supervision of the graduate student’s
action path models to problems in diverse fields of theoreti-
faculty advisor. Repeatable for credit.
cal and applied aqueous geochemistry. Advanced topics in
aqueous geochemistry are presented and subsequently inves-
tigated using computer simulation approaches. Includes
hands-on experience with the software EQ3/6. Instruction is
provided in the use of basic UNIX commands. The course
progressively builds user ability through a wide variety of
applications including problems in thermodynamic data
quality evaluation, ore deposition, sediment diagenesis,
96
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

Geology and Geological Engineering
Program Description:
JOHN D. HUMPHREY, Associate Professor and Interim Department
The Department of Geology and Geological Engineering
Head
offers Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees
JOHN B. CURTIS, Professor
in Geology and Geochemistry; and Master of Engineering,
WENDY J. HARRISON, Professor
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Geo-
MURRAY W. HITZMAN, Professor, Charles F. Fogarty Professor of
logical Engineering. Geological Engineering degrees require
Economic Geology
possession or acquisition of an undergraduate engineering
EILEEN POETER, Professor
SAMUEL B. ROMBERGER, Professor
degree or its equivalent.
STEPHEN A. SONNENBERG, Professor, Charles Boettcher
Graduate students desiring to study ground water, engi-
Distinguished Chair in Petroleum Geology
neering geology/geotechnics, mining engineering geology
RICHARD F. WENDLANDT, Professor
and some environmental applications are generally expected
DAVID A. BENSON, Associate Professor
to pursue the Geological Engineering degree. Students desir-
L. GRAHAM CLOSS, Associate Professor
ing to study petroleum or minerals exploration or develop-
JERRY D. HIGGINS, Associate Professor
ment sciences, geochemistry and/or geology generally pursue
JOHN E. McCRAY, Associate Professor
KEVIN W. MANDERNACK, Associate Professor
Geology or Geochemistry degrees. Students are initially ad-
ERIC P. NELSON, Associate Professor
mitted to either geoscience or geological engineering degree
PIRET PLINK-BJORKLUND, Associate Professor
programs and must receive approval of the GE department
PAUL SANTI, Associate Professor
Graduate Advisory Committee to switch degree categories.
BRUCE TRUDGILL, Associate Professor
Program Requirements:
WEI ZHOU, Associate Professor
NIGEL M. KELLY, Assistant Professor
Geology Degrees:
CHRISTIAN V. SHOREY, Instructor
The Master of Science (Geology) academic program will
CHARLES F. KLUTH, Distinguished Scientist
require 36 semester hours of course and research credit hours
DAVID PYLES, Research Professor
(a maximum of 9 credit hours may be 400-level course work),
DONNA S. ANDERSON, Research Associate Professor
plus a thesis. Twelve of the 36 credit hours may be research
MASON DYKSTRA, Research Associate Professor
credits. To ensure breadth of background, the course of study
NICHOLAS B. HARRIS, Research Associate Professor
for the Master of Science (Geology) degree must include at
KARIN HOAL, Research Associate Professor
least one graduate course in each of the fields of stratigraphy/
MAEVE BOLAND, Research Assistant Professor
sedimentology, structural geology/tectonics, and petrology.
RENAUD BOUROULLEC, Research Assistant Professor
At the discretion of the student’s thesis advisory committee,
MARY CARR, Research Assistant Professor
THOMAS L.T. GROSE, Professor Emeritus
an appropriate course taken from a degree program other
JOHN D. HAUN, Professor Emeritus
than Geology may be substituted for one (and only one) of
NEIL F. HURLEY, Professor Emeritus, Charles Boettcher
the fields above. Candidates must also complete GEOL607,
Distinguished Chair in Petroleum Geology
Graduate Seminar, as part of their course programs. All
RICHARD W. HUTCHINSON, Professor Emeritus
Master of Science (Geology) candidates must also complete
KEENAN LEE, Professor Emeritus
an appropriate thesis, based upon original research they have
A. KEITH TURNER, Professor Emeritus
completed. A thesis proposal and course of study must be ap-
JOHN E. WARME, Professor Emeritus
proved by a candidate’s thesis committee before the candi-
ROBERT J. WEIMER, Professor Emeritus
date begins substantial work on the thesis research.
TIMOTHY A. CROSS, Associate Professor Emeritus
GREGORY S. HOLDEN, Associate Professor Emeritus
The requirement for Doctor of Philosophy (Geology) aca-
Degrees Offered:
demic programs will be established individually by a candi-
date’s Doctoral Thesis Advisory Committee, but must meet
Professional Master’s Degree
the minimum requirements presented below. The Doctor of
(Petroleum Reservoir Systems) (Non-Thesis)
Philosophy (Geology) academic program will require a mini-
Professional Master’s Degree (Mineral Exploration
mum of 72 hours of course and research credit hours (a max-
and Mining Geosciences) (Non-Thesis)
imum of 9 credit hours may be 400-level course work), plus
Professional Master’s Degree (Geochemistry) (Non-Thesis)
a qualifying examination and a thesis. All candidates must
Master of Engineering (Geological Engineer) (Non-Thesis)
complete a minimum of 24 research credit hours and must
Master of Science (Geology)
complete a minimum of 48 course credit hours, including 12
Master of Science (Geological Engineering)
hours in a minor field. Up to 24 course credit hours (includ-
Master of Science (Geochemistry)
ing those for the minor field) may be awarded by the candi-
Doctor of Philosophy (Geology)
date’s Doctoral Thesis Advisory Committee for completion
Doctor of Philosophy (Geochemistry)
of a Master of Science degree (at CSM or elsewhere). The
Doctor of Philosophy (Geological Engineering)
Doctor of Philosophy (Geology) course program must satisfy
the breadth requirements required of Master of Science
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
97

(Geology) candidates (including GEOL607) and must also
below. Approval of those courses will be given by the Geo-
include GEOL511 (History of Geological Concepts).
chemistry Committee of the Whole. No more than 9 credits
Prospective students should submit the results of the Grad-
of 400-level courses may constitute the 36 minimum credit
uate Record Examination with their application for admission
requirement.
to graduate study. In the event that it is not possible, because
A 17 credit-hour core program consists of:
of geographic and other restrictions, to take the Graduate
CHGN403: Environmental Chemistry (3 hrs, Fall)
Record Examination prior to enrolling at Colorado School
GEGN467*: Ground-Water Engineering (4 hrs, Fall)
of Mines, enrollment may be granted on a provisional basis
CHGC503: Introduction to Geochemistry (4 hrs, Fall)
subject to satisfactory completion of the examination within
GEGN509: Aqueous Geochemistry (3 hrs, Fall)
the first year of residence.
GEOL530: Clay Characterization (1 hr, Fall)
Professional Masters – Geochemistry
CHGC504: Methods in Geochemistry (2 hrs, Spring)
Introduction
*If this course is transferred from the undergraduate program,
The proposed program is intended to provide: [1] an oppor-
an advanced hydrogeology course may be substituted from
tunity for CSM undergraduates to obtain, as part of a fifth
the list below)
year of study, a Masters in addition to the Bachelors degree;
An additional 12 credit-hours must be selected from the
and [2] additional education for working professionals in the
following list.
area of geochemistry as it applies to problems relating to the
CHGC530: Environmental Chemistry and Geochemistry
environment.
(3 hrs., Spring)
The program outlined below is a non-thesis masters degree
CHGC555: Environmental Organic Chemistry
program administered by the Geochemistry Program, and may
(3 hrs., Spring)
be completed as a combined degree program by individuals
CHGC562: Microbiology and the Environment
already matriculated as undergraduate students at The Col-
(3 hrs., Spring)
orado School of Mines, or by individuals already holding un-
CHGC563: Environmental Microbiology Laboratory
dergraduate or advanced degrees and are interested in a
(2 hrs., Fall)
graduate program that does not have the traditional research
CHGC564: Biogeochemistry and Geomicrobiology
requirement. The program consists primarily of coursework
(3 hrs., Fall)
in Geochemistry and allied fields, with an emphasis on envi-
CHGC610: Nuclear and Isotopic Geochemistry
ronmental applications. No research is required though the
(3 hrs., Spring)
program does allow for independent study, professional de-
CHGC640: Soil Gas Geochemistry (3 hrs., Spring)
velopment, internship and coop experience.
CHGN503: Advanced Physical Chemistry (3 hrs., Fall)
Application
GEGN527: Organic Geochemistry of Fossil Fuels & Ore
Undergraduate students at CSM must declare an interest
Deposits (3 hrs., Spring)
during their 3rd year to allow for planning of coursework that
GEGN532: Geological Data Analysis (3 hrs., Fall)
will apply towards the program; these students must have an
GEGN575: Applications of Geographic Information
overall GPA of at least 3.0. Students majoring in other de-
Systems (3 hrs., Spring)
partments besides Chemistry & Geochemistry and Geology
GEGN581: Advanced Ground- Water Engineering
& Geological Engineering may want to decide on the com-
(3 hrs., Fall)
bined degree program option earlier to be sure prerequisites
GEGN583: Mathematical Modeling of Ground-Water
are satisfied. External people applying for the program must
Systems (3 hrs., Spring)
follow the same procedures that all prospective graduate stu-
GEGN681: Vadose Zone Hydrology (3 hrs., Spring)
dents follow; however, the requirement of the general GRE
GEGN683: Advanced Ground-Water Modeling
may be waived.
(3 hrs., Spring)
GEOL512: Mineralogy and Crystal Chemistry (3 hrs., Fall)
Requirements
GEOL684: Chemical Modeling of Aqueous Systems
A minimum of 36 credit hours are required, with an over-
(3 hrs., Spring)
all GPA of at least 3.0. The overall course requirements will
GXGN571: Geochemical Exploration
depend on the background of the individual, but may be tai-
(3 hrs., Fall and Spring)
lored to professional objectives.
An additional 7 credit-hours of free electives may be selected
CSM students that intend to follow the 4+1 format may
to complete the 36 credit-hour requirement. Free electives
transfer into the program 6 credits of 400-level or above
may be selected from the list above, and may also be inde-
courses taken as part of their undergraduate curriculum,
pendent study credits (CHGN599, GEGN599 or GEOL599)
provided those courses fit into the overall professional objec-
taken to fulfill a research, cooperative, or other professional
tives of the individual, and compliment the course program
development experience. A course program will be designed
98
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

in advance through consultation between the student and an
Geophysics:
advisor from the Geochemistry Committee of the Whole.
GPGN507 Near-Surface Field Methods (3 hrs., Fall)
Professional Masters in Mineral Exploration and Mining
GPGN509 Physical and Chemical Properties and
Geosciences
Processes in Rock, Soil, and Fluids (3 hrs., Fall)
This is a non-thesis, masters degree program jointly ad-
GPGN510 Gravity and Magnetic Exploration
ministered by Geology and Geological Engineering, Geo-
(3 hrs., Spring)
chemistry, and Geophysics. Students gain admission to the
GPGN511 Advanced Gravity and Magnetic Exploration
program by application to any of the sponsoring departments
(4 hrs., Spring, even years)
and acceptance through the normal procedures of that depart-
GPGN520 Electrical and Electromagnetic Exploration
ment. This appendix lists course requirements and options.
(4 hrs., Fall, odd years)
GPGN521 Advanced Electrical and Electromagnetic
Requirements
Exploration (4 hrs., Spring, even years)
A minimum of 36 credit hours. Up to 9 credit hours may
GPGN540 Mining Geophysics (3 hrs., Fall)
be at the 400-level. All other credits toward the degree must
be 500-level or above.
Other:
u A 15 credit hour core program from the relevant depart-
Economics and Business:
ments and consists of:
EBGN535 Economics of Metal Industries and Markets
(3 hrs., Spring)
GEGN403: Mineral Exploration Design (3 hrs., Spring)
EBGN536 Mineral Policies and International Investment
GEOL515: Advanced Mineral Deposits-Magmatic &
(3 hrs., Spring)
Syngenetic Ores (3 hrs., Fall) or
EBGN541 International Trade (3 hrs., Spring)
GEOL516: Advanced Mineral Deposits-Epithermal
EBGN575 Advanced Mining and Energy Valuation
Hydrothermal Systems (3 hrs., Spring) or
(3 hrs., Fall)
GEGN528 Mining Geology (3 hrs., Spring, even years)
EBGN580 Exploration Economics (3 hrs., Fall)
GEGX571: Geochemical Exploration (3 hrs., Fall)
GPGN530: Applied Geophysics (3 hrs., Spring)
Environmental Science and Engineering:
EBGN504 Economic Evaluation and Investment Decision
ESGN456 Scientific Basis of Environmental Regulations
Methods (3 hrs., Spring) or
(3 hrs., Fall)
EBGN510 Natural Resource Economics (3 hrs., Fall) or
ESGN500 Environmental Water Chemistry (4 hrs., Fall)
EBGN512 Macroeconomics (3 hours, Spring) or
ESGN502 Environmental Law (3 hrs., Fall)
MNGN585 Mining Economics (3 hrs., Spring, even years)
Metallurgy and Materials Engineering:
u 15 additional credit hours must be selected from the fol-
MTGN429 Metallurgical Environment (3 hrs., Spring)
lowing list. Selection of courses will be undertaken by the
MTGN431 Hydro- and Electrometallurgy (2 hrs., Spring)
student in consultation with their degree committee con-
MTGN432 Pyrometallurgy (3 hrs., Spring)
sisting of three faculty from the respective programs that
Other courses may be selected from the CSM offerings with
have admitted the student (GC, GE, GP, MN):
the approval of representatives from the administering depart-
Geochemistry:
ments or program.
GEGX633: Lithgeochemical Mineral Exploration
6 credit hours may be independent study in the student’s home
(3 hrs. Spring)
department or additional course work from the list above.
GEGX635: Surficial Exploration Geochemistry
Professional Masters in Petroleum Reservoir Systems:
(3 hrs Spring)
This is a non-thesis, interdisciplinary masters degree pro-
Geology and Geological Engineering:
gram jointly administered by the departments of Geology and
GEOL404: Ore Microscopy (3 hrs., Spring)
Geological Engineering, Geophysics, and Petroleum Engi-
GEGN517: Field Methods in Economic Geology
neering. This program consists only of coursework in petro-
(3 hrs., Spring and Fall)
leum geoscience and engineering. No research is required.
GEOL505: Applied Structural Geology (3 hrs., Spring)
The degree is particularly suited for employees of service
GEOL509: Introduction to Aqueous Geochemistry
companies and non-U.S. professionals from the international
(3 hrs., Fall)
petroleum sector. It is also attractive for individuals with a
GEGN518: Mineral Exploration (3 hrs., Spring)
B.S. degree who desire a graduate-level credential for em-
GEGN528: Mining Geology (3 hrs., Spring)
ployment in the petroleum industry.
GEGN532: Geological Data Analysis (3 hrs., Fall)
General Administration:
GEOL545: Introduction to Remote Sensing (3 hrs., Spring)
The three participating departments share oversight for
GEOL575: Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
this program through a committee consisting of one faculty
(3 hrs., Fall)
member from each of the three departments. Students gain
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
99

admission to the program by application to any of the three
content of the report is determined by the student’s advisor,
sponsoring departments. Students are administered by that
in consultation with the student, and is approved by the Geo-
department into which they first matriculate.
logical Engineering Graduate Program Committee. The for-
Requirements:
mat of the report will follow the guidelines for a professional
A minimum of 36 credit hours. Up to 9 credit hours may
journal paper.
be at the 400 level. All other credits toward the degree must
The student, in consultation with the advisor, must prepare
be 500 level or above.
a formal program of courses and independent study topic for
9 hours must consist of:
approval by the Geological Engineering Graduate Program
1 course selected from the following:
Committee. The program must be submitted to the commit-
GPGN419/PEGN 419 Well Log Analysis and Formation
tee on or before the end of the first week of classes of the
Evaluation
first semester.
GPGN519/PEGN519 Advanced Formation Evaluation
The most common difficulty in scheduling completion of
2 courses selected from the following:
the degree involves satisfaction of prerequisites. Common
GEGN439/GPGN439/PEGN439 Multi-Disciplinary Petro-
deficiency courses are Statics, Mechanics of Materials, and
leum Design
Fluid Mechanics. These are essential to the engineering
GEGN503/GPGN503/PEGN503 Integrated Exploration
underpinnings of the degree. An intense program at CSM
and Development I
involving 18 credit hours each semester including Statics in
GEGN504/GPGN504/PEGN504 Integrated Exploration
the fall and Fluid Mechanics in the spring and 9 credits in the
and Development II
summer including Mechanics of Materials, allows these
9 additional hours must consist of one course each from
classes to be taken along with the standard program. Some
the 3 participating departments.
students may choose to take these prerequisites elsewhere
before arriving on the CSM campus.
The remaining 18 hours may consist of graduate courses
from any of the 3 participating departments, or other courses
Engineering Geology/Geotechnics Specialty (Non-Thesis)
approved by the committee. Up to 6 hours may consist of in-
Students working towards a Masters of Engineering
dependent study, including an industry project.
(non-thesis) with specialization in Engineering Geology/
Geotechnics must meet the prerequisite course requirements
Geological Engineering Degrees:
listed later in this section. Required courses for the degree are:
The Masters of Engineering (Non-Thesis) Program in
Geological Engineering outlined below may be completed
Fall Semester (15 hours)
by individuals already holding undergraduate or advanced
GEGN468 Engineering Geology & Geotechnics (4)
degrees or as a combined degree program by individuals al-
GEGN467 Groundwater Engineering (4)
ready matriculated as undergraduate students at The Col-
GEGN532 Geological Data Analysis (3)
orado School of Mines. The program is comprised of 36
GEGN570 Case Histories in Engineering Geology (3), or
credit hours with 30 course credit hours and 6 credit hours of
GEGN571 Advanced Engineering Geology (3)
independent study (GEGN 599). Up to nine credit hours can
Electives* (1)
be at the 400 level and the remainder will be 500 or 600
level. For the combined degree program, courses recom-
Spring Semester (15 hours)
mended as appropriate for double counting may be chosen
GEGN573 Geological Engineering Site Investigation (3)
from GEGN 403, 439, 469, and 470. The typical program
GEGN671 Landslides: Investigation, Analysis &
plan includes 15 course credit hours in both the fall and the
Mitigation (3), or
spring terms followed by 6 independent study credit hours
GEGN672 Advanced Geotechnics (3)
during the summer term. The non-thesis degree includes
Electives* (9)
three areas of specialization (engineering geology/geotech-
nics, ground-water engineering, and mining geological engi-
Summer (6 hours)
neering).
GEGN599 Independent Study in Geological
Engineering (6)
All Masters of Engineering (Non-Thesis) program will in-
clude the following core requirements:
*Electives and course substitutions are approved by the
Geological Engineering Graduate Program Committee and
GEGN532 Geological Data Analysis (3)
must be consistent with the program specialization. As part
GEGN599 Independent Study in Geological
of their elective courses, students are required to have an ad-
Engineering (6)
vanced course in both soil and rock engineering. Possibilities
GEGN599 requires a project and report that demonstrate
for other electives include graduate-level rock mechanics and
competence in the application of geological engineering prin-
rock engineering, soil mechanics and foundations, ground
ciples that merits a grade of B or better. The project topic and
100
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

water, site characterization, geographical information systems
Spring Semester (15 hours)
(GIS), project management and geophysics, for example.
GEOL516 Advanced Mineral Deposits-Epigenetic
Ground Water Engineering/Hydrogeology Specialty
Hydrothermal Systems (3)
(Non-Thesis)
GEGN518 Mineral Exploration (3) or Mining Geology (3)
Students working towards a Masters of Engineering (non-
GEGN505. Applied Structural Geology (3)
thesis) with specialization in Ground Water Engineering and
Electives* (6)
Hydrogeology must meet the prerequisite course requirements
Summer (6 hours)
listed later in this section. Required courses for the degree
GEGN599 Independent Study in Geological
(36 hours) are:
Engineering (6)
GEGN467 Ground Water Engineering (3) Fall
*Electives and course substitutions are approved by the
GEGN532 Geological Data Analysis (3) Fall
Geological Engineering Graduate Program Committee and
GEGN681 Vadose Zone Hydrology (3) Fall, or
must be consistent with the program specialization. Typi-
GEGN581 Advanced Hydrogeology (3) Fall
cally, the elective courses are selected from the following
GEGN509 Aqueous Geochemistry (3) Fall, or
topical areas: mineral deposits geology, ore microscopy, ap-
ESGN500 Environmental Water Chemistry (3)
plied geophysics, applied geochemistry, remote sensing, en-
Fall or Spring
gineering geology, environmental geology, engineering
economics / management, mineral processing, geostatistics,
GEGN583 Mathematical Modeling of Ground Water Sys-
geographic information systems, environmental or explo-
tems (3) Spring
ration and mining law, and computers sciences.
GEGN470 Ground Water Engineering Design (3)
The Master of Science Degree Program in Geological
Spring, or
Engineering requires a minimum of 36 semester hours of
ESGN575 Hazardous Waste Site Remediation (3) Spring
course and project/research credit hours (a maximum of 9
GEGN575 Applications of Geographic Information
credit hours may be 400-level course work), plus a Graduate
Systems (3) Fall or Spring
Thesis. The degree includes three areas of specialization
GEGN599 Independent Study in Geological
(engineering geology/geotechnics, groundwater engineering,
Engineering (6) Summer
and mining geological engineering) with common require-
Electives* (9)
ments as follows:
*Electives and course substitutions are approved by the
1. GEGN532 Geological Data Analysis (3)
Geological Engineering Graduate Program Committee and
2. GEOL607 Graduate Geology Seminar (1)
must be consistent with the program specialization. As part
3. At least twelve hours of research credits are required:
of their elective courses, students are required to have at least
Master of Science Research (GEGN705).
one additional advanced course in hydrogeochemistry. Possi-
bilities for other electives include courses in site characteri-
4. At least 24 course credit hours are required, and must be
zation, environmental science and engineering, geographical
approved by the student’s thesis committee.
information systems (GIS), geochemistry, and geophysics,
The content of the thesis is to be determined by the student’s
for example.
advisory committee in consultation with the student. The
Mining Geological Engineering Specialty (Non-Thesis)
Masters thesis must demonstrate creative and comprehensive
Students working towards a Masters of Engineering (non-
ability in the development or application of geological engi-
thesis) with specialization in Mining Geology must meet the
neering principles. The format of the thesis will follow the
prerequisite course requirements listed later in this section.
guidelines described under the Thesis Writer’s Guide.
Required courses for the degree are:
In addition to the common course requirements, the
Fall Semester (15 hours)
Master of Science degree with specialization in Engineer-
GEGN468 Engineering Geology & Geotechnics (4), or
ing Geology/Geotechnics requires:
GEGN467. Groundwater Engineering (4)
GEGN467 Groundwater Engineering (4)
GEGN532 Geological Data Analysis (3)
GEGN468 Engineering Geology & Geotechnics (4)
GEOL515 Advanced Mineral Deposits-Magmatic &
GEGN570 Case Histories in Engineering Geology (3)
Sygenetics Ores (3)
And at least two of the following courses:
MNGN523. Special Topics-Surface Mine Design (2), or
GEGN571 Advanced Engineering Geology (3)
MNGN523 Special Topics-Underground Mine Design (2)
GEGN573 Geological Engineering Site Investigation (3)
Electives* (3)
GEGN671 Landslides: Investigation, Analysis &
Mitigation
GEGN672 Advanced Geotechnics (3)
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
101

Typically, the additional courses are selected from the
in consultation with the student. The dissertation must make
following topical areas: engineering geology, groundwater
a new contribution to the geological engineering profession.
engineering, groundwater modeling, soil mechanics and
The format of the dissertation will follow the guidelines de-
foundations, rock mechanics, underground construction, seis-
scribed under the Thesis Writer’s Guide. A minimum of 24
mic hazards, geomorphology, geographic information systems,
research credits must be taken. A minor area of study, in-
construction management, finite element modeling, waste
cluding 12 credit hours of course work, must be included in
management, environmental engineering, environmental law,
the program.
engineering management, and computer programming.
In addition to the common course requirements, a PhD
In addition to the common course requirements, the Master
specializing in Engineering Geology/Geotechnics requires
of Science degree with specialization in Ground Water also
additional course work tailored to the student’s specific inter-
requires the following courses:
ests and approved by the doctoral program committee. (Typi-
GEGN467 Groundwater Engineering (4)
cally, the additional courses are selected from the following
GEGN468 Engineering Geology & Geotechnics (4)
topical areas: engineering geology, groundwater engineering,
GEGN572 Ground-Water Engineering (3)
groundwater modeling, soil mechanics and foundations, rock
GEGN583 Mathematical Modeling Of Groundwater (3)
mechanics, underground construction, seismic hazards, geo-
morphology, geographic information systems, construction
2 courses selected as follows:
management, finite element modeling, waste management,
ESGN500 Environmental Water Chemistry (3) or
environmental engineering, environmental law, engineering
GEGN509/CHGC509 (3) Introduction To Aqueous
management, and computer programming.) The minor area
Geochemistry
of study typically is in geotechnical engineering, rock
ESGN503 Environmental Pollution (3) or
mechanics/earth systems engineering, environmental engi-
GEGN581 (3) Advanced Groundwater
neering, groundwater engineering or geology.
As nearly all ground water software is written in Fortran,
In addition to the common course requirements listed pre-
if the student does not know Fortran, a Fortran course must
viously, a PhD specializing in Ground Water also requires:
be taken before graduation, knowledge of other computer
GEGN581 (3) Advanced Groundwater Engineering
languages is encouraged
GEGN669 (3) Advanced Topics In Engineering
In addition to the common course requirements, the Master
Hydrogeology
of Science degree with specialization in Mining Geology
GEGN681 (3) Vadose Zone Hydrology
also requires:
GEGN683 (3) Advanced Ground Water Modeling
1. GEGN528 Mining Geology (3) or GEGN518 Mineral Ex-
and additional course work tailored to the student’s specific
ploration (3)
interests, which are likely to include chemistry, engineering,
environmental science, geophysics, math (particularly Partial
2. Specialty Areas (17 credits minimum.)
Differential Equations), microbiology, organic chemistry,
This will include about 5–6 courses (predominantly at 500
contaminant transport, soil physics, optimization, shallow re-
and 600 level) selected by the student in conjunction with the
sistivity or seismic methods. The student’s advisory commit-
Masters program advisory committee. Specialty areas might
tee has the authority to approve elective courses and any
include: mineral deposits geology, mineral exploration, min-
substitutions for required courses.
ing geology, mineral processing, applied geophysics, applied
If a student selects the ESGN elective courses from the
geochemistry, engineering geology, environmental geology,
Masters courses, then ESGN is their likely minor.
geostatistics, geographic information systems, environmental
or exploration and mining law, engineering economics/
In addition to the common course requirements, a PhD
management, and computer sciences.
specializing in Mining Geology also requires:
The Doctor of Philosophy (Geological Engineering)
GEGN468. Engineering Geology & Geotechnics (4) or
degree requires a minimum of 72 hours course work and re-
GEGN467. Groundwater Engineering (4)
search combined. Requirements include the same courses as
GEGN518. Mineral Exploration (3) or
for the Master of Science (Geological Engineering) with the
GEGN528. Mining Geology (3)
additions noted below and the exception that a PhD Disser-
GEGN505. Applied Structural Geology (3)
tation must be executed under GEGN/GEOL706 Graduate
GEOL515. Advanced Mineral Deposits-Magmatic &
Research Credit: Doctor Of Philosophy. After completing all
Syngenetic Ores (3)
coursework and an admission to candidacy application, the
GEOL516 Advanced Mineral Deposits-Epigenetic
Dissertation is completed under GEGN/GEOL706 Graduate
Hydrothermal Systems (3)
Research Doctor Of Philosophy. The content of the disserta-
tion is to be determined by the student’s advisory committee
MNGN523. Special Topics-Surface Mine Design (2) or
MNGN523. Special Topics- Underground Mine Design (2)
102
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

Additional course work suited to the student’s specific
Mathematics (2 semesters of calculus)
interests and approved by the doctoral program committee.
An additional science course (other than geology) or
(Typically, the additional courses are selected from the fol-
advanced mathematics
lowing topical areas: mineral deposits geology, mineral
Physics (2 semesters)
exploration, mining geology, mineral processing, applied
Professional Masters Degree Programs:
geophysics, applied geochemistry, engineering geology, envi-
Candidates for the Professional Masters Degree must
ronmental geology, geostatistics, geographic information
possess an appropriate geosciences undergraduate degree or
systems, environmental or exploration and mining law, engi-
its equivalent. Prerequisites are the same as those required
neering economics/management, and computer sciences). The
for the Master of Science (Geology) Degree.
minor area of study may be in geotechnical engineering, rock
mechanics/earth systems engineering, environmental engi-
Engineering Programs:
neering, groundwater engineering, mining engineering, min-
The candidate for the degree of Master of Engineering
eral economics/engineering economics or geology.
(Geological Engineer), Master of Science (Geological Engi-
neering) or Doctor of Philosophy (Geological Engineering)
Geochemistry Program Requirements:
must have completed the following or equivalent subjects.
The geochemistry program comprises a core group of
Graduate credit may be granted for courses at or above the
courses and four optional tracks: Mineralogy-Petrology,
400 level, if approved by the student’s advisory committee.
Aqueous-Environmental, Ore Deposits-Exploration, and
Organic-Petroleum. Satisfactory performance in all core
Mathematics:
courses is required of all geochemistry students. Required
Four semesters including: Calculus (2 semesters) and one
core courses are:
semester of any two of: calculus III, differential equations,
probability and statistics, numerical analysis, linear algebra,
CHGC503 Introduction to Geochemistry,
operations research, optimization
CHGC504 Methods in Geochemistry and
CHGN503 Advanced Physical Chemistry
Basic Science:
Chemistry (2 semesters)
See the Geochemistry program section in this bulletin for
Mineralogy and Petrology
further details.
Physics (2 semesters)
Qualifying Examination
Stratigraphy or Sedimentation
Ph.D. students must pass a qualifying examination by the
Physical Geology
end of the second year of their programs. This timing may be
Computer Programming or GIS
adjusted for part-time students. This examination will be ad-
Engineering Science:
ministered by the student’s Doctoral committee and will con-
Structural Geology and one semester in four of the follow-
sist of an oral and a written examination, administered in a
ing subjects:
format to be determined by the Doctoral Committee. Two
negative votes in the Doctoral Committee constitute failure
Physical Chemistry or Thermodynamics
of the examination.
Statics
Mechanics of Materials
In case of failure of the qualifying examination, a re-
Fluid Mechanics
examination may be given upon the recommendation of the
Dynamics
Doctoral Committee and approval of the Graduate Dean.
Soil Mechanics
Only one re-examination may be given.
Rock Mechanics
Prerequisites:
Engineering Design:
Geology Programs:
Field Geology
The candidate for the degree of Master of Science
(Geology) or Doctor of Philosophy (Geology) must have
As part of the graduate program each student must take
completed the following or equivalent subjects, for which
one semester in two of the following subjects if such courses
credit toward an advanced degree will not be granted.
were not taken for a previous degree:
General Geology
Mineral Deposits/Economic Geology
Structural Geology
Hydrogeology
Field Geology (6 weeks)
Engineering Geology
Mineralogy
and also as part of the graduate program one semester in
Petrology
three of the following subjects if such courses were not taken
Historical Geology
for a previous degree:
Stratigraphy
Foundation Engineering
Chemistry (3 semesters, including at least 1 semester of
Engineering Hydrology
physical or organic)
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
103

Geomorphology
lanches are also discussed. Microclimates and weather pat-
Airphoto Interpretation, Photogeology, or Remote Sensing
terns common in Colorado. Prerequisite: Completion of CSM
Petroleum Geology
freshman technical core, or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
Introduction to Mining
mester hours. Offered alternate years; Spring 2003.
Introductory Geophysics
GEOC408. INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY (II)
Engineering Geology Design
An introduction to the scientific study of the oceans, includ-
Mineral Exploration Design
ing chemistry, physics, geology, biology, geophysics, and
Groundwater Engineering Design
mineral resources of the marine environment. Lectures from
Other engineering design courses as approved by the
pertinent disciplines are included. Recommended background:
program committee
basic college courses in chemistry, geology, mathematics,
Description of Courses
and physics. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alter-
GEGN401. MINERAL DEPOSITS (I) Introductory presen-
nate years; Spring 2002.
tation of magmatic, hydrothermal, and sedimentary metallic
GEGN 432. GEOLOGICAL DATA MANAGEMENT (I)
ore deposits. Chemical, petrologic, structural, and sedimento-
Techniques for managing and analyzing geological data,
logical processes that contribute to ore formation. Description
including statistical analysis procedures and computer pro-
of classic deposits representing individual deposit types. Re-
gramming. Topics addressed include elementary probability,
view of exploration sequences. Laboratory consists of hand
populations and distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing,
specimen study of host rock-ore mineral suites and mineral
analysis of data sequences, mapping, sampling and sample
deposit evaluation problems. Prerequisite: GEGN316 and
representativity, linear regression, and overview of univariate
DCGN209. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
and multivariate statistical methods. Practical experience with
GEGN403. MINERAL EXPLORATION DESIGN (II) (WI)
principles of software programming and statistical analysis
Exploration project design: commodity selection, target se-
for geological applications via suppled software and data sets
lection, genetic models, alternative exploration approaches
from geological case histories. Prerequistes: Senior standing
and associated costs, exploration models, property acquisi-
in Geological Engineering or permission of instructor. 1 hour
tion, and preliminary economic evaluation. Lectures and lab-
lecture, 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
oratory exercises to simulate the entire exploration sequence
GEGN438. PETROLEUM GEOLOGY (I) Source rocks,
from inception and planning through implementation to dis-
reservoir rocks, types of traps, temperature and pressure
covery, with initial ore reserve calculations and preliminary
conditions of the reservoir, theories of origin and accumula-
economic evaluation. Prerequisite: GEGN401 and EPIC251.
tion of petroleum, geology of major petroleum fields and
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
provinces of the world, and methods of exploration of petro-
GEGN404. ORE MICROSCOPY/ FLUID INCLUSIONS
leum. Term report required. Laboratory consists of well log
(II) Identification of ore minerals using reflected light
analysis, stratigraphic correlation, production mapping,
microscopy, micro-hardness, and reflectivity techniques.
hydrodynamics and exploration exercises. Prerequisite:
Petrographic analysis of ore textures and their significance.
GEOL309 and GEOL314; GEGN316 or GPGN486 or
Guided research on the ore mineralogy and ore textures of
PEGN316. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
classic ore deposits. Prerequisites: GEOL321, GEGN401, or
GEGN439/GPGN439/PEGN439. MULTI-DISCIPLINARY
consent of instructor. 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
PETROLEUM DESIGN (II) (WI) This is a multidisciplinary
GEGN405. MINERAL DEPOSITS (I) Physical and chemi-
design course that integrates fundamentals and design con-
cal characteristics and geologic and geographic setting of
cepts in geological, geophysical, and petroleum engineering.
magmatic, hydrothermal, and sedimentary metallic mineral
Students work in integrated teams consisting of students
deposits from the aspects of genesis, exploration, and min-
from each of the disciplines. Multiple open-end design prob-
ing. For non-majors. Prerequisite: GEOL308, DCGN209 or
lems in oil and gas exploration and field development, in-
concurrent enrollment. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
cluding the development of a prospect in an exploration play
GEOC407. ATMOSPHERE, WEATHER AND CLIMATE
and a detailed engineering field study, are assigned. Several
(II) An introduction to the Earth’s atmosphere and its role in
detailed written and oral presentations are made throughout
weather patterns and long term climate. Provides basic
the semester. Project economics including risk analysis are
understanding of origin and evolution of the atmosphere,
an integral part of the course. Prerequisites: GP majors:
Earth’s heat budget, global atmospheric circulation and mod-
GPGN302 ,303 and EPIC251. PE majors: PEGN316,
ern climatic zones. Long- and short-term climate change in-
PEGN414, PEGN422, PEGN423, PEGN424 (or concurrent)
cluding paleoclimatology, the causes of glacial periods and
GEOL308 and EPIC251; GE Majors: GEOL308 or
global warming, and the depletion of the ozone layer. Causes
GEOL309, GEGN438, GEGN316, and EPIC251. 2 hours
and effects of volcanic eruptions on climate, El Nino, acid
lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
rain, severe thunderstorms, tornadoes, hurricanes, and ava-
104
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

GEGN442. ADVANCED ENGINEERING GEOMOR-
water quality problems involving the design of well fields,
PHOLOGY (II) Application of quantitative geomorphic
drilling programs, and/or pump tests. Engineering reports,
techniques to engineering problems. Map interpretation,
complete with specifications, analysis, and results, will be re-
photointerpretation, field observations, computer modeling,
quired. Prerequisite: GEGN467 or equivalent or consent of
and GIS analysis methods. Topics include: coastal engineer-
instructor and EPIC251. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 se-
ing, fluvial processes, river engineering, controlling water
mester hours.
and wind erosion, permafrost engineering. Multi-week de-
GEGN473. GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING SITE INVES-
sign projects and case studies. Prerequisite: GEGN342 and
TIGATION (II) (WI) Methods of field investigation, testing,
GEGN468, or graduate standing; GEGN475/575 recom-
and monitoring for geotechnical and hazardous waste sites,
mended. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
including: drilling and sampling methods, sample logging,
GEGN466. GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING (I) Theory
field testing methods, instrumentations, trench logging,
of groundwater occurrence and flow. Relation of ground-
foundation inspection, engineering stratigraphic column and
water to surface water; potential distribution and flow; theory
engineering soils map construction. Projects will include
of aquifer tests; water chemistry, water quality, and contami-
technical writing for investigations (reports, memos, pro-
nant transport. Laboratory sessions on water budgets, water
posals, workplans). Class will culminate in practice conduct-
chemistry, properties of porous media, solutions to hydraulic
ing simulated investigations (using a computer simulator).
flow problems, ananlytical and digital models, and hydrogeo-
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
logic interpretation. Prerequisite: mathematics through calcu-
GEGN475. APPLICATIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC INFOR-
lus and MATH225, GEOL309, GEOL315, and EGGN351, or
MATION SYSTEMS (II) An introduction to Geographic
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
Information Systems (GIS) and their applications to all areas
GEGN467. GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING (I) Theory
of geology and geological engineering. Lecture topics include:
of groundwater occurrence and flow. Relation of ground-
principles of GIS, data structures, digital elevation models,
water to surface water; potential distribution and flow; theory
data input and verification, data analysis and spatial modeling,
of aquifer tests; water chemistry, water quality, and contami-
data quality and error propagation, methods of GIS evaluation
nant transport. Laboratory sessions on water budgets, water
and selection. Laboratories will use personal computer systems
chemistry, properties of porous media, solutions to hydraulic
for GIS projects, as well as video presentations. Prerequisite:
flow problems, analytical and digital models, and hydrogeo-
SYGN101. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
logic interpretation. Prerequisite: mathematics through calcu-
GEGN476. DESKTOP MAPPING APPLICATIONS FOR
lus and MATH225, GEOL309, GEOL314 or GEOL315, and
PROJECT DATA MANAGEMENT (I, II) Conceptual
EGGN351, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours
overview and hands-on experience with a commercial desk-
lab; 4 semester hours.
top mapping system. Display, analysis, and presentation
GEGN468. ENGINEERING GEOLOGY AND GEOTECH-
mapping functions; familiarity with the software compo-
NICS (I) Application of geology to evaluation of construction,
nents, including graphical user interface (GUI); methods for
mining, and environmental projects such as dams, water-
handling different kinds of information; organization and
ways, tunnels, highways, bridges, buildings, mine design,
storage of project documents. Use of raster and vector data
and land-based waste disposal facilities. Design projects in-
in an integrated environment; basic raster concepts; introduc-
cluding field, laboratory, and computer analysis are an im-
tion to GIS models, such as hill shading and cost/distance
portant part of the course. Prerequisite: MNGN321 and
analysis. Prerequisite: No previous knowledge of desktop
concurrent enrollment in EGGN361/EGGN363 or consent of
mapping or GIS technology assumed. Some computer expe-
instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 semester hours.
rience in operating within a Windows environment recom-
GEGN469. ENGINEERING GEOLOGY DESIGN (II) (WI)
mended. 1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour.
This is a capstone design course that emphasizes realistic
GEGN481. ADVANCED HYDROGEOLOGY (I) Lectures,
engineering geologic/geotechnics projects. Lecture time is
assigned readings, and discussions concerning the theory,
used to introduce projects and discussions of methods and
measurement, and estimation of ground water parameters,
procedures for project work. Several major projects will be
fractured-rock flow, new or specialized methods of well
assigned and one to two field trips will be required. Students
hydraulics and pump tests, tracer methods, and well con-
work as individual investigators and in teams. Final written
struction design. Design of well tests in variety of settings.
design reports and oral presentations are required. Prerequi-
Prerequisites: GEGN467 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
site: GEGN468 or equivalent and EPIC251. 2 hours lecture,
lecture; 3 semester hours.
3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
GEGN483. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF GROUND-
GEGN470. GROUND-WATER ENGINEERING DESIGN
WATER SYSTEMS (II) Lectures, assigned readings, and
(II) (WI) Application of the principles of hydrogeology and
direct computer experience concerning the fundamentals and
ground-water engineering to water supply, geotechnical, or
applications of analytical and finite-difference solutions to
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
105

ground water flow problems as well as an introduction to in-
GEGN503/GPGN503/PEGN503. INTEGRATED EXPLO-
verse modeling. Design of computer models to solve ground
RATION AND DEVELOPMENT (I) Students work alone
water problems. Prerequisites: Familiarity with computers,
and in teams to study reservoirs from fluvial-deltaic and val-
mathematics through differential and integral calculus, and
ley fill depositional environments. This is a multidisciplinary
GEGN467. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
course that shows students how to characterize and model
GEGN/GEOL498. SEMINAR IN GEOLOGY OR GEO-
subsurface reservoir performance by integrating data, meth-
LOGICAL ENGINEERING (I, II) Special topics classes,
ods and concepts from geology, geophysics and petroleum
taught on a one-time basis. May include lecture, laboratory
engineering. Activities and topics include field trips to sur-
and field trip activities. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor
face outcrops, well logs, borehole cores, seismograms, reser-
and department head. Variable credit; 1 to 3 semester hours.
voir modeling of field performance, written exercises and
Repeatable for credit under different topics.
oral team presentations. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours. Offered fall
GEGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING
semester, odd years.
GEOLOGY OR ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY (I, II)
Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems in
GEGN504/GPGN504/PEGN504. INTEGRATED EXPLO-
geological engineering or engineering hydrogeology. Pre-
RATION AND DEVELOPMENT (I) Students work in multi-
requisite: Approval of instructor and department head. Vari-
disciplinary teams to study practical problems and case
able credit; 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
studies in integrated subsurface exploration and develop-
ment. The course addresses emerging technologies and
GEOL499. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GEOLOGY (I, II)
timely topics with a general focus on carbonate reservoirs.
Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems in
Activities include field trips, 3D computer modeling, written
geology. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and department.
exercises and oral team presentation. Prerequisite: Consent
Variable credit; 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
of instructor. 3 hours lecture and seminar; 3 semester hours.
Courses
Offered fall semester, even years.
The following courses are not all offered each academic
GEOL505. APPLIED STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY (II)
year. Any of those offered for which fewer than five students
Structural geology with emphasis on solving problems in
have registered may be omitted in any semester. All 500-
field and lab exercises using systematic analysis by geometric
level courses are open to qualified seniors with permission of
and mapping techniques. Interpretation of the structural as-
the department and Dean of Graduate School. The 600-level
pects of ore control, fossil fuels, and environmental geology.
courses are open only to students enrolled in the Graduate
Relationships between mechanical properties and structural
School.
behavior of geological materials. Prerequisite: GEGN316 or
GEOL501. APPLIED STRATIGRAPHY (I) Review of basic
equivalent. 2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
concepts in siliciclastic and carbonate sedimentology and
GEOL506. PHYSICS OF ROCK DEFORMATION (II)
stratigraphy. Introduction to advanced concepts and their
A material-oriented, mechanistic approach to understanding
application to exploration and development of fossil fuels
brittle and ductile rock deformation. Starts with fundamental
and stratiform mineral deposits. Modern facies models and
understanding of stress and strain. Physical processes of rock
sequence-stratigraphic concepts applied to solving strati-
fracture, friction, and flow will be studied as they relate to
graphic problems in field and subsurface settings. Prerequi-
earthquakes, crustal fluid movement, creep, and folding. Em-
sites: GEOL314 or equivalent or consent of instructor.
phasis on relating initial and derived microstructure, such as
3 hours lecture, 4 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
grain size, micro-cracks, and intracrystalline dislocation, to
GEOL502. STRUCTURAL METHODS FOR SEISMIC IN-
stresses, temperatures, and fluids in the Earth. Rock anisotropy,
TERPRETATION (I) A practical course that covers the wide
heterogeneity, and scale effects discussed. Prerequisite:
variety of structural methods and techniques that are essential
GEGN309 or equivalent.3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
to produce a valid and coherent interpretation of 2D and 3D
Offered alternate years, Spring 2002.
seismic reflection data in structurally complex areas. Topics
GEGN509/CHGC509. INTRODUCTION TO AQUEOUS
covered include: Extensional tectonics, fold and thrust belts,
GEOCHEMISTRY (II) Analytical, graphical and interpre-
salt tectonics, inversion tectonics and strike-slip fault sys-
tive methods applied to aqueous systems. Thermodynamic
tems. Laboratory exercises are based on seismic datasets
properties of water and aqueous solutions. Calculation and
from a wide variety of structural regimes from across the
graphical expression of acid-base, redox and solution-min-
globe. The course includes a 4 day field trip to SE Utah. Pre-
eral equilibria. Effect of temperature and kinetics on natural
requisite: GEOL309 and GEOL 314 or GEOL 315, or equiv-
aqueous systems. Adsorption and ion exchange equilibria be-
alents, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture/lab; 3
tween clays and oxide phases. Behavior of trace elements
semester hours.
and complexation in aqueous systems. Application of organic
geochemistry to natural aqueous systems. Light stable and un-
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Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

stable isotopic studies applied to aqueous systems. Prerequi-
matic-hydrothermal systems such as porphyry copper-molyb-
site: DCGN209 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. 3
denum-gold deposits, epithermal precious metal deposits,
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
metamorphogenetic gold deposits, volcanic and sedimentary
GEOL510. IMPACT GEOLOGY (II) A seminar-based
rock-hosted epigenetic base metal ores and epigenetic sedi-
course of inquiry into the nature, process, and geological
mentary-rock hosted and unconformity-related uranium de-
significance of extra-terrestrial impacts on the Earth. Course
posits. Prerequisite: GEGN401 or equivalent, or consent of
topics include the nature of impactors, impact processes,
instructor. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
morphology of impact structures, shock metamorphism, case
GEGN517. FIELD METHODS FOR ECONOMIC GEOL-
studies of impacts, and the role of impacts in Earth evolution,
OGY (II) Methods of field investigation for economic geol-
biologic extinctions, and economic deposits. Optional field
ogy including underground mapping at the CSM test mine in
trips to Meteor Crater and other impact sites over Spring
Idaho Springs, logging of drill core, logging of drill chips,
Break. 2 hours seminar, 3 hours lab, 3 credit hours.
and surface mapping. Technical reports will be written for
GEOL511. HISTORY OF GEOLOGIC CONCEPTS (II)
each of the projects. 9 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
Lectures and seminars concerning the history and philosophy
GEGN518. MINERAL EXPLORATION (II) Mineral indus-
of the science of geology; emphasis on the historical devel-
try overview, deposit economics, target selection, deposit
opment of basic geologic concepts. 3 hours lecture and semi-
modeling, exploration technology, international exploration,
nar; 3 semester hours. Required of all doctoral candidates in
environmental issues, program planning, proposal develop-
department. Offered alternate years. Spring 2001.
ment. Team development and presentation of an exploration
GEOL512. MINERALOGY AND CRYSTAL CHEMISTRY
proposal. Prerequisite: GEOL515, GEOL516, or equivalent.
(I) Relationships among mineral chemistry, structure, crys-
2 hours lecture/seminar, 2 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
tallography, and physical properties. Systematic treatments of
Offered when student demand is sufficient.
structural representation, defects, mineral stability and phase
GEGN 520. URANIUM GEOCHEMISTRY AND GEOL-
transitions, solid solutions, substitution mechanisms, and
OGY (I) In-depth study of the geochemical and geological
advanced methods of mineral identification and characteriza-
controls on the distribution of uranium and associated ele-
tion. Applications of principles using petrological and envi-
ments in the crust of the earth. Emphasis will be placed on
ronmental examples. Prerequisites: GEOL321, DCGN 209 or
geochemical and geological models for the formation of eco-
equivalent or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours
nomically recoverable concentrations of uranium, including,
lab; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years. Fall 2001.
but not limited to paleoplacer, unconformity-related, sand-
GEOL515. ADVANCED MINERAL DEPOSITS - MAG-
stone-hosted, volcanic-hydrothermal, breccia-hosted, peg-
MATIC AND SYNGENETIC ORES (I) Time-space aspects
matite, and shale and phosphorite-hosted deposits. Source of
of metallogenesis in relation to regional and local geological
metals, mechanisms of transport and deposition will be con-
evolution of the earth. Processes leading to the formation of
sidered. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture;
ore magmas and fluids within tectonic and stratigraphic frame-
3 semester hours.
works, and to the development of favorable ore-forming
GEGN527/CHGC527. ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY OF
environments. Emphasis will be placed on processes respon-
FOSSIL FUELS AND ORE DEPOSITS (II) A study of
sible for ore genesis in magmatic systems, such as layered
organic carbonaceous materials in relation to the genesis and
complexes, carbonatites and pegmatites, and on the subma-
modification of fossil fuel and ore deposits. The biological
rine hydrothermal processes responsible for syndepositional
origin of the organic matter will be discussed with emphasis
deposits in volcanic and sedimentary terrains, including mas-
on contributions of microorganisms to the nature of these
sive base and precious metal sulfide ores. Ore deposits in
deposits. Biochemical and thermal changes which convert
certain sedimentary rocks, including copper, paleoplacer
the organic compounds into petroleum, oil shale, tar sand,
gold-uranium, marine evaporite, barite, and phosphate ores
coal, and other carbonaceous matter will be studied. Principal
are considered in context of their generative environments and
analytical techniques used for the characterization of organic
processes. Prerequisite: GEGN401 or equivalent, or consent
matter in the geosphere and for evaluation of oil and gas
of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
source potential will be discussed. Laboratory exercises
GEOL516. ADVANCED MINERAL DEPOSITS - EPIGE-
will emphasize source rock evaluation, and oil-source rock
NETIC HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS (II) Time-space
and oil-oil correlation methods. Prerequisite: CHGN221,
aspects of metallogenesis in relation to regional and local geo-
GEGN438, or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours
logical evolution of the earth. Processes leading to the gener-
lab; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years, Spring 2003.
ation of metalliferous hydrothermal mineralizing solutions
GEGN528/MNGN528. MINING GEOLOGY (II) Role of
within tectonic and lithologic frameworks, and to the devel-
geology and the geologist in the development and production
opment of favorable ore-forming environments. Emphasis
stages of a mining operation. Topics addressed: mining oper-
will be placed on processes responsible for ore genesis in mag-
ation sequence, mine mapping, drilling, sampling, reserve es-
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
107

timation, economic evaluation, permitting, support functions.
geology and global change. Lab interpretation of remote
Field trips, mine mapping, data evaluation exercises, and
sensing imagery and introduction to digital image processing.
term project. Prerequisite: GEGN401 or GEGN405 or
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
permission of instructors. 2 hours lecture/seminar, 3 hours
GEOL546. GEOLOGIC APPLICATIONS OF REMOTE
lab; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years when student
SENSING (II) Application of remote sensing to regional geo-
demand is sufficient.
logic studies and to mineral and energy resource assessments.
GEGN530. CLAY CHARACTERIZATION (I) Clay mineral
Study of remote sensing techniques, including spectral analy-
structure, chemistry and classification, physical properties
sis, lineament analysis, and digital image processing. Reviews
(flocculation and swelling, cation exchange capacity, surface
of case studies and current literature. Student participation in
area and charge), geological occurrence, controls on their sta-
discussion required. Prerequisite: GEOL545 or consent of in-
bilities. Principles of X-ray diffraction, including sample
structor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
preparation techniques, data collection and interpretation,
GEOL550. INTEGRATED BASIN MODELING (I) This
and clay separation and treatment methods. The use of scan-
course introduces students to principal methods in computer-
ning electron microscopy to investigate clay distribution and
based basin modeling: structural modeling and tectonic
morphology. Methods of measuring cation exchange capacity
restoration; thermal modeling and hydrocarbon generation;
and surface area. Prerequisite: GEGN206 or equivalent, or
and stratigraphic modeling. Students apply techniques to
consent of instructor. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab; 1 semester
real data set that includes seismic and well data and learn to
hour.
integrate results from multiple approaches in interpreting a
GEGN532. GEOLOGICAL DATA ANALYSIS (I or II)
basin's history. The course is primarily a lab course. Prereq-
Techniques and strategy of data analysis in geology and geo-
uisite: Consent of instructor. A course background in struc-
logical engineering: basic statistics review, analysis of data
tural geology, sedimentology/stratigraphy or organic
sequences, mapping, sampling and sample representativity,
geochemistry will be helpful. 1 hour lecture, 5 hours labs;
univariate and multivariate statistics, geostatistics, and geo-
3 semester hours.
graphic information systems (GIS). Practical experience with
GEGN570. CASE HISTORIES IN GEOLOGICAL ENGI-
geological applications via supplied software and data sets
NEERING AND HYDROGEOLOGY (I) Case histories in
from case histories. Prerequisites: Introductory statistics course
geological and geotechnical engineering, ground water, and
(MATH323 or MATH530 equivalent) or permission of instruc-
waste management problems. Students are assigned prob-
tor. 2 hours lecture/discussion; 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
lems and must recommend solutions and/or prepare defend-
GEGN542. ADVANCED ENGINEERING GEOMOR-
able work plans. Discussions center on the role of the
PHOLOGY (II) Application of quantitative geomorphic tech-
geological engineer in working with government regulators,
niques to engineering problems. Map interpretation,
private-sector clients, other consultants, and other special in-
photointerpretation, field observations, computer modeling,
terest groups. Prerequisite: GEGN442, GEGN467,
and GIS analysis methods. Topics include: coastal engineer-
GEGN468, GEGN469, GEGN470 or consent of instructor. 3
ing, fluvial processes, river engineering, controlling water
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and wind erosion, permafrost engineering. Multi-week de-
GEOL570/GPGN570. APPLICATIONS OF SATELLITE
sign projects and case studies. Prerequisite: GEGN342 and
REMOTE SENSING (II) Students are introduced to geo-
GEGN468, or graduate standing; GEGN475 or GEGN575
science applications of satellite remote sensing. Introductory
recommended. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
lectures provide background on satellites, sensors, methodol-
GEOL543. MODERN SEDIMENTS FIELD PROGRAM (S)
ogy, and diverse applications. One or more areas of applica-
Detailed field study of modern transitional and shallow ma-
tions are presented from a systems perspective. Guest
rine environments of sedimentary deposition. Both detrital
lecturers from academia, industry, and government agencies
and carbonate environments are included. Emphasis on en-
present case studies focusing on applications, which vary
ergy and mineral resources. Conducted at field locations such
from semester to semester. Students do independent term
as southeastern United States and the Bahamas. Fees are as-
projects, under the supervision of a faculty member or guest
sessed for field and living expenses and transportation. Pre-
lecturer, that are presented both written and orally at the end
requisite: Background in sedimentary geology and consent of
of the term. Prerequisite: PHGN200, MATH225, GEOL309
instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
GEOL545. INTRODUCTION TO REMOTE SENSING (I)
GEGN571. ADVANCED ENGINEERING GEOLOGY (I)
Theory and application of remote sensing techniques using
Emphasis will be on engineering geology mapping methods,
visible, infrared, and microwave electromagnetic energy.
and geologic hazards assessment applied to site selection and
Spectral information from cameras and scanning instruments,
site assessment for a variety of human activities. Prerequi-
including infrared photography, radar imagery, Landsat im-
site: GEGN468 or equivalent. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3
agery, and imaging spectroscopy. Survey of applications to
semester hours. Offered alternate years, Fall 2004.
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Graduate Bulletin
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GEGN573. GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING SITE INVES-
GEGN578. GIS PROJECT DESIGN (I, II) Project imple-
TIGATION (II) Methods of field investigation, testing, and
mentation of GIS analysis. Projects may be undertaken by in-
monitoring for geotechnical and hazardous waste sites,
dividual students, or small student teams. Documentation of
including: drilling and sampling methods, sample logging,
all project design stages, including user needs assessment,
field testing methods, instrumentation, trench logging,
implementation procedures, hardware and software selection,
foundation inspection, engineering stratigraphic column and
data sources and acquisition, and project success assessment.
engineering soils map construction. Projects will include
Various GIS software may be used; projects may involve
technical writing for investigations (reports, memos, pro-
2-dimensional GIS, 3-dimensional subsurface models, or
posals, workplans). Class will culminate in practice conduct-
multi-dimensional time-series analysis. Prerequisite: Consent
ing simulated investigations (using a computer simulator).
of instructor. Variable credit, 1-3 semester hours, depending
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
on project. Offered on demand.
GEGN574. GEOTECHNICAL ASPECTS OF WASTE DIS-
GEOL580/GPGN580/MNGN580. INDUCED SEISMICITY
POSAL (II) Analysis and review of the legal and technical
(II) Earthquakes are sometimes caused by the activities of
problems surrounding the shallow land burial of waste
man. These activities include mining and quarrying, petroleum
materials, with special emphasis on hazardous solid waste.
and geothermal energy production, building water reservoirs
Methods of investigation of new and abandoned or inactive
and dams, and underground nuclear testing. This course will
waste sites. Measurement of contaminant movement in the
help students understand the characteristics and physical
ground, design of contaminant and monitoring systems, case
causes of man-made earthquakes and seismicity induced in
histories of field performance, and current research findings.
various situations. Students will read published reports and ob-
Prerequisite: GEGN468 and EGGN361/EGGN363. 3 hours
jectively analyze the seismological and ancillary data therein
lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years, Spring 2004.
to decide if the causative agent was man or natural processes.
GEGN575. APPLICATIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC INFOR-
Prerequisites: Undergraduate geology and physics. 3 hours lec-
MATION SYSTEMS (II) An introduction to Geographic
ture; 3 semester hours. Offered spring semester, odd years.
Information Systems (GIS) and their applications to all areas
GEGN581. ADVANCED GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING
of geology and geological engineering. Lecture topics in-
(I) Lectures, assigned readings, and discussions concerning
clude: principles of GIS, data structures, digital elevation
the theory, measurement, and estimation of ground water
models, data input and verification, data analysis and spatial
parameters, fractured-rock flow, new or specialized methods
modeling, data quality and error propagation, methods of
of well hydraulics and pump tests, tracer methods. Prerequi-
GIS evaluation and selection. Laboratories will use Macin-
site: GEGN467 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
tosh and DOS-based personal computer systems for GIS
mester hours.
projects, as well as video-presentations. Visits to local GIS
GEGN583. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF GROUND-
laboratories, and field studies will be required. 2 hours lec-
WATER SYSTEMS (II) Lectures, assigned readings, and
ture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
direct computer experience concerning the fundamentals and
GEGN576. FUNDAMENTALS OF VECTOR GEOGRAPHIC
applications of finite-difference and finite-element numerical
INFORMATION SYSTEMS (I, II) Fundamentals of rela-
methods and analytical solutions to ground water flow and
tional vector GIS; topological relationships; spatial coordi-
mass transport problems. Prerequisite: A knowledge of
nate systems; data capture and conversion; displaying and
FORTRAN programming, mathematics through differential
correcting errors; mapping precision; spatial data attribute
and integral calculus, and GEGN467 or consent of instructor.
accuracy; and database models. Case studies. Prerequisite:
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
GEGN475 or GEGN575. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
GEGN585. HYDROCHEMICAL EVOLUTION AND
Offered on demand.
MODELING OF GROUND-WATER SYSTEMS (I) Appli-
GEGN577. VECTOR GIS ANALYSIS FUNCTIONS (I, II)
cation of hydrologic, geochemical, and isotopic concepts to
Classification of relational vector GIS analysis functions;
the natural evolution of groundwater systems. Principles of
topological relationships; constructing a database; associat-
groundwater evolution in the vadose zone, in evaporative
ing attributes with spatial data; relating and joining attribute
environments, wetlands, unconfined and confined ground-
tables; selecting and manipulating data records; edgematching
water systems, and areas of interaquifer mixing. Introduction
and merging maps; displaying data; query and analysis func-
of use of geochemical modeling techniques to constrain prob-
tions; topological overlay operations; distance functions. Case
lems of mass transfer and mass balance in groundwater sys-
studies of spatial analysis projects. Prerequisite: GEGN475
tems. Course is designed to provide students with overview
or GEGN575, and GEGN576. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester
of hydrochemistry prior to taking advanced numerical mod-
hours. Offered on demand.
eling courses in hydrology and geochemistry. Prerequisites:
DCGN209 and GEGN467 or equivalent or consent of in-
structor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
109

GEGN/GEOL598. SEMINAR IN GEOLOGY OR GEO-
processes, as the basic processes and key restrictions for
LOGICAL ENGINEERING (I, II) Special topics classes,
building stratigraphy. Linkage of physical processes with de-
taught on a one-time basis. May include lecture, laboratory
positional environments and stratigraphy. Learning the key
and field trip activities. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor
observations for recognizing depositional environments in
and department head. Variable credit; 1 to 3 semester hours.
outcrops and cores. Linkage to well logs. Seminars, field
Repeatable for credit under different topics.
trips, field labs and report required. Prerequisite: GEOL 501
GEGN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING
or equivalent. 3 hours lecture and seminar; 3 semester hours.
GEOLOGY OR ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY(I, II)
GEOL611. DYNAMIC STRATIGRAPHY (II) Keynote lec-
Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems in
tures and a seminar series on the dynamics of depositional
geological engineering or engineering hydrogeology. Pre-
systems; understanding the dynamics of the depositional
requisite: Approval of instructor and department head. Vari-
processes, depositional environments and how they behave in
able credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
changing sea-level and sediment supply conditions; from
GEOL599. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GEOLOGY (I, II).
basic processes to sequence stratigraphy of the siliciclasti
Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems in
systems. Field trips and report required. Prerequisite:
geology. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and department.
GEOL501 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture and seminar; 3 se-
Variable credit; 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
mester hours.
GEOL605. ADVANCED STRUCTURAL AND TECTONIC
GEOL613. GEOLOGIC RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZA-
PRINCIPLES (I) Seminar discussions on geotectonic prin-
TION (I or II) Principles and practice of characterizing
ciples, mountain patterns and cycles, type regional and areal
petroleum reservoirs using geologic and engineering data,
studies in tectonic style. Comparative tectonics. Includes
including well logs, sample descriptions, routine and special
field work in nearby areas on specific tectonic problems, re-
core analysis and well tests. Emphasis is placed on practical
view of recent literature, and tectonic analysis in mineral and
analysis of such data sets from a variety of clastic petroleum
fuel exploration. Prerequisite: GEOL309. 2 hours lecture and
reservoirs worldwide. These data sets are integrated into de-
seminar, 3 hours field; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate
tailed characterizations, which then are used to solve practi-
years, Fall 2005.
cal oil and gas field problems. Prerequisites: GEGN438,
GEOL501, GEOL505/605 or equivalents. 3 hours lecture;
GEOL606. ADVANCED STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY (RE-
3 semester hours.
GIONAL) (II) Seminar discussion of the world’s main tec-
tonic provinces using modern methods of tectonic analysis;
GEOL614. PETROLEUM GEOLOGY OF DEEP-WATER
includes discussion of typical structures for each province
CLASTIC DEPOSITIONAL SYSTEMS (I) Course com-
and thorough review of recent literature. Assigned reports on
bines local and regional deep-water sedimentology, sequence
analysis of regional structural patterns and their possible re-
stratigraphy, reservoir geology, interpretation of outcrops,
production experimentally. Prerequisite: GEOL605. 3 hours
reflection seismic records, cores and well logs. Focus is on
lecture and seminar; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate
depositional processes, facies and their interpretation within
years, Spring 2004.
deep-water depositional systems, turbidite models and their
evolution, control of reservoir characteristics and perform-
GEOL607. GRADUATE SEMINAR (I, II) Recent geologic
ance, turbidites within a sequence stratigraphic framework,
ideas and literature reviewed. Preparation and oral presenta-
and the global occurrence of turbidite reservoirs. Laboratory
tion of short papers. 1 hour seminar; 1 semester hour. Re-
exercises on seismic, well log, and core interpretation. Seven
quired of all geology candidates for advanced degrees during
day field trip to study classic turbidites in Arkansas and to
their enrollment on campus.
develop individual field mapping and interpretation projects.
GEOL609. ADVANCED PETROLEUM GEOLOGY (II)
Prerequisites: GEGN438, GEOL501 or equivalents. 3 hours
Subjects to be covered involve consideration of basic chemi-
lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours. Offered alternate
cal, physical, biological and geological processes and their
years. Fall 2003.
relation to modern concepts of oil/gas generation (including
GEOL615. GEOCHEMISTRY OF HYDROTHERMAL
source rock deposition and maturation), and migration/
MINERAL DEPOSITS (I) Detailed study of the geochem-
accumulation (including that occurring under hydrodynamic
istry of selected hydrothermal mineral deposits. Theory and
conditions). Concepts will be applied to the historic and pre-
application of stable isotopes as applied to mineral deposits.
dictive occurrence of oil/gas to specific Rocky Mountain
Origin and nature of hydrothermal fluids and the mechanisms
areas. In addition to lecture attendance, course work involves
of transport and deposition of ore minerals. Review of wall-
review of topical papers and solution of typical problems.
rock alteration processes. Fundamental solution chemistry
Prerequisite: GEGN438 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lec-
and the physical chemistry of hydrothermal fluids. Prerequi-
ture; 3 semester hours.
site: GEGN401 or equivalent or consent of instructor. 3 hours
GEOL610. ADVANCED SEDIMENTOLOGY (II) Keynote
lecture; 3 semester hours.
lectures and a seminar series on the physical depositional
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Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

GEOL616. ADVANCED MINERAL DEPOSITS (II) Re-
GEOL625. ADVANCED METAMORPHIC PETROLOGY
views of current literature and research regarding selected
(I) Metamorphic processes and concepts, emphasizing
topics in mineral deposits. Group discussion and individual
physical and chemical controls in the development of mineral
participation expected. May be repeated for credit if different
assemblages. Petrographic examination of rock suites from
topics are involved. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
representative metamorphic zones and facies. Emphasis
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
on the interrelationships of crystallization and deformation
GEOL617. THERMODYNAMICS AND MINERAL
and an interpretation of metamorphic history. Prerequisite:
PHASE EQUILIBRIA (I) Basic thermodynamics applied to
GEGN 307 or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture and
natural geologic systems. Evaluation of mineral-vapor min-
seminar, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate
eral solution, mineral-melt, and solid solution equilibria with
years; Fall 2002.
special emphasis on oxide, sulfide, and silicate systems. Ex-
GEOL628. ADVANCED IGNEOUS PETROLOGY (I)
perimental and theoretical derivation, use, and application of
Igneous processes and concepts, emphasizing the genesis,
phase diagrams relevant to natural rock systems. An emphasis
evolution, and emplacement of tectonically and geochemi-
will be placed on problem solving rather than basic theory.
cally diverse volcanic and plutonic occurrences. Tectonic
Prerequisite: DCGN209 or equivalent or consent of instruc-
controls on igneous activity and petrochemistry. Petrographic
tor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate
study of igneous suites, mineralized and non-mineralized,
years; Fall 2003.
from diverse tectonic settings. Prerequisites: GEOL321,
GEOL618. EVOLUTION OF ORE DEPOSITS (II) The
GEGN206. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
evolutionary changes in major types of ore deposits through
Offered alternate years; Fall 2003.
time are described, and the causative changes in their geo-
GEOL642. FIELD GEOLOGY (S) Field program operated
logical environments and genetic processes are considered.
concurrently with GEGN316 field camp to familiarize the
The possible significance of these changes to tectonic
student with basic field technique, geologic principles, and
processes, and to crustal evolution of the earth are evaluated.
regional geology of Rocky Mountains. Prerequisite: Under-
In this context ore deposits are of interest not only for their
graduate degree in geology and GEGN316 or equivalent.
commercial value, but scientifically, as additional guides
During summer field session; 1 to 3 semester hours.
to the earth’s evolutionary development through 4 billion
GEOL643. GRADUATE FIELD SEMINARS (I, II, S) Spe-
years of earth history. Prerequisite: GEGN401, GEOL515,
cial advanced field programs emphasizing detailed study of
GEOL516 or equivalents or consent of instructor. 3 hours
some aspects of geology. Normally conducted away from the
lectures and/or seminar/lab; 3 semester hours.
Golden campus. Prerequisite: Restricted to Ph.D. or advanced
GEOL621. PETROLOGY OF DETRITAL ROCKS (II)
M.S. candidates. Usually taken after at least one year of
Compositions and textures of sandstones, siltstones, and
graduate residence. Background requirements vary accord-
mudrocks. Relationship of compositions and textures of
ing to nature of field study. Consent of instructor and depart-
provenance, environment of deposition, and burial history.
ment head is required. Fees are assessed for field and living
Development of porosity and permeability. Laboratory exer-
expenses and transportation. 1 to 3 semester hours; may be
cises emphasize use of petrographic thin sections, x-ray
repeated for credit with consent of instructor.
diffraction analysis, and scanning electron microscopy to
GEOL645. VOLCANOLOGY (II) Assigned readings and
examine detrital rocks. A term project is required, involving
seminar discussions on volcanic processes and products.
petrographic analysis of samples selected by student. Pre-
Principal topics include pyroclastic rocks, craters and
requisites: GEGN206 , GEOL321 or equivalent or consent of
calderas, caldron subsidence, diatremes, volcanic domes,
instructor. 2 hours lecture and seminar, 3 hours lab; 3 semes-
origin and evolution of volcanic magmas, and relation of
ter hours. Offered on demand.
volcanism to alteration and mineralization. Petrographic
GEOL624. CARBONATE SEDIMENTOLOGY AND
study of selected suites of lava and pyroclastic rocks in the
PETROLOGY (II) Processes involved in the deposition of
laboratory. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 hour semi-
carbonate sediments with an emphasis on Recent environ-
nar, 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
ments as analogs for ancient carbonate sequences. Carbonate
GEOL653. CARBONATE DIAGENESIS AND GEOCHEM-
facies recognition through bio- and lithofacies analysis, three-
ISTRY(II) Petrologic, geochemical, and isotopic approaches
dimensional geometries, sedimentary dynamics, sedimentary
to the study of diagenetic changes in carbonate sediments
structures, and facies associations. Laboratory stresses iden-
and rocks. Topics covered include major near-surface diage-
tification of Recent carbonate sediments and thin section
netic environments, subaerial exposure, dolomitization, burial
analysis of carbonate classification, textures, non-skeletal
diagenesis, carbonate aqueous equilibria, and the carbonate
and biogenic constituents, diagenesis, and porosity evolution.
geochemistry of trace elements and stable isotopes. Labora-
Prerequisite: GEGN321 and GEGN206 or consent of instruc-
tory stresses thin section recognition of diagenetic textures
tor. 2 hours lecture/seminar, 2 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
and fabrics, x-ray diffraction, and geochemical/isotopic
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
111

approaches to diagenetic problems. Prerequisite: GEOL624
rendering of complex geological objects, interactions with
or equivalent or consent of instructor. 4 to 6 hours lecture/
analytical models, and the capabilities of new software and
seminar/lab; 3 semester hours.
hardware. Prerequisites: GEGN575 and consent of instructor.
GEGN669. ADVANCED TOPICS IN ENGINEERING
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit
HYDROGEOLOGY Review of current literature and re-
under different topics.
search regarding selected topics in hydrogeology. Group dis-
GEGN681. VADOSE ZONE HYDROLOGY (II) Study of
cussion and individual participation. Guest speakers and field
the physics of unsaturated groundwater flow and contami-
trips may be incorporated into the course. Prerequisite: Con-
nant transport. Fundamental processes and data collection
sent of instructor. 1 to 2 semester hours; may be repeated for
methods will be presented. The emphasis will be on analytic
credit with consent of instructor.
solutions to the unsaturated flow equations and analysis of
GEGN670. ADVANCED TOPICS IN GEOLOGICAL ENGI-
field data. Application to non-miscible fluids, such as gaso-
NEERING Review of current literature and research regard-
line, will be made. The fate of leaks from underground tanks
ing selected topics in engineering geology. Group discussion
will be analyzed. Prerequisites: GEGN467 or equivalent;
and individual participation. Guest speakers and field trips
Math through Differential Equations; or consent of instructor.
may be incorporated into the course. Prerequisite: Consent of
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Repeatable for
GEGN682. FLOW AND TRANSPORT IN FRACTURED
credit under different topics.
ROCK (I) Explores the application of hydrologic and engi-
GEGN671. LANDSLIDES: INVESTIGATION, ANALYSIS
neering principles to flow and transport in fractured rock.
& MITIGATION Geological investigation, analysis, and de-
Emphasis is on analysis of field data and the differences be-
sign of natural rock and soil slopes and mitigation of unstable
tween flow and transport in porous media and fractured rock.
slopes. Topics include landslide types and processes, trigger-
Teams work together throughout the semester to solve prob-
ing mechanisms, mechanics of movements, landslide investi-
lems using field data, collect and analyze field data, and do
gation and characterization, monitoring and instrumentation,
independent research in flow and transport in fractured rock.
soil slope stability analysis, rock slope stability analysis, rock
Prerequisites: GEGN581 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
fall analysis, stabilization and risk reduction measures. Pre-
lecture; 3 credit hours. Offered alternate years; Fall 2001.
requisites: GEGN468, EGGN 361, MNGN321, (or equiva-
GEGN683. ADVANCED GROUND WATER MODELING
lents) or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
(II) Flow and solute transport modeling including: 1) ad-
hours.
vanced analytical modeling methods; 2) finite elements,
GEGN672. ADVANCED GEOTECHNICS (II) Geological
random-walk, and method of characteristics numerical meth-
analysis, design, and stabilization of natural soil and rock
ods; 3) discussion of alternative computer codes for model-
slopes and rock foundations; computer modeling of slopes;
ing and presentation of the essential features of a number of
use of specialized methods in earth construction. Prerequi-
codes; 4) study of selection of appropriate computer codes
site: GEGN468, EGGN361/EGGN363 and MNGN321.
for specific modeling problems; 5) application of models to
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ground water problems; and 6) study of completed modeling
projects through literature review, reading and discussion.
GEGN 673. ADVANCED GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
Prerequisite: GEOL/CHGC509 or GEGN583, and GEGN585
DESIGN (II) Application of geological principles and ana-
or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 se-
lytical techniques to solve complex engineering problems re-
mester hours.
lated to geology, such as mitigation of natural hazards,
stabilization of earth materials, and optimization of construc-
GEGN684. CHEMICAL MODELING OF AQUEOUS SYS-
tion options. Design tools to be covered will include prob-
TEMS (II) Provides theoretical background and practical
lem solving techniques, optimization, reliability,
experience in the application of chemical equilibrium and re-
maintainability, and economic analysis. Students will com-
action path models to problems in diverse fields of theoreti-
plete independent and group design projects, as well as a
cal and applied aqueous geochemistry. Advanced topics in
case analysis of a design failure. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
aqueous geochemistry are presented and subsequently inves-
hours. Offered alternate years, Spring 2007.
tigated using computer simulation approaches. Includes
hands-on experience with the software EQ3/6. Instruction is
GEGN675. ADVANCED TOPICS IN GEOGRAPHIC IN-
provided in the use of basic UNIX commands. The course
FORMATION SYSTEMS (I, II) Review of current develop-
progressively builds user ability through a wide variety of
ments and research in specific advanced topics concerning
applications including problems in thermodynamic data
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology and their
quality evaluation, ore deposition, sediment diagenesis,
applications to all areas of geology and geological engineer-
groundwater evolution, contaminant geochemistry, leachate
ing. Topics will include 3-dimensional data systems, the
generation, and enhanced oil recovery treatments. Course
problems of 3-dimensional data structures, visualization and
ends with student presentations of a chemical modeling
112
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

study applied to a problem of their choosing. Prerequisite:
Geochemcial Exploration
GEGN585 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture/computer
GEGX571. GEOCHEMICAL EXPLORATION (I)
lab; 3 semester hours.
Dispersion of trace metals from mineral deposits and their
GEGN685. APPLIED GROUND-WATER MODELING
discovery. Laboratory consists of analysis and statistical in-
PROBLEM SOLVING (I, II) Approach to and resolution of
terpretation of data of soils, stream sediments, vegetation,
technical ground-water modeling problems from industrial
and rock in connection with field problems. Term report re-
applications. Conceptual analysis taught via Socratic Dialectic.
quired. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture,
Students reproduce, analyze, and resolve each problem. Each
3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
class offers new problems and learning experiences, thus the
GEGX633. LITHOGEOCHEMICAL MINERAL EXPLO-
course can be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.
RATION (II) Principles and application of primary disper-
By successful completion of this course, students earn certifi-
sion to the search for metallic mineral deposits. Evaluation
cation to advise on the International Ground Water Modeling
of the design, sampling, analytical, and interpretational tech-
Center technical support line in a part-time employment mode.
niques used in lithogeochemical exploration. Practical labora-
Prerequisite: GEGN583 or consent of instructor. 2 hours
tory exercises. Term projects required. Prerequisite: GXGN571,
recitation alternate weeks; 3 hours lab every week; 2 semes-
GEGN401 or equivalent or consent of instructor. 3 hours
ter hours.
lecture/seminar/lab; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate
GEGN/GEOL698. SEMINAR IN GEOLOGY OR GEO-
years, on demand.
LOGICAL ENGINEERING (I, II) Special topics classes,
GEGX635. SURFICIAL EXPLORATION GEOCHEM-
taught on a one-time basis. May include lecture, laboratory
ISTRY (II) Secondary dispersion processes (mechanical and
and field trip activities. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor
chemical) applied to the search for metalliferous mineral
and department head. Variable credit; 1 to 3 semester hours.
deposits. A variety of sampling media, analytical procedures,
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
and interpretive techniques are evaluated. Landscape geo-
GEGN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING
chemistry framework for exploration program design. Pre-
GEOLOGY OR ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY(I, II)
requisite: GEGX571 or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems in
A course in geomorphology recommended. 3 hours
geological engineering or engineering hydrogeology. Pre-
lecture/seminar/lab; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate
requisite: Approval of instructor and department head. Varia-
years, on demand.
ble credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
GEGX637. ADVANCED STUDIES IN EXPLORATION
GEOL699. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GEOLOGY (I, II).
GEOCHEMISTRY (I, II) Individual special investigations
Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems in
of a laboratory or field problem in exploration geochemistry
geology. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and department.
under the direction of a member of staff. Work on the same
Variable credit; 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
or a different topic may be continued through later semesters
and additional credits earned. Prerequisite: GEGX571 and
GEGN700. GRADUATE ENGINEERING REPORT -
consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for
MASTER OF ENGINEERING (I, II, S) Laboratory, field
credit.
and library work for the Master of Engineering report under
supervision of the student’s advisory committee.
GEGN704 GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT: MASTER
OF ENGINEERING Engineering design credit hours re-
quired for completion of the degree Master of Engineering -
thesis. Engineering design must be carried out under the di-
rect supervision of the graduate student’s faculty advisor.
Repeatable for credit.
GEGN/GEOL705 GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT:
MASTER OF SCIENCE Research credit hours required
for completion of the degree Master of Science - thesis. Re-
search must be carried out under the direct supervision of the
graduate student’s faculty advisor. Repeatable for credit.
GEGN/GEOL706 GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT:
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Research credit hours re-
quired for completion of the degree Doctor of Philosophy.
Research must be carried out under direct supervision of the
graduate student’s faculty advisor. Repeatable for credit.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
113

Geophysics
The Earth supplies all materials needed by our society,
TERENCE K. YOUNG, Professor and Department Head
serves as the repository of used products, and provides a
MICHAEL L. BATZLE, Baker Hughes Professor of Petrophysics
home to all its inhabitants. Therefore, geophysics and geo-
and Borehole Geophysics
physical engineering have important roles to play in the solu-
THOMAS L. DAVIS, Professor
tion of challenging problems facing the inhabitants of this
DAVE HALE, Charles Henry Green Professor of Exploration
planet, such as providing fresh water, food, and energy for
Geophysics
Earth’s growing population, evaluating sites for underground
GARY R. OLHOEFT, Professor
construction and containment of hazardous waste, monitor-
ROEL K. SNIEDER, Keck Foundation Professor of Basic
Exploration Science
ing non-invasively the aging infrastructures (natural gas
ILYA D. TSVANKIN, Professor
pipelines, water supplies, telecommunication conduits, trans-
THOMAS M. BOYD, Associate Professor and Dean of Graduate
portation networks) of developed nations, mitigating the
Studies
threat of geohazards (earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides,
YAOGUO LI, Associate Professor
avalanches) to populated areas, contributing to homeland
ANDRÉ REVIL, Associate Professor
security (including detection and removal of unexploded
PAUL SAVA, Assistant Professor
ordnance and land mines), evaluating changes in climate and
NORMAN BLEISTEIN, Research Professor and University
managing humankind’s response to them, and exploring
Emeritus Professor
other planets.
KENNETH L. LARNER, Research Professor and University
Emeritus Professor
Energy companies and mining firms employ geophysicists
ROBERT D. BENSON, Research Associate Professor
to explore for hidden resources around the world. Engineer-
MANIKA PRASAD, Research Associate Professor
ing firms hire geophysical engineers to assess the Earth’s
FENG SU, Research Associate Professor
near-surface properties when sites are chosen for large
STEPHEN J. HILL, Adjunct Associate Professor
construction projects and waste-management operations.
DAVID J. WALD, Adjunct Associate Professor
Environmental organizations use geophysics to conduct
CHARLES P. ODEN, Adjunct Assistant Professor
groundwater surveys and to track the flow of contaminants.
WARREN B. HAMILTON, Distinguished Senior Scientist
On the global scale, geophysicists employed by universities
PIETER HOEKSTRA, Distinguished Senior Scientist
THOMAS R. LAFEHR, Distinguished Senior Scientist
and government agencies (such as the United States Geo-
MISAC N. NABIGHIAN, Distinguished Senior Scientist
logical Survey, NASA, and the National Oceanographic and
ADEL ZOHDY, Distinguished Senior Scientist
Atmospheric Administration) try to understand such Earth
FRANK A. HADSELL, Emeritus Professor
processes as heat flow, gravitational, magnetic, electric, ther-
ALEXANDER A. KAUFMAN, Emeritus Professor
mal, and stress fields within the Earth’s interior. For the past
GEORGE V. KELLER, Emeritus Professor
decade, 100% of CSM’s geophysics graduates have found
PHILLIP R. ROMIG, JR., Emeritus Professor
employment in their chosen field, with about 20% choosing
Degrees Offered
to pursue graduate studies.
Professional Masters in Mineral Exploration and Mining
Founded in 1926, the Department of Geophysics at the
Geosciences
Colorado School of Mines is recognized and respected around
Professional Masters in Petroleum Reservoir Systems
the world for its programs in applied geophysical research and
education. With 20 active faculty members and small class
Master of Science (Geophysics)
sizes, students receive individualized attention in a close-knit
Master of Science (Geophysical Engineering)
environment. Given the interdisciplinary nature of geophysics,
Doctor of Philosophy (Geophysics)
the graduate curriculum requires students to become thoroughly
Doctor of Philosophy (Geophysical Engineering)
familiar with geological, mathematical, and physical theory,
in addition to exploring the theoretical and practical aspects of
Program Description
the various geophysical methodologies.
Geophysicists study and explore the Earth’s interior
through physical measurements collected at the earth’s sur-
Research Emphasis
face, in boreholes, from aircraft, and from satellites. Using a
The Department conducts research in a wide variety
combination of mathematics, physics, geology, chemistry,
of areas mostly related, but not restricted, to applied geo-
hydrology, and computer science, a geophysicist analyzes
physics. Candidates interested in the research activities of a
these measurements to infer properties and processes within
specific faculty member are encouraged to obtain a copy of
the Earth’s complex interior. Non-invasive imaging beneath
the Department’s view book and to contact that faculty mem-
the surface of Earth and other planets by geophysicists is
ber directly. To give prospective candidates an idea of the
analogous to non-invasive imaging of the interior of the
types of research activities available in geophysics at CSM,
human body by medical specialists.
a list of the recognized research groups operating within the
Department of Geophysics is given below.
114
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

The Center for Wave Phenomena (CWP) is a research group
available on the web at:
with a total of four faculty members from the Department
http://www.geophysics.mines.edu/cgem/.
of Geophysics. With research sponsored by some 30 com-
The Center for Petrophysics (CENPET) is an interdisciplinary
panies worldwide in the petroleum-exploration industry,
facility that performs research and education in all aspects
plus U.S. government agencies, CWP emphasizes the de-
of petrophysics ranging from acoustic measurements on
velopment of theoretical and computational methods for
core material for the calibration of seismic surveys to the
imaging of the Earth’s subsurface, primarily through use
design of new borehole instruments to measure climato-
of the reflection seismic method. Researchers have been
logical parameters in the ice of the Antarctic. CENPET is
involved in forward and inverse problems of wave propa-
dedicated to understanding the properties of the materials
gation as well as data processing for data obtained where
in the earth and how geophysical observations can be used
the subsurface is complex, specifically where it is both
to predict these properties. Several departments (Geology,
heterogeneous and anisotropic. Further information about
Chemistry, Petroleum Engineering, Mathematics, and
CWP can be obtained at http://www.cwp.mines.edu.
Geophysics) cooperate in the center. For more information
The Reservoir Characterization Project (RCP) integrates the
consult http://www.geophysics.mines.edu/petrophysics
acquisition and interpretation of multicomponent, three-
Program Requirements
dimensional seismic reflection and downhole data, with
The Department offers both traditional, research-oriented
the geology and petroleum engineering of existing oil
graduate programs and a non-thesis professional education
fields, in an attempt to understand the complex properties
program designed to meet specific career objectives. The
of petroleum reservoirs. Like CWP, RCP is a multidiscipli-
program of study is selected by the student, in consultation
nary group with faculty members from Geophysics, Petro-
with an advisor, and with thesis committee approval, accord-
leum Engineering, and Geology. More information about
ing to the student’s career needs and interests. Specific de-
RCP can be obtained at http://www.mines.edu/academic/
grees, have specific requirements as detailed below.
geophysics/rcp.
Geophysical Engineering Program Objectives
The Rock Physics Laboratory conducts research on the phys-
Geophysical engineers and geophysicists must apply
ical properties of rocks having varying porosity, permea-
quantitative techniques to analyze an entity as complex as the
bility and fluid content. These properties are measured at
Earth. Geophysical graduates, therefore, require a special com-
various temperatures and pressures to simulate reservoir
bination of traits and abilities to thrive in this discipline. The
conditions.
Department of Geophysics strives to graduate students who:
The Environmental Geophysics Group investigates the uses
1. Think for themselves and demonstrate the willingness
of complex resistivity and ground-penetrating radar for the
to question conventional formulations of problems, and
characterization of contaminated soils.
are capable of solving these problems independently.
The Center for Gravity, Electrical & Magnetic Studies
2. Are creative and demonstrate the ability to conceive
(CGEM) in the Department of Geophysics at the Colorado
and validate new hypotheses, new problem descrip-
School of Mines is an academic research center that fo-
tions, and new methods for analyzing data.
cuses on the quantitative interpretation of gravity, mag-
netic, electrical and electromagnetic data in applied
3. Are good experimentalists and have demonstrated the
geophysics. The center brings together the diverse expert-
ability to design and carry out a geophysical field sur-
ise of faculty and students in these different geophysical
vey or laboratory experiment and ensure that the
methods and works towards advancing the state of art in
recorded data are of the highest-possible quality.
geophysical data interpretation for real-world problems.
4. Can program a computer in a high-level language to
The emphases of CGEM research are processing and in-
acquire, process, model and display scientific data.
version of applied geophysical data. The primary areas of
5. Can deal rationally with uncertainty and have demon-
application include petroleum exploration, mineral explo-
strated that they understand that geophysical data are
ration, and unexploded ordnance (UXO) detection and dis-
always incomplete and uncertain; can quantify the un-
crimination. In addition, environmental problems, natural
certainty and recognize when it is not acceptable to
hazard monitoring, archaeological mapping, hydro-geo-
make decisions based on these data.
physics and crustal study are also within the scope of the
center. There are currently four major research groups
6. Have demonstrated qualities that are the foundation of
within the center: Gravity and Magnetics Research Con-
leadership; know the importance of taking risks, and
sortium (GMRC), Unexploded Ordnance Research Group
are able to make good judgments about the level of risk
(UXO), Hydro-Geophysics Research Group (HGR), and
that is commensurate with their knowledge, experience,
Marine CSEM Consortium (CSEM). Research fundings
and chance of failure; realize that failure is unavoidable
are provided by petroleum companies, SERDP, ERDC,
if you want to learn and grow.
and other agencies. More information about CGEM is
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
115

7. Have demonstrated they are capable of completing the
u 15 additional credit hours must be selected from the fol-
scientific and engineering problem-solving process
lowing list. Selection of courses will be undertaken by the
from beginning to end.
student in consultation with their degree committee con-
8. Can communicate scientific concepts, problems and so-
sisting of three faculty from the respective programs that
lutions effectively in oral and written English.
have admitted the student (GC, GE, GP, MN):
9. Can present and defend their ideas effectively in public
Geochemistry:
forums and debate.
GEGX633 Lithgeochemical Mineral Exploration
(3 hrs. Spring)
In addition to the above, at the Doctor of Philosophy
GEGX635 Surficial Exploration Geochemistry (3 hrs Spring)
(Ph.D.) level, the Department of Geophysics strives to gradu-
ate students who:
Geology and Geological Engineering:
GEOL404 Ore Microscopy (3 hrs.)
10. Can teach college-level scientific and engineering
GEOL498 Field Methods in Economic Geology (3 hrs)
concepts.
GEOL505 Applied Structural Geology (3 hrs. Spring)
11. Can conceive, plan and write proposals to fund research.
GEOL509 Introduction to Aqueous Geochemistry (3 hrs. Fall)
12. Can publish in the peer-reviewed scientific and engi-
GEGN518 Mineral Exploration (3 hrs. Fall)
neering literature.
GEGN528 Mining Geology (3 hrs. Fall)
13. Can communicate scientific concepts in a discipline
GEGN532 Geological Data Analysis (3 hrs. Fall)
outside geophysics.
GEOL545 Introduction to Remote Sensing (3 hrs. Spring)
GEOL575 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) (3 hrs. Fall)
14. Can communicate scientific concepts in a language
other than English.
Geophysics:
GPGN507 Near-Surface Field Methods (3 hrs. Fall)
15. Have a broad background in the fundamentals of sci-
GPGN509 Physical and Chemical Properties and Processes
ence and engineering in the earth sciences.
in Rock, Soil, and Fluids (3 hrs. Fall)
Professional Masters in Mineral Exploration and Mining
GPGN510 Gravity and Magnetic Exploration (3 hrs. Spring)
Geosciences
GPGN511 Advanced Gravity and Magnetic Exploration
This is a non-thesis, masters degree program jointly ad-
(4 hrs. Spring, even years)
ministered by Geology and Geological Engineering, Geo-
GPGN520 Electrical and Electromagnetic Exploration
chemistry, and Geophysics. Students gain admission to the
(4 hrs. Fall, odd years)
program by application to any of the sponsoring departments
GPGN521 Advanced Electrical and Electromagnetic
and acceptance through the normal procedures of that depart-
Exploration (4 hrs. Spring, even years)
ment. This appendix lists course requirements and options.
GPGN540 Mining Geophysics (3 hrs. Fall)
Requirements
Economics and Business:
A minimum of 36 credit hours. Up to 9 credit hours may
EBGN535 Economics of Metal Industries and Markets
be at the 400-level. All other credits toward the degree must
(3 hrs. Spring)
be 500-level or above.
EBGN536 Mineral Policies and International Investment
u A 15 credit hour core program from the relevant depart-
(3 hrs. Spring)
ments consisting of:
EBGN541 International Trade (3 hrs. Spring)
EBGN575 Advanced Mineral Asset Valuation (3 hrs. Fall)
GEGN403 Mineral Exploration Design (3 hrs. Spring)
EBGN580 Exploration Economics (3 hrs. Fall)
GEOL515 Advanced Mineral Deposits-Magmatic &
Environmental Science and Engineering:
Syngenetic Ores (3 hrs. Fall) or
ESGN 456 Scientific Basis of Environmental Regulations
GEOL516 Advanced Mineral Deposits-Epithermal
(3 hrs. Fall)
Hydrothermal Systems (3 hrs. Spring) or
ESGN 500 Principles of Environmental Chemistry
GEGN528 Mining Geology (3 hrs. Spring even years)
(4 hrs. Fall)
GEGX571 Geochemical Exploration (3 hrs. Fall)
ESGN 502 Environmental Law (3 hrs. Fall)
GPGN530 Applied Geophysics (3 hrs. Spring)
Metallurgy and Materials Engineering:
EBGN504 Economic Evaluation and Investment
MTGN429 Metallurgical Environment (3 hrs. Spring)
Decision Methods (3 hrs. Spring) or
MTGN431 Hydro- and Electrometallurgy (2 hrs. Spring)
EBGN510 Natural Resource Economics (3 hrs. Fall) or
MTGN432 Pyrometallurgy (3 hrs. Spring)
EBGN512 Macroeconomics (3 hrs. Spring) or
Other courses may be selected from the CSM offerings
MNGN585 Mining Economics (3 hrs. Spring even years)
with the approval of representatives from the administering
departments or program. 6 credit hours may be independent
116
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

study in the student’s home department or additional course
u Within the opinion of the Geophysics faculty at large,
work from the list above.
the student’s dissertation topic must be appropriate for
Professional Masters in Petroleum Reservoir Systems
inclusion as part of an Engineering degree.
This is a multi-disciplinary, non-thesis master’s degree for
For either Master of Science degree, a minimum of 26
students interested in working as geoscience professionals in
course credits is required accompanied by a minimum of 12
the petroleum industry. The Departments of Geophysics,
credits of graduate research. While individual courses consti-
Petroleum Engineering, and Geology and Geological Engi-
tuting the degree are determined by the student, and approved
neering share oversight for the Professional Masters in Petro-
by their advisor and thesis committee, courses applied to all
leum Reservoir Systems program through a committee
M.S. degrees must satisfy the following criteria:
consisting of one faculty member from each department.
u All course, research, transfer, residence, and thesis re-
Students gain admission to the program by application to any
quirements are as described in Registration and Tuition
of the three sponsoring departments. Students are adminis-
Classification and Graduate Degrees and Requirements
tered by that department into which they first matriculate. A
sections of this document.
minimum of 36 hours of course credit is required to complete
the Professional Masters in Petroleum Reservoir Systems
u All credits applied to the thesis must be at the 400 (sen-
program. Up to 9 credits may be earned by 400 level courses.
ior) level or above. Courses required to fulfill deficien-
All other credits toward the degree must be 500 level or
cies, as described below, may be 300 level and lower,
above. At least 9 hours must consist of:
but these cannot be applied to the course credit require-
ments of the degree.
(1) 1 course selected from the following:
u The student’s advisor and committee may require ful-
GPGN419/PEGN419 Well Log Analysis and Formation
fillment of all or some program deficiencies as de-
Evaluation
scribed below. Credits used to fulfill program
GPGN519/PEGN519 Advanced Formation Evaluation
deficiencies are not included in the minimum required
(2) 2 courses selected from the following:
credits needed to obtain the M.S. Degree.
GEGN439/GPGN439/PEGN439 Multi-Disciplinary Pe-
u Students must include the following courses in their
troleum Design
Master degree program
GEGN503/GPGN503/PEGN503 Integrated Exploration
LICM515 – Professional Oral Communication
and Development
(1 credit)
GEGN504/GPGN504/PEGN504 Integrated Exploration
GPGN581 – Graduate Seminar (1 credit)
and Development
GPGN705 – Graduate Research – Master of Science
Also 9 additional hours must consist of one course each
(12 credits in addition to the required 26 course
from the 3 participating departments. The remaining 18
credits).
hours may consist of graduate courses from any of the 3
As described in the Master of Science, Thesis and Thesis
participating departments, or other courses approved by the
Defense section of this bulletin, all M.S. candidates must
committee. Up to 6 hours may consist of independent study,
successfully defend their M.S. thesis in an open oral Thesis
including an industry project.
Defense. The guidelines of the Thesis Defense enforced by
Master of Science Degrees: Geophysics and Geophysical
the Department of Geophysics follow those outlined in the
Engineering
Graduate Bulletin, with one exception. The Department of
Students may obtain a Master of Science Degree in either
Geophysics requires students submit the final draft of their
Geophysics or Geophysical Engineering. Both degrees have
written thesis to their Thesis Committee no less than two
the same coursework and thesis requirements, as described
weeks prior to the thesis defense date.
below. Students are normally admitted into the Master of Sci-
Doctor of Philosophy Degrees:
ence in Geophysics program. If, however, a student would
like to obtain the Master of Science in Geophysical Engineer-
Geophysics and Geophysical Engineering
ing, the course work and thesis topic must meet the following
Students may obtain a Doctor of Philosophy Degree in
requirements. Note that these requirements are in addition to
either Geophysics or Geophysical Engineering. Both degrees
those associated with the Master of Science in Geophysics.
have the same coursework and thesis requirements, as de-
scribed below. Students are normally admitted into the Ph.D.
u Students must complete, either prior to their arrival at
in Geophysics program. If, however, a student would like to
CSM or while at CSM, no fewer than 16 credits of
obtain the Ph.D. in Geophysical Engineering, the course
engineering coursework. What constitutes coursework
work and thesis topic must meet the following requirements.
considered as engineering is determined by the Geo-
Note that these requirements are in addition to those associ-
physics faculty at large.
ated with the Ph.D. in Geophysics.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
117

u Students must complete, either prior to their arrival at
sion of one additional year may be petitioned by students
CSM or while at CSM, no fewer than 16 credits of
through their Thesis Committees.
engineering coursework. What constitutes coursework
In the Department of Geophysics, the Doctoral Research
considered as engineering is determined by the Geo-
Qualifying Examination consists of the preparation, presen-
physics faculty at large.
tation, and defense of one research project and a thesis pro-
u Within the opinion of the Geophysics faculty at large,
posal. The research project and thesis proposal used in this
the student’s dissertation topic must be appropriate for
process must conform to the standards posted on the Depart-
inclusion as part of an Engineering degree.
ment of Geophysics web site.
For the Doctor of Philosophy Degree (Ph.D.), at least 72
As described in the Doctor of Philosophy, Thesis Defense
credits beyond the Bachelors degree are required. No fewer
section of this bulletin, all Ph.D. candidates must successfully
than 24 research credits are required. At least 12 credit
defend their Ph.D. thesis in an open oral Thesis Defense. The
hours must be completed in a minor program approved by
guidelines of the Thesis Defense enforced by the Department
the candidate's PhD Thesis Committee. Up to 36 course
of Geophysics follow those outlined in the Graduate Bulletin,
credits can be awarded by the candidate's committee for
with one exception. The Department of Geophysics requires
completion of a thesis-based Master's Degree at another in-
students submit the final draft of their written thesis to their
stitution. While individual courses constituting the degree are
Thesis Committee no less than two weeks prior to the thesis
determined by the student, and approved by the student's ad-
defense date. However, three weeks is preferred as discussed
visor and committee, courses applied to all Ph.D. degrees
in the FAQ section of the Department of Geophysics website
must satisfy the following criteria:
(Graduate Curriculum).
u All course, research, minor degree programs, transfer,
Acceptable Thesis Formats
residence, and thesis requirements are as described in
In addition to traditional dissertations, the Department of
Registration and Tuition Classification and Graduate
Geophysics also accepts dissertations that are compendia of
Degrees and Requirements sections of this document.
papers published or submitted to peer-reviewed journals. The
u All credits applied to the thesis must be at the 400
following guidelines are applied by the Department in deter-
(senior) level or above. Courses required to fulfill de-
mining the suitability of a thesis submitted as a series of writ-
ficiencies, as described below, may be 300 level and
ten papers.
lower, but these cannot be applied to the course credit
u All papers included in the dissertation must have a
requirements of the degree.
common theme, as approved by a student’s thesis
u The student’s advisor and committee may require
committee.
fulfillment of all or some program deficiencies as de-
u Papers should be submitted for inclusion in a disserta-
scribed below. Credits used to fulfill program deficien-
tion in a common format and typeset.
cies are not included in the minimum required credits
u In addition to the individual papers, students must pre-
needed to obtain the Ph.D. Degree.
pare abstract, introduction, discussion, and conclusions
u Students must include the following courses in their
sections of the thesis that tie together the individual
Ph.D. program
papers into a unified dissertation.
LICM515 – Professional Oral Communication (1 credit)
u A student’s thesis committee might also require the
GPGN681 – Graduate Seminar (1 credit)
preparation and inclusion of various appendices with
GPGN706 – Graduate Research – Doctor of Philosophy
the dissertation in support of the papers prepared ex-
(minimum 24 credits)
plicitly for publication.
Choose two of the following:
Graduate Program Background Requirements
SYGN501 – The Art of Science (1 credit)
All graduate programs in Geophysics require that appli-
SYGN600 – Fundamentals of College Teaching
cants have a background that includes the equivalent of ade-
(2 credits)
quate undergraduate preparation in the following areas:
LAIS601 – Academic Publishing (2 or 3 credits)
u Mathematics – Linear Algebra or Linear Systems, Dif-
u Students are also required to participate in a practical
ferential Equations, Computer Programming
teaching experience.
u Physics – Classical Physics
In the Doctoral program, students must demonstrate the
u Geology – Structural Geology and Stratigraphy
potential for successful completion of independent research
u Geophysics – Geophysical Field Methods and courses
and enhance the breadth of their expertise by completing a
that include theory and application in three of the
Doctoral Research Qualifying Examination no later than two
following areas: gravity/magnetics, seismic, electrical/
years from the date of enrollment in the program. An exten-
118
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

electromagnetics, borehole geophysics, and physics of
GPGN432. FORMATION EVALUATION (II) The basics of
the earth
core analysis and the principles of all common borehole in-
u In addition, candidates in the Doctoral program are
struments are reviewed. The course teaches interpretation
expected to have no less than one year of college level
methods that combine the measurements of various borehole
or two years of high school courses in a single foreign
instruments to determine rock properties such as porosity,
language.
permeability, hydrocarbon saturation, water salinity, ore
grade and ash content. The impact of these parameters on
Candidates not prepared in one or more of these areas may
reserve estimates of hydrocarbon reservoirs and mineral ac-
be admitted into the program if their background and demon-
cumulations is demonstrated. Geophysical topics such as ver-
strated talents give reasonable expectation that they can over-
tical seismic profiling, single well and cross-well seismic are
come deficiencies during their graduate career.
emphasized in this course, while formation testing, and cased
Description of Courses
hole logging are covered in GPGN419/PEGN419 presented
GPGN404. DIGITAL ANALYSIS (I) The fundamentals of
in the fall. The laboratory provides on-line course material
one-dimensional digital signal processing as applied to geo-
and hands-on computer log evaluation exercises. Prerequisites:
physical investigations are studied. Students explore the
MATH225, GPGN302, GPGN303, and GPGN308. 3 hours
mathematical background and practical consequences of the
lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours. Only one of the two
sampling theorem, convolution, deconvolution, the Z and
courses GPGN432 and GPGN419/PEGN419 can be taken
Fourier transforms, windows, and filters. Emphasis is placed
for credit.
on applying the knowledge gained in lecture to exploring
GPGN438. GEOPHYSICS PROJECT DESIGN (I, II)
practical signal processing issues. This is done through
Complementary design course for geophysics restricted elec-
homework and in-class practicum assignments requiring the
tive course(s). Application of engineering design principles
programming and testing of algorithms discussed in lecture.
to geophysics through advanced work, individual in charac-
Prerequisites: MATH213, MATH225, and PHGN311, or con-
ter, leading to an engineering report or senior thesis and oral
sent of instructor. Knowledge of a computer programming
presentation thereof. Choice of design project is to be arranged
language is assumed. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab; 3 semester
between student and individual faculty member who will
hours.
serve as an advisor, subject to department head approval.
GPGN414. GRAVITY AND MAGNETIC EXPLORATION
Prerequisites: GPGN302, GPGN303, GPGN308, and com-
(II) Instrumentation for land surface, borehole, sea floor, sea
pletion of or concurrent enrollment in geophysics method
surface, and airborne operations. Reduction of observed
courses in the general topic area of the project design. Credit
gravity and magnetic values. Theory of potential field effects
variable, 1 to 3 hours. Course can be retaken once.
of geologic distributions. Methods and limitations of inter-
GPGN439. GEOPHYSICS PROJECT DESIGN (II)
pretation. Prerequisite: GPGN303. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours
GEGN439/PEGN439. MULTI-DISCIPLINARY PETRO-
lab; 4 semester hours.
LEUM DESIGN (II). This is a multidisciplinary design
GPGN419/PEGN419.WELL LOG ANALYSIS AND FORMA-
course that integrates fundamentals and design concepts in
TION EVALUATION (I) The basics of core analysis and the
geological, geophysical, and petroleum engineering. Students
principles of all common borehole instruments are reviewed.
work in integrated teams consisting of students from each of
The course shows (computer) interpretation methods that
the disciplines. Multiple open-end design problems in oil and
combine the measurements of various borehole instruments
gas exploration and field development, including the devel-
to determine rock properties such as porosity, permeability,
opment of a prospect in an exploration play a detailed engi-
hydrocarbon saturation, water salinity, ore grade, ash-con-
neering field study, are assigned. Several detailed written and
tent, mechanical strength, and acoustic velocity. The impact
oral presentations are made throughout the semester. Project
of these parameters on reserves estimates of hydrocarbon
economics, including risk analysis, are an integral part of the
reservoirs and mineral accumulations is demonstrated. Pre-
course. Prerequisites: GP majors: GPGN302 and GPGN303;
requisite: MATH225, GPGN302, GPGN303, and GPGN308.
GE majors: GEOL308 or GEOL309, GEGN316, GEGN438;
3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
PE majors: PEGN316, PEGN414, PEGN422, PEGN423,
GPGN422. METHODS OF ELECTRICAL PROSPECTING
PEGN424 (or concurrent). 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab;
(I) In-depth study of the application of electrical and electro-
3 semester hours.
magnetic methods to crustal studies, minerals exploration, oil
GPGN452. ADVANCED SEISMIC METHODS (I) Histori-
and gas exploration, and groundwater. Laboratory work with
cal survey. Propagation of body and surface waves in elastic
scale and mathematical models coupled with field work over
media; transmission and reflection at single and multiple inter-
areas of known geology. Prerequisite: GPGN308 or consent
faces; energy relationships; attenuation factors, data process-
of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
ing (including velocity interpretation, stacking, and migration)
interpretation techniques including curved ray methods.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
119

Acquisition, processing, and interpretation of laboratory
ment. Credit – variable, 1 to 6 hours. Repeatable for credit
model data; seismic processing using an interactive work-
under different titles.
station. Prerequisite: GPGN302 and concurrent enrollment in
GPGN499. GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION (I, II)
GPGN404, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours
Individual project; instrument design, data interpretation,
lab; 4 semester hours.
problem analysis, or field survey. Prerequisite: Consent of
GPGN470/GEOL 470. APPLICATIONS OF SATELLITE
department. “Independent Study” form must be completed
REMOTE SENSING (II) Students are introduced to geo-
and submitted to the Registrar. Credit dependent upon nature
science applications of satellite remote sensing. Introductory
and extent of project. Variable 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeat-
lectures provide background on satellites, sensors, methodol-
able for credit.
ogy, and diverse applications. One or more areas of appli-
Graduate Courses
cation are presented from a systems perspective. Guest
500-level courses are open to qualified seniors with the
lecturers from academia, industry, and government agencies
permission of the department and Dean of the Graduate
present case studies focusing on applications, which vary
School. 600-level courses are open only to students enrolled
from semester to semester. Students do independent term
in the Graduate School.
projects, under the supervision of a faculty member or guest
lecturer, that are presented both written and orally at the end
GPGN503/GEGN503/PEGN503. INTEGRATED EXPLO-
of the term. Prerequisites: PHGN200, MATH225, GEOL308
RATION AND DEVELOPMENT (I) Students work alone
or GEOL 309, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
and in teams to study reservoirs from fluvial-deltaic and val-
mester hours
ley fill depositional environments. This is a multidisciplinary
course that shows students how to characterize and model
GPGN486. GEOPHYSICS FIELD CAMP (S) Introduction
subsurface reservoir performance by integrating data, meth-
to geological and geophysical field methods. The program
ods and concepts from geology, geophysics and petroleum
includes exercises in geological surveying, stratigraphic sec-
engineering. Activities include field trips, computer model-
tion measurements, geological mapping, and interpretation of
ing, written exercises and oral team presentations. Prerequi-
geological observations. Students conduct geophysical surveys
site: GEOL501 or consent of instructors. 2 hours lecture,
related to the acquisition of seismic, gravity, magnetic, and
3 hours lab; 3 semester hours. Offered fall semester, odd years.
electrical observations. Students participate in designing the
appropriate geophysical surveys, acquiring the observations,
GPGN504/GEGN504/PEGN504. INTEGRATED EXPLO-
reducing the observations, and interpreting these observa-
RATION AND DEVELOPMENT (I) Students work in multi-
tions in the context of the geological model defined from the
disciplinary teams to study practical problems and case studies
geological surveys. Prerequisites: GEOL308 or GEOL309,
in integrated subsurface exploration and development. Stu-
GEOL314, GPGN302, GPGN303, GPGN308, GPGN315 or
dents will learn and apply methods and concepts from geol-
consent of instructor. Up to 6 weeks field; up to 6 semester
ogy, geophysics and petroleum engineering to timely design
hours, minimum 4 hours.
problems in oil and gas exploration and field development.
Activities include field trips, computer modeling, written
GPGN494. PHYSICS OF THE EARTH (II) Students will
exercises and oral team presentations. Prerequisite: GPGN/
explore the fundamental observations from which physical
GEGN/PEGN503 or consent of instructors. 3 hours lecture
and mathematical inferences can be made regarding the
and seminar; 3 semester hours. Offered fall semester, even
Earth’s origin, structure, and evolution. These observations
years.
include traditional geophysical observations (e.g., seismic,
gravity, magnetic, and radioactive) in addition to geochemi-
GPGN507. NEAR-SURFACE FIELD METHODS (I)
cal, nucleonic, and extraterrestrial observations. Emphasis is
Students design and implement data acquisition programs
placed on not only cataloging the available data sets, but also
for all forms of near-surface geophysical surveys. The result
on developing and testing quantitative models to describe
of each survey is then modeled and discussed in the context
these disparate data sets. Prerequisites: GEOL201, GPGN302,
of field design methods. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
GPGN303, GPGN308, PHGN311, and MATH225, or con-
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours. Offered fall
sent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
semester, even years.
GPGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN GEOPHYSICS (I, II)
GPGN509. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES
New topics in geophysics. Each member of the academic
AND PROCESSES IN ROCK, SOILS, AND FLUIDS (I)
faculty is invited to submit a prospectus of the course to the
Physical and chemical properties and processes that are
department head for evaluation as a special topics course. If
measurable with geophysical instruments are studied, includ-
selected, the course can be taught only once under the 498
ing methods of measurement, interrelationships between
title before becoming a part of the regular curriculum under a
properties, coupled processes, and processes which modify
new course number and title. Prerequisite: Consent of depart-
properties in pure phase minerals and fluids, and in mineral
mixtures (rocks and soils). Investigation of implications for
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Colorado School of Mines
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petroleum development, minerals extraction, groundwater
ing, petroleum, environmental and engineering) in exploring
exploration, and environmental remediation. Prerequisite:
for new deposits, site design, etc. The methods studied in-
Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
clude gravity, magnetic, electrical, seismic, radiometric and
GPGN510. GRAVITY AND MAGNETIC EXPLORATION
borehole techniques. Emphasis on techniques and their appli-
(II) Instrumentation for land surface, borehole, sea floor,
cations are tailored to student interests. The course, intended
sea surface, and airborne operations. Reduction of observed
for non-geophysics students, will emphasize the theoretical
gravity and magnetic values. Theory of potential field effects
basis for each technique, the instrumentation used and data
of geologic distributions. Methods and limitations of inter-
collection, processing and interpretation procedures specific
pretation. Prerequisite: GPGN303, GPGN321, or consent of
to each technique so that non-specialists can more effectively
instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
evaluate the results of geophysical investigations. Prerequi-
sites: PHGN100, PHGN200, MATH111. GEGN401 or con-
GPGN511. ADVANCED GRAVITY AND MAGNETIC
sent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
EXPLORATION (II) Field or laboratory projects of interest
to class members; topics for lecture and laboratory selected
GPGN540. MINING GEOPHYSICS (I) Introduction to
from the following: new methods for acquiring, processing,
gravity, magnetic, electric, radiometric and borehole tech-
and interpreting gravity and magnetic data, methods for the
niques used by the mining industry in exploring for new de-
solution of two- and three-dimensional potential field prob-
posits. The course, intended for graduate geophysics students,
lems, Fourier transforms as applied to gravity and magnetics,
will emphasize the theoretical basis for each technique, the
the geologic implications of filtering gravity and magnetic
instrumentation used and data collection, processing and
data, equivalent distributions, harmonic functions, inver-
interpretation procedures specific to each technique. Pre-
sions. Prerequisite: GPGN414 or consent of instructor.
requisites: GPGN321, GPGN322, MATH111,MATH112,
3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab and field; 4 semester hours.
MATH213. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Offered spring semester, even years.
GPGN551/MATH693. WAVE PHENOMENA SEMINAR
GPGN519/PEGN 519. ADVANCED FORMATION EVAL-
(I, II) Students will probe a range of current methodologies
UATION (II) A detailed review of well logging and other
and issues in seismic data processing, with emphasis on
formation evaluation methods will be presented, with the
underlying assumptions, implications of these assumptions,
emphasis on the imaging and characterization of hydrocarbon
and implications that would follow from use of alternative
reservoirs. Advanced logging tools such as array induction,
assumptions. Such analysis should provide seed topics for
dipole sonic, and imaging tools will be discussed. The second
ongoing and subsequent research. Topic areas include: Statics
half of the course will offer in parallel sessions: for geologists
estimation and compensation, deconvolution, multiple sup-
and petroleum engineers on subjects such as pulsed neutron
pression, suppression of other noises, wavelet estimation,
logging, nuclear magnetic resonance, production logging,
imaging and inversion, extraction of stratigraphic and litho-
and formation testing; for geophysicists on vertical seismic
logic information, and correlation of surface and borehole
profiling, cross well acoustics and electro-magnetic surveys.
seismic data with well log data. Every student registers for
Prerequisite: GPGN419/PEGN419 or consent of instructor.
GPGN551 in the first semester in residence and receives a
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
grade of PRG. The grade is changed to a letter grade after
the student’s presentation of thesis research. Prerequisite:
GPGN520. ELECTRICAL AND ELECTROMAGNETIC
Consent of department. 1 hour seminar; 1 semester hour.
EXPLORATION (I) Electromagnetic theory. Instrumenta-
tion. Survey planning. Processing of data. Geologic interpre-
GPGN552. INTRODUCTION TO SEISMOLOGY (I) Intro-
tations. Methods and limitations of interpretation. Prerequisite:
duction to basic principles of elasticity including Hooke’s law,
GPGN308 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours
equation of motion, representation theorems, and reciprocity.
lab; 4 semester hours. Offered fall semester, odd years
Representation of seismic sources, seismic moment tensor,
radiation from point sources in homogeneous isotropic
GPGN521. ADVANCED ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRO-
media. Boundary conditions, reflection/transmission coeffi-
MAGNETIC EXPLORATION (II) Field or laboratory
cients of plane waves, plane-wave propagation in stratified
projects of interest to class members; topics for lecture and
media. Basics of wave propagation in attenuative media,
laboratory selected from the following: new methods for ac-
brief description of seismic modeling methods. Prerequisite:
quiring, processing and interpreting electrical and electro-
GPGN452 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semes-
magnetic data, methods for the solution of two- and
ter hours.
three-dimensional EM problems, physical modeling, inte-
grated inversions. Prerequisite: GPGN422 or GPGN520, or
GPGN553. INTRODUCTION TO SEISMOLOGY (II) This
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester
course is focused on the physics of wave phenomena and the
hours. Offered spring semester, even years
importance of wave-theory results in exploration and earth-
quake seismology. Includes reflection and transmission prob-
GPGN530. APPLIED GEOPHYSICS (II) Introduction to
lems for spherical waves, methods of steepest descent and
geophysical techniques used in a variety of industries (min-
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
121

stationary phase, point-source radiation in layered isotropic
seismic profile data for separation of upgoing and down-
media, surface and non-geometrical waves. Discussion of
going P- and S- wave arrivals. Prerequisite: GPGN452 and
seismic modeling methods, fundamentals of wave propagation
GPGN561 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semes-
in anisotropic and attenuative media. Prerequisite: GPGN552
ter hours. Offered spring semester, odd years.
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
GPGN570/GEOL570. APPLICATIONS OF SATELLITE
Offered spring semester, even years
REMOTE SENSING (II) Students are introduced to geo-
GPGN555. INTRODUCTION TO EARTHQUAKE SEIS-
science applications of satellite remote sensing. Introductory
MOLOGY (II) Introductory course in observational, engi-
lectures provide background on satellites, sensors, methodol-
neering, and theoretical earthquake seismology. Topics
ogy, and diverse applications. One or more areas of appli-
include: seismogram interpretation, elastic plane waves and
cation are presented from a systems perspective. Guest
surface waves, source kinematics and constraints from seis-
lecturers from academia, industry, and government agencies
mograms, seismicity and earthquake location, magnitude and
present case studies focusing on applications, which vary
intensity estimates, seismic hazard analysis, and earthquake
from semester to semester. Students do independent term
induced ground motions. Students interpret digital data from
projects, under the supervision of a faculty member or guest
globally distributed seismic stations. Prerequisite: GPGN452.
lecturer, that are presented both written and orally at the end
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered spring semester,
of the term. Prerequisites: PHGN200, MATH225, GEOL308
odd years.
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
GPGN558. SEISMIC DATA INTERPRETATION (II) Prac-
GPGN574. GROUNDWATER GEOPHYSICS (II) Descrip-
tical interpretation of seismic data used in exploration for
tion of world groundwater aquifers. Effects of water satura-
hydrocarbons. Integration with other sources of geological
tion on the physical properties of rocks. Use of geophysical
and geophysical information. Prerequisite: GPGN452,
methods in the exploration, development and production of
GEOL501 or equivalent or consent of instructor. 2 hours
groundwater. Field demonstrations of the application of the
lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
geophysical methods in the solution of some groundwater
GPGN561. SEISMIC DATA PROCESSING I (I) Introduc-
problems. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture,
tion to basic principles underlying the processing of seismic
3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
data for suppression of various types of noise. Includes the
GPGN580/GEOL580/MNGN580. INDUCED SEISMICITY
rationale for and methods for implementing different forms
(II) Earthquakes are sometimes caused by the activities of
of gain to data, and the use of various forms of stacking for
man. These activities include mining and quarrying, petro-
noise suppression, such as diversity stacking of Vibroseis
leum and geothermal energy production, building water
data, normal-moveout correction and common-midpoint
reservoirs and dams, and underground nuclear testing. This
stacking, optimum-weight stacking, beam steering and the
course will help students understand the characteristics and
stack array. Also discussed are continuous and discrete one-
physical causes of man-made earthquakes and seismicity
and two-dimensional data filtering, including Vibroseis cor-
induced in various situations. Students will read published
relation, spectral whitening, moveout filtering, data interpo-
reports and objectively analyze the seismological and ancil-
lation, slant stacking, and the continuous and discrete Radon
lary data therein to decide if the causative agent was man or
transform for enhancing data resolution and suppression of
natural processes. Prerequisite: basic undergraduate geology
multiples and other forms of coherent noise. Prerequisite:
and physics. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
GPGN452 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semes-
GPGN581. GRADUATE SEMINAR – MS (I, II) Presenta-
ter hours. Offered fall semester, even years.
tion describing results of MS thesis research. All theses must
GPGN562. SEISMIC DATA PROCESSING II (II) The stu-
be presented in seminar before corresponding degree is
dent will gain understanding of applications of deterministic
granted. Every MS student registers for GPGN581 only in
and statistical deconvolution for wavelet shaping, wavelet
his/her first semester in residence and receives a grade of
compression, and multiple suppression. Both reflection-based
PRG. Thereafter, students must attend the weekly Heiland
and refraction-based statistics estimation and correction for
Distinguished Lecture every semester in residence. The grade
2-D and 3-D seismic data will be covered, with some atten-
of PRG is changed to a letter grade after the student’s presen-
tion to problems where subsurface structure is complex. Also
tation of MS thesis research. 1 hour seminar, 1 semester hour.
for areas of complex subsurface structure, students will be
GPGN583. THEORY OF GEOPHYSICAL METHODS I (I)
introduced to analytic and interactive methods of velocity
This course describes the physical and mathematical prin-
estimation. Where the near-surface is complex, poststack and
ciples of the gravimetric, magnetometric and electrical
prestack imaging methods, such as layer replacement are
methods of geophysical prospecting. For each method, the
introduced to derive dynamic corrections to reflection data.
following questions are discussed: 1) the physical laws and
Also discussed are special problems related to the processing
examples illustrating their application; 2) the physical prop-
of multi-component seismic data for enhancement of shear-
erties of rocks and the influence of the medium on the field;
wave information, and those related to processing of vertical
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3) the distribution of field generators in the medium; 4) the
view of basic matrix manipulation. Utilization of existing
relevant systems of field equations; 5) methods of solution of
CSM and department computer program libraries. Some
the forward problems; 6) approximate methods of field cal-
basic and specialized numerical integration techniques used
culation and their application in geophysics; 7) the behavior
in geophysics. Geophysical applications of finite elements,
of the fields as they are applied in the main geophysical
finite differences, integral equation modeling, and summary
methods; 8) the relationship between the fields and the geo-
representation. Project resulting in a term paper on the use of
metric and physical parameters of the medium. Prerequisite:
numerical methods in geophysical interpretation. Prerequi-
Consent of department. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
site: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
GPGN584. THEORY OF GEOPHYSICAL METHODS II
Offered spring semester, odd years.
(II) This course describes the physical and mathematical
GPGN651. ADVANCED SEISMOLOGY (I) In-depth
principles of the electromagnetic, seismic and nuclear meth-
discussion of wave propagation and seismic processing for
ods of geophysical prospecting. For each method, the follow-
anisotropic, heterogeneous media. Topics include influence
ing questions are discussed: 1) the physical laws and examples
of anisotropy on plane-wave velocities and polarizations,
illustrating their application; 2) the physical properties of
traveltime analysis for transversely isotropic models, aniso-
rocks and the influence of the medium on the field; 3) the
tropic velocity-analysis and imaging methods, point-source
distribution of field generators in the medium; 4) the relevant
radiation and Green’s function in anisotropic media, inversion
systems of field equations; 5) methods of solution of the
and processing of multicomponent seismic data, shear-wave
forward problems; 6) approximate methods of field calcula-
splitting, and basics of seismic fracture characterization. Pre-
tion and their application in geophysics; 7) the behavior of
requisites: GPGN552 and GPGN553 or consent of instructor.
the fields as they are applied in the main geophysical methods;
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered fall semester, even
8) the relationship between the fields and the geometric and
years.
physical parameters of the medium. Prerequisite: GPGN583.
GPGN658. SEISMIC MIGRATION (I, II) Seismic migra-
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
tion is the process that converts seismograms, each recorded
GPGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN GEOPHYSICS (I, II)
as a function of time, to an image of the earth’s subsurface,
New topics in geophysics. Each member of the academic
which is a function of depth below the surface. The theoreti-
faculty is invited to submit a prospectus of the course to the
cal and practical aspects of finite-difference, Kirchhoff,
department head for evaluation as a special topics course. If
Fourier transform, and other methods for migration are em-
selected, the course can be taught only once under the 598
phasized with numerous computer programs and exercises.
title before becoming a part of the regular curriculum under a
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semes-
new course number and title. Prerequisite: Consent of depart-
ter hours.
ment. Credit-variable, 1 to 6 hours. Repeatable for credit
GPGN660. MATHEMATICS OF SEISMIC IMAGING AND
under different titles.
MIGRATION (II) During the past 40 years geophysicists
GPGN599. GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATIONS MS (I, II)
have developed many techniques (known collectively as
Individual project; instrument design, data interpretation,
“migration”) for imaging geologic structures deep within the
problem analysis, or field survey. Prerequisite: Consent of
Earth’s subsurface. Beyond merely imaging strata, migration
department and “Independent Study” form must be com-
can provide information about important physical properties
pleted and submitted to the Registrar. Credit dependent upon
of rocks, necessary for the subsequent drilling and develop-
nature and extent of project. Variable 1 to 6 hours. Repeat-
ment of oil- and gas-bearing formations within the Earth. In
able for credit.
this course the student will be introduced to the mathematical
GPGN605. INVERSION THEORY (II) Introductory course
theory underlying seismic migration, in the context of “inverse
in inverting geophysical observations for inferring earth
scattering imaging theory.” The course is heavily oriented
structure and processes. Techniques discussed include:
toward problem solving. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Monte-Carlo procedures, Marquardt-Levenburg optimiza-
Offered spring semester, odd years.
tion, and generalized linear inversion. In addition, aspects of
GPGN681. GRADUATE SEMINAR – PHD (I, II) Presenta-
probability theory, data and model resolution, uniqueness
tion describing results of Ph.D. thesis research. All theses
considerations, and the use of a priori constraints are pre-
must be presented in seminar before corresponding degree is
sented. Students are required to apply the inversion methods
granted. Every PhD student registers for GPGN681 only in
described to a problem of their choice and present the results
his/her first semester in residence and receives a grade of
as an oral and written report. Prerequisite: MATH225 and
PRG. Thereafter, students must attend the weekly Heiland
knowledge of a scientific programming language. 3 hours
Distinguished Lecture every semester in residence. The grade
lecture; 3 semester hours.
of PRG is changed to a letter grade after the student’s presen-
GPGN606. SIMULATION OF GEOPHYSICAL DATA (II)
tation of PhD thesis research. 1 hour seminar; 1 semester
Efficiency of writing and running computer programs. Re-
hour.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
123

GPGN698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN GEOPHYSICS (I, II)
Hydrologic Science and Engineering
New topics in geophysics. Each member of the academic
JOHN MCCRAY, Associate Professor Environmental Science &
faculty is invited to submit a prospectus of the course to the
Engineering, Program Director
department head for evaluation as a special topics course. If
DAVID BENSON, Associate Professor Geology & Geological
selected, the course can be taught only once under the 698
Engineering, Associate Director
title before becoming a part of the regular curriculum under
HUSSEIN AMERY, Associate Professor Liberal Arts & International
a new course number and title. Prerequisite: Consent of in-
Studies
structor. Credit – variable, 1 to 6 hours. Repeatable for credit
TZAHI CATH, Assistant Professor Environmental Science &
under different topics.
Engineering
RONALD R.H. COHEN, Associate Professor Environmental
GPGN699. GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION-PHD (I, II)
Science & Engineering
Individual project; instrument design, data interpretation,
JÖRG DREWES, Assistant Professor Environmental Science &
problem analysis, or field survey. Prerequisite: Consent of
Engineering
department and “Independent Study” form must be com-
VAUGHN GRIFFITHS, Professor Civil Engineering
pleted and submitted to the Registrar. Credit dependent upon
DAVID HALE, Professor Geophysics
nature and extent of project, not to exceed 6 semester hours.
BRUCE HONEYMAN, Professor, Environmental Science &
Repeatable for credit.
Engineering
JOHN HUMPHREY, Associate Professor Geology & Geological
GPGN705. GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT: MASTER
Engineering
OF SCIENCE Research credit hours required for completion
TISSA ILLANGASEKARE, Professor Environmental Science &
of the degree Master of Science - thesis. Research must be
Engineering and AMAX Chair
carried out under the direct supervision of the graduate stu-
YAOGUO LI, Associate Professor Geophysical Engineering
dent’s faculty advisor. Repeatable for credit.
NING LU, Professor Civil Engineering
DONALD MACALADY, Professor Emeritus Chemistry &
GPGN706. GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT: DOCTOR
Geochemistry
OF PHILOSOPHY Research credit hours required for com-
JUNKO MUNAKATA MARR, Assistant Professor Environmental
pletion of the degree Doctor of Philosophy-thesis. Research
Science & Engineering
must be carried out under direct supervision of the graduate
GARY OLHOEFT, Professor Geophysics
student’s faculty advisor. Repeatable for credit.
EILEEN POETER, Professor Geology & Geological Engineering
JAMES RANVILLE, Assistant Professor Chemistry &
Geochemistry
ANDRËE REVIL, Associate Professor Geophysical Engineering
SAMUEL ROMBERGER, Professor, Geology & Geological
Engineering
GEORGE SHERK, Research Associate Professor Liberal Arts &
International Studies
ROBERT L. SIEGRIST, Professor Environmental Science &
Engineering
JOHN SPEAR, Assistant Professor Environmental Science &
Engineering
Geological Engineering
BETTINA VOELKER, Associate Professor Chemistry &
Geochemistry
Degrees Offered:
Master of Science (Hydrology), Thesis option
Master of Science (Hydrology), Non-thesis option
Doctor of Philosophy (Hydrology)
Program Description:
The Hydrologic Science and Engineering (HSE) Program
is an interdisciplinary graduate program comprised of faculty
from several different CSM departments.
The program offers programs of study in fundamental
hydrologic science and applied hydrology with engineering
applications. Our program encompasses ground-water hydro-
geology, surface-water hydrology, vadose-zone hydrology,
watershed hydrology, contaminant transport and fate, con-
124
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

taminant remediation, hydrogeophysics, and water policy/law.
Combined Degree Program Option
Students may elect to follow the Science or the Engineering
CSM undergraduate students have the opportunity to begin
Track.
work on a M.S. degree in Hydrology while completing their
HSE requires a core study of 4 formal graduate courses and
Bachelor’s degree. The CSM Combined Degree Program
a field session. However, programs of study are interdiscipli-
provides the vehicle for students to use undergraduate course-
nary in nature, and the remainder of the coursework is obtained
work as part of their Graduate Degree curriculum. For more
from multiple departments at CSM and is approved for each
information please contact the HSE program faculty.
student by the student’s advisor and thesis Committee.
Program Requirements:
To achieve the Master of Science (M.S.) degree, students
M.S. Non-Thesis Option: 36 total credit hours, consisting
may elect the Non-Thesis option, based exclusively upon
of coursework (30 h), and Independent Study (6 h) working
coursework and a project report, or the Thesis option. The
on a research project with HSE faculty, including a written
thesis option is comprised of coursework in combination
report.
with individual laboratory, modeling and/or field research
M.S. Thesis Option: 30 total credit hours, consisting of
performed under the guidance of a faculty advisor and pre-
coursework (24 h), and research (6 h). Students must also
sented in a written thesis approved by the student’s committee. write and orally defend a research thesis.
HSE also offers a combined baccalaureate/masters degree
Ph.D.: 72 total credit hours, consisting of coursework
program in which CSM students obtain an undergraduate
(at least 15 h), and research (at least 24 h). Students must
degree as well as a Thesis or Non- thesis M.S. in Hydrology.
also successfully complete qualifying examinations, write
As many as six credit hours may be counted toward the
and defend a dissertation proposal, write and defend a doc-
requirements of both the B.S. and M.S. degrees. Please see
toral dissertation, and are expected to submit the dissertation
the Combined Undergraduate/Graduate Programs sections in
work for publication in scholarly journals.
the Graduate and Undergraduate Bulletins for additional
information.
Thesis Committee Requirements
Students must meet the general requirements listed in
To achieve the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree,
the graduate bulletin section Graduate Degrees and Require-
students are expected to complete a combination of course-
ments. In addition, the student’s advisor or co-advisor must
work and original research, under the guidance of a faculty
be an HSE faculty member. For M.S. thesis students, at least
advisor and Doctoral committee, which culminates in a sig-
two committee members must be members of the HSE faculty.
nificant scholarly contribution to a specialized field in hydro-
For doctoral students, at least 3 members must be a member
logic sciences or engineering. Full-time enrollment is expected
of the HSE faculty.
and leads to the greatest success, although part-time enroll-
ment may be allowed under special circumstances. All
Prerequisites Science Track:
doctoral students must complete the full-time, on-campus
u baccalaureate degree in a science or engineering
residency requirements described in the general section of
discipline
the Graduate Bulletin.
u college calculus: two semesters required
Currently, students will apply to the hydrology program
u differential equations: one semester required
through the Graduate School and be assigned to the HSE par-
u college physics: one semester required
ticipating department of the student’s HSE advisor. Partici-
pating departments include: Chemistry and Geochemistry,
u college chemistry: one year required
Engineering, Environmental Science and Engineering (ESE),
u college statistics: one semester required
Geology and Geological Engineering (GGE), Geophysical
Prerequisites Engineering Track:
Engineering, Mining Engineering (ME), and Petroleum Engi-
u baccalaureate degree in a science or engineering
neering (PE). HSE is part of the Western Regional Graduate
Program, a recognition that designates these programs as
discipline
unique within the Western United States. An important bene-
u college calculus: two semesters required
fit of this designation is that students from several western
u differential equations: one semester required
states are given the tuition status of Colorado residents.
These states include Alaska, Arizona, Hawaii, Idaho, Mon-
u college physics: two semester required
tana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South
u college chemistry: two years required
Dakota, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.
u college statistics: one semester required
For more information on HSE curriculum please refer to
u statics, one semester required
the HSE website at http://www.mines.edu/academic/hydro/.
u mechanics of materials, one semeser required
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
125

u dynamics, one semester required
chosen from any of the graduate courses offered at CSM and
u thermodynamics, one semester required
other local universities.
u engineering design (equivalent of a 400-level capstone
ENGINEERING TRACK
design course or ESGN 451 - Hydraulic Problems)
Curriculum areas of emphasis consist of core courses, and
electives. Core courses include all core courses in the Sci-
Note that some pre-requisites may be completed in the
ence Track and a relevant Capstone Design Course (e.g.
first few semesters of the graduate program if approved by
Ground Water Engineering GEGN 470)
the hydrology program faculty. Graduate courses may be
used to fulfill one or more of these requirements after ap-
Elective courses may be chosen from a list approved by
proval by the ISE Graduate CAdmissions Committee and the
the HSE program faculty with one free elective that may be
student’s Thesis Committee.
chosen from any of the graduate courses offered at CSM and
other local universities. At least half of the elective credits
Required Curriculum:
must come from the following list:
Students will work with their academic advisors and grad-
GEGN 598
Quantitative Hydrology
uate thesis committees to establish plans of study that best fit
GEGN 683
Advanced Groundwater Modeling
their individual interests and goals. Each student will develop
ESGN 622
Multiphase Fluids Transport
and submit a plan of study to their advisor during the first se-
GEGN 681
Vadose-Zone Hydrology
mester of enrollment. Doctoral students may transfer in cred-
GEGN 581
Advanced Hydrogeology
its from an earned M.S. graduate program according to
GEGN 682
Flow And Transport In Fractured Rock
requirements listed in the Graduate Degrees and Require-
ESGN 503
Environmental Pollution, Fate, Sources
ments section of the graduate bulletin, and after approval by
ESGN 575
Hazardous Waste Site Remediation
the student's thesis committee. Recommended pre-requisite
GEGN 585
Hydrochemical Modeling
courses may be taken for credit during the first year a student
GEGN 684
Chemical Modeling of Aqueous Systems
is enrolled in HSE. In some cases, graduate courses may sat-
EGGN 454
Water Supply Engineering
isfy one or more pre-requisites if approved by the hydrology
ESGN 603
Water Reuse and Treatment
program faculty.
EGES 533
Unsaturated Soil Mechanics
SCIENCE TRACK:
EGES 534
Soil Behavior
Curriculum areas of emphasis consist of core courses, and
EGES 553
Engineering Hydrology
electives. Core courses include the following:
EGES 554
Open Channel Flow
Ground Water Engineering (GEGN 466)
GEGN 532
Geological Data Analysis
Surface-Water Hydrology (ESGN 527)
GEGN 575
Applications of GIS
Environmental Chemistry (CHGC 505)
GEGN 542
Advanced Engineering Geomorphology
Subsurface Contaminant Fate and Transport (ESGN522)
GEGN 573
Site Investigation
Or
ESGN 601
Risk Assessment
Surface Water Quality Modeling (ESGN520)
ESGN 598
Numerical Methods for Modeling of
Field Hydrology as described in the following paragraph
Water and Environmental Systems
Students are also required to complete a hydrology field
session that will be offered through existing courses taught by
Description of Courses
Environmental Science and Engineering, Geology and Geo-
The hydrology program courses are taken from existing
logical Engineering, or Geophysical Engineering. HSE semi-
courses at CSM. In addition to the core courses listed above,
nar is also required and will typically have a 598 course
the elective courses currently approved by HSE faculty can
number. These are one-credit reading and discussion semi-
be viewed at http://www.mines.edu/Academic/hydro/.
nars. PhD students are required to complete at least two, and
M.S. students must complete one seminar. The seminar
courses are taught nearly every semester, with different topics
depending on the instructor. Students who plan to incorporate
hydrochemistry into their research may elect to replace
CHGC 505 with a two-course combination that includes an
aqueous inorganic chemistry course (e.g., GEGN 509 or
ESGN 500) and an environmental organic chemistry course
(e.g., CHGC/ESGN 555).
Elective courses may be chosen from a list approved by
the HSE program faculty with one free elective that may be
126
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

Liberal Arts and International Studies
Master of International Political Economy of
LAURA J. PANG, Associate Professor and Division Director
Resources (MIPER).
CARL MITCHAM, Professor
The Division of Liberal Arts and International Studies of-
BARBARA M. OLDS, Professor and Associate Vice President for
fers a 36 semester-hour non-thesis Master of International
Educational Innovation
Political Economy of Resources (MIPER) degree. The mas-
EUL-SOO PANG, Professor
ter's degree program is part of CSM's Combined Undergrad-
ARTHUR B. SACKS, Professor and Associate Vice President for
uate/Graduate programs. Students participating in the
Academic & Faculty Affairs
HUSSEIN A. AMERY, Associate Professor
combined degree program may double count up to 6 semes-
JAMES V. JESUDASON, Associate Professor
ter hours of 400-level course work from their undergraduate
JUAN C. LUCENA, Associate Professor
IPE minor or undergraduate course work (excluding foreign
SYLVIA GAYLORD, Assistant Professor
languages) to the MIPER. An additional 3 credit-hours may
TINA L. GIANQUITTO, Assistant Professor
be transferred upon the recommendation of the IPE Program
JOHN R. HEILBRUNN, Assistant Professor
Director and the approval of the Dean of Graduate Studies.
JON LEYDENS, Assistant Professor and Writing Program
The MIPER program is ideal for global resources industry
Administrator
JAMES D. STRAKER, Assistant Professor
leaders and public sector policy markers dealing with devel-
TONI LEFTON, Senior Lecturer
oping non-renewable resources on a global scale. The pro-
SANDY WOODSON, Senior Lecturer and Undergraduate Advisor
gram's philosophical foundations are built on the twin pillars
ROBERT KLIMEK, Lecturer
of applying key methods and theories of international politi-
DAVID J. MESKILL, Lecturer
cal economy (IPE) and comparative political economy (CPE)
ROSE PASS, Lecturer
to understanding the role of the world's resources in the con-
JENNIFER SCHNEIDER, Lecturer
text of human and natural environment. The concept of "re-
SUSAN J. TYBURSKI, Lecturer
sources" is understood in the context of the environment in
BETTY J. CANNON, Emeritus Associate Professor
which resources are found and developed, as well as both
W. JOHN CIESLEWICZ, Emeritus Professor
state and non-state actors who play a role in developing, mar-
DONALD I. DICKINSON, Emeritus Professor
WILTON ECKLEY, Emeritus Professor
keting, and consuming them on a global scale.
PETER HARTLEY, Emeritus Associate Professor
The objective of the MIPER program is to develop profes-
T. GRAHAM HEREFORD, Emeritus Professor
sional analytical skills in (1) resources development and
JOHN A. HOGAN, Emeritus Professor
management strategies embedded in the inter-state and supra-
KATHLEEN H. OCHS, Emeritus Associate Professor
national relationships between the state and the market; (2)
ANTON G. PEGIS, Emeritus Professor
analysis of regional and global security and risk issues affect-
THOMAS PHILIPOSE, University Emeritus Professor
JOSEPH D. SNEED, Emeritus Professor
ing resources industry; and (3) transnational trade and invest-
RONALD V. WIEDENHOEFT, Emeritus Professor
ment flows as well as resources production and consumption.
KAREN B. WILEY, Emeritus Associate Professor
IPE Graduate Certificates
The IPE Graduate Certificate program is divided into two
Degrees Offered:
parts: (1) the first 15-credit hour certificate focuses on the
Master of International Political Economy of Resources
IPE theories, methods, and models; and (2) the second 15-
(Non-Thesis)
credit hour certificate focuses on specialization, such as re-
Non-Degree Certificates Offered:
gional development (Asia-Pacific, Latin America/the
International Political Economy Graduate Certificate 1
Americas, Africa, and the Middle East), international or com-
parative political economy issues, and project-specific
International Political Economy Graduate Certificate 2
themes like trade, finance, the environment, gender, ethnicity,
Graduate Certificate in Science and Technology Policy
and so forth.
Non-Degree Minor Offered:
Upon completion of 15 credit hours (or 5 courses), the stu-
Graduate Individual Minor
dent will be issued a certificate. The program is designed in
a flexible format so that the student can take time to com-
Program Description:
plete the course requirements. The graduate certificate pro-
The Division of Liberal Arts & International Studies offers
gram is part of CSM’s combined undergraduate/graduate
one non-thesis professional graduate degree, the Master of
degree program. As such, students participating in the com-
International Political Economy of Resources (MIPER); two
bined degree program may double count up to 6 credit hours
graduate certificates in International Political Economy
of 400 level course work toward each certificate. If the stu-
(IPE); a graduate certificate in Science and Technology Pol-
dent completes all 30 credit hours, he/she may petition for
icy; and a graduate individual minor.
admission into the Master of International Political Economy
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
127

of Resources degree program, which requires the completion
2. International Political Economy of Regions (Latin
of an additional 6 credit-hours.
America, Asia Pacific, the Middle East, and Sub-Saharan
Science and Technology Graduate Certificate
Africa)
(STP)
3. Global Resources Security
The Science and Technology Policy (STP) graduate certifi-
4. Global Resources Development
cate is offered by the Division of Liberal Arts & International
Studies in collaboration with the Center for Science and
5. International Political Risk Assessment and Mitigation
Technology Policy, Cooperative Institute for Research in En-
6. Quantitative Methods for IPE
vironmental Science (CIRES), at the University of Colorado
Elective Courses
at Boulder. The aim is to provide a broad, practical under-
The student is required to choose two of the following
standing of science-society relations that will benefit practic-
three areas:
ing scientists and engineers, especially in the fields of
science and engineering that are the traditional mission of the
1. Area Studies and Comparative Political Economy
Colorado School of Mines.
(CPE) Themes: Development, institutions, regimes,
state-building vs. nation-building, social stratification,
Graduate Individual Minor
ethnicity, gender, religion, and culture provide fertile
Graduate students in departments and divisions other than
fields of CPE investigations in such regions of interest
LAIS may earn a minor in the Division if they complete 12
to the MIPER program as Asia Pacific, Latin
hours of course work from the LAIS course offerings, includ-
America/the Americas, the Middle East and the Islamic
ing Special Topics (LAIS 498 or 598 courses) or Independent
World, Sub-Saharan Africa, and the European Union
Study (LAIS 499 or 599) chosen in consultation with an
and FSU states.
LAIS advisor. Note: The Graduate Individual Minor must be
approved by the student's graduate committee and by the
2. IPE Themes: IPE themes include trade, finance, re-
LAIS Division.
gionalism, cross-regionalism, globalization, interna-
tional organizations, inter-state relations, security,
Program Requirements:
non-traditional security, country political risk assess-
Master of International Political Economy of
ment and mitigation, corruption and development, eth-
Resources (MIPER)
nic conflicts, cultural clashes, environmental politics
The Master of International Political Economy of Re-
and policies, technology and social transformation, and
sources non-thesis professional degree requires 36 semester
the like.
hours of course work. It may be completed as part of a Com-
bined Undergraduate/Graduate program by students already
3. IPE Theories and Methods: Study based in theories,
matriculated as undergraduate students at Colorado School of
methods, and models associated with the disciplines of
Mines, or by individuals already holding undergraduate or
International Political Economy, Comparative Political
advanced degrees who are interested in a non-thesis graduate
Economy, and/or International Relations.
program of study. CSM students interested in pursuing the
Outside Field
MIPER as part of a Combined Undergraduate/Graduate pro-
In some cases, the student will be encouraged to take
gram are encouraged to make an initial contact with the di-
courses outside LAIS as a minor. Courses in engineering, sci-
rector of the MIPER program after completion of the first
ence, economics, business, and law can be highly useful to
semester of their Sophomore year for counseling on degree
developing additional IPE skills in resources industry and
application procedures, admissions standards, and degree
policy making arena. The student must receive permission
completion requirements. See "Combined
from the Program Director and his/her adviser before under-
Undergraduate/Graduate Degree Programs" elsewhere in this
taking non-LAIS course work.
bulletin for further details.
Admission Requirements
The MIPER program has two parts: (1) 18 credit-hours
The requirements for admission into the MIPER Program
(six core courses) drawn from six core thematic areas; and
are as follows:
(2) 18 credit-hours (six courses) of electives. See Program
1. BS or BA with a cumulative grade point average (GPA)
Director for specific courses associated with each of these
at or above 3.0 (4.0 scale). CSM undergraduates who
two areas.
do not meet the overall GPA of 3.0 but who are pursuing
MIPER-related courses are designated in the Description
the undergraduate IPE Minor or who have taken three or
of Courses below by the code [IPE].
more IPE courses with a minimum GPA of 3.0 in IPE
Core Thematic Areas
course work will also be considered for admission.
1. International Political Economy: Theories and Methods
2. The GRE is required. Under certain circumstances, the
GRE requirements can be waived by the permission of
128
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

the Program Director. Contact the MIPER Program Di-
credit-hours (three courses) in the second certificate must
rector for details.
come from Region studies, or IPE- or CPE-driven thematic
3. A TOEFL score of 580 (paper test), 237 (computer
courses. Six credit hours can be minor courses taken outside
test), or 92-93 (Internet test) or higher is required for
of LAIS but relevant to the core content and approaches of
students who are non-native English speakers.
IPE and CPE. The student must consult the Program Director
before embarking on the non-LAIS minor program of study.
4. A two-page essay is required and must discuss why the
candidate is interested in pursuing the MIPER and how
Admission Requirements
he/she intends to utilize IPE knowledge and skills.
The requirements for admission into the IPE Graduate
Certificates Program are as follows:
5. No foreign language is required at the time of admis-
sion. However, those intending to spend an optional
1. BS or BA with a cumulative grade point average (GPA)
overseas semester must have appropriate language
at or above 3.0 (4.0 scale). CSM undergraduates who
skills.
do not meet the overall GPA of 3.0 but who are pursuing
the undergraduate IPE Minor or who have taken three or
Transfer Credit
more IPE courses with a minimum GPA of 3.0 in IPE
Up to 15 semester hours of a MIPER degree may be trans-
course work will also be considered for admission.
fer credit from another university. Requests for transfer
credit must be approved by the Director of the MIPER Pro-
2. The GRE is not required.
gram who will review course syllabi and evidence of work
3. A TOEFL score of 580 (paper test), 237 (computer
completion as provided by the student. Transfer credits must
test), or 92-93 (Internet test) or higher is required for
not have been used as credit toward a Bachelor's degree. The
students who are non-native English speakers.
transfer limit includes CSM distance learning courses.
4. A two-page essay is required and must discuss why the
Overseas Semester
candidate is interested in pursuing one or both IPE
In exceptional cases, the student will be encouraged to
Graduate Certificates and how he/she intends to utilize
spend one semester at an overseas institution in East Asia ,
IPE acquired knowledge and skills.
Latin America, Europe, the Middle East, Africa, or Australa-
5. No foreign language is required at the time of admis-
sia. The MIPER Program Director and the student's adviser
sion. However, demonstrated commitment to learning a
will assist in finding an appropriate university overseas.
second and/or third language during residency in the
International Political Economy Graduate
program is strongly encouraged.
Certificates
Transfer Credits
The IPE Graduate Certificates require 15 credit-hours
Students may not, on an individual basis, request that
each. Either one or both of the certificates may be completed
transfer credits from other institutions be applied to an IPE
as part of a Combined Undergraduate/Graduate program by
Graduate Certificate. The transfer limit includes CSM dis-
students already matriculated as undergraduate students at
tance learning courses.
Colorado School of Mines, or by individuals already holding
undergraduate or advanced degrees who are interested in a
Double-Counting CSM Undergraduate Course Work
briefer amount of study in International Political Economy at
for MIPER or IPE Graduate Certificates
the graduate level. CSM students interested in pursuing the
As noted above, students coming from within CSM can
MIPER as part of a Combined Undergraduate/Graduate pro-
transfer up to 6 credit-hours of 400-level course work auto-
gram are encouraged to make an initial contact with the di-
matically from their undergraduate IPE minor or undergradu-
rector of the MIPER program after completion of the first
ate International Studies Cluster (excluding foreign
semester of their Sophomore year for counseling on applica-
languages). An additional 3 credit-hours may be transferred
tion procedures, admissions standards, and completion re-
upon the recommendation of the IPE Program Director and
quirements. See “Combined Undergraduate/Graduate
the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School.
Degree Programs" elsewhere in this bulletin for further de-
Science and Technology Policy Graduate
tails.
Certificate
IPE Graduate Certificate-related courses are designated in
The STP certificate requires a total of 15 semester hours
the Description of Courses below by the code [IPE].
of graduate-level courses. Two of these courses should be
science and technology policy courses that emphasize, in one
Certificate I (15 credit-hours). For the first graduate cer-
instance, humanities perspectives, and in another, social sci-
tificate, students must take courses from five of the six core
ence perspectives. The other three courses may be selected,
thematic areas associated with the MIPER.
at student discretion and with adviser approval, from among
Certificate II (15 credit-hours). For the second graduate
the suite of courses offered at CSM and CU-Boulder. Exist-
certificate, students must choose an area of specialization in
ing LAIS courses included in this suite are:
consultation with the Program Director. Nine of the 15
LAIS 447/547 Global Corporations
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
129

LAIS 448
Global Environmental Issues
mary sources and works of literature will provide the media
LAIS 450/550 Political Risk Assessment
for examining these phenomena. In addition, Arthur
Schlesinger, Jr.’s thesis about the “unifying ideals and com-
LAIS 487/587 Environmental Politics and Policy
mon culture” that have allowed the United States to absorb
LAIS 488/588 Water Politics and Policy
immigrants from every corner of the globe under the um-
LAIS 545
International Political Economy
brella of individual freedom, and the various ways in which
Americans have attempted to live up to the motto “e pluribus
LAIS 548
Global Environmental Politics and Policy
unum” will also be explored. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prereq-
LAIS 586
Science and Technology Policy
uisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester
Students may also incorporate courses from the Econom-
hours.
ics and Business core M.S. curriculum in Mineral Economics
LAIS406. THE AMERICAN DREAM: ILLUSION OR RE-
in the Economics and Public Policy area of specialization.
ALITY? This seminar will examine “that elusive phrase, the
Finally, it is recommend that STP certificate students
American dream,” and ask what it meant to the pioneers in
do either a focused study of science and technology policy
the New World, how it withered, and whether it has been re-
in the United States or some other country, including the
vived. The concept will be critically scrutinized within cul-
possibility of taking one IPE regional studies course in
tural contexts. The study will rely on the major genres of
which student research will be allowed to focus on science
fiction, drama, and poetry, but will venture into biography
and technology policy issues related to that region.
and autobiography, and will range from Thoreau’s Walden to
Description of Courses:
Kerouac’s On the Road and Boyle’s Budding Prospects. Pre-
Note: Many but not all LAIS graduate courses are listed
requisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3
below as 400/500 combinations.
hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
Humanities and Social Sciences (LAIS)
LAIS409. SHAKESPEAREAN DRAMA Shakespeare, the
LAIS401. CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY II This course is
most well known writer in English and perhaps the world,
a continuation of LAIS301 for those interested in developing
deals with universal themes and the ultimate nature of what it
their poetry writing further. It focuses on reading and writing
is to be a human being. His plays are staged, filmed, and read
poetry. Students will learn many different poetic forms to
around the globe, even after 400 years. This seminar will ex-
compliment prosody, craft, and technique. Aesthetic prefer-
plore why Shakespeare's plays and characters have such last-
ences will be developed as the class reads, discusses, and
ing power and meaning to humanity. The seminar will
models some of the great American poets. Weekly exercises
combine class discussion, lecture, and video. Grades will be
reflect specific poetic tools, encourage the writing of literary
based on participation, response essays, and a final essay.
poetry, and simulate the development of the student's craft.
Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
The purpose of the course is to experience the literature and
SYGN200. 3 hours seminar. 3 semester hours.
its place in a multicultural society, while students "try on"
LAIS414. HEROES AND ANTIHEROES: A TRAGIC
various styles and contexts in order to develop their own
VIEW This course features heroes and antiheroes (average
voice. The course enrollment is split between the 300 and
folks, like most of us), but because it is difficult to be heroic
400 levels to allow returning students the opportunity for
unless there are one or more villains lurking in the shadows,
continued development. An additional book review and pres-
there will have to be an Iago or Caesar or a politician or a
entation, as well as leading the small groups will be expected
member of the bureaucracy to overcome. Webster’s defines
of returning students. Prerequisite: LAIS301. Prerequisite or
heroic as “exhibiting or marked by courage and daring.”
corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar. 3 semester hours.
Courage and daring are not confined to the battlefield, of
course. One can find them in surprising places in the commu-
LAIS402. WRITING PROPOSALS FOR A BETTER
nity (Ibsen’s Enemy of the People), in the psychiatric ward
WORLD This course develops the student's writing and
(Kesey’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest), in the military
higher-order thinking skills and helps meet the needs of un-
(Heller’s Catch-22), on the river (Twain’s The Adventures of
derserved populations, particularly via funding proposals
Huckleberry Finn or in a “bachelor pad” (Simon’s Last of the
written for nonprofit organizations. Prerequisite: LAIS100.
Red Hot Lovers). Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar;
corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
3 semester hours.
LAIS420/520. BUSINESS, ENGINEERING AND LEADER-
LAIS405. BECOMING AMERICAN: LITERARY PER-
SHIP ETHICS A critical exploration of business, management,
SPECTIVES This course will explore the increasing hetero-
engineering, and leadership ethics, with an emphasis on rela-
geneity of U.S. society by examining the immigration and
tions among these fields of practice. Prerequisite: LAIS100.
assimilation experience of Americans from Europe, Africa,
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar/discus-
Latin America, and Asia as well as Native Americans. Pri-
sion; 3 semester hours.
130
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LAIS435/535. LATIN AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT [IPE]
LAIS442. NATURAL RESOURCES AND WAR IN
A senior seminar designed to explore the political economy
AFRICA [IPE] Africa possesses abundant natural resources
of current and recent past development strategies, models, ef-
yet suffers civil wars and international-conflicts based on ac-
forts, and issues in Latin America, one of the most dynamic
cess to resource revenues. The course examines the distinc-
regions of the world today. Development is understood to be
tive history of Africa, the impact of the resource curse,
a nonlinear, complex set of processes involving political,
mismanagement of government and corruption, and specific
economic, social, cultural, and environmental factors whose
cases of unrest and war in Africa. Prerequisite: LAIS100.
ultimate goal is to improve the quality of life for individuals.
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar. 3 se-
The role of both the state and the market in development
mester hours. See list below for LAIS542 course descrip-
processes will be examined. Topics to be covered will vary as
tion.
changing realities dictate but will be drawn from such sub-
LAIS446/546. GLOBALIZATION [IPE] This international
jects as inequality of income distribution; the role of educa-
political economy seminar is an historical and contemporary
tion and health care; region-markets; the impact of
analysis of globalization processes examined through se-
globalization; institution-building; corporate-community-
lected issues of world affairs of political, economic, military,
state interfaces; neoliberalism; privatization; democracy; and
and diplomatic significance. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prereq-
public policy formulation as it relates to development goals.
uisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester
Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
hours.
SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
LAIS447/547. GLOBAL CORPORATIONS [IPE] This in-
LAIS436/536. HEMISPHERIC INTEGRATION IN THE
ternational political economy seminar seeks to (1) understand
AMERICAS [IPE] This international political economy
the history of the making of global corporations and their re-
seminar is designed to accompany the endeavor now under
lationship to the state, region-markets, and region-states; and
way in the Americas to create a free trade area for the entire
(2) analyze the on-going changes in global, regional, and na-
Western Hemisphere. Integrating this hemisphere, however,
tional political economies due to the presence of global cor-
is not just restricted to the mechanics of facilitating trade but
porations. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
also engages a host of other economic, political, social, cul-
SYGN 200. 3 hours seminar. 3 semester hours.
tural, and environmental issues, which will also be treated in
this course. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequi-
LAIS448. GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES [IPE]
site: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
Critical examination of interactions between development
and the environment and the human dimensions of global
LAIS437/537. ASIAN DEVELOPMENT [IPE] This inter-
change; social, political, economic, and cultural responses to
national political economy seminar deals with the historical
the management and preservation of natural resources and
development of Asia Pacific from agrarian to post-industrial
ecosystems on a global scale. Exploration of the meaning and
eras; its economic, political, and cultural transformation
implications of “stewardship of the Earth” and “sustainable
since World War II, contemporary security issues that both
development.” Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or coreq-
divide and unite the region; and globalization processes that
uisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
encourage Asia Pacific to forge a single trading bloc. Prereq-
uisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3
LAIS449. CULTURAL DYNAMICS OF GLOBAL DEVEL-
hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
OPMENT [IPE] Role of cultures and nuances in world de-
velopment; cultural relationship between the developed
LAIS441. AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT (IPE) This course
North and the developing South, specifically between the
provides a broad overview of the political economy of
U.S. and the Third World. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequi-
Africa. Its goal is to give students an understanding of the
site or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester
possibilities of African development and the impediments
hours.
that currently block its economic growth. Despite substantial
natural resources, mineral reserves, and human capital, most
LAIS450/550. POLITICAL RISK ASSESSMENT [IPE]
African countries remain mired in poverty. The struggles that
This course will review the existing methodologies and tech-
have arisen on the continent have fostered thinking about the
niques of risk assessment in both country-specific and global
curse of natural resources where countries with oil or dia-
environments. It will also seek to design better ways of as-
monds are beset with political instability and warfare. Read-
sessing and evaluating risk factors for business and public
ings give first an introduction to the continent followed by a
diplomacy in the increasingly globalized context of economy
focus on the specific issues that confront African develop-
and politics wherein the role of the state is being challenged
ment today. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requi-
and redefined. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequi-
site: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar. 3 semester hours. See list
site: SYGN200. Prerequisite: At least one IPE 300- or 400-
below for LAIS541 course description.
level course and permission of instructor. 3 hours seminar; 3
semester hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
131

LAIS451/551. POLITICAL RISK ASSESSMENT RE-
historical and cultural cases. Countries to be included range
SEARCH SEMINAR [IPE] When offered, this international
across Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Prerequisite:
political economy seminar must be taken concurrently with
LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
LAIS 450/550, Political Risk Assessment. Its purpose is to
seminar; 3 semester hours.
acquaint the student with empirical research methods and
LAIS476. TECHNOLOGY AND INTERNATIONAL DE-
sources appropriate to conducting a political risk assessment
VELOPMENT [IPE] An historical examination of the role of
study, and to hone the students analytical abilities. Prerequi-
technology in humanitarian and social improvement projects.
site: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. Con-
Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
current enrollment in LAIS 450/550. 1 hour seminar; 1
SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
semester hour.
LAIS486/586. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY
LAIS452/552. CORRUPTION AND DEVELOPMENT
An examination of current issues relating to science and
[IPE] This course addresses the problem of corruption and
technology policy in the United States and, as appropriate, in
its impact on development. Readings are multidisciplinary
other countries. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or coreq-
and include policy studies, economics, and political science.
uisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
Students will acquire an understanding of what constitutes
corruption, how it negatively affects development, and what
LAIS487/587. ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POL-
they, as engineers in a variety of professional circumstances,
ICY Seminar on environmental policies and the political and
might do in circumstances in which bribe paying or taking
governmental processes that produce them. Group discussion
might occur. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequi-
and independent research on specific environmental issues.
site: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
Primary but not exclusive focus on the U.S. Prerequisite:
LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
LAIS459. INTERNATIONAL FIELD PRACTICUM [IPE]
seminar; 3 semester hours.
For students who go abroad for an on-site practicum involv-
ing their technical field as practiced in another country and
LAIS488/588. WATER POLITICS AND POLICY Seminar
culture; required course for students pursuing a certificate in
on water policies and the political and governmental
International Political Economy; all arrangements for this
processes that produce them, as an example of natural re-
course are to be supervised and approved by the advisor of
source politics and policy in general. Group discussion and
the International Political Economy minor program. Prereq-
independent research on specific politics and policy issues.
uisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3
Primary but not exclusive focus on the U.S. Prerequisite:
hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
seminar; 3 semester hours.
LAIS465. THE AMERICAN MILITARY EXPERIENCE A
survey of military history, with primary focus on the Ameri-
LAIS498. SPECIAL TOPICS Pilot course or special topics
can military experience from 1775 to present. Emphasis is
course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s)
placed not only on military strategy and technology, but also
and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Pre-
on relevant political, social, and economic questions. Prereq-
requisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
uisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3
Variable credit: 1 to 6 semester hours. Repeatable for credit
hours seminar; 3 semester hours. Open to ROTC students or
under different topics.
by permission of the LAIS Division.
LAIS499. INDEPENDENT STUDY Individual research or
LAIS470. TECHNOLOGY AND GENDER: ISSUES This
special problem projects supervised by a faculty member. Pri-
course focuses on how women and men relate to technology.
marily for students who have completed their Humanities and
Several traditional disciplines will be used: philosophy, his-
Social Science requirements. Instructor consent required. Pre-
tory, sociology, literature, and a brief look at theory. The class
requisite: “Independent Study” form must be completed and
will begin discussing some basic concepts such as gender and
submitted to the Registrar. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite
sex and the essential and/or social construction of gender, for
or corequisite: SYGN200. Variable credit: 1 to 6 semester
example. We will then focus on topical and historical issues.
hours. Repeatable for credit.
We will look at modern engineering using sociological studies
LAIS541. AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT [IPE] Africa pos-
that focus on women in engineering. We will look at some
sesses abundant natural resources yet suffers low levels of eco-
specific topics including military technologies, ecology, and
nomic growth. This IPE course examines the distinctive
reproductive technologies. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequi-
history of Africa, the impact of the putative resource curse, en-
site or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester
demic unrest and civil war, mismanagement of government,
hours.
and corruption, among other topics. Readings are multidisci-
LAIS475. ENGINEERING CULTURES IN THE DEVEL-
plinary and draw from policy studies, economics, and political
OPING WORLD An investigation and assessment of engi-
science. Students will acquire an understanding of different
neering problem solving in the developing world using
theoretical approaches from the social sciences to explain how
132
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

natural resources affect development in Africa. The course
LAIS554. REGION-MARKETS AND REGION-STATES
helps students learn to apply different theories to specific cases
[IPE] This research seminar will deal with the international
and productive sectors. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
political economy dimensions of the origin, the structure,
LAIS542. NATURAL RESOURCES AND WAR IN AFRICA
and the function of the world’s major region-markets and re-
[IPE] This course examines the relationship between natural
gion states. Special emphasis will be given to the changing
resources and wars in Africa. It begins by discussing the com-
roles of nation-states, globalization of trade and finance, and
plexity of Africa with its several many languages, peoples, and
the future world polity. Prerequisites: any two IPE courses at
geographic distinctions. Among the most vexing challenges
the 300-level, or one IPE course at the 400 level. 3 hours
for Africa is the fact that the continent possesses such wealth
seminar; 3 semester hours.
and yet still struggles with endemic warfare, which is hypo-
LAIS559. INTERNATIONAL INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOL-
thetically caused by greed and competition over resource rents.
OGY [IPE] This course has, as its primary aim, the equip-
Readings are multidisciplinary and draw from policy studies,
ping of a future consultant to deal with the cultural,
economics, and political science. Students will acquire an un-
socioeconomic, behavioral, psychological, ethical, and politi-
derstanding of different theoretical approaches from the social
cal problems in the international workplace. Specific materi-
sciences to explain the relationship between abundant natural
als covered are: Early experimentation with small group
resources and war in Africa. The course helps students apply
dynamics relative to economic incentive; Hawthorne experi-
the different theories to specific cases and productive sectors. 3
ments; experiments of Asch on perception, Analysis of case
hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
studies of work productivity in service and technological in-
LAIS545. INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY
dustries. Review of work of F.W. Taylor, Douglas McGregor,
[IPE] This course will combine the historical and theoretical
Blake & Mouton, and others in terms of optimum working
foundations of international political economy and empirical
conditions relative to wage and fringe benefits. Review of
case studies of the world’s various regions. The student will
Niccolò Machiavelli’s The Prince and the Discourses, and
be required to be familiar with key IPE schools of thought,
The Art of War by Sun Tzu with application to present times
history of development and underdevelopment of key re-
and international cultural norms. The intent of this course is
gions, and a series of contemporary issues and themes that
to teach the survival, report writing, and presentation skills,
drives globalization. Prerequisites: any two IPE courses at
and cultural awareness needed for success in the real inter-
the 300-level, or one IPE course at the 400 level. 3 hours
national business world. The students are organized into
seminar; 3 semester hours.
small groups and do a case each week requiring a presenta-
tion of their case study results, and a written report of the
LAIS546. GLOBALIZATION [IPE] This seminar deals with
results as well. (Textbooks: Human Side of Enterprise by
the historical development of international political economy
Douglas McGregor, Principles of Scientific Management by
as a discipline. (Originally studied as the harbinger of today's
F.W. Taylor, The Art of War by Sun Tzu, Up The Organiza-
political science, economics, sociology, anthropology, and
tion by Robert Townsend, The Prince and the Discourses of
history, International Political Economy is the multidiscipli-
Niccolò Machiavelli, and The Managerial Grid by Blake &
nary study of the relationship between the states and the mar-
Mouton.) 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours
kets.) A fuller understanding will be achieved through
research and data analysis as well as interpretation of case
LAIS560. GLOBAL GEOPOLITICS [IPE] This seminar
studies. Prerequisites: LAIS345 and any 400-level IPE
deals with geopolitical theories and how they help us explain
course, or two equivalent courses. 3 hours seminar; 3 semes-
and understand contemporary developments in the world.
ter hours.
Empirical evidence from case studies help students develop a
deeper understanding of the interconnections between the po-
LAIS548. GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND
litical, economic, social, cultural and geographic dimensions
POLICY [IPE] This seminar examines the increasing impor-
of governmental policies and corporate decisions. Prerequi-
tance of environmental policy and politics in international
sites: any two IPE courses at the 300-level, or one IPE course
political economy and global international relations. Using
at the 400 level. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
both historical analysis and interdisciplinary environmental
studies perspectives, this course explores global environmen-
LAIS561. URBANIZATION AND DEVELOPMENT [IPE]
tal problems that have prompted an array of international and
This seminar course discusses the effects of colonization, un-
global regimes and other approaches to deal with them. It
even regional development, industrialization and globaliza-
looks at the impact of environmental policy and politics on
tion on urban systems. The urban models that will be studied
development, and the role that state and non-state actors play,
include the pre-industrial, colonial, global, Latin American
especially in North-South relations and in the pursuit of sus-
and Islamic cities. Approaches to urban development and
tainability. Prerequisites: any two IPE courses at the 300-
how they affect settlement planning, as well as urban-rural
level; or one IPE course at the 400 level; or one IPE course at
interface, urban labor markets, housing and shelter, migration
the 300 level and one environmental policy/issues course at
will be considered. Sustainable cities and world cities will be
the 400 level. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
discussed. Prerequisites: any two IPE courses at the 300-
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
133

level, or one IPE course at the 400 level. 3 hours seminar; 3
Foreign Languages (LIFL)
semester hours.
A variety of foreign languages is available through the
LAIS586. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY An
LAIS Division. Students interested in a particular language
examination of current issues relating to science and technol-
should check with the LAIS Division Office to determine
ogy policy in the United States and, as appropriate, in other
when these languages might be scheduled. In order to gain
countries. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
basic proficiency from their foreign language study, students
are encouraged to enroll for at least two semesters in what-
LAIS598. SPECIAL TOPICS Pilot course or special topics
ever language(s) they elect to take. If there is sufficient
course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s)
demand, the Division can provide third- and fourth-semester
and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Vari-
courses in a given foreign language. No student is permitted
able credit: 1 to 6 semester hours. Repeatable for credit
to take a foreign language that is either his/her native language
under different titles.
or second language. Proficiency tests may be used to deter-
LAIS599. INDEPENDENT STUDY Individual research or
mine at what level a student should be enrolled, but a student
special problem projects supervised by a faculty member.
cannot receive course credit by taking these tests.
Variable credit: 1 to 6 hours. Repeatable for credit.
Foreign Language Policy
LAIS601. ACADEMIC PUBLISHING Students will finish
Students will not receive credit for taking a foreign
this course with increased knowledge of general and disci-
language in which they have had previous courses as per the
pline-specific writing conversations as well as the ability to
following formula:
use that knowledge in publishing portions of theses or disser-
If a student has taken one year in high school or one semes-
tations. Beyond the research article, students will also have
ter in college, he/she will not receive graduation credit for
the opportunity to learn more about genres such as confer-
the first semester in a CSM foreign language course. Like-
ence abstracts, conference presentations, literature reviews,
wise, if a student has taken two years in high school or two
and research funding proposals. Prerequisite: Must have
semesters in college, he/she will not receive graduation credit
completed one full year (or equivalent) of graduate school
for the second semester, and if a student has taken three years
course work. 3 hours seminar. Variable credit: 2 or 3 semes-
in high school or three semesters in college, he/she will not
ter hours.
receive graduation credit for the third semester.
Communication (LICM)
LIFL498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE
LICM501. PROFESSIONAL ORAL COMMUNICATION A
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from spe-
five-week course which teaches the fundamentals of effec-
cial interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the
tively preparing and presenting messages. "Hands-on" course
course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
emphasizing short (5- and 10-minute) weekly presentations
Variable credit: 1 to 6 semester hours. Repeatable for credit
made in small groups to simulate professional and corporate
under different titles.
communications. Students are encouraged to make formal
presentations which relate to their academic or professional
LIFL499. INDEPENDENT STUDY Individual research or
fields. Extensive instruction in the use of visuals. Presenta-
special problem projects supervised by a faculty member. In-
tions are rehearsed in class two days prior to the formal pre-
structor consent required. Prerequisite: “Independent Study”
sentations, all of which are video-taped and carefully
form must be completed and submitted to the registrar. Vari-
evaluated. 1 hour lecture/lab; 1 semester hour.
able credit: 1 to 6 hours. Repeatable for credit.
134
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

Materials Science
PATRICK R. TAYLOR, George S. Ansell Distinguished Professor in
JOHN J. MOORE, Trustees Professor, Director, and Department
Chemical Metallurgy, Director, Kroll Institute for Extractive
Head of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
Metallurgy
DAVID L. OLSON, Lead Scientist, John Henry Moore
CHESTER J. VAN TYNE, FIERF Professor
Distinguished Professor of Physical Metallurgy
STEVEN W. THOMPSON, Associate Professor
REED AYERS, Assistant Professor
Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry
RYAN O'HAYRE, Assistant Professor
DANIEL M. KNAUSS, Professor and Interim Head of Department
PATRICIO MENDEZ, Assistant Professor
PAUL JAGODZINSKI, Professor
EDGAR E. VIDAL, Assistant Professor
KENT J. VOORHEES, Professor
ARUN MADAN, Research Professor
SCOTT W. COWLEY, Associate Professor
JOHN CHANDLER, Lecturer
MARK EBERHART, Associate Professor
MARTIN MATAYA, Lecturer
KIM R. WILLIAMS, Associate Professor
STEPHEN G. BOYES, Assistant Professor
Department of Physics
STEVEN R. DEC, Lecturer
JAMES A. McNEIL, Professor and Head of Department
Department of Chemical Engineering
REUBEN T. COLLINS, Professor and Director, Center of Solar and
JAMES ELY, Professor and Head of Department
Electronic Materials
JOHN R. DORGAN, Professor
THOMAS E. FURTAK, Professor
DAVID W.M. MARR, Professor
P. CRAIG TAYLOR, Professor and Associate Director of Colorado
COLIN WOLDEN, Associate Professor
Energy Research Institute
DAVID T. WU, Associate Professor
TIMOTHY R. OHNO, Associate Professor
SUMIT AGARWAL, Assistant Professor
DAVID M. WOOD, Associate Professor
MATTHEW LIBERATORE, Assistant Professor
LINCOLN CARR, Assistant Professor
JAMES E. BERNARD, Research Associate Professor
Division of Engineering
DON L. WILLIAMSON, Emeritus Professor
TERRY PARKER, Professor and Director of Engineering Division
Department of Mining Engineering
ROBERT J. KEE, George R. Brown Distinguished Professor of
HUGH MILLER, Associate Professor
Engineering
VILEM PETR, Research Assistant Professor
MARK LUSK, Professor
GRAHAM MUSTOE, Professor
PANOS KIOUSIS, Associate Professor
Degrees Offered:
DAVID R. MUNOZ, Associate Professor
Master of Science (Materials Science; thesis option or
JOHN P.H. STEELE, Associate Professor
non-thesis option)
TYRONE VINCENT, Associate Professor
CHRISTIAN CIOBANU, Assistant Professor
Doctor of Philosophy (Materials Science)
NEAL SULLIVAN, Assistant Professor
Program Description:
MONEESH UPMANYU, Assistant Professor
The interdisciplinary materials science program is admin-
Department of Environmental Science & Engineering
istered jointly by the Departments of Chemical Engineering,
RONALD R. COHAN, Professor
Chemistry and Geochemistry, Metallurgical and Materials
JOHN R. SPEAR, Assistant Professor
Engineering, Physics and the Division of Engineering. Each
department is represented on both the Governing Board and
Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
the Graduate Affairs Committee, which are responsible for
JOHN J. MOORE, Trustee Professor and Head of Department, and
the operation of the program. The variety of disciplines pro-
Director, Advanced Coatings and Surface Engineering Laboratory
vides for programs of study ranging from the traditional ma-
DAVID L. OLSON, John Henry Moore Distinguished Professor,
Lead Scientist Materials Science Program
terials science program to a custom-designed program.
MICHAEL J. KAUFMAN, Professor
Program Requirements:
STEPHEN LIU, Professor and Director of the Center for Welding,
Master of Science (thesis option):
Joining and Coating Research
The Master of Science degree requires a minimum of 30
GERARD P. MARTINS, Professor
semester hours of acceptable course work and case study
DAVID K. MATLOCK, ARMCO Foundation Fogarty Professor;
credit including:
Director, Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research Center
BRAJENDRA MISHRA, Professor
u Minimum of 18 hours of Materials Science courses
IVAR E. REIMANIS, Professor
(must have completed the core courses).
NIGEL SAMMES, Herman F. Coors Distinguished Professor of
u 6 to 18 hours of thesis research credits depending upon
Ceramic Engineering
JOHN G. SPEER, Professor
focus area requirements.
u Submit a thesis and pass the Defense of Thesis exami-
nation before the Thesis Committee.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
135

Master of Science (non-thesis option with a case study):
u The fulfillment of the Materials Science core course
The Master of Science degree requires a minimum of 30
requirements plus additional courses as required by the
semester hours of acceptable course work and research credit
focus area and a minimum of 30 hours of research credit.
including:
u A written and/or oral qualifying examination in the spe-
u 18 hours of Materials Sciences courses from a list of
cialty area (depending upon focus area requirements). See
required courses and 12 hours of other materials-
the Material Science Program Guidelines for Graduate
related courses selected by the student with guidance
Students at http://www.mines.edu/academic/matsci/.
from the student’s advisor and the mentor of the spe-
u Prepare and submit a thesis and pass a Defense of
cialty area group that the student has selected. The
Thesis examination before the Thesis Committee.
specialty materials-related courses can be courses that
are taken in preparation for the student’s PhD qualifying
Prerequisites:
process examination, usually taken in the second year of
The primary admission requirement for this interdiscipli-
graduate school. Total of at least 30 credit hours.
nary program is a Bachelor of Science or Master of Engi-
u 6 hours of case study credits. (Sign up for MLGN599,
neering degree in biological sciences, physical science, or
Case Study Materials Science, using a paper form at
engineering. Courses must be equivalent to the degree pro-
the Registrar's Office.) The student must successfully
grams offered at CSM in the following departments: Chem-
prepare and defend a case study report on a topic that is
istry and Geochemistry, Engineering (mechanical, electrical,
most likely supporting materials for the student’s PhD
or civil), Chemical Engineering, Metallurgical and Materials
thesis.
Engineering, or Physics.
The decision of which type of Master degree you should
Deficiency Courses:
pursue needs to be decided with council of your advisor. The
A student admitted to this graduate program who has not
decision will affect the number of course hours required for
taken one or all of the following courses (or equivalent) will
the Master degree and whether a thesis or a case study report
be required (depending on their focus area) to satisfy any
is to be written and defended.
such deficiency early in their program of study: Mechanics,
Differential Equations, Modern Physics, and Physical Chem-
Required Curriculum:
istry/Chemical Thermodynamics.
Listed below are the required six Materials Science core
Focus Areas:
courses:
Advanced Polymeric Materials; Ceramics; Composites;
MLGN500 Processing, Microstructure, and Properties of
Electronic Materials; Joining Science; Mechanics of Materials;
Materials
Computational Materials Science; Surfaces & Interfaces/
MLGN512/MTGN412 Ceramic Engineering
Films & Coatings: Biomaterials; Nuclear Materials, Mining-
Materials Science, and Enviro-Materials Science.
MLGN530/CRGN415/CHGN430 Introduction to Polymer
Science
Thesis Committee Structure:
The M.S. student will invite at least 3 members (one of
MLGN501/CHGN580 Structure of Materials
whom is the advisor) to serve on a graduate committee. At
MLGN504/MTGN555 Solid State Thermodynamics or
least one of these members must be from a department other
CHEN509 Advanced Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics
than that of the advisor.
MLGN511 Kinetic Concerns in Materials Processing
The Ph.D. student will invite 5 members (one of whom is
Students who have taken the equivalent of any of the core
the advisor) to serve on a graduate committee. At least one of
courses listed above, and have not used the courses to fulfill
these members must be in a department other than that of the
requirements towards their B.S. degree, may petition the Ma-
advisor. External members may be invited to participate.
terials Science Graduate Committee for transfer credit.
For administrative purposes, the student will be resident in
Doctor of Philosophy:
the advisor’s department.
The prerequisite for acceptance into the Materials Science
The student’s graduate committee will have final approval
PhD Program is completion of a science or engineering Mas-
of the course of study.
ter degree (with or without thesis) and completion of the
Materials Science Core courses with a grade of B or better
Fields of Research:
(or evidence that the course content of these courses had
Advanced polymeric materials
been taken in previous courses).
Alloy theory, concurrent design, theory-assisted materials en-
gineering, electronic structure theory
The Doctor of Philosophy degree requires a minimum of
Applications of artificial intelligence techniques to materials
72 hours of course and research credit including:
processing and manufacturing, neural networks for process
136
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

modeling and sensor data processing, manufacturing
Physical metallurgy, ferrous and nonferrous alloy systems
process control
Physical vapor deposition, thin films, coatings
Archaeometallurgy, industry and university partnerships
Power electronics, plasma physics, pulsed power, plasma
Bio materials
material processing
Ceramic processing, modeling of ceramic processing
Processing and characterization of electroceramics (ferro-
Characterization, thermal stability, and thermal degradation
electrics, piezoelectrics, pyroelectrics, and dielectrics), glass-
mechanisms of polymers
ceramics for electronic and structural applications,
Chemical and physical processing of materials, engineered
thermodynamic modeling of ferroelectrics
materials, materials synthesis
Pyrometallurgy, corrosion, materials synthesis, coatings
Chemical processing of materials
Reactive metals properties and processing of ceramics and ce-
Chemical vapor deposition
ramic-metal composites, dielectrics and ferrimagnetics
Coating materials and applications
Solidification and near net shape processing
Computational condensed-matter physics, semiconductor al-
Surface physics, epitaxial growth, interfacial science, adsorp-
loys, first-principles phonon calculations
tion
Computer modeling and simulation
Transformations, microstructure, deformation, fracture
Control systems engineering, artificial neural systems for
Transport phenomena, mathematical modeling, kinetic proper-
senior data processing, polymer cure monitoring sensors,
ties of colloidal suspensions, diffusion with chemical reac-
process monitoring and control for composites manufac-
tion
turing
Weld metallurgy, materials joining processes
Crystal and molecular structure determination by X-ray crys-
Welding and joining science
tallography
Electro deposition
Description of Courses (Interdisciplinary Program)
Experimental condensed-matter physics, thermal and electri-
The following courses are considered to be part of the
cal properties of materials, superconductivity, photo-
Materials Science Program. Some have been cross-listed
voltaics
between Materials Science and the participating departments/
Extractive and process metallurgy, electrochemical corrosion,
division. Other courses not included may be suitable for
synthesis of ceramic precursor powders and metal powders
inclusion in a graduate program. See the participating depart-
Forging, deformation modeling, high-temperature material
ment listings. It should be noted that the course requirement
behavior
for graduate-level registration for a MLGN 500-level course
Fuel cell materials
which is cross-listed with a 400-level course-number will
Fullerene synthesis, combustion chemistry
include an additional course-component above that required
Heat and mass transfer, materials processing
for 400-level credit.
Heterogeneous catalysis, reformulated and alcohol fuels, sur-
MLGN500. PROCESSING, MICROSTRUCTURE, AND
face analysis, electrophotography
PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS (I) A summary of the im-
Intelligent automated systems, intelligent process control, ro-
portant relationships between the processing, microstructure,
botics, artificial neural systems
and properties of materials. Topics include electronic struc-
Materials synthesis, interfaces, flocculation, fine particles
ture and bonding, crystal structures, lattice defects and mass
Mathematical modeling of material processes
transport, glasses, phase transformation, important materials
Mechanical metallurgy, failure analysis, deformation of ma-
processes, and properties including: mechanical and rheo-
terials, advanced steel coatings
logical, electrical conductivity, magnetic, dielectric, optical,
Molten salt processing
thermal, and chemical. In a given year, one of these topics
Mössbauer spectroscopy, ion implantation, small-angle X-ray
will be given special emphasis. Another area of emphasis is
scattering, semiconductor defects
phase equilibria. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours
Nano materials
lecture; 3 semester hours.
Non destructive evaluation
Novel separation processes: membranes, catalytical mem-
MLGN501/CHGN580. STRUCTURE OF MATERIALS (II)
brane reactors, biopolymer adsorbents for heavy metal
Principles of crystallography and diffraction from materials.
remediation of ground surface water
Properties of radiation useful for studying the structure of
Numerical modeling of particulate media, thermomechanical
materials. Structure determination methods. Prerequisite:
analysis
Any Physics III course. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Optical properties of materials and interfaces
MLGN502/PHGN440. INTRODUCTORY SOLID STATE
Phase transformations and mechanisms of microstructural
PHYSICS (II) Introduction to the physics of condensed
change, electron microscopy, structure-property relation-
matter with an emphasis on periodic crystals, including geo-
ships
metrical, dynamical, thermal, and electronic properties.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
137

Discussion of experimental methods including photon and
reactions and diffusion in solids, and the theory of conduc-
neutron scattering, charge and heat transport, action of simple
tors and semiconductors. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
solid state devices. Prerequisite: Physics III and MATH225.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. MLGN502 requires a term
MLGN510/CHGN410 SURFACE CHEMISTRY (I) Intro-
project. PHGN440 ABET classification: 3 hrs. engineering
duction to colloid systems, capillarity, surface tension and
science.
contact angle, adsorption from solution, micelles and micro-
MLGN503/CHGN515. CHEMICAL BONDING IN MATE-
emulsions, the solid/gas interface, surface analytical tech-
RIALS (I) Introduction to chemical bonding theories and
niques, Van Der Waal forces, electrical properties and colloid
calculations and their applications to solids of interest to
stability, some specific colloid systems (clays, foams and
materials science. The relationship between a material’s
emulsions). Students enrolled for graduate credit in MLGN510
properties and the bonding of its atoms will be examined for
must complete a special project. Prerequisite: DCGN209 or
a variety of materials. Includes an introduction to organic
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
polymers. Computer programs will be used for calculating
MLGN511. KINETIC CONCERNS IN MATERIALS
bonding parameters. Prerequisite: Consent of department.
PROCESSING I (I) Introduction to the kinetics of materials
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
processing, with emphasis on the momentum, heat and mass
MLGN504/MTGN555. SOLID STATE THERMODYNAM-
transport. Discussion of the basic mechanism of transport in
ICS (I) A second course in thermodynamics which applies
gases, liquids and solids. Prerequisite: MTGN352, MTGN361,
chemical thermodynamic principles to phase equilibria, point
MATH225 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
defects, surfaces and electrochemistry. The application of
MLGN512/MTGN412. CERAMIC ENGINEERING (II)
thermodynamic principles through Maxwell’s principles will
Application of engineering principles to nonmetallic and
be extended to a broad range of material properties. Prerequi-
ceramic materials. Processing of raw materials and produc-
site: Solid State Thermodynamics I or equivalent. 3 hours
tion of ceramic bodies, glazes, glasses, enamels, and cements.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
Firing processes and reactions in glass bonded as well as me-
MLGN505*/MTGN445. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF
chanically bonded systems. Prerequisite: MTGN348. 3 hours
MATERIALS (I) Mechanical properties and relationships.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
Plastic deformation of crystalline materials. Relationships of
MLGN513. PROBLEM SOLVING IN MATERIALS SCI-
microstructures to mechanical strength. Fracture, creep, and
ENCE (I) Review the theoretical aspects of various physical
fatigue. Prerequisite: MTGN348. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours
phenomena of major importance to materials scientists. De-
lab; 3*/4 semester hours. * This is a 3 credit-hour graduate-
velop mathematical models from these theories, and con-
course in the Materials Science Program and a 4 credit-hour
struct quantitative solution procedures based on analytical
undergraduate-course in the MTGN program.
and numerical techniques. Prerequisite: MATH225. 3 hours
MLGN506/MTGN556. TRANSPORT IN SOLIDS (II)
lecture; 3 semester hours.
Thermal and electrical conductivity. Solid state diffusion in
MLGN514. EXPERIMENTAL METHODS AND INSTRU-
metals and metal systems. Kinetics of metallurgical reactions
MENTATION (S) This course consists of two parts, (i) a
in the solid state. Prerequisite: Consent of department. 3 hours
series of classes that describe theory of measurements and
lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of odd years only.)
experimental principles and (ii) a series of laboratory visits to
MLGN507/PHGN540. CONDENSED MATTER I (I) Prin-
either perform experimental measurements or to see actual
ciples and applications of the quantum theory of electrons
procedures demonstrated. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
and phonons in solids: structure, symmetry, and bonding;
1 hour lecture; 2 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
electron states and excitations in metals and alloys; transport
MLGN515/MTGN415. ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES AND
properties; surfaces. Prerequisite: PHGN420 and PHGN440
APPLICATIONS OF MATERIALS (II) Survey of the elec-
or their equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
trical properties of materials, and the applications of materi-
MLGN508/PHGN541. CONDENSED MATTER II (II)
als as electrical circuit components. The effects of chemistry,
Principles and applications of the quantum theory of elec-
processing, and microstructure on the electrical properties
trons and phonons in solids: phonon states in solids; transport
will be discussed, along with functions, performance require-
properties; electron states and excitations in semiconductors
ments, and testing methods of materials for each type of cir-
and insulators; defects and impurities; amorphous materials;
cuit component. The general topics covered are conductors,
magnetism; superconductivity. Prerequisite: MLGN507/
resistors, insulators, capacitors, energy convertors, magnetic
PHGN540. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
materials, and integrated circuits. Prerequisites: PHGN200;
MLGN509/CHGN523. SOLID STATE CHEMISTRY (I)
MTGN311 or MLGN501; MTGN412/MLGN512, or consent
Dependence on properties of solids on chemical bonding and
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
structure; principles of crystal growth, crystal imperfections,
138
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

MLGN516/MTGN416 PROPERTIES OF CERAMICS (II)
MLGN525/PHGN525. SURFACE PHYSICS (I) Solid state
A survey of the properties of ceramic materials and how
physics focusing on the structural and electronic nature of
these properties are determined by the chemical structure
the outer few atomic layers and the gas-surface interations.
(composition), crystal structure, and the microstructure of
Detailed explanations of many surface analysis techniques
crystalline ceramics and glasses. Thermal, optical, and me-
are provided, highlighting the application of these techniques
chanical properties of single-phase and multi-phase ceramics,
to current problems, particularly electronic materials. Pre-
including composites, are covered. Prerequisites: PHGN200,
requisite: MLGN502 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
MTGN311 or MLGN501, MTGN412 or consent of instruc-
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours (Fall of even years only)
tor. 3 semester hours: 3 hours lecture
MLGN526/MTGN526. GEL SCIENCE AND TECHNOL-
MLGN517/EGGN422. SOLID MECHANICS OF MATERI-
OGY An introduction to the science and technology of par-
ALS (I) Review mechanics of materials. Introduction to
ticulate and polymeric gels, emphasizing inorganic systems.
elastic and non-linear continua. Cartesian tensors and stresses
Interparticle forces. Aggregation, network formation, perco-
and strains. Analytical solution of elasticity problems. Develop
lation, and the gel transition. Gel structure, rheology, and
basic concepts of fracture mechanics. Prerequisite: EGGN320
mechanical properties. Application to solid-liquid separation
or equivalent, MATH225 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
operations (filtration, centrifugation, sedimentation) and to
mester hours.
ceramics processing. Prerequisite: Graduate level status or
MLGN518/MTGN518. PHASE EQUILIBRIA IN CERAM-
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ICS SYSTEMS (II) Application of one of four component
Spring of odd years only.
oxide diagrams to ceramic engineering problems. Emphasis
MLGN530/CHGN430/CRGN415. INTRODUCTION TO
on refractories and glasses and their interaction with metallic
POLYMER SCIENCE (I) An introduction to the chemistry
systems. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture;
and physics of macromolecules. Topics include the properties
3 semester hours.
and statistics of polymer solutions, measurements of molecu-
MLGN519/MTGN419. NON-CRYSTALLINE MATERIALS
lar weights, molecular weight distributions, properties of
(I) An introduction to the principles of glass science and en-
bulk polymers, mechanisms of polymer formation, and prop-
gineering and non-crystalline materials in general. Glass for-
erties of thermosets and thermoplasts including elastomers.
mation, structure, crystallization and properties will be
Prerequisite: CHGN327 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lec-
covered, along with a survey of commercial glass composi-
ture; 3 semester hours.
tions, manufacturing processes and applications. Prerequi-
MLGN531/CRGN416. INTRODUCTION TO POLYMER
sites: MTGN311 or MLGN501; MLGN512/MTGN412, or
ENGINEERING (II) This class provides a background in
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
polymer fluid mechanics, polymer rheological response and
MLGN521. KINETIC CONCERNS IN MATERIAL PRO-
polymer shape forming. The class begins with a discussion of
CESSING II (I, II) Advanced course to address the kinetics
the definition and measurement of material properties. Inter-
of materials processing, with emphasis in those processes
relationships among the material response functions are elu-
that promote phase and structural transformations. Processes
cidated and relevant correlations between experimental data
that involve precipitation, sintering, oxidation, sol-gel, coat-
and material response in real flow situations are given. Pro-
ing, etc., will be discussed in detail. Prerequisite: MLGN511.
cessing operations for polymeric materials will then be ad-
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
dressed. These include the flow of polymers through circular,
slit, and complex dies. Fiber spinning, film blowing, extru-
MLGN522/PHGN441. SOLID STATE PHYSICS APPLICA-
sion and coextrusion will be covered as will injection mold-
TIONS AND PHENOMENA Continuation of MLGN502/
ing. Graduate students are required to write a term paper and
PHGN440 with an emphasis on applications of the principles
take separate examinations which are at a more advanced
of solid state physics to practical properties of materials includ-
level. Prerequisite: CRGN307, EGGN351 or equivalent.
ing: optical properties, superconductivity, dielectric properties,
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
magnetism, noncrystalline structure, and interfaces. Graduate
students in physics cannot receive credit for MLGN522, only
MLGN535, PHGN435/535, and ChEN435/535. INTERDIS-
PHGN441. Prerequisite: MLGN502/PHGN440. 3 hours lec-
CIPLINARY MICROELECTRONICS PROCESSING LAB-
ture, 3 semester hours. *Those receiving graduate credit will
ORATORY (II) Application of science and engineering
be required to submit a term paper, in addition to satisfying
principles to the design, fabrication, and testing of microelec-
all of the other requirements of the course.
tronic devices. Emphasis on specific unit operations and the
interrelation among processing steps. Prerequisite: Consent
MLGN523/MTGN523. APPLIED SURFACE AND SOLU-
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
TION CHEMISTRY (I) Solution and surface chemistry of
importance in mineral and metallurgical operations. Prerequi-
MLGN536/CHGN536. ADVANCED POLYMER SYNTHE-
site: Consent of department. 3 semester hours. (Fall of even
SIS (II) An advanced course in the synthesis of macromole-
years only.)
cules. Various methods of polymerization will be discussed
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
139

with an emphasis on the specifics concerning the syntheses
heat-and-mass-transfer applied to spray drying and drying
of different classes of organic and inorganic polymers. Pre-
porous bodies. Prerequisites: ChEN307 or ChEN308 or
requisite: CHGN430, ChEN415, MLGN530 or consent of
MTGN461 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semes-
instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
ter hours
MLGN544/MTGN414. PROCESSING OF CERAMICS (II)
MLGN563/MTGN463. POLYMER ENGINEERING:
A description of the principles of ceramic processing and the
STRUCTURE, PROPERTIES AND PROCESSING An in-
relationship between processing and microstructure. Raw
troduction to the structure and properties of polymeric mate-
materials and raw material preparation, forming and fabrica-
rials, their deformation and failure mechanisms, and the
tion, thermal processing, and finishing of ceramic materials
design and fabrication of polymeric end items. The molecu-
will be covered. Principles will be illustrated by case studies
lar and crystallographic structures of polymers will be devel-
on specific ceramic materials. A project to design a ceramic
oped and related to the elastic, viscoelastic, yield and fracture
fabrication process is required. Field trips to local ceramic
properties of polymeric solids and reinforced polymer compos-
manufacturing operations are included. Prerequisites:
ites. Emphasis will be placed on forming techniques for end
MTGN311, MTGN331, and MTGN412/MLGN512 or
item fabrication including: extrusion, injection molding, re-
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
action injection molding, thermoforming, and blow molding.
MLGN550/MTGN450. STATISTICAL PROCESS CON-
The design of end items will be considered in relation to: ma-
TROL AND DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS (I) An introduc-
terials selection, manufacturing engineering, properties, and
tion to statistical process control, process capability analysis
applications. Prerequisite: MTGN311 or equivalent or con-
and experimental design techniques. Statistical process con-
sent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
trol theory and techniques will be developed and applied to
MLGN565/MTGN565 MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF
control charts for variables and attributes involved in process
CERAMICS AND COMPOSITES (I) Mechanical properties
control and evaluation. Process capability concepts will be
of ceramics and ceramic-based composites; brittle fracture of
developed and applied for the evaluation of manufacturing
solids; toughening mechanisms in composites; fatigue, high
processes. The theory and application of designed experiments
temperature mechanical behavior, including fracture, creep
will be developed and applied for full factorial experiments,
deformation. Prerequisites: MTGN445 or MLGN505, or con-
fractional factorial experiments, screening experiments,
sent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of
multilevel experiments and mixture experiments. Analysis of
even years only.)
designed experiments will be carried out by graphical and
MLGN569/MTGN569/MTGN469/EGGN469/EGES569/
statistical techniques. Computer software will be utilized for
ChEN469/ChEN569 FUEL CELL SCIENCE AND TECH-
statistical process control and for the design and analysis of
NOLOGY (II) Investigate fundamentals of fuel-cell opera-
experiments. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lec-
tion and electrochemistry from a chemical thermodynamics
ture, 3 semester hours.
and materials-science perspective. Review types of fuel cells,
MLGN552/MTGN552. INORGANIC MATRIX COMPOS-
fuel-processing requirements and approaches, and fuel-cell
ITES (I) An introduction to the processing, structure, prop-
system integration. Examine current topics in fuel-cell sci-
erties and applications of metal matrix and ceramic matrix
ence and technology. Fabricate and test operational fuel cells
composites. Importance of structure and properties of both
in the Colorado Fuel Cell Center. 3 credit hours. Prerequi-
the matrix and the reinforcement and the types of reinforce-
sites: EGGN371 or ChEN357 or MTGN351; Thermodynam-
ment utilized, e.g., particulate, short fiber, continuous fiber,
ics I, MATH225 Differential Equations, or consent of
and laminates. Special emphasis will be placed on the devel-
instructor.
opment of properties such as electrical and thermal will also
MLGN570/MTGN570 BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF MATERI-
be examined. Prerequisite/Corequisite: MTGN311, MTGN348,
ALS Introduction to the diversity of biomaterials and appli-
MTGN351, MTGN352, MTGN445/MLGN505 or consent
cations through examination of the physiologic environment
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours (Fall of odd
in conjunction with compositional and structural require-
years only)
ments of tissues and organs. Appropriate domains and appli-
MLGN561 TRANSPORT PHENOMENA IN MATERIALS
cations of metals, ceramics and polymers, including
PROCESSING (II) Fluid flow, heat and mass transfer applied
implants, sensors, drug delivery, laboratory automation, and
to processing of materials. Rheology of polymers, liquid
tissue engineering are presented. Prerequisites: ESGN 301 or
metal/particles slurries, and particulate solids. Transient flow
equivalent, or instructor consent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
behavior of these materials in various geometries, including
hours.
infiltration of liquids in porous media. Mixing and blending.
MLGN583/CHGN583. PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS
Flow behavior of jets, drainage of films and particle fluidiza-
OF SURFACE ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES (II) Instrumental
tion. Surface-tension-, electromagnetic-, and bubble-driven
techniques for the characterization of surfaces of solid mate-
flows. Heat -transfer behavior in porous bodies applied to
rials. Applications of such techniques to polymers, corrosion,
sintering and solidification of composites. Simultaneous
140
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

metallurgy, adhesion science, micro-electronics. Methods of
ground who wish to apply that background to polymerization
analysis discussed: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS),
production techniques. The class begins with a review of the
auger electron spectroscopy (AES), ion scattering spectroscopy
fundamental concepts of reaction engineering, introduces the
(ISS), secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), Rutherford
needed terminology and describes different reactor types.
backscattering (RBS), scanning and transmission electron
The applied kinetic models relevant to polymerization reac-
microscopy (SEM, TEM), energy and wavelength dispersive
tion engineering are then developed. Next, mixing effects are
X-ray analysis; principles of these methods, quantification,
introduced; goodness of mixing and effects on reactor per-
instrumentation, sample preparation. Prerequisite: B.S. in
formance are discussed. Thermal effects are then introduced
metallurgy, chemistry, chemical engineering, physics, or
and the subjects of thermal runaway, thermal instabilities,
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and multiple steady states are included. Reactive processing,
MLGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS Special topic course on a
change in viscosity with the extent of reaction and continu-
specific subject defined by instructor. Prerequisite: consent of
ous drag flow reactors are described. Polymer devolatiliza-
instructor 1 to 3 hours. Repeatable for credit under different
tion constitutes the final subject of the class. Prerequisites:
titles.
CRGN518 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MLGN599. CASE STUDY MATERIALS SCIENCE (I, II)
MLGN673. STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF POLY-
An independent study of a selected materials processing or
MERS This course will provide an understanding of struc-
material characterization problem involving a thorough
ture - properties relations in polymeric materials. The topics
analysis of the various solutions reported in the technical lit-
include: phase separation, amorphous structures, crystalline
erature and/or a thorough industrial survey. The case study
structures, liquid crystals, glass-rubber transition behavior,
will prepare a case study report of technical merit. Prerequi-
rubber elasticity, viscoelasticity, mechanical properties of
site/co-requisite: MLGN501, MLGN502, MLGN503,
polymers, polymer forming processes, and electrical proper-
MLGN504, and MLGN511, and MLGN517 or consent of
ties of polymers. Prerequisite: MLGN563 or consent of in-
advisor. 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
structor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
MLGN625/CHEN625/CHGN625 MOLECULAR SIMULA-
MLGN696/MTGN696. VAPOR DEPOSITION PROCESSES
TION METHODS (I Even Years), Principles and practice of
(II) Introduction to the fundamental physics and chemistry
modern computer simulation techniques used to understand
underlying the control of vapor deposition processes for the
solids, liquids, and gases. Review of the statistical foundation
deposition of thin films for a variety of applications, e.g.,
of thermodynamics followed by in-depth discussion of
corrosion/oxidation resistance, decorative coatings, elec-
Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics techniques. Discus-
tronic and magnetic thin films. Emphasis on the vapor depo-
sion of intermolecular potentials, extended ensembles, and
sition processes and the control of process variables rather
mathematical algorithms used in molecular simulations. Pre-
than the structure and properties of the thin films. Prerequi-
requisites: graduate level thermodynamics (required), statisti-
sites: MTGN351, MTGN461, or equivalent courses, or con-
cal mechanics (recommended). 3 semester hours.
sent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MLGN634. POLYMER SOLUTIONS AND THERMODY-
MLGN698. ADVANCED TOPICS Advanced study of mate-
NAMICS/CRGN609. ADVANCED TOPICS IN THERMO-
rials science theory and application of materials science prin-
DYNAMICS The phase behavior of polymer solutions is
ciples in a specialty area of the instructor’s choosing. Not
dramatically different from their low molecular weight
part of thesis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to 3 se-
analogs due to the small entropy of mixing associated with
mester hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.
large polymer molecules. This course begins with a discus-
MLGN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY Independent study of
sion of classical thermodynamics and the stability of phases.
a materials science topic with guidance of an instructor. Not
Statistical mechanics and the partition function for an ideal
part of thesis. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 1 to 3 hours.
mixture are reviewed. Next, the solution properties of an iso-
Repeatable for credit.
lated polymer coil in solution are elucidated. This discussion
MLGN705. GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT: MASTER
leads naturally to the description of dilute solution behavior
OF SCIENCE Research credit hours required for completion
and its applications. The thermodynamics of concentrated
of the degree Master of Science - thesis. Research must be
solutions are then undertaken using Flory-Huggins theory.
carried out under the direct supervision of the graduate stu-
Brownian motion of polymer molecules and the thermody-
dent’s faculty advisor. Repeatable for credit.
namics of polymers at interfaces are also covered. Prerequi-
site: MLGN530, MLGN504, or CRGN520 or equivalent.
MLGN706. GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT: DOCTOR
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
OF PHILOSOPHY Research credit hours required for com-
pletion of the degree Doctor of Philosophy. Research must be
MLGN635. POLYMER REACTION ENGINEERING/
carried out under direct supervision of the graduate student’s
CRGN618. ADVANCED TOPICS IN REACTION KINETICS
faculty advisor. Repeatable for credit.
This class is aimed at engineers with a firm technical back-
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
141

Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Program Requirements:
GRAEME FAIRWEATHER, Professor and Department Head
The Master of Science degree (thesis option) requires 36
BERNARD BIALECKI, Professor
credit hours of acceptable course work and research, comple-
TRACY CAMP, Professor
tion of a satisfactory thesis, and successful oral defense of
MAHADEVAN GANESH, Professor
this thesis. The course work includes the required core
WILLY HEREMAN, Professor
curriculum. 12 of the 36 credit hours must be designated for
PAUL A. MARTIN, Professor
supervised research.
DINESH MEHTA, Professor
WILLIAM NAVIDI, Professor
The Master of Science degree (non-thesis option) requires
BARBARA M. MOSKAL, Associate Professor
36 credit hours of course work. The course work includes the
LUIS TENORIO, Associate Professor
required core curriculum.
MICHAEL COLAGROSSO, Assistant Professor
REINHARD FURRER, Assistant Professor
The Doctor of Philosophy requires 72 credit hours beyond
QI HAN, Assistant Professor
the bachelor’s degree. At least 24 of these hours are thesis
JAE YOUNG LEE, Assistant Professor
hours. Doctoral students must pass the comprehensive exami-
ANDRZEJ SZYMCZAK, Assistant Professor
nation (a qualifying examination and thesis proposal), com-
CYNDI RADER, Senior Lecturer
plete a satisfactory thesis, and successfully defend their thesis.
TERRY BRIDGMAN, Lecturer
The specific core curriculum requirements can be found
G. GUSTAVE GREIVEL, Lecturer
in the Mathematical and Computer Sciences Department
NATHAN PALMER, Lecturer
ROMAN TANKELEVICH, Lecturer
Graduate Student Handbook: Call 303 273-3860; FAX 303
SCOTT STRONG, Instructor
273-3875, or look on the Web at http://www.mines.edu/
WILLIAM R. ASTLE, Professor Emeritus
Academic/macs/Academic_Programs/grad.htm. This hand-
NORMAN BLEISTEIN, Professor Emeritus
book also provides an overview of the programs, require-
ARDEL J. BOES, Professor Emeritus
ments and policies of the department.
AUSTIN R. BROWN, Professor Emeritus
JOHN DeSANTO, Professor Emeritus
Prerequisites:
RAYMOND R. GUTZMAN, Professor Emeritus
Applied Mathematics:
FRANK G. HAGIN, Professor Emeritus
Linear algebra
DONALD C.B. MARSH, Professor Emeritus
Vector calculus
STEVEN PRUESS, Professor Emeritus
ROBERT E. D. WOOLSEY, Professor Emeritus
Ordinary differential equations
BARBARA B. BATH, Associate Professor Emerita
Advanced calculus (Introduction to real analysis)
RUTH MAURER, Associate Professor Emerita
ROBERT G. UNDERWOOD, Associate Professor Emeritus
Statistics:
Linear algebra
Degrees Offered:
Master of Science (Mathematical and Computer Sciences)
Introduction to probability & statistics
Doctor of Philosophy (Mathematical and Computer
Advanced calculus (Introduction to real analysis)
Sciences)
Computer Science:
Program Description:
Science - two semesters
There are three areas of concentration within the depart-
Mathematics - two semesters of calculus, at least two
ment: applied mathematics, statistics, and computer science.
courses from ordinary differential equations, linear algebra,
Since the requirements for these areas vary somewhat, they
statistics, discrete mathematics
are often considered separately in this catalog. However, la-
Data structures
beling these as distinct areas is not meant to discourage any
A programming language
student from pursuing research involving more than one.
Work in any of these areas can lead to the degree of Master
Upper level courses in at least three of software engineer-
of Science or Doctor of Philosophy. Applicants to the gradu-
ing, numerical analysis, machine architecture/assembly lan-
ate program need these four items: 1. A statement of purpose
guage, comparative languages, analysis of algorithms,
(short essay) from the applicant briefly describing back-
operating systems
ground, interests, goals at CSM, career intentions, etc. 2. The
general Graduate Record Examination. 3. B or better average
in courses in the major field. 4. B or better overall undergrad-
uate grade point average.
142
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

Fields of Research:
power series to those less predictable series. The course is
Applied Mathematics:
taught from a historical perspective. It covers an introduction
Computational Methods and Analysis for Wave Phenomena
to the real numbers, sequences and series and their conver-
Classical Scattering Theory
gence, real-valued functions and their continuity and differ-
Classical Wave Propagation
entiability, sequences of functions and their pointwise and
Mathematical Methods for Wave Phenomena
uniform convergence, and Riemann-Stieltjes integration the-
Micro-local Analysis
ory. Prerequisite: MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224, and
Nonlinear Partial Differential Equations
MATH332. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Numerical Analysis
CSCI403. DATA BASE MANAGEMENT (I) Design and
Optimal Control
evaluation of information storage and retrieval systems, in-
Optimization Software
cluding defining and building a data base and producing the
Seismic Inverse Methods
necessary queries for access to the stored information. Gen-
Symbolic Computing
eralized data base management systems, query languages,
Statistics:
and data storage facilities. General organization of files in-
Inverse Problems in Statistics
cluding lists, inverted lists and trees. System security and
Multivariate Statistics
system recovery, and system definition. Interfacing host lan-
Spatial Statistics
guage to data base systems. Prerequisite: CSCI262. 3 hours
Stochastic Modeling
lecture; 3 semester hours.
Survival Analysis
CSCI404. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (I) General inves-
Computer Science:
tigation of the Artificial Intelligence field. During the first
Applied Algorithms and Data Structures
part of the course a working knowledge of the LISP pro-
Cognitive Modeling
gramming language is developed. Several methods used in
Computer Aided Geometric Design
artificial intelligence such as search strategies, knowledge
Computer Graphics
representation, logic and probabilistic reasoning are devel-
Computer Networks
oped and applied to problems. Learning is discussed and se-
Computer Vision
lected applications presented. Prerequisite: CSCI262,
Data Mining
MATH/CSCI358. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Image Processing
MATH/CSCI406.ALGORITHMS (I, II) Divide-and-conquer:
Machine Learning
splitting problems into subproblems of a finite number.
Mathematical Software
Greedy: considering each problem piece one at a time for op-
Mobile Computing and Networking
timality. Dynamic programming: considering a sequence of
Parallel Computing
decisions in problem solution. Searches and traversals: deter-
Scientific Visualization
mination of the vertex in the given data set that satisfies a
Sensor Networks
given property. Techniques of backtracking, branch-and-
Simulation
bound techniques, techniques in lower bound theory. Prereq-
VLSI Design Automation
uisite: CSCI262, MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224,
Description of Courses
MATH/CSCI358. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Senior Year
MATH/CSCI407. INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC
CSCI400. PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING LAN-
COMPUTING (I, II) Round-off error in floating point arith-
GUAGES (I, II) Study of the principles relating to design,
metic, conditioning and stability, solution techniques (Gauss-
evaluation and implementation of programming languages of
ian elimination, LU factorization, iterative methods) of linear
historical and technical interest, considered as individual en-
algebraic systems, curve and surface fitting by the method of
tities and with respect to their relationships to other lan-
least-squares, zeros of nonlinear equations and systems by it-
guages. Topics discussed for each language include: history,
erative methods, polynomial interpolation and cubic splines,
design, structural organization, data structures, name struc-
numerical integration by adaptive quadrature and multivari-
tures, control structures, syntactic structures, and implemen-
ate quadrature, numerical methods for initial value problems
tation of issues. The primary languages discussed are
in ordinary differential equations. Emphasis is on problem
FORTRAN, PASCAL, LISP, ADA, C/C++, JAVA, PROLOG,
solving using efficient numerical methods in scientific com-
PERL.Prerequisite: CSCI262. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
puting. Prerequisite: MATH315 or MATH325 and knowl-
hours.
edge of computer programming. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
MATH401 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS (I) This
hours.
course is a first course in real analysis that lays out the con-
CSCI411. INTRODUCTION TO EXPERT SYSTEMS (II)
text and motivation of analysis in terms of the transition from
General investigation of the field of expert systems. The first
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
143

part of the course is devoted to designing expert systems.
MATH/CSCI440. PARALLEL COMPUTING FOR SCIEN-
The last half of the course is implementation of the design
TISTS AND ENGINEERS (I) This course is designed to in-
and construction of demonstration prototypes of expert sys-
troduce the field of parallel computing to all scientists and
tems. Prerequisite: CSCI262, MATH/CSCI358. 3 hours lec-
engineers. The students will be taught how to solve scientific
ture; 3 semester hours.
problems. They will be introduced to various software and
CSCI422. USER INTERFACES (I) User Interface Design is
hardware issues related to high performance computing. Pre-
a course for programmers who want to learn how to create
requisite: Programming experience in C++, consent of in-
more effective software. This objective will be achieved by
structor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
studying principles and patterns of interaction design, cri-
MATH/CSCI441. COMPUTER GRAPHICS (I) Data struc-
tiquing existing software using criteria presented in the text-
tures suitable for the representation of structures, maps,
book, and researching and analyzing the capabilities of
three-dimensional plots. Algorithms required for windowing,
various software development tools. Students will also learn
color plots, hidden surface and line, perspective drawings.
a variety of techniques to guide the software design process,
Survey of graphics software and hardware systems. Prerequi-
including Goal-Directed Design, Cognitive Walkthrough,
site: CSCI262. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
Talk-aloud and others. Prerequisite: CSCI262. 3 hours lec-
CSCI442. OPERATING SYSTEMS (I, II) Covers the basic
ture; 3 semester hours.
concepts and functionality of batch, timesharing and single-
MATH424. INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED STATISTICS
user operating system components, file systems, processes,
(I) Linear regression, analysis of variance, and design of ex-
protection and scheduling. Representative operating systems
periments, focusing on the construction of models and evalu-
are studied in detail. Actual operating system components are
ation of their fit. Techniques covered will include stepwise
programmed on a representative processor. This course pro-
and best subsets regression, variable transformations, and
vides insight into the internal structure of operating systems;
residual analysis. Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of
emphasis is on concepts and techniques which are valid for
data with statistical software. Prerequisites: MATH323 or
all computers. Prerequisite: CSCI262, CSCI. 3 hours lecture;
MATH335. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
3 semester hours.
MATH433/BELS433 MATHEMATICAL BIOLOGY (I) This
CSCI443. ADVANCED PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS
course will discuss methods for building and solving both
USING JAVA. (I, II) This course will quickly review pro-
continuous and discrete mathematical models. These meth-
gramming constructs using the syntax and semantics of the
ods will be applied to population dynamics, epidemic spread,
Java programming language. It will compare the constructs
pharmcokinetics and modeling of physiologic systems. Mod-
of Java with other languages and discuss program design and
ern Control Theory will be introduced and used to model liv-
implementation. Object oriented programming concepts will
ing systems. Some concepts related to self-organizing
be reviewed and applications, applets, servlets, graphical user
systems will be introduced. Prerequisite: MATH315 or
interfaces, threading, exception handling, JDBC, and net-
MATH325. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
working as implemented in Java will be discussed. The ba-
MATH436. ADVANCED STATISTICAL MODELING (II)
sics of the Java Virtual Machine will be presented.
Modern methods for constructing and evaluating statistical
Prerequisites: CSCI261, CSCI262. 3 hours lecture, 3 semes-
models. Topics include generalized linear models, general-
ter hours
ized additive models, hierarchical Bayes methods, and re-
CSCI445. WEB PROGRAMMING (II) Web Programming is
sampling methods. Prerequisites: MATH335 and MATH424.
a course for programmers who want to develop Web-based
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
applications. It covers basic web site design extended by
MATH437. MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS (II) Introduction
client-side and server-side programming. Students should
to applied multivariate techniques for data analysis. Topics
know the elements of HTML and Web architecture and be
include principal components, cluster analysis, MANOVA
able to program in a high level language such as C++ or
and other methods based on the multivariate Gaussian distri-
Java. The course builds on this knowledge by presenting top-
bution, discriminant analysis, classification with nearest
ics such as Cascading Style Sheets, JavaScript, PERL and
neighbors.Prerequisites: MATH335 or MATH323. 3 hours
database connectivity that will allow the students to develop
lecture; 3 semester hours.
dynamic Web applications. Prerequisites: Fluency in a high
level computer language/consent of instructor. 3 hours lec-
MATH438. STOCHASTIC MODELS (II) An introduction to
ture, 3 semester hours.
stochastic models applicable to problems in engineering,
physical science, economics, and operations research.
MATH454. COMPLEX ANALYSIS (II) The complex plane.
Markov chains in discrete and continuous time, Poisson
Analytic functions, harmonic functions. Mapping by elemen-
processes, and topics in queuing, reliability, and renewal the-
tary functions. Complex integration, power series, calculus of
ory. Prerequisite: MATH434. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester
residues. Conformal mapping. Prerequisite: MATH315 or
hours.
MATH325. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
144
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

MATH455. PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (I)
Graduate Courses
Linear partial differential equations, with emphasis on the
500-level and 700-level courses are open to qualified
classical second-order equations: wave equation, heat equa-
seniors with the permission of the department and Dean of
tion, Laplace's equation. Separation of variables, Fourier
Graduate School.
methods, Sturm-Liouville problems. Prerequisite: MATH315
MATH500. LINEAR VECTOR SPACES (I) Finite dimen-
or MATH325. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
sional vector spaces and subspaces: dimension, dual bases,
MATH458. ABSTRACT ALGEBRA (II) This course is an
annihilators. Linear transformations, matrices, projections,
introduction to the concepts of contemporary abstract algebra
change of basis, similarity. Determinants, eigenvalues, multi-
and applications of those concepts in areas such as physics
plicity. Jordan form. Inner products and inner product spaces
and chemistry. Topics include groups, subgroups, isomor-
with orthogonality and completeness. Prerequisite: MATH401.
phisms and homomorphisms, rings integral domains and
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
fields. Prerequisites: MATH213 and MATH223 or
MATH502. REAL AND ABSTRACT ANALYSIS (I) Intro-
MATH224, and MATH300 or consent of the instructor. 3
duction to metric and topological spaces. Lebesgue measure
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and measurable functions and sets. Types of convergence,
CSCI471. COMPUTER NETWORKS I (I) This introduction
Lebesgue integration and its relation to other integrals. Inte-
to computer networks covers the fundamentals of computer
gral convergence theorems. Absolute continuity and related
communications, using TCP/IP standardized protocols as the
concepts. Prerequisite: MATH401. 3 hours lecture; 3 semes-
main case study. The application layer and transport layer of
ter hours.
communication protocols will be covered in depth. Detailed
MATH503. FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS (I) Normed linear
topics include application layer protocols (HTTP, FTP,
spaces, linear operators on normed linear spaces, Banach
SMTP, and DNS), reliable data transfer, connection manage-
spaces, inner product and Hilbert spaces, orthonormal bases,
ment, and congestion control. In addition, students will build
duality, orthogonality, adjoint of a linear operator, spectral
a computer network from scratch and program client/server
analysis of linear operators. Prerequisite: MATH502. 3 hours
network applications. Prerequisite: CSCI442 or consent of
lecture; 3 semester hours.
instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
MATH506. COMPLEX ANALYSIS II (II) Analytic func-
MATH 482 STATISTICS PRACTICUM (II) This is the cap-
tions. Conformal mapping and applications. Analytic contin-
stone course in the Statistics Option. Students will apply sta-
uation. Schlicht functions. Approximation theorems in the
tistical principles to data analysis through advanced work,
complex domain. Prerequisite: MATH454. 3 hours lecture;
leading to a written report and an oral presentation. Choice
3 semester hours.
of project is arranged between the student and the individual
faculty member who will serve as advisor. Prerequisites:
MATH510. ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
MATH335 and MATH424. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
AND DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS (I) Topics to be covered:
hours.
basic existence and uniqueness theory, systems of equations,
stability, differential inequalities, Poincare-Bendixon theory,
MATH/CSCI491. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (I)
linearization. Other topics from: Hamiltonian systems,
(WI) Individual investigation under the direction of a depart-
periodic and almost periodic systems, integral manifolds,
ment faculty member. Written report required for credit. Pre-
Lyapunov functions, bifurcations, homoclinic points and
requisite: Consent of Department Head. 1 to 3 semester
chaos theory. Prerequisite: MATH315 and MATH332 or
hours, no more than 6 in a degree program.
equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MATH/CSCI492. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (II)
MATH514. APPLIED MATHEMATICS I (I) The major
(WI) Individual investigation under the direction of a depart-
theme in this course is various non-numerical techniques for
ment faculty member. Written report required for credit. Pre-
dealing with partial differential equations which arise in
requisite: Consent of Department Head. 1 to 3 semester
science and engineering problems. Topics include transform
hours, no more than 6 in a degree program.
techniques, Green’s functions and partial differential equa-
MATH/CSCI498. SPECIAL TOPICS (I, II, S) Selected top-
tions. Stress is on applications to boundary value problems
ics chosen from special interests of instructor and students.
and wave theory. Prerequisite: MATH455 or equivalent.
Prerequisite: Consent of Department Head. Variable: 1 to 3
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
semester hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.
MATH515. APPLIED MATHEMATICS II (II) Topics in-
MATH/CSCI499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II, S) Indi-
clude integral equations, applied complex variables, an intro-
vidual research or special problem projects supervised by a
duction to asymptotics, linear spaces and the calculus of
faculty member; also, given agreement on a subject matter,
variations. Stress is on applications to boundary value prob-
content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: Independent Study
lems and wave theory, with additional applications to engi-
form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Vari-
neering and physical problems. Prerequisite: MATH514.
able Credit: 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
145

CSCI522. USER INTERFACE DESIGN (I) An introduction
Weighted residual and finite element methods. Prerequisite:
to the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). Students
MATH315, MATH332, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lec-
will review current literature from prominent researchers in
ture; 3 semester hours.
HCI and will discuss how the researchers' results may be ap-
MATH551. COMPUTATIONAL LINEAR ALGEBRA (II)
plied to the students' own software design efforts. The
Numerical analysis of algorithms for solving linear systems
course textbook and supplementary materials will provide a
of equations, least squares methods, the symmetric eigen-
number of practical techniques and guidelines for develop-
problem, singular value decomposition, conjugate gradient
ing software to better meet users' needs, such as Goal-Di-
iteration. Modification of algorithms to fit the architecture.
rected Design, Cognitive Walk Through and Talk-aloud
Error analysis, existing software packages. Prerequisites:
testing methodologies, and interaction design patterns. Pre-
MATH332, MATH/CSCI407, or consent of instructor. 3
requisite: CSCI261 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
hours.
MATH556. MODELING WITH SYMBOLIC SOFTWARE
MATH530. STATISTICAL METHODS I (I) Introduction to
(I) Case studies of various models from mathematics, the
probability, random variables, and discrete and continuous
sciences and engineering through the use of the symbolic soft-
probability models. Elementary simulation. Data summariza-
ware package MATHEMATICA. Based on hands-on projects
tion and analysis. Confidence intervals and hypothesis testing
dealing with contemporary topics such as number theory, dis-
for means and variances. Chi square tests. Distribution-free
crete mathematics, complex analysis, special functions, classi-
techniques and regression analysis. Prerequisite: MATH213
cal and quantum mechanics, relativity, dynamical systems,
or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
chaos and fractals, solitons, wavelets, chemical reactions, pop-
MATH531. STATISTICAL METHODS II (II) Continuation
ulation dynamics, pollution models, electrical circuits, signal
of MATH530. Multiple regression and trend surface analysis.
processing, optimization, control theory, and industrial mathe-
Analysis of variance. Experimental design (Latin squares,
matics. The course is designed for graduate students and scien-
factorial designs, confounding, fractional replication, etc.)
tists interested in modeling and using symbolic software as a
Nonparametric analysis of variance. Topics selected from
programming language and a research tool. It is taught in a
multivariate analysis, sequential analysis or time series analy-
computer laboratory. Prerequisites: Senior undergraduates
sis. Prerequisite: MATH323 or MATH530 or MATH535.
need consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CSCI561. THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS OF COM-
MATH534. MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS I (I) The
PUTER SCIENCE (I) Mathematical foundations of com-
basics of probability, discrete and continuous probability dis-
puter science. Models of computation, including automata,
tributions, sampling distributions, order statistics, conver-
pushdown automata and Turing machines. Language models,
gence in probability and in distribution, and basic limit
including alphabets, strings, regular expressions, grammars,
theorems, including the central limit theorem, are covered.
and formal languages. Predicate logic. Complexity analysis.
Prerequisite: Consent of department. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
Prerequisite: CSCI262, MATH/CSCI358. 3 hours lecture; 3
mester hours.
semester hours.
MATH535. MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS II (II) The
CSCI562 APPLIED ALGORITHMS AND DATA STRUC-
basics of hypothesis testing using likelihood ratios, point and
TURES (II) Industry competitiveness in certain areas is
interval estimation, consistency, efficiency, sufficient statis-
often based on the use of better algorithms and data struc-
tics, and some nonparametric methods are presented. Prereq-
tures. The objective of this class is to survey some interesting
uisite: MATH534 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
application areas and to understand the core algorithms and
hours.
data structures that support these applications. Application
MATH/CSCI542. SIMULATION (I) Advanced study of
areas could change with each offering of the class, but would
simulation techniques, random number, and variate genera-
include some of the following: VLSI design automation,
tion. Monte Carlo techniques, simulation languages, simula-
computational biology, mobile computing, computer security,
tion experimental design, variance reduction, and other
data compression, web search engines, geographical informa-
methods of increasing efficiency, practice on actual prob-
tion systems. Prerequisite: MATH/CSCI406, or consent of
lems. Offered every other year. Prerequisite: CSCI262 (or
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
equivalent), CSCI323 (or CSCI530 or equivalent), or permis-
CSCI563. PARALLEL COMPUTING FOR SCIENTISTS
sion of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
AND ENGINEERS (I) Students are taught how to use paral-
MATH550. NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF PARTIAL DIF-
lel computing to solve complex scientific problems. They
FERENTIAL EQUATIONS (II) Numerical methods for
learn how to develop parallel programs, how to analyze their
solving partial differential equations. Explicit and implicit
performance, and how to optimize program performance.
finite difference methods; stability, convergence, and con-
The course covers the classification of parallel computers,
sistency. Alternating direction implicit (ADI) methods.
shared memory versus distributed memory machines, soft-
146
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

ware issues, and hardware issues in parallel computing. Stu-
of data mining-related research issues. Prerequisite: CSCI262
dents write programs for state of the art high performance su-
or permission of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
percomputers, which are accessed over the network.
CSCI570. NEURAL NETWORKS (I) This course explores
Prerequisite: Programming experience in C, consent of in-
the theory behind neural networks, and focuses on the appli-
structor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
cation of this technology to real problems in areas as diverse
CSCI564 ADVANCED COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE (I)
as DNA pattern recognition, robot control, hazardous waste
The objective of this class is to gain a detailed understanding
remediation, and forensics. For the prepared student, this
about the options available to a computer architect when de-
course also facilitates a transition from doing coursework to
signing a computer system along with quantitative justifica-
producing publishable research. Skills required to understand,
tions for the options. All aspects of modern computer
critique, and extend existing research are emphasized. An
architectures including instruction sets, processor design,
introductory series of lectures is followed by more in-depth
memory system design, storage system design, multiproces-
study of current research topics. Depending on a student’s
sors, and software approaches will be discussed. Prerequisite:
background, the course project is either a literature survey or
CSCI341, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semes-
application or exploration of a neural network method of the
ter hours.
student’s choice. Prerequisite: CSCI404. 3 hours lecture;
CSCI565. DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING SYSTEMS (II)
3 semester hours.
Introduction to the design and use of distributed computer
CSCI571. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (I) Artificial
systems based on networks of workstations and server com-
Intelligence (AI) is the subfield of computer science that
puters. Topics include theory, applications, systems and case
studies how to automate tasks for which people currently
studies describing current approaches. Prerequisites: Under-
exhibit superior performance over computers. Historically,
graduate machine architecture or consent of instructor.
AI has studied problems such as machine learning, language
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
understanding, game playing, planning, robotics, and machine
CSCI566. ADVANCED DATABASE MANAGEMENT (II)
vision. AI techniques include those for uncertainty manage-
Advanced issues in database management, with emphasis on
ment, automated theorem proving, heuristic search, neural
their application to scientific data. Topics to be covered in-
networks, and simulation of expert performance in special-
clude: object-oriented database management, database rules,
ized domains like medical diagnosis. This course provides
distributed databases, database design, transaction manage-
an overview of the field of Artificial Intelligence. Particular
ment, query optimization, concurrency control, and manage-
attention will be paid to learning the LISP language for AI
ment of scientific data. Each student develops a course
programming. Prerequisite: CSCI262. 3 hours lecture;
project, as a vehicle for exploring and applying a database re-
3 semester hours.
search issue. Prerequisite: CSCI403 or equivalent. 3 hours
CSCI572. COMPUTER NETWORKS II (II) This introduc-
lecture; 3 semester hours.
tion to computer networks covers the fundamentals of com-
CSCI567. ADVANCED OBJECT ORIENTED SOFTWARE
puter communications, using TCP/IP standardized protocols
ENGINEERING (II) Advanced software engineering con-
as the main case study. This second course on computer net-
cepts, with emphasis on how to develop object-oriented ap-
works covers the network layer, data link layer, and physical
plication programs. The entire software lifecycle is
layer of communication protocols in depth. Detailed topics
discussed: requirements analysis, program design, implemen-
include routing (unicast, multicast, and broadcast), one hop
tation, debugging and testing. Seamless program develop-
error detection and correction, and physical topologies. Other
ment is emphasized, in which the development process is an
topics include the history of computer communications and
incremental refinement of a computer model of real-world
protocols for emerging networks (e.g., ad hoc networks and
objects. Examples in the course are from scientific applica-
sensor networks). In addition, students will program
tion programs. The object-oriented use of the C++ language
client/server network applications and simulate a network
is taught and used in assignments. Prerequisite: Knowledge
protocol in a network simulator. Prerequisite: CSCK471.
of C or C++. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CSCI568. DATA MINING (II) This course is an introduc-
CSCI575. MACHINE LEARNING (II) The goal of machine
tory course in data mining. It covers fundamentals of data
learning research is to build computer systems that learn
mining theories and techniques. We will discuss association
from experience and that adapt to their environments. Ma-
rule mining and its applications, overview of classification
chine learning systems do not have to be programmed by hu-
and clustering, data preprocessing, and several application-
mans to solve a problem; instead, they essentially program
specific data mining tasks. We will also discuss practical data
themselves based on examples of how they should behave, or
mining using a data mining software. Project assignments in-
based on trial and error experience trying to solve the prob-
clude implementation of existing data mining algorithms,
lem. This course will focus on the methods that have proven
data mining with or without data mining software, and study
valuable and successful in practical applications. The course
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
147

will also contrast the various methods, with the aim of ex-
computer architectures, supercomputing, parallel processing,
plaining the situations in which each is most appropriate.
distributed processing, and algorithms. Prerequisite: Consent
Prerequisites: CSCI262 and MATH323, or consent of in-
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
structor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MATH/CSCI691. GRADUATE SEMINAR (I) Presentation
MATH/CSCI598. SPECIAL TOPICS (I, II, S) Pilot course
of latest research results by guest lecturers, staff, and ad-
or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests
vanced students. Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1 hour
of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered
seminar; 1 semester hour. Repeatable for credit to a maxi-
only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1
mum of 12 hours.
to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles. MATH/CSCI692. GRADUATE SEMINAR (II) Presentation
MATH/CSCI599. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II, S) Indi-
of latest research results by guest lecturers, staff, and ad-
vidual research or special problem projects supervised by a
vanced students. Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1 hour
faculty member, when a student and instructor agree on a
seminar; 1 semester hour. Repeatable for credit to a maxi-
subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: Inde-
mum of 12 hours.
pendent Study form must be completed and submitted to the
MATH693/GPGN551. WAVE PHENOMENA SEMINAR
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for
(I, II) Students will probe a range of current methodologies
credit.
and issues in seismic data processing, with emphasis on
MATH610. ADVANCED TOPICS IN DIFFERENTIAL
underlying assumptions, implications of these assumptions,
EQUATIONS (II) Topics from current research in ordinary
and implications that would follow from use of alternative
and/or partial differential equations; for example, dynamical
assumptions. Such analysis should provide seed topics for
systems, advanced asymptotic analysis, nonlinear wave prop-
ongoing and subsequent research. Topic areas include: Sta-
agation, solitons. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
tistics estimation and compensation, deconvolution, multiple
lecture; 3 semester hours.
suppression, suppression of other noises, wavelet estimation,
MATH614. ADVANCED TOPICS IN APPLIED MATHE-
imaging and inversion, extraction of stratigraphic and litho-
MATICS (I) Topics from current literature in applied mathe-
logic information, and correlation of surface and borehole
matics; for example, wavelets and their applications, calculus
seismic data with well log data. Prerequisite: Consent of de-
of variations, advanced applied functional analysis, control
partment. 1 hour seminar; 1 semester hour.
theory. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture;
MATH/CSCI698. SPECIAL TOPICS (I, II, S) Pilot course
3 semester hours.
or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests
MATH616. INTRODUCTION TO MULTI-DIMENSIONAL
of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered
SEISMIC INVERSION (II) Introduction to high frequency
only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1
inversion techniques. Emphasis on the application of this
to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.
theory to produce a reflector map of the earth’s interior and
MATH/CSCI699. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II, S) Indi-
estimates of changes in earth parameters across those reflec-
vidual research or special problem projects supervised by a
tors from data gathered in response to sources at the surface
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on
or in the interior of the earth. Extensions to elastic media are
a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “In-
discussed, as well. Includes high frequency modeling of the
dependent Study” form must be completed and submitted to
propagation of acoustic and elastic waves. Prerequisites:
the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable
partial differential equations, wave equation in the time or
for credit.
frequency domain, complex function theory, contour integra-
MATH/CSCI705. GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT:
tion. Some knowledge of wave propagation: reflection, re-
MASTER OF SCIENCE (I, II, S) Research credit hours re-
fraction, diffraction. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
quired for completion of the degree Master of Science - the-
MATH650. ADVANCED TOPICS IN NUMERICAL
sis. Research must be carried out under the direct supervision
ANALYSIS (II) Topics from the current literature in numeri-
of the graduate student’s faculty advisor. Repeatable for
cal analysis and/or computational mathematics; for example,
credit.
advanced finite element method, sparse matrix algorithms,
MATH/CSCI706. GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT:
applications of approximation theory, software for initial value
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (I, II, S) Research credit
ODE’s, numerical methods for integral equations. Prerequi-
hours required for completion of the degree Doctor of Philos-
site: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ophy. Research must be carried out under direct supervision
CSCI660. ADVANCED TOPICS IN COMPUTER SYS-
of the graduate student’s faculty advisor. Repeatable for
TEMS (II) Topics from the current literature in hardware
credit.
and software computer systems; for example, user interfaces,
object oriented software engineering, database management,
148
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

Metallurgical and Materials
recommendation of the MME Department. 2) A total of 12
Engineering
hours of course credits of which only 3 credit hours can be at
JOHN J. MOORE, Trustees Professor and Department Head
the 400 level. The specific courses to be taken are deter-
MICHAEL J. KAUFMAN, Professor
mined by the Graduate Advisor in the Department Center se-
STEPHEN LIU, Professor
lected by the candidate. A cumulative grade point average of
GERARD P. MARTINS, Professor
B or better must be maintained while completing these re-
DAVID K. MATLOCK, Charles S. Fogarty Professor
quirements.
BRAJENDRA MISHRA, Professor
Degree Program Requirements:
DAVID L. OLSON, John H. Moore Distinguished Professor
IVAR E. REIMANIS, Professor
The program requirements for the three graduate degrees
NIGEL SAMMES, Herman. F. Coors Distinguished Professor
offered by the Department are listed below:
JOHN G. SPEER, Professor
Master of Engineering degree: Two tracks are available
PATRICK R. TAYLOR, George S. Ansell Distinguished Professor of
as follows:
Chemical Metallurgy
CHESTER J. VANTYNE, FIERF Professor
II. Undergraduate/graduate program*: i) a minimum of 30
STEVEN W. THOMPSON, Associate Professor
total semester hours of acceptable course work; ii) case
PATRICIO MENDEZ, Assistant Professor
independent study course work component cannot exceed
EDGAR E. VIDAL, Assistant Professor
6 semester hours; and iii) submittal and presentation, and
GEORGE S. ANSELL, President Emeritus and Professor Emeritus
subsequent acceptance by the Graduate Advisor, of a re-
GLEN R. EDWARDS, University Professor Emeritus
port which presents the results of a case study or an engi-
JOHN P. HAGER, University Professor Emeritus
neering development. (*See pp. xx-xx, Combined
GEORGE KRAUSS, University Professor Emeritus
Undergraduate/Graduate Programs.)
W. REX BULL, Professor Emeritus
DENNIS W. READEY, University Professor Emeritus
II. Graduate Program: i) a minimum of 30 total semester
GERALD L. DePOORTER, Associate Professor Emeritus
hours of acceptable course work; ii) case-/indepen-
ROBERT H. FROST, Associate Professor Emeritus
dentstudy course-work cannot exceed 6 semester hours;
HANS-JOACHIM KLEEBE, Research Professor
and iii) submittal and presentation, and subsequent ac-
ARUN MADAN, Research Professor
ceptance by the Graduate Advisor, of a report which pres-
ents the results of a case study or an engineering
Degrees Offered:
development.
Master of Engineering (Metallurgical and Materials
Engineering)
Master of Science degree: i) a minimum of 24 semester
hours of acceptable course work and 6 semester hours of re-
Master of Science (Metallurgical and Materials
search credit; and, ii) submittal and successful oral-defense
Engineering)
of a thesis, before their Thesis Committee, which presents
Doctor of Philosophy (Metallurgical and Materials
the results of original scientific research or development.
Engineering)
Doctor of Philosophy degree: i) a minimum of 42 semes-
Program Description:
ter hours of acceptable course work, which may include
The program of study for the Master or Doctor of Philoso-
course credits (to be approved by the Thesis Committee) pre-
phy degrees in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering is
sented for the Master's degree, provided that the degree was
selected by the student in consultation with her or his advi-
in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering or a similar field.
sor, and with the approval of the Thesis Committee. The pro-
However, at least 21 hours of acceptable course work must
gram can be tailored within the framework of the regulations
be taken at the Colorado School of Mines; ii) 30 semester
of the Graduate School to match the student’s interests while
hours of research credit; iii) 9 to12 semester hours of course
maintaining the main theme of materials engineering and
work to compliment the research program of the student as
processing. There are three Areas of Specialization within the
determined by the Advisor/Thesis-Committee; iv) presenta-
Department: Physical and Mechanical Metallurgy; Physico-
tion of a Proposal on their Thesis-Research Project to their
chemical Processing of Materials; and, Ceramic Engineering.
Thesis Committee; v) a passing grade on written and oral
The Department is home to five research centers: the Ad-
Qualifying-Process (Q.P.) Examinations, for the purpose of
vanced Coatings and Surface Engineering Laboratory, the
determining that adequate preparation and the ability to con-
Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research Center;
duct high-quality, independent research have been achieved;
the Colorado Center for Advanced Ceramics; the Center for
vi) presentation (usually 6 months after successfully com-
Welding and Joining Research; and, the Kroll Institute for
pleting their Q.P. Examinations) of a Progress Report on their
Extractive Metallurgy. A Graduate Certificate is offered by
Research Project to their Thesis Committee and, vii) submit-
each Department Center – the program requirements are: 1)
tal and successful defense of a thesis, which presents the re-
Be admitted to MME Graduate Certificate Program upon the
sults of original scientific research or development, before
their Thesis Committee.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
149

Notes: The examinations under v) are specific to the stu-
Biomaterials
dent's declared Area of Specialization (currently a total of
Composite materials
three), and consist of a written and oral component. The writ-
Preparation of ceramic powders
ten examinations consist of a general topics examination and
Pyro-, hydro-, and electro-metallurgy
an area-or-specialization examination. The oral examination
Processing of industrial wastes
consists of responses by the student to questions on the fun-
Plasma synthesis and processing
damentals related to the student's proposed research. A Q.P.
Computer simulation techniques for design of new high
Oral-Examination Document consisting of: a) an Extended
performance materials
Abstract of the student's Thesis-Research Proposal, and b)
Thin film/coating, processing, and characterization
associated Fundamental Topics on which the student expects
Environmentally benign materials processes
to be examined, is presented to the Examining Committee
Semiconductor materials
(different from the Thesis Committee) prior to this event. The
Powder metallurgy
student delivers a 10 minutes oral-presentation, reviewing the
Aerospace structural materials
document at the start of the (oral) examination. There is a
Failure analysis and fracture mechanics of materials
standing schedule to offer the examinations during the last
Forming of metals and other materials
four to five weeks of the Spring and Fall semesters. How-
Fatigue of materials
ever, intent to take the examinations must be declared within
Description of Courses
the first month of the intended semester.
Undergraduate Courses
Although there is no formal seminar-course requirement,
graduate students, both Master and Doctoral candidates, as
A maximum of nine hours of 400-level credits, with the
part of their professional development, are required to attend
approval of the Thesis Committee, may be applied towards
the Department seminars scheduled on Thursdays during the.
the course-work requirement for a Master’s degree.
Fall and Spring semesters.
MTGN412/MLGN512.CERAMIC ENGINEERING (II)
Prerequisites:
Application of engineering principles to nonmetallic and
The entering graduate-student in the Department of Metal-
ceramic materials. Processing of raw materials and produc-
lurgical and Materials Engineering must have completed an
tion of ceramic bodies, glazes, glasses, enamels, and cermets.
undergraduate program equivalent to that required for the
Firing processes and reactions in glass bonded as well as me-
B.S. degree in: Metallurgical and Materials Engineering,
chanically bonded systems. Prerequisite: MTGN348. 3 hours
Materials Science or a related field. This should have included
lecture; 3 semester hours.
a background in science fundamentals and engineering prin-
MTGN414/MLGN544. PROCESSING OF CERAMICS (II)
ciples. A student, who possesses this background but has not
Principles of ceramic processing and the relationship between
taken specific undergraduate-courses in Metallurgical and
processing and microstructure. Raw materials and raw mate-
Materials Engineering, will be allowed to rectify these course
rials preparation, forming and fabrication, thermal process-
deficiencies at the beginning of their program of study.
ing, and finishing of ceramic materials will be covered.
Fields of Research:
Principles will be illustrated by case studies on specific
Synthesis, processing, and characterization of photovoltaic
ceramic materials. A project to design a ceramic fabrication
materials
process is required. Field trips to local ceramic manufac-
Optical phenomena of interfaces and composites
turing operations are included. Prerequisites: MTGN272,
High-Tc superconductors
MTGN311 or consent of the Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
Dielectrics and piezoelectrics
mester hours.
Glasses and crystallizable glasses for electronics
MTGN415/MLGN515. ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES AND
Ferroelectrics and ferroelectric thin films
APPLICATIONS OF MATERIALS (II) Survey of the elec-
Porous ceramics and ceramic fibers
trical properties of materials, and the applications of materials
Combustion synthesis of advanced materials
as electrical circuit components. The effects of chemistry,
Welding and joining of metals and dissimilar materials
processing, and microstructure on the electrical properties
including ceramics and composites
will be discussed, along with the functions, performance re-
Laser Processing of Materials
quirements, and testing methods of materials for each type of
Physical metallurgy
circuit component. The general topics covered are conduc-
Mechanical metallurgy
tors, resistors, insulators, capacitors, energy convertors, mag-
Processing microstructure, and properties of advanced steels
netic materials, and integrated circuits. Prerequisite: PHGN200,
Oxidation and corrosion of metals and ceramics
MTGN311 or MLGN501 or consent of Instructor. 3 hours
Interfacial phenomena
lecture; 3 semester hours.
Surface characterization of materials
150
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

MTGN416/MLGN516. PROPERTIES OF CERAMICS (II)
and refining of metals by hydro- and electrometallurgical
Survey of the properties of ceramic materials and how these
techniques. Discussion of unit processes in hyrdometallurgy,
properties are determined by the chemical structure (compo-
electrowinning, and electrorefining. Analysis of integrated
sition), crystal structure, and the microstructure of crystalline
flowsheets for the recovery of nonferrous metals. Prerequisite:
ceramics and glasses. Thermal, optical, and mechanical prop-
MTGN334, MTGN351, MTGN461. Co-requisite: MTGN433
erties of single-phase and multiphase ceramics, including
or consent of Instructor. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
composites, are covered. Prerequisites: PHGN200, MTGN311
MTGN432. PYROMETALLURGY (II) Extraction and re-
or MLGN501 or consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 se-
fining of metals including emergent practices. Modifications
mester hours.
driven by environmental regulations and by energy minimi-
MTGN417. REFRACTORY MATERIALS (I) Refractory
zation. Analysis and design of processes and the impact of
materials in metallurgical construction. Oxide phase dia-
economic considerations. Prerequisite: MTGN334. 3 hours
grams for analyzing the behavior of metallurgical slags in
lecture; 3 semester hours.
contact with materials of construction. Prerequisite: consent
MTGN433. HYDRO- AND ELECTROMETALLURGY
of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
LABORATORY (I) Experiments designed to supplement the
MTGN419/MLGN519. NON-CRYSTALLINE MATERIALS
lectures in MTGN431. Co-requisite: MTGN431 or consent
(I) An introduction to the principles of glass science-and-
of Instructor.
engineering and non-crystalline materials in general. Glass
MTGN434. DESIGN AND ECONOMICS OF METALLUR-
formation, structure, crystallization, and properties will be
GICAL PLANTS (II) Design of metallurgical processing
covered, along with a survey of commercial glass composi-
systems. Methods for estimating process costs and profitabil-
tions, manufacturing processes, and applications. Prerequi-
ity. Performance, selection, and design of process equipment.
sites: MTGN311 or MLGN501, MTGN412/MLGN512, or
Integration of process units into a working plant and its eco-
consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
nomics, construction, and operation. Market research and
MTGN422. PROCESS ANALYSIS AND DEVELOPMENT
surveys. Prerequisite: MTGN351 or consent of Instructor.
(II) Aspects of process development, plant design, and man-
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
agement. Prerequisite: MTGN334. Co-requisite: MTGN424
MTGN436. CONTROL AND INSTRUMENTATION OF
or consent of Instructor. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
METALLURGICAL PROCESSES (II) Analysis of
MTGN424. PROCESS ANALYSIS AND DEVELOPMENT
processes for metal extraction and refining using classical
LABORATORY (II) Projects designed to supplement the
and direct-search optimization methods and classical process
lectures in MTGN422. Prerequisite: MTGN422 or consent of
control with the aid of chemical functions and thermody-
Instructor. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
namic transfer operations. Examples from physicochemical
MTGN429. METALLURGICAL ENVIRONMENT (I)
and physical metallurgy processes. Co-erequisite: MTGN438
Examination of the interface between metallurgical process
or consent of Instructor. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
engineering and environmental engineering. Wastes, efflu-
MTGN438. CONTROL AND INSTRUMENTATION OF
ents and their point sources in metallurgical processes such
METALLURGICAL PROCESSES LABORATORY (II)
as mineral concentration, value extraction and process metal-
Experiments designed to supplement the lectures in
lurgy are studied in context. Fundamentals of metallurgical
MTGN436. Co-requisite: MTGN436 or consent of Instructor.
unit operations and unit processes with those applicable to
3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
waste and effluent control, disposal and materials recycling
MTGN442. ALLOY AND PHASE STABILITY (II) Phase
are covered. Engineering design and engineering cost com-
equilibrium of solid solutions, primary and intermediate
ponents are also included for selected examples. Fundamen-
phases, binary and ternary phase equilibrium diagrams,
tals and applications receive equal coverage. Prerequisites:
multicomponent systems. Phase transformations in ferrous
MTGN334 or consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture;
alloys, hardenability, heat treatment, surface modification,
3 semester hours.
alloying of steel, precipitation alloys and alloy design for cast
MTGN430. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY OF IRON AND
irons, stainless steels, and tool steels. Prerequisite: MTGN348
STEELMAKING (I) Physical chemistry principles of blast
or consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
furnace and direct reduction production of iron and refining
MTGN445/MLGN505*. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF
of iron to steel. Discussion of raw materials, productivity,
MATERIALS (I) Mechanical properties and relationships.
impurity removal, deoxidation, alloy additions, and ladle
Plastic deformation of crystalline materials. Relationships of
metallurgy. Prerequisite: MTGN334. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
microstructures to mechanical strength. Fracture, creep, and
mester hours.
fatigue. Laboratory sessions devoted to advanced mechanical
MTGN431. HYDRO- AND ELECTROMETALLURGY (I)
testing techniques to illustrate the application of the funda-
Physical and chemical principles involved in the extraction
mentals presented in the lectures. Prerequisite: MTGN348.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
151

3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4/3* semester hours. *A 3
ment the lectures in MTGN456. Co-requisite: MTGN456.
semester-hour graduate-course in the Materials Science
3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
Program (ML) and a 4 semester-hour undergraduate-course
MTGN461.TRANSPORT PHENOMENA AND REACTOR
in the MTGN program.
DESIGN FOR METALLURGICAL-AND-MATERIALS
MTGN450/MLGN550. STATISTICAL PROCESS CON-
ENGINEERS (I) Introduction to the conserved-quantities:
TROL AND DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS (I) Introduction
momentum, heat, and mass transfer, and application of chem-
to statistical process control, process capability analysis and
ical kinetics to elementary reactor-design. Examples from
experimental design techniques. Statistical process control
materials processing and process metallurgy. Molecular
theory and techniques developed and applied to control
transport properties: viscosity, thermal conductivity, and
charts for variables and attributes involved in process control
mass diffusivity of materials encountered during processing
and evaluation. Process capability concepts developed and
operations. Uni-directional transport: problem formulation
applied to the evaluation of manufacturing processes. Theory
based on the required balance of the conserved-quantity ap-
of designed experiments developed and applied to full fac-
plied to a control-volume. Prediction of velocity, temperature
torial experiments, fractional factorial experiments, screening
and concentration profiles. Equations of change: continuity,
experiments, multilevel experiments and mixture experiments.
motion, and energy. Transport with two independent variables
Analysis of designed experiments by graphical and statistical
(unsteady-state behavior). Interphase transport: dimension-
techniques. Introduction to computer software for statistical
less correlations - friction factor, heat, and mass transfer coeffi-
process control and for the design and analysis of experiments.
cients. Elementary concepts of radiation heat-transfer. Flow
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semes-
behavior in packed beds. Design equations for: Continuous-
ter hours
Flow/Batch Reactors with Uniform Dispersion and Plug
MTGN451. CORROSION ENGINEERING (II) Principles
Flow Reactors. Digital computer methods for the design of
of electrochemistry. Corrosion mechanisms. Methods of cor-
metallurgical systems. Laboratory sessions devoted to:
rosion protection including cathodic and anodic protection
Tutorials/Demonstrations to facilitate the understanding of
and coatings. Examples, from various industries, of corrosion
concepts related to selected topics; and, Projects with the
problems and solutions. Prerequisite: MTGN351. 3 hours
primary focus on the operating principles and use of modern
lecture; 3 semester hours
electronic instrumentation for measurements on lab-scale
systems in conjunction with correlation and prediction
MTGN452. CERAMIC AND METAL MATRIX COMPOS-
strategies for analysis of results. Prerequisites: MATH225,
ITES Introduction to the synthesis, processing, structure,
MTGN351 and MTGN352. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab;
properties and performance of ceramic and metal matrix
3 semester hours.
composites. Survey of various types of composites, and cor-
relation between processing, structural architecture and prop-
MTGN463. POLYMER ENGINEERING (I) Introduction to
erties. Prerequisites: MTGN272, MTGN311, MTGN348,
the structure and properties of polymeric materials, their
MTGN351. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
deformation and failure mechanisms, and the design and
fabrication of polymeric end items. Molecular and crystallo-
MTGN453. PRINCIPLES OF INTEGRATED CIRCUIT
graphic structures of polymers will be developed and related
PROCESSING (I) Introduction to the electrical conductivity
to the elastic, viscoelastic, yield and fracture properties of
of semiconductor materials; qualitative discussion of active
polymeric solids and reinforced polymer composites.
semiconductor devices; discussion of the steps in integrated
Emphasis on forming and joining techniques for end item
circuit fabrication; detailed investigation of the materials sci-
fabrication including: extrusion, injection molding, reaction
ence and engineering principles involved in the various steps
injection molding, thermoforming, and blow molding. The
of VLSI device fabrication; a presentation of device packaging
design of end items will be considered in relation to: materi-
techniques and the processes and principles involved. Prereq-
als selection, manufacturing engineering, properties, and
uisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
applications. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours
MTGN456. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY (II) Introduction
lecture; 3 semester hours.
to electron optics and the design and application of transmis-
MTGN464. FORGING AND FORMING (II) Introduction to
sion and scanning electron microscopes. Interpretation of
plasticity. Survey and analysis of working operations of forg-
images produced by various contrast mechanisms. Electron
ing, extrusion, rolling, wire drawing and sheet metal forming.
diffraction analysis and the indexing of electron diffraction
Metallurgical structure evolution during working. Prerequi-
patterns. Prerequisite: MTGN311 or consent of instructor.
sites: EGGN320 and MTGN348 or EGGN390. 2 hours lec-
Co-requisite: MTGN458. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
ture; 3 hours lab, 3 semester hours.
MTGN458. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY LABORATORY
MTGN466. DESIGN: SELECTION AND USE OF MATE-
(II) Laboratory exercises to illustrate specimen preparation
RIALS (II) Selection of alloys for specific applications, de-
techniques, microscope operation, and the interpretation of
signing for corrosion resistant service, concept of passivity,
images produced from a variety of specimens, and to supple-
152
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

designing for wear resistant service, designing for high tem-
MTGN512. SPECIAL METALLURGICAL AND MATERI-
perature service and designing for high strength/weight appli-
ALS ENGINEERING PROBLEMS (II) Continuation of
cations. Introduction to the aluminum, copper, nickel, cobalt,
MTGN511. Prerequisite: Selection of topic with consent of
stainless steel, cast irons, titanium and refractory metal alloy-
faculty supervisor. 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for
systems. Coating science and selection. Prerequisite:
credit under different titles.
MTGN348. 1 hour lecture, 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
MTGN514. DEFECT CHEMISTRY AND TRANSPORT
MTGN475. METALLURGY OF WELDING (I) Introduc-
PROCESSES IN CERAMIC SYSTEMS (I) Ceramic materi-
tion to welding processes thermal aspects; metallurgical
als science in the area of structural imperfections, their chem-
evaluation of resulting microstructures; attendant phase
istry, and their relation to mass and charge transport; defects
transformations; selection of filler metals; stresses; stress
and diffusion, sintering, and grain growth with particular em-
relief and annealing; preheating and post heating; distortion
phasis on the relation of fundamental transport phenomena to
and defects; welding ferrous and nonferrous alloys; and,
sintering and microstructure development and control. Pre-
welding tests. Prerequisite: MTGN348. Co-requisite:
requisites: DCGN209 or MTGN351; MT311 or Consent of
MTGN477. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of odd
MTGN477. METALLURGY OF WELDING LABORATORY
years only.)
(I) Experiments designed to supplement the lectures in
MTGN516. MICROSTRUCTURE OF CERAMIC SYS-
MTGN475. Co-requisite: MTGN475. 3 hours lab; 1 semester
TEMS (II) Analysis of the chemical and physical processes
hour.
controlling microstructure development in ceramic systems.
MTGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METALLURGICAL
Development of the glassy phase in ceramic systems and the
AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING (I, II) Pilot course or
resulting properties. Relationship of microstructure to chem-
special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of
ical, electrical, and mechanical properties of ceramics.
instructor(s) and student(s). The course topic is generally
Application to strengthening and toughening in ceramic
offered only once. . Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 1 to
composite system. Prerequisite: Graduate status or Consent
3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles. of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of
even years only.)
MTGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Independent
advanced-work leading to a comprehensive report. This work
MTGN517. REFRACTORIES (I) The manufacture, testing,
may take the form of conferences, library, and laboratory
and use of basic, neutral, acid, and specialty refractories are
work. Choice of problem is arranged between student and a
presented. Special emphasis is placed on the relationship be-
specific Department faculty-member. Prerequisite: Selection
tween physical properties of the various refractories and their
of topic with consent of faculty supervisor; “Independent
uses in the metallurgical industry. Prerequisite: Consent of
Study Form” must be completed and submitted to Registrar.
Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
1 to 3 semester hours for each of two semesters. Repeatable
MTGN518/MLGN518. PHASE EQUILIBRIA IN CERAMIC
for credit.
SYSTEMS (II) Application of one to four component oxide
Graduate Courses
diagrams to ceramic engineering problems. Emphasis on
Most courses are offered once every two years. However,
refractories and glasses and their interaction with metallic
those courses offered for which fewer than five students have
systems. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture;
registered may be cancelled that semester. Courses at the
3 semester hours. (Spring of odd years only.)
500-level are open to qualified seniors with approval of the
MTGN523/MLGN523. APPLIED SURFACE AND SOLU-
Department and the Dean of the Graduate School. Courses at
TION CHEMISTRY (II) Solution and surface chemistry of
the 600-level are open only to graduate students in good
importance in mineral and metallurgical operations. Pre-
standing. A two-year course-schedule is available in the De-
requisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
partment office.
hours. (Spring of odd years only.)
MTGN511. SPECIAL METALLURGICAL AND MATERI-
MTGN526/MLGN526. GEL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
ALS ENGINEERING PROBLEMS (I) Independent ad-
An introduction to the science and technology of particulate
vanced work, not leading to a thesis. This may take the form
and polymeric gels, emphasizing inorganic systems. Inter-
of conferences, library, and laboratory work. Selection of as-
particle forces. Aggregation, network formation, percolation,
signment is arranged between student and a specific Depart-
and the gel transition. Gel structure, rheology, and mechanical
ment faculty-member. Prerequisite: Selection of topic with
properties. Application to solid-liquid separation operations
consent of faculty supervisor. 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeat-
(filtration, centrifugation, sedimentation) and to ceramics
able for credit under different titles.
processing. Prerequisite: Graduate Status or Consent of
Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of odd
years only.)
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
153

MTGN527/ESGN562. SOLID WASTE MINIMIZATION
troduction to the fundamental principles and design criteria
AND RECYCLING (II) Industrial case-studies, on the ap-
for the selection and use of standard mineral processing unit
plication of engineering principles to minimize waste forma-
operations in comminution and physical separation. Topics
tion and to meet solid waste recycling challenges. Proven and
covered include: crushing (jaw, cone, gyratory), grinding
emerging solutions to solid waste environmental problems, es-
(ball, pebble, rod, SAG, HPGR), screening, thickening, sedi-
pecially those associated with metals. Prerequisites: ESGN500
mentation, filtration and hydrocyclones. Two standard min-
and ESGN504 or Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
eral processing plant-design simulation software (MinOCad
mester hours.
and JK SimMet) are used in the course. Prerequisites: Gradu-
MTGN528. EXTRACTIVE METALLURGY OF COPPER,
ate or Senior in good- standing or consent of instructor.3
GOLD AND SILVER. Practical applications of fundamentals
hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
of chemical-processing-of-materials to the extraction of gold,
MTGN 533 PARTICULATE MATERIAL PROCESSING II
silver and copper. Topics covered include: History; Ore de-
- APPLIED SEPARATIONS. An introduction to the funda-
posits and mineralogy; Process Selection; Hydrometallurgy
mental principles and design criteria for the selection and use
and leaching; Oxidation pretreatment; Purification and recov-
of standard mineral processing unit operations in applied sep-
ery; Refinement; Waste treatment; and Industrial examples.
arations. Topics covered include: photometric ore sorting,
Prerequisites: Graduate or Senior in good-standing or con-
magnetic separation, dense media separation, gravity separa-
sent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
tion, electrostatic separation and flotation (surface chemistry,
MTGN529. METALLURGICAL ENVIRONMENT (I)
reagents selection, laboratory testing procedures, design and
Effluents, wastes, and their point sources associated with
simulation). Two standard mineral processing plant-design
metallurgical processes, such as mineral concentration and
simulation software (MinOCad and JK SimMet) are used in
values extraction—providing for an interface between metal-
the course. Graduate or Senior in good- standing or consent
lurgical process engineering and the environmental engineer-
of instructor.3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
ing areas. Fundamentals of metallurgical unit operations and
MTGN534. CASE STUDIES IN PROCESS DEVELOP-
unit processes, applied to waste and effluents control, re-
MENT A study of the steps required for development of a
cycling, and waste disposal. Examples which incorporate
mineral recovery process. Technical, economic, and human
engineering design and cost components are included. Pre-
factors involved in bringing a process concept into commer-
requisites: MTGN334 or Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lec-
cial production. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
ture; 3 semester hours.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
MTGN530. ADVANCED IRON AND STEELMAKING (I)
MTGN535. PYROMETALLURGICAL PROCESSES (II)
Physicochemical principles of gas-slag-metal reactions
Detailed study of a selected few processes, illustrating the
applied to the reduction of iron ore concentrates and to the
application of the principles of physical chemistry (both
refining of liquid iron to steel. The role of these reactions in
thermodynamics and kinetics) and chemical engineering
reactor design—blast furnace and direct iron smelting fur-
(heat and mass transfer, fluid flow, plant design, fuel technol-
nace, pneumatic steelmaking furnace, refining slags, deoxi-
ogy, etc.) to process development. Prerequisite: Consent of
dation and degassing, ladle metallurgy, alloying, and
Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
continuous casting of steel. Prerequisite: DCGN209 or
MTGN536. OPTIMIZATION AND CONTROL OF METAL-
MTGN351 or Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
LURGICAL SYSTEMS Application of modern optimiza-
mester hours. (Fall of even years only.)
tion and control theory to the analysis of specific systems in
MTGN531. THERMODYNAMICS OF METALLURGI-
extractive metallurgy and mineral processing. Mathematical
CAL AND MATERIALS PROCESSING (I) Application of
modeling, linear control analysis, dynamic response, and
thermodynamics to the processing of metals and materials,
indirect optimum seeking techniques applied to the process
with emphasis on the use of thermodynamics in the develop-
analysis of grinding, screening, filtration, leaching, precipita-
ment and optimization of processing systems. Focus areas
tion of metals from solution, and blast furnace reduction of
will include entropy and enthalpy, reaction equilibrium, solu-
metals. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture;
tion thermodynamics, methods for analysis and correlation of
3 semester hours.
thermodynamics data, thermodynamic analysis of phase dia-
MTGN537. ELECTROMETALLURGY (II) Electrochemi-
grams, thermodynamics of surfaces, thermodynamics of de-
cal nature of metallurgical processes. Kinetics of electrode
fect structures, and irreversible thermodynamics. Attention
reactions. Electrochemical oxidation and reduction. Complex
will be given to experimental methods for the measurement
electrode reactions. Mixed potential systems. Cell design and
of thermodynamic quantities. Prerequisite: MTGN351 or
optimization of electrometallurgical processes. Batteries and
Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
fuel cells. Some aspects of corrosion. Prerequisite: Consent
MTGN 532 PARTICULATE MATERIAL PROCESSING I -
of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of
COMMINUTION AND PHYSICAL SEPARATIONS. An in-
even years only.)
154
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

MTGN538. HYDROMETALLURGY (II) Kinetics of liq-
propagation. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lec-
uid-solid reactions. Theory of uniformly accessible surfaces.
ture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of odd years only.)
Hydrometallurgy of sulfide and oxides. Cementation and
MTGN546. CREEP AND HIGH TEMPERATURE MATE-
hydrogen reduction. Ion exchange and solvent extraction.
RIALS (II) Mathematical description of creep process.
Physicochemical phenomena at high pressures. Microbiolog-
Mathematical methods of extrapolation of creep data. Micro-
ical metallurgy. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours
mechanisms of creep deformation, including dislocation
lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of odd years only.)
glide and grain boundary sliding. Study of various high tem-
MTGN539. PRINCIPLES OF MATERIALS PROCESSING
perature materials, including iron, nickel, and cobalt base
REACTOR DESIGN (II) Review of reactor types and ideal-
alloys and refractory metals, and ceramics. Emphasis on
ized design equations for isothermal conditions. Residence
phase transformations and microstructure-property relation-
time functions for nonreacting and reacting species and its
ships. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture;
relevance to process control. Selection of reactor type for a
3 semester hours. (Spring of odd years only.)
given application. Reversible and irreversible reactions in
MTGN547. PHASE EQUILIBRIUM IN MATERIALS
CSTR’s under nonisothermal conditions. Heat and mass
SYSTEMS (I) Phase equilibrium of uniary, binary, ternary,
transfer considerations and kinetics of gas-solid reactions
and multicomponent systems, microstructure interpretation,
applied to fluo-solids type reactors. Reactions in packed
pressure-temperature diagrams, determination of phase dia-
beds. Scale up and design of experiments. Brief introduction
grams. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture;
into drying, crystallization, and bacterial processes. Exam-
3 semester hours.
ples will be taken from current metallurgical practice. Pre-
requisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
MTGN548. TRANSFORMATIONS IN METALS (I) Sur-
hours. (Spring of odd years only.)
face and interfacial phenomena, order of transformation,
grain growth, recovery, recrystallization, solidification, phase
MTGN541. INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS OF METALS (I)
transformation in solids, precipitation hardening, spinoidal
Electron theory of metals. Classical and quantum-mechanical
decomposition, martensitic transformation, gas metal reac-
free electron theory. Electrical and thermal conductivity,
tions. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture;
thermoelectric effects, theory of magnetism, specific heat,
3 semester hours. (Fall of odd years only.)
diffusion, and reaction rates. Prerequisite: MTGN445.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MTGN549. CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS IN FERROUS
ALLOYS (I) Development and review of solid state trans-
MTGN542. ALLOYING THEORY, STRUCTURE, AND
formations and strengthening mechanisms in ferrous alloys.
PHASE STABILITY (II) Empirical rules and theories relat-
Application of these principles to the development of new
ing to alloy formation. Various alloy phases and constituents
alloys and processes such as high strength low alloy steels,
which result when metals are alloyed and examined in detail.
high temperature alloys, maraging steels, and case hardening
Current information on solid solutions, intermetallic com-
processes. Prerequisite: MTGN348. 3 hours lecture; 3 semes-
pounds, eutectics, liquid immiscibility. Prerequisite: MTGN445
ter hours.
or Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MTGN551. ADVANCED CORROSION ENGINEERING
MTGN543. THEORY OF DISLOCATIONS (I) Stress field
(I) Advanced topics in corrosion engineering. Case studies
around dislocation, forces on dislocations, dislocation reac-
and industrial application. Special forms of corrosion. Ad-
tions, dislocation multiplication, image forces, interaction with
vanced measurement techniques. Prerequisite: MTGN451.
point defects, interpretation of macroscopic behavior in light
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of even years only.)
of dislocation mechanisms. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of odd years only.)
MTGN552/MLGN552. INORGANIC MATRIX COMPOS-
ITES Introduction to the processing, structure, properties
MTGN544. FORGING AND DEFORMATION MODEL-
and applications of metal matrix and ceramic matrix compos-
ING (I) Examination of the forging process for the fabri-
ites. Importance of structure and properties of both the matrix
cation of metal components. Techniques used to model
and the reinforcement and the types of reinforcement utilized—
deformation processes including slab equilibrium, slip line,
particulate, short fiber, continuous fiber, and laminates. Em-
upper bound and finite element methods. Application of
phasis on the development of mechanical properties through
these techniques to specific aspects of forging and metal
control of synthesis and processing parameters. Other physi-
forming processes. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.
cal properties such as electrical and thermal will also be ex-
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of odd years only.)
amined. Prerequisite/Co-requisite*: MTGN352, MTGN445/
MTGN545. FATIGUE AND FRACTURE (I) Basic fracture
MLGN505*; or, Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
mechanics as applied to engineering materials, S-N curves,
mester hours. (Summer of even years only.)
the Goodman diagram, stress concentrations, residual stress
MTGN553. STRENGTHENING MECHANISMS (II)
effects, effect of material properties on mechanisms of crack
Strain hardening in polycrystalline materials, dislocation
interactions, effect of grain boundaries on strength, solid
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
155

solution hardening, martensitic transformations, precipitation
termination of simulation models. Commercial computer-
hardening, point defects. Prerequisite: MTGN543 or concur-
based simulation-package to provide the experience and
rent enrollment. 3 hours lecture;3 semester hours. (Spring of
background necessary to build and analyze models of manu-
even years only.)
facturing and service operations such as ferrous and nonfer-
MTGN554. OXIDATION OF METALS (II) Kinetics of oxi-
rous alloy production, ceramic materials production, casting
dation. The nature of the oxide film. Transport in oxides.
and molding, forming, machining and finishing, joining,
Mechanisms of oxidation. The Oxidation protection of high-
coating, electronic manufacturing, inspection and quality
temperature metal systems. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.
control, logistic processes, and service processes. Prerequi-
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of even years
site: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
only.)
MTGN560. ANALYSIS OF METALLURGICAL FAILURES
MTGN555/MLGN504. SOLID STATE THERMODYNAM-
(II) Applications of the principles of physical and mechani-
ICS (I) Thermodynamics applied to solid state reactions,
cal metallurgy to the analysis of metallurgical failures.
binary and ternary phase diagrams, point, line and planar de-
Nondestructive testing. Fractography. Case study analysis.
fects, interfaces, and electrochemical concepts. Prerequisite:
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semes-
Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ter hours. (Spring of odd years only.)
MTGN556/MLGN506. TRANSPORT IN SOLIDS (I)
MTGN561. PHYSICAL METALLURGY OF ALLOYS
Thermal and electrical conductivity. Solid state diffusion in
FOR AEROSPACE (I) Review of current developments in
metals and metal systems. Kinetics of metallurgical reactions
aerospace materials with particular attention paid to titanium
in the solid state. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours
alloys, aluminum alloys, and metal-matrix composites. Em-
lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of even years only.)
phasis is on phase equilibria, phase transformations, and
microstructure-property relationships. Concepts of innova-
MTGN557. SOLIDIFICATION (I) Heat flow and fluid flow
tive processing and microstructural alloy design are included
in solidification, thermodynamics of solidification, nuclea-
where appropriate. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3
tion and interface kinetics, grain refining, crystal and grain
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of even years only.)
growth, constitutional supercooling, eutectic growth, solidifi-
cation of castings and ingots, segregation, and porosity. Pre-
MTGN564 CONSTITUTIVE MODELING OF MATERIAL
requisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
BEHAVIOR (I) Examination of various constitutive models
hours. (Fall of odd years only.)
which are used to characterize material behavior. Models for
elastic behavior, strain hardening, strain-rate hardening,
MTGN558. MANAGEMENT OF MANUFACTURING
creep, viscoplastic, cyclical hardening and nonisothermal
PROCESSES Theory and practice of management of manu-
behavior will be discussed. Experimental methods and data
facturing operations. Topics include inventory control models;
analysis to determine various constitutive parameters will be
factory dynamics and flow-through manufacturing processes;
described. Incorporation of these models in computer codes,
application of Little’s Queueing Law to relate cycle time,
especially finite element analysis. . Prerequisite: Consent of
throughput and work-in-process; influence of variability on
Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of even
utilization and process flow; bottleneck planning and the in-
years only.)
fluence of bottleneck constraints on cycle time, throughput
and work-in-process; batching laws; application of queueing
MTGN565 MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CERAMICS
network theory for process analysis and optimization; shop-
AND COMPOSITES (I) Mechanical properties of ceramics
floor control and constant work-in-process control systems.
and ceramic-based composites; brittle fracture of solids;
Application of the principles of manufacturing management
toughening mechanisms in composites; fatigue, high temper-
to processes such as casting and molding, forming, machin-
ature mechanical behavior, including fracture, creep deforma-
ing and finishing, joining, coating, electronic manufacturing,
tion. Prerequisites: MTGN445 or MLGN505, or Consent of
inspection and quality control, logistic processes, and service
Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of even
processes. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture;
years only.)
3 semester hours.
MTGN 569, MLGN 569, EGGN 569, ChEN 569 Fuel Cell
MTGN559. SIMULATION OF MANUFACTURING AND
Science and Technology (II) Fundamentals of fuel-cell opera-
SERVICE PROCESSES Introduction to the theory and prac-
tion and electrochemistry from chemical-thermodynamics
tice of dynamic simulation of queuing systems such as those
and materials-science perspectives. Review types of fuel
encountered in manufacturing systems and service opera-
cells, fuel-processing requirements and approaches, and fuel-
tions. Topics include generation of random numbers and ran-
cell system integration. Examine current topics in fuel-cell
dom variates, discrete and continuous statistical distributions
science and technology. Fabricate and test operational fuel
used for simulation, simulation dynamics, queuing systems,
cells in the Colorado Fuel Cell Center. Prerequisites: MTGN
statistical analysis of simulation output, entity transfer, con-
351 or EGGN371 or ChEN357 and MATH225; or Consent
veyors, batching, statistical analysis of simulation output, and
of Instructor 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
156
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

MTGN/MLGN 570 BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF MATERIALS
MTGN586. DESIGN OF WELDED STRUCTURES AND
Introduction to the diversity of biomaterials and applications
ASSEMBLIES Introduction to the concepts and analytical
through examination of the physiologic environment in con-
practice of designing weldments. Designing for impact,
junction with compositional and structural requirements of
fatigue, and torsional loading. Designing of weldments using
tissues and organs. Appropriate domains and applications of
overmatching and undermatching criteria. Analysis of com-
metals, ceramics and polymers, including implants, sensors,
bined stresses. Designing of compression members, column
drug delivery, laboratory automation, and tissue engineering
bases and splices. Designing of built-up columns, welded
are presented. Prerequisites: ESGN 301 or equivalent, or
plate cylinders, beam-to-column connections, and trusses.
Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
Designing for tubular construction. Weld distortion and
MTGN571. METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS ENGI-
residual stresses. Joint design. Process consideration in weld
NEERING LABORATORY Basic instruction in advanced
design. Welding codes and specifications. Estimation of
equipment and techniques in the field of extraction, mechani-
welding costs. Prerequisite/Co-requisite: MATH225 or
cal or physical metallurgy. Prerequisite: Selection and Con-
equivalent, EGGN320 or equivalent, MTGN475 or Consent
sent of Instructor. 3 to 9 hours lab ; 1 to 3 semester hours.
of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Summer of
odd years only.)
MTGN580. ADVANCED WELDING METALLURGY (II)
Weldability, defects, phase transformations, heat flow, pre-
MTGN587. PHYSICAL PHENOMENA OF WELDING
heat treatment, post-heat treatment, heat affected zone,
AND JOINING PROCESSES (I) Introduction to arc
microstructure, and properties. Prerequisite: Consent of
physics, fluid flow in the plasma, behavior of high pressure
Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of even
plasma, cathodic and anodic phenomena, energy generation
years only.)
and temperature distribution in the plasma, arc stability, metal
transfer across arc, electron beam welding processes, keyhole
MTGN581. WELDING HEAT SOURCES AND INTERAC-
phenomena. Ohmic welding processes, high frequency weld-
TIVE CONTROLS (I) The science of welding heat sources
ing, weld pool phenomena. Development of relationships be-
including gas tungsten arc, gas metal arc, electron beam and
tween physics concepts and the behavior of specific welding
laser. The interaction of the heat source with the workpiece
and joining processes. Prerequisite/Co-requisite: PHGN300,
will be explored and special emphasis will be given to using
MATH225, MTGN475, or Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lec-
this knowledge for automatic control of the welding process.
ture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of even years only.)
Prerequisite: Graduate Status or Consent of Instructor. 3
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of odd years only.)
MTGN591. PHYSICAL PHENOMENA OF COATING
PROCESSES (I) Introduction to plasma physics, behavior of
MTGN582. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF WELDED
low pressure plasma, cathodic and anodic phenomena, glow
JOINTS (II) Mechanical metallurgy of heterogeneous sys-
discharge phenomena, glow discharge sputtering, magnetron
tems, shrinkage, distortion, cracking, residual stresses, me-
plasma deposition, ion beam deposition, cathodic arc evapora-
chanical testing of joints, size effects, joint design, transition
tion, electron beam and laser coating processes. Development
temperature, fracture. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3
of relationships between physics concepts and the behavior
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of odd years only.)
of specific coating processes. Prerequisite/Co-requisite:
MTGN583. PRINCIPLES OF NON-DESTRUCTIVE TEST-
PHGN300, MATH225, or Consent of Instructor. 3 hours
ING AND EVALUATION (I) Introduction to testing meth-
lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of odd years only.)
ods; basic physical principles of acoustics, radiography, and
MTGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METALLURGICAL
electromagnetism; statistical and risk analysis; fracture me-
AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING (I, II) Pilot course or
chanics concepts; design decision making, limitations and
special topics course. Topics chosen according to special
applications of processes; fitness-for- service evaluations.
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). The course topic is
Prerequisite: Graduate Status or Consent of Instructor. 3
generally offered only once.. Prerequisite: Consent of In-
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of odd years only.)
structor. Variable hours lecture/lab; 1 to 6 semester hours.
MTGN584. NON-FUSION JOINING PROCESSES (II)
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
Joining processes for which the base materials are not
MTGN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
melted. Brazing, soldering, diffusion bonding, explosive
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
bonding, and adhesive bonding processes. Theoretical as-
member. Student and instructor to agree on subject matter,
pects of these processes, as well as the influence of process
content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study”
parameters. Special emphasis to the joining of dissimilar ma-
Form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. 1 to
terials using these processes. Prerequisite: Consent of In-
3 semester hours for each of two semesters. Repeatable for
structor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of odd
credit.
years only.)
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
157

MTGN631. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA IN METALLUR-
MTGN698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METALLURGICAL
GICAL AND MATERIALS SYSTEMS Physical principles
AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING (I, II) Pilot course or
of mass, momentum, and energy transport. Application to the
special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of
analysis of extraction metallurgy and other physicochemical
instructor(s) and student(s). The course topic is generally
processes. Prerequisite: MATH225 and MTGN461or equiv-
offered only once. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to 3
alent, or Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
semester hours per semester. Repeatable for credit under dif-
hours.
ferent titles.
MTGN671 ADVANCED MATERIALS LABORATORY (I)
MTGN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
Experimental and analytical research in the fields of produc-
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
tion, mechanical, chemical, and/or physical metallurgy.
member. Student and instructor to agree on subject matter,
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours;
content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study”
3 semester hours.
Form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. 1 to
MTGN672. ADVANCED MATERIALS LABORATORY
3 semester hours for each of two semesters. Repeatable for
(II) Continuation of MTGN671. 1 to 3 semester hours.
credit.
MTGN696/MLGN696. VAPOR DEPOSITION PROCESSES
MTGN705. GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT: MASTER
(II) Introduction to the fundamental physics and chemistry
OF SCIENCE Research credit hours required for completion
underlying the control of deposition processes for thin films
of the degree Master of Science. Research under the direct
for a variety of applications—wear resistance, corrosion/
supervision of the faculty advisor. Repeatable for credit.
oxidation resistance, decorative coatings, electronic and
MTGN706. GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT: DOCTOR
magnetic. Emphasis on the vapor deposition process varia-
OF PHILOSOPHY Research credit hours required for com-
bles rather than the structure and properties of the deposited
pletion of the degree Doctor of Philosophy. Research under
film. Prerequisites: MTGN351, MTGN461, or equivalent
the direct supervision of the faculty advisor. Repeatable for
courses or Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
credit.
hours. (Summer of odd years only.)
MTGN697. MICROSTRUCTURAL EVOLUTION OF
COATINGS AND THIN FILMS (I) Introduction to aqueous
and non-aqueous chemistry for the preparation of an effec-
tive electrolyte; for interpretation of electrochemical princi-
ples associated with electrodeposition; surface science to
describe surface structure and transport; interphasial structure
including space charge and double layer concepts; nucleation
concepts applied to electrodeposition; electrocrystallization
including growth concepts; factors affecting morphology and
kinetics; co-deposition of non-Brownian particles; pulse
electrodeposition; electrodeposition parameters and control;
physical metallurgy of electrodeposits; and, principles asso-
ciated with vacuum evaporation and sputter deposition.
Factors affecting microstructural evolution of vacuum and
sputtered deposits; nucleation of vapor and sputtered deposits;
modeling of matter-energy interactions during co-deposition;
and, Thornton’s model for coating growth. Prerequisite/
co-requisite: MATH225, MTGN351, MTGN352, or Consent
of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Summer of
even years only.)
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Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
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Mining Engineering
ence - Non-Thesis option must complete a minimum of 30
TIBOR G. ROZGONYI, Professor and Department Head
credit hours of course work of which 6 credit hours may be
KADRI DAGDELEN, Professor
applied towards the analytical report writing, if required.
UGUR OZBAY, Professor
The Master of Engineering degree (Engineer of Mines)
LEVENT OZDEMIR, Professor and Director of Earth Mechanics
in Mining Engineering includes all the requirements for the
Institute
MARK KUCHTA, Associate Professor
M.S. degree, with the sole exception that an “engineering
HUGH B. MILLER, Associate Professor
report” is required rather than a Master’s Thesis.
MASAMI NAKAGAWA, Associate Professor
The Doctor of Philosophy degree in Mining and Earth
MANOHAR ARORA, Senior Lecturer
Systems Engineering requires a total of 72 credit hours, be-
MEHMET CIGLA, Research Assistant Professor
yond the bachelor's degree. A minimum of 18 credit hours of
VILEM PETR, Research Assistant Professor
course work, and 24 hours of research credit is required. The
Degrees Offered:
thesis must be successfully defended before a doctoral com-
Master of Engineering (Engineer of Mines)
mittee.
Master of Science (Mining and Earth Systems Engineering)
Prerequisites:
Doctor of Philosophy (Mining and Earth Systems
Students entering a graduate program for the master’s or
Engineering)
doctor’s degree are expected to have had much the same
undergraduate training as that required at Colorado School of
Program Description:
Mines in mining, if they are interested in the traditional mining
The program has two distinctive, but inherently inter-
specialty. Students interested in the Earth Systems engineering
woven specialties.
specialty with different engineering sub-disciplinary background
The Mining Engineering area or specialty is predomi-
may also require special mining engineering subjects depend-
nantly for mining engineers and it is directed towards the
ing upon their graduate program. Deficiencies if any, will be
traditional mining engineering fields. Graduate work is nor-
determined by the Department of Mining Engineering on the
mally centered around subject areas such as mine planning
basis of students’ education, experience, and graduate study.
and development, computer aided mine design, rock mechan-
For specific information on prerequisites, students are
ics, operations research applied to the mineral industry, envi-
encouraged to refer to a copy of the Mining Engineering
ronment and sustainability considerations, mine
Department’s Departmental Guidelines and Regulations for
mechanization, mine evaluation, finance and management
Graduate Students, available from the Mining Engineering
and similar mining engineering topics.
Department.
The Earth Systems Engineering area or specialty is
Required Curriculum:
designed to be distinctly interdisciplinary by merging the
Graduate students, depending upon their specialty and
mining engineering fundamentals with civil, geotechnical,
background may be required to complete two of the three core
environmental or other engineering into advanced study tracks
courses listed below during their program of study at CSM.
in earth systems, rock mechanics and earth structural systems,
underground excavation, and construction systems. This
These courses are:
specialty is open for engineers with different sub-disciplinary
MNGN508. Advanced Rock Mechanics
backgrounds, but interested in working and/or considering
MNGN512 - Surface Mine Design
performing research in mining, tunneling, excavation and
MNGN516 - Underground Mining
underground construction areas.
In addition, all full-time graduate students are required to
Graduate work is normally centered around subject areas
register for and attend MNGN625 - Graduate Mining Semi-
such as site characterization, environmental aspects, under-
nar each semester while in residence, except in the case of
ground construction and tunneling (including microtunneling),
scheduling conflicts with other course(s) approved by the
excavation methods and equipment, mechanization of mines
thesis advisor.
and underground construction, environmental and manage-
ment aspects, modeling and design in geoengineering.
Fields of Research:
The Mining Engineering Department focuses on the fol-
Program Requirements:
lowing fundamental areas:
The Master of Science degree in Mining and Earth Systems
Geomechanics, Rock Mechanics and Stability of Under-
Engineering has two options available. Master of Science -
ground and Surface Excavations
Thesis and Master of Science - Non-Thesis. Thesis Option re-
Computerized Mine Design and Related Applications (in-
quires a minimum of 21 semester credit hours of course work
cluding Geostatistical Modeling)
and 9 semester credits of research, approved by student’s
Advanced Integrated Mining Systems Incorporating Mine
graduate committee, plus a master’s thesis. The Master of Sci-
Mechanization and Mechanical Mining Systems
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
159

Underground Excavation (Tunneling) and Construction
MNGN410. EXCAVATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT.
Site Characterization and Geotechnical Investigations,
Successful implementation and management of surface and
Modeling and Design in Geoengineering.
underground construction projects, preparation of contract
Rock Fragmentation
documents, project bidding and estimating, contract awarding
Mineral Processing, Communition, Separation Technology
and notice to proceed, value engineering, risk management,
Bulk Material Handling
construction management and dispute resolution, evaluation
Description of Courses
of differing site conditions claims. Prerequisite: MNGN 210
MNGN404. TUNNELING (I) Modern tunneling techniques.
or Instructor’s consent, 2-hour lecture, 2 semester hours.
Emphasis on evaluation of ground conditions, estimation of
MNGN414. MINE PLANT DESIGN Analysis of mine plant
support requirements, methods of tunnel driving and boring,
elements with emphasis on design. Materials handling, de-
design systems and equipment, and safety. Prerequisite:
watering, hoisting, belt conveyor and other material handling
none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
systems for underground mines. Prerequisite: MNGN312,
MNGN405. ROCK MECHANICS IN MINING (I) The
MNGN314 or Instructor's consent. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours
course deals with the rock mechanics aspect of design of
lab; 3 semester hours.
mine layouts developed in both underground and surface.
MNGN418. ADVANCED ROCK MECHANICS Analytical
Underground mining sections include design of coal and hard
and numerical modeling analysis of stresses and displace-
rock pillars, mine layout design for tabular and massive ore
ments induced around engineering excavations in rock. In-
bodies, assessment of caving characteristics or ore bodies,
situ stress. Rock failure criteria. Complete load deformation
performance and application of backfill, and phenomenon of
behavior of rocks. Measurement and monitoring techniques
rock burst and its alleviation. Surface mining portion covers
in rock mechanics. Principles of design of excavation in
rock mass characterization, failure modes of slopes exca-
rocks. Analytical, numerical modeling and empirical design
vated in rock masses, probabilistic and deterministic ap-
methods. Probabilistic and deterministic approaches to rock
proaches to design of slopes, and remedial measures for
engineering designs. Excavation design examples for shafts,
slope stability problems. Prerequisite: MN321 or equivalent.
tunnels, large chambers and mine pillars. Seismic loading of
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
structures in rock. Phenomenon of rock burst and its allevia-
MNGN406. DESIGN AND SUPPORT OF UNDERGROUND
tion. Prerequisite: MNGN321 or Instructor's consent. 3 hours
EXCAVATIONS Design of underground excavations and
lecture; 3 semester hours.
support. Analysis of stress and rock mass deformations
MNGN421. DESIGN OF UNDERGROUND EXCAVATIONS
around excavations using analytical and numerical methods.
(II) Design of underground openings in competent and broken
Collections, preparation, and evaluation of in situ and labora-
ground using rock mechanics principles. Rock bolting design
tory data for excavation design. Use of rock mass rating sys-
and other ground support methods. Coal, evaporite, metallic
tems for site characterization and excavation design. Study of
and nonmetallic deposits included. Prerequisite: MNGN321,
support types and selection of support for underground exca-
concurrent enrollment or Instructor’s consent. 3 hours lecture;
vations. Use of numerical models for design of shafts, tun-
3 semester hours.
nels and large chambers. Prerequisite: Instructor’s consent.
MNGN422/522. FLOTATION Science and engineering
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in odd years.
governing the practice of mineral concentration by flotation.
MNGN407. ROCK FRAGMENTATION (II) Theory and
Interfacial phenomena, flotation reagents, mineral-reagent
application of rock drilling, rock boring, explosives, blasting,
interactions, and zeta-potential are covered. Flotation circuit
and mechanical rock breakage. Design of blasting rounds,
design and evaluation as well as tailings handling are also cov-
applications to surface and underground excavation. Prerequi-
ered. The course also includes laboratory demonstrations of
site: DCGN241, concurrent enrollment or Instructor’s con-
some fundamental concepts. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
sent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in odd years.
MNGN423. FLOTATION LABORATORY (I) Experiments to
MNGN408. UNDERGROUND DESIGN AND CONSTRUC-
accompany the lectures in MNGN422. Corequisite: MNGN421
TION Soil and rock engineering applied to underground
or Instructor's consent. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour
civil works. Tunneling and the construction of underground
MNGN424. MINE VENTILATION (II) Fundamentals of
openings for power facilities, water conveyance, transporta-
mine ventilation, including control of gas, dust, temperature,
tion, and waste disposal; design, excavation and support of
and humidity; ventilation network analysis and design of sys-
underground openings. Emphasis on consulting practice, case
tems. Prerequisite: EGGN351, 371 and MNGN314 or Instruc-
studies, geotechnical design, and construction methods. Pre-
tor’s consent. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
requisite: EGGN361 OR MNGN321, or Instructor’s consent.
2 hours of lecture; 2 semester hours.
MNGN427. MINE VALUATION (II) Course emphasis is on
the business aspects of mining. Topics include time valuation
of money and interest formulas, cash flow, investment crite-
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Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

ria, tax considerations, risk and sensitivity analysis, escala-
MNGN438. GEOSTATISTICS (I) Introduction to elementary
tion and inflation and cost of capital. Calculation procedures
probability theory and its applications in engineering and sci-
are illustrated by case studies. Computer programs are used.
ences; discrete and continuous probability distributions; param-
Prerequisite: Senior in Mining, graduate status or Instructor's
eter estimation; hypothesis testing; linear regression; spatial
consent. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
correlations and geostatistics with emphasis on applications
MNGN428. MINING ENGINEERING EVALUATION
in earth sciences and engineering. Prerequisites: MATH112.
AND DESIGN REPORT I (I) (WI) Preparation of phase I
2 hours of lecture and 3 hours of lab. 3 semester hours.
engineering report based on coordination of all previous
MNGN440. EQUIPMENT REPLACEMENT ANALYSIS (I)
work. Includes mineral deposit selection, geologic descrip-
Introduction to the fundamentals of classical equipment re-
tion, mining method selection, ore reserve determination, and
placement theory. Emphasis on new, practical approaches to
permit process outline. Emphasis is on detailed mine design
equipment replacement decision making. Topics include:
and cost analysis evaluation in preparation for MNGN429. 3
operating and maintenance costs, obsolescence factors, tech-
hours lab; 1 semester hour.
nological changes, salvage, capital investments, minimal
MNGN429. MINING ENGINEERING EVALUATION
average annual costs, optimum economic life, infinite and
AND DESIGN REPORT II (II) (WI) Preparation of formal
finite planning horizons, replacement cycles, replacement vs.
engineering report based on all course work in the mining
expansion, maximization of returns from equipment replace-
option. Emphasis is on mine design, equipment selection,
ment expenditures. Prerequisite: MNGN427, senior or gradu-
production scheduling, evaluation and cost analysis. Pre-
ate status. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
requisite: MNGN427, 428. 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
MNGN444. EXPLOSIVES ENGINEERING II This course
MNGN431. MINING AND METALLURGICAL ENVI-
gives students in engineering and applied sciences the oppor-
RONMENT This course covers studies of the interface
tunity to acquire the fundamental concepts of explosives
between mining and metallurgical process engineering and
engineering and science applications as they apply to indus-
environmental engineering areas. Wastes, effluents and their
try and real life examples. Students will expand upon their
point sources in mining and metallurgical processes such as
MNGN 333 knowledge and develop a more advanced knowl-
mineral concentration, value extraction and process metal-
edge base including an understanding of the subject as it ap-
lurgy are studied in context. Fundamentals of unit operations
plies to their specific project interests. Assignments, quizzes,
and unit processes with those applicable to waste and efflu-
concept modeling and their project development and presen-
ent control, disposal and materials recycling are covered.
tation will demonstrate student’s progress. Prerequisite:
Engineering design and engineering cost components are
none. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
also included for some examples chosen. The ratio of funda-
MNGN445/545. ROCK SLOPE ENGINEERING Introduc-
mentals to applications coverage is about 1:1. Prerequisite:
tion to the analysis and design of slopes excavated in rock.
Instructor's consent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Rock mass classification and strength determinatiosn, geo-
MNGN433. MINE SYSTEMS ANALYSIS I (II) Applica-
logical structural parameters, properties of fracture sets, data
tion of statistics, systems analysis, and operations research
collection techniques, hydrological factors, methods of
techniques to mineral industry problems. Laboratory work
analysis of slope stability, wedge intersections, monitoring
using computer techniques to improve efficiency of mining
and maintenance of final pit slopes, classification of slides.
operations. Prerequisite: senior or graduate status. 2 hours
Deterministic and probabilistic approaches in slope design.
lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
Remedial measures. Laboratory and field exercise in slope
design. Collection of data and specimens in the field for de-
MNGN434. PROCESS ANALYSIS Projects to accompany
terming physical properties required for slope design. Appli-
the lectures in MNGN422. Prerequisite: MNGN422 or In-
cation of numerical modeling and analytical techniques to
structor's consent. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
slope stability determinations for hard rock and soft rock
MNGN436. UNDERGROUND COAL MINE DESIGN (II)
environments. Prerequisite: Instructor’s consent. 3 hours
Design of an underground coal mine based on an actual coal
lecture. 3 hours semester hours.
reserve. This course shall utilize all previous course material
MNGN460 INDUSTRIAL MINERALS PRODUCTION (II)
in the actual design of an underground coal mine. Ventilation,
This course describes the engineering principles and practices
materials handling, electrical transmission and distribution,
associated with quarry mining operations related to the cement
fluid mechanics, equipment selection and application, mine
and aggregate industries. The course will cover resource defi-
plant design. Information from all basic mining survey
nition, quarry planning and design, extraction, and processing
courses will be used. Prerequisite: MNGN316, 321, 414,
of minerals for cement and aggregate production. Permitting
EGGN329 and DCGN381 or EGGN384. Concurrent enroll-
issues and reclamation, particle sizing and environmental
ment with the Instructor's consent permitted. 3 hours lecture,
practices, will be studied in depth. Prerequisite: MNGN312,
3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
161

MNGN318, MNGN322, MNGN323, or Instructor's consent.
performance and application of backfill, and phenomenon of
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
rock burst and its alleviation. Surface mining portion covers
MNGN482. MINE MANAGEMENT (II) Basic principles
rock mass characterization, failure modes of slopes excavated
of successful mine management, supervision, administrative
in rock masses, probabilistic and deterministic approaches to
policies, industrial and human engineering. Prerequisite:
design of slopes, and remedial measures for slope stability
Senior or graduate status or Instructor's consent. 2 hours
problems. Prerequisite: MN321 or equivalent. 3 hours lec-
lecture; 2 semester hours. Offered in odd years.
ture; 3 semester hours
MNGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MINING ENGINEERING
MNGN506. DESIGN AND SUPPORT OF UNDER-
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen
GROUND EXCAVATIONS Design of underground exca-
from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually
vations and support. Analysis of stress and rock mass
the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor con-
deformations around excavations using analytical and
sent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for
numerical methods. Collections, preparation, and evaluation
credit under different titles.
of in situ and laboratory data for excavation design. Use of
rock mass rating systems for site characterization and exca-
MNGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) (WI) Indi-
vation design. Study of support types and selection of sup-
vidual research or special problem projects supervised by
port for underground excavations. Use of numerical models
a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree
for design of shafts, tunnels and large chambers. Prerequisite:
on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite:
Instructor’s consent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted
Offered in odd years.
to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeat-
able for credit.
MNGN507. ADVANCED DRILLING AND BLASTING (I)
An advanced study of the theories of rock penetration includ-
Graduate Courses
ing percussion, rotary, and rotary percussion drilling. Rock
500-level courses are open to qualified seniors with per-
fragmentation including explosives and the theories of blast-
mission of the department and Dean of the Graduate School.
ing rock. Application of theory to drilling and blasting prac-
600-level courses are open only to students enrolled in the
tice at mines, pits, and quarries. Prerequisite: MNGN407.
Graduate School.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in odd years.
MNGN501. REGULATORY MINING LAWS AND CON-
MNGN508. ADVANCED ROCK MECHANICS Analytical
TRACTS (I) Basic fundamentals of engineering law, regula-
and numerical modeling analysis of stresses and displace-
tions of federal and state laws pertaining to the mineral
ments induced around engineering excavations in rock. In-
industry and environment control. Basic concepts of mining
situ stress. Rock failure criteria. Complete load deformation
contracts. Offered in even numbered years. Prerequisite:
behavior of rocks. Measurement and monitoring techniques
Senior or graduate status. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
in rock mechanics. Principles of design of excavation in
Offered in even years.
rocks. Analytical, numerical modeling and empirical design
MNGN503. MINING TECHNOLOGY FOR SUSTAIN-
methods. Probabilistic and deterministic approaches to rock
ABLE DEVELOPMENT (I, II) The primary focus of this
engineering designs. Excavation design examples for shafts,
course is to provide students an understanding of the funda-
tunnels, large chambers and mine pillars. Seismic loading of
mental principles of sustainability and how they influence the
structures in rock. Phenomenon of rock burst and its allevia-
technical components of a mine's life cycle, beginning during
tion. Prerequisite: MNGN321 or professor’s consent. 3 hours
project feasibility and extending through operations to clo-
lecture; 3 semester hours.
sure and site reclamation. Course discussions will address a
MNGN511. MINING INVESTIGATIONS (I, II) Investi-
wide range of traditional engineering topics that have spe-
gational problems associated with any important aspect of
cific relevance and impact to local and regional communities,
mining. Choice of problem is arranged between student and
such as mining methods and systems, mine plant design and
instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Lecture, con-
layout, mine operations and supervision, resource utilization
sultation, lab, and assigned reading; 2 to 4 semester hours.
and cutoff grades, and labor. The course will emphasize the
importance of integrating social, political, and economic con-
MNGN512. SURFACE MINE DESIGN Analysis of ele-
siderations into technical decision-making and problem solv-
ments of surface mine operation and design of surface min-
ing. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
ing system components with emphasis on minimization of
adverse environmental impact and maximization of efficient
MNGN505. ROCK MECHANICS IN MINING (I) The
use of mineral resources. Ore estimates, unit operations,
course deals with the rock mechanics aspect of design of
equipment selection, final pit determinations, short- and
mine layouts developed in both underground and surface.
long-range planning, road layouts, dump planning, and cost
Underground mining sections include design of coal and hard
estimation. Prerequisite: MNGN210. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
rock pillars, mine layout design for tabular and massive ore
mester hours.
bodies, assessment of caving characteristics or ore bodies,
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MNGN513 ADVANCED SURFACE MINE DESIGN (II)
MNGN518. ADVANCED BULK UNDERGROUND MIN-
This course introduces students to alternative open pit plan-
ING TECHNIQUES This course will provide advanced
ning and design concepts. Course emphasis is on optimiza-
knowledge and understanding of the current state-of-the-art
tion aspects of open pit mine design. Topics include 3-D
in design, development, and production in underground hard
ultimate pit limit algorithms and their applications; computer
rock mining using bulk-mining methods. Design and layout
aided haul road and dump designs; heuristic long- and short-
of sublevel caving, block caving, open stoping and blasthole
term pit scheduling techniques; parametrization concepts;
stoping systems. Equipment selection, production scheduling,
mathematical optimization for sequencing and scheduling;
ventilation design, and mining costs. Prerequisites: MNGN314,
ore control and truck dispatching. Design procedures are il-
MNGN516, or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours
lustrated by case studies using various computer programs.
lab; 3 semester hours. Spring of odd years.
Prerequisite: MNGN308, MNGN312, or consent of instruc-
MNGN519. ADVANCED SURFACE COAL MINE DESIGN
tor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(II) Review of current manual and computer methods of re-
MNGN514. MINING ROBOTICS (I) Fundamentals of
serve estimation, mine design, equipment selection, and mine
robotics as applied to the mining industry. The focus is on
planning and scheduling. Course includes design of a surface
mobile robotic vehicles. Topics covered are mining applica-
coal mine for a given case study and comparison of manual and
tions, introduction and history of mobile robotics, sensors,
computer results. Prerequisite: MNGN312, 316, 427. 2 hours
including vision, problems of sensing variations in rock
lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours. Offered in odd years.
properties, problems of representing human knowledge in
MNGN520. ROCK MECHANICS IN UNDERGROUND
control systems, machine condition diagnostics, kinematics,
COAL MINING (I) Rock mechanics consideration in the de-
and path finding. Prerequisite: CSCI404 or consent of in-
sign of room-and-pillar, longwall, and shortwall coal mining
structor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in odd
systems. Evaluation of bump and outburst conditions and re-
years.
medial measures. Methane drainage systems. Surface subsi-
MNGN515. MINE MECHANIZATION AND AUTOMATION
dence evaluation. Prerequisite: MNGN321. 3 hours lecture;
This course will provide an in-depth study of the current state
3 semester hours. Offered in odd years.
of the art and future trends in mine mechanization and mine
MNGN422/522. FLOTATION Science and engineering gov-
automation systems for both surface and underground min-
erning the practice of mineral concentration by flotation.
ing, review the infrastructure required to support mine auto-
Interfacial phenomena, flotation reagents, mineral-reagent
mation, and analyze the potential economic and health and
interactions, and zeta-potential are covered. Flotation circuit
safety benefits. Prerequisite: MNGN312, MNGN314,
design and evaluation as well as tailings handling are also cov-
MNGN316, or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours
ered. The course also includes laboratory demonstrations of
lab; 3 semester hours. Fall of odd years.
some fundamental concepts. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MNGN516. UNDERGROUND MINE DESIGN Selection,
MNGN523. SELECTED TOPICS (I, II) Special topics in
design, and development of most suitable underground
mining engineering, incorporating lectures, laboratory work or
mining methods based upon the physical and the geological
independent study, depending on needs. This course may be
properties of mineral deposits (metallics and nonmetallics),
repeated for additional credit only if subject material is differ-
conservation considerations, and associated environmental
ent. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 2 to 4 semester hours.
impacts. Reserve estimates, development and production
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
planning, engineering drawings for development and extrac-
tion, underground haulage systems, and cost estimates. Pre-
MNGN525. INTRODUCTION TO NUMERICAL TECH-
requisite: MNGN210. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3
NIQUES IN ROCK MECHANICS (I) Principles of stress
semester hours.
and infinitesimal strain analysis are summarized, linear con-
stitutive laws and energy methods are reviewed. Continuous
MNGN517. ADVANCED UNDERGROUND MINING (II)
and laminated models of stratified rock masses are introduced.
Review and evaluation of new developments in advanced
The general concepts of the boundary element and finite
underground mining systems to achieve improved productiv-
element methods are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the
ity and reduced costs. The major topics covered include:
boundary element approach with displacement discontinui-
mechanical excavation techniques for mine development and
ties, because of its relevance to the modeling of the extrac-
production, new haulage and vertical conveyance systems,
tion of tabular mineral bodies and to the mobilization of
advanced ground support and roof control methods, mine
faults, joints, etc. Several practical problems, selected from
automation and monitoring, new mining systems and future
rock mechanics and subsidence engineering practices, are
trends in automated, high productivity mining schemes. Pre-
treated to demonstrate applications of the techniques. Prerequi-
requisite: Underground Mine Design (e.g., MNGN314).
site: MNGN321, EGGN320, or equivalent courses, MATH455
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Offered in even years.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
163

MNGN526. MODELING AND MEASURING IN GEOME-
of geostatistical modeling in mining. Prerequisite: MATH323
CHANICS (II) Introduction to instruments and instrumen-
or equivalent course in statistics; graduate or senior status.
tation systems used for making field measurements (stress,
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
convergence, deformation, load, etc.) in geomechanics. Tech-
MNGN539. ADVANCED MINING GEOSTATISTICS (II)
niques for determining rock mass strength and deformability.
Advanced study of the theory and application of geostatistics
Design of field measurement programs. Interpretation of field
in mining engineering. Presentation of state-of-the-art geo-
data. Development of predictive models using field data.
statistical concepts, including: robust estimation, nonlinear
Introduction to various numerical techniques (boundary ele-
geostatistics, disjunctive kriging, geostatistical simulation,
ment, finite element, FLAC, etc.) for modeling the behavior
computational aspects. This course includes presentations by
of rock structures. Demonstration of concepts using various
many guest lecturers from the mining industry. Emphasis on
case studies. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of
the development and application of advanced geostatistical
instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
techniques to difficult problems in the mining industry today.
Offered in odd years.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in odd years.
MNGN527. THEORY OF PLATES AND SHELLS Classical
MNGN545/445 ROCK SLOPE ENGINEERING Introduc-
methods for the analysis of stresses in plate type structure are
tion to the analysis and design of slopes excavated in rock.
presented first. The stiffness matrices for plate element will be
Rock mass classification and strength determinations, geo-
developed and used in the finite element method of analysis.
logical structural parameters, properties of fracture sets, data
Membrane and bending stresses in shells are derived. Appli-
collection techniques, hydrological factors, methods of
cation of the theory to tunnels, pipes, pressures vessels, and
analysis of slope stability, wedge intersections, monitoring
domes, etc., will be included. Prerequisites: EGGN320 or in-
and maintenance of final pit slopes, classification of slides.
structor’s consent. 3 hours lecture; 3 credit hours.
Deterministic and probabilistic approaches in slope design.
MNGN528. MINING GEOLOGY (I) Role of geology and
Remedial measures. Laboratory and field exercise in slope
the geologist in the development and production stages of
design. Collection of data and specimens in the field for
a mining operation. Topics addressed: mining operation
determining physical properties required for slope design.
sequence, mine mapping, drilling, sampling, reserve est-
Application of numerical modeling and analytical techniques
imation, economic evaluation, permitting, support functions.
to slope stability determinations for hard rock and soft rock
Field trips, mine mapping, data evaluation, exercises and
environments. Prerequisite: Instructor’s consent. 3 hours lec-
term project. Prerequisite: GEGN401 or GEGN405 or per-
ture. 3 hours semester hours.
mission of instructors. 2 hours lecture/seminar, 3 hours
MNGN549/EGES549. MARINE MINING SYSTEMS (I)
laboratory: 3 semester hours. Offered in even years.
Define interdisciplinary marine mining systems and opera-
MNGN530. INTRODUCTION TO MICRO COMPUTERS
tional requirements for the exploration survey, sea floor min-
IN MINING (I) General overview of the use of PC based
ing, hoisting, and transport. Describe and design components
micro computers and software applications in the mining
of deep-ocean, manganese-nodule mining systems and other
industry. Topics include the use of: database, CAD, spread-
marine mineral extraction methods. Analyze dynamics and
sheets, computer graphics, data acquisition, and remote com-
remote control of the marine mining systems interactions and
munications as applied in the mining industry. Prerequisite:
system components. Describe the current state-of-the-art tech-
Any course in computer programming. 2 hours lecture,
nology, operational practice, trade-offs of the system design
3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
and risk. Prerequisite: EGGN351, EGGN320, GEOC408 or
MNGN536. OPERATIONS RESEARCH TECHNIQUES IN
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
THE MINERAL INDUSTRY Analysis of exploration, min-
Offered alternate even years.
ing, and metallurgy systems using statistical analysis. Monte
MNGN559/EGES559. MECHANICS OF PARTICULATE
Carlo methods, simulation, linear programming, and computer
MEDIA (1) This course allows students to establish funda-
methods. Prerequisite: MNGN433 or consent of instructor.
mental knowledge of quasi-static and dynamic particle be-
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours. Offered in
havior that is beneficial to interdisciplinary material handling
even years.
processes in the chemical, civil, materials, metallurgy, geo-
MNGN538. GEOSTATISTICAL ORE RESERVE ESTIMA-
physics, physics, and mining engineering. Issues of interst
TION (I) Introduction to the application and theory of geo-
are the definition of particl size and size distribution, particle
statistics in the mining industry. Review of elementary
shape, nature of packing, quasi-static behavior under differ-
statistics and traditional ore reserve calculation techniques.
ent external loading, particle collisions, kinetic theoretical
Presentation of fundamental geostatistical concepts, includ-
modeling of particulate flows, molecular dynamic simula-
ing: variogram, estimation variance, block variance, kriging,
tions, and a brief introduction of solid-fluid two-phase flows.
geostatistical simulation. Emphasis on the practical aspects
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semes-
ter hours. Fall semesters, every other year.
164
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

MNGN550. NEW TECHNIQUES IN MINING (II) Review
MNGN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
of various experimental mining procedures, including a criti-
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
cal evaluation of their potential applications. Mining methods
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
covered include deep sea nodule mining, in situ gassification
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Indepen-
of coal, in situ retorting of oil shale, solution mining of solu-
dent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
ble minerals, in situ leaching of metals, geothermal power
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for
generation, oil mining, nuclear fragmentation, slope caving,
credit.
electro-thermal rock penetration and fragmentation. Prerequi-
MNGN625. GRADUATE MINING SEMINAR (I, II) Dis-
site: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. 3 hours lec-
cussions presented by graduate students, staff, and visiting
ture; 3 semester hours. Offered in even years.
lecturers on research and development topics of general in-
MNGN452/MNGN552. SOLUTION MINING AND PRO-
terest. Required of all graduate students in mining engineer-
CESSING OF ORES Theory and application of advanced
ing every semester during residence. 1 semester hour upon
methods of extracting and processing of minerals, under-
completion of thesis or residence.
ground or in situ, to recover solutions and concentrates of
MNGN698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MINING ENGINEERING
value-materials, by minimization of the traditional surface
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen
processing and disposal of tailings to minimize environmental
from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually
impacts. Prerequisites: Senior or graduate status; instructor’s
the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor con-
consent 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in spring.
sent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for
MNGN585. MINING ECONOMICS (I) Advanced study in
credit under different titles.
mine valuation with emphasis on revenue and cost aspects.
MNGN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual re-
Topics include price and contract consideration in coal, metal
search or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
and other commodities; mine capital and operating cost esti-
member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a sub-
mation and indexing; and other topics of current interest. Pre-
ject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Indepen-
requisite: MNGN427 or EBGN504 or equivalent. 3 hours
dent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in even years.
Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for
MNGN590. MECHANICAL EXCAVATION IN MINING
credit.
(II) This course provides a comprehensive review of the
MNGN700. GRADUATE ENGINEERING REPORT-
existing and emerging mechanical excavation technologies
MASTER OF ENGINEERING (I, II) Laboratory, field, and
for mine development and production in surface and under-
library work for the Master of Engineering report under
ground mining. The major topics covered in the course in-
supervision of the student’s advisory committee. Required of
clude: history and development of mechanical excavators,
candidates for the degree of Master of Engineering. Variable
theory and principles of mechanical rock fragmentation,
1 to 6 hours. Repeatable for credit to a maximum of 6 hours.
design and performance of rock cutting tools, design and
operational characteristics of mechanical excavators (e.g.
MNGN705 GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT: MASTER
continuous miners, roadheaders, tunnel boring machines,
OF SCIENCE Research credit hours required for completion
raise drills, shaft borers, impact miners, slotters), applications
of the degree Master of Science - thesis. Research must be
to mine development and production, performance prediction
carried out under the direct supervision of the graduate stu-
and geotechnical investigations, costs versus conventional
dent’s faculty advisor. Repeatable for credit.
methods, new mine designs for applying mechanical exca-
MNGN706 GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT: DOCTOR
vators, case histories, future trends and anticipated develop-
OF PHILOSOPHY Research credit hours required for com-
ments and novel rock fragmentation methods including water
pletion of the degree Doctor of Philosophy. Research must be
jets, lasers, microwaves, electron beams, penetrators, electri-
carried out under direct supervision of the graduate student’s
cal discharge and sonic rock breakers. Prerequisite: Senior or
faculty advisor. Repeatable for credit.
graduate status. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in
GOGN501. SITE INVESTIGATION AND CHARACTERI-
odd years.
ZATION An applications oriented course covering: geological
MNGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MINING ENGINEERING
data collection, geophysical methods for site investigation;
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen
hydrological data collection; materials properties determina-
from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually
tion; and various engineering classification systems. Presen-
the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor con-
tation of data in a format suitable for subsequent engineering
sent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for
design will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Introductory courses
credit under different titles.
in geology, rock mechanics, and soil mechanics. 3 hours lec-
ture; 3 semester hours.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
165

GOGN502. SOLID MECHANICS APPLIED TO ROCKS
GOGN506. EXCAVATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT
An introduction to the deformation and failure of rocks and
Normal project initiation, design procedures, project financ-
rock masses and to the flow of groundwater. Principles of
ing, permitting and environmental impacts, preparation of
displacement, strain and stress, together with the equations
plans and specifications, contract award, notice to proceed
of equilibrium are discussed. Elastic and plastic constitutive
and legal requirements. Construction alternatives, contract
laws, with and without time dependence, are introduced.
types, standard contract language, bidding and estimating
Concepts of strain hardening and softening are summarized.
and contract awarding procedures. Construction inspection
Energy principles, energy changes caused by underground
and control methods and completion procedures. Conflict
excavations, stable and unstable equilibria are defined. Fail-
resolution, administrative redress, arbitration and litigation.
ure criteria for intact rock and rock masses are explained.
Time and tonnage based incentive programs. The role of
Principles of numerical techniques are discussed and illus-
experts. Prerequisite: College-level in Microeconomics or
trated. Basic laws and modeling of groundwater flows are
Engineering Economy. Degree in Engineering. 2 hours lec-
introduced. Prerequisite: Introductory Rock Mechanics. 3
ture; 2 semester hours.
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
GOGN625. GEO-ENGINEERING SEMINAR Discussions
GOGN503. CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING
presented by graduate students, staff, and visiting lectures
LABORATORY An applications oriented course covering:
on research and development topics of general interest. Re-
Advanced rock testing procedures; dynamic rock properties
quired of all graduate students in Geo-Engineering every
determination; on-site measurements; and various rock mass
semester, during residence. Prerequisite: Enrollment in Geo-
modeling approaches. Presentation of data in a format suit-
Engineering Program. 1 semester hour upon completion of
able for subsequent engineering design will be emphasized.
thesis or residence.
Prerequisite: Introductory courses in geology, rock mechan-
ics, and soil mechanics. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
GOGN504. SURFACE STRUCTURES IN EARTH MATE-
RIALS Principles involved in the design and construction of
surface structures involving earth materials. Slopes and cuts.
Retaining walls. Tailing dams. Leach dumps. Foundations.
Piles and piers. Extensive use of case examples. Prerequi-
sites: GOGN501, GOGN502, GOGN503. 3 hours lecture;
3 semester hours.
GOGN505. UNDERGROUND EXCAVATION IN ROCK
Components of stress, stress distributions, underground
excavation failure mechanisms, optimum orientation and
shape of excavations, excavation stability, excavation support
design, ground treatment and rock pre-reinforcement, drill
and blast excavations, mechanical excavation, material
haulage, ventilation and power supply, labor requirements
and training, scheduling and costing of underground exca-
vations, and case histories. Prerequisites: GOGN501,
GOGN502, GOGN503. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
166
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

Nuclear Engineering
Department of Mining Engineering, the Department of
UWE GREIFE, Interim Academic Program Chair, Associate
Physics, the Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engi-
Professor Physics
neering, the Division of Environmental Science and Engi-
neering, and the Division of Liberal Arts and International
Department of Chemistry
Studies. While delivering a traditional Nuclear Engineering
JAMES F. RANVILLE, Associate Professor Chemistry and
course core, the School of Mines program for the Nuclear
Geochemistry
Engineering degree emphasizes the nuclear fuel life cycle.
Faculty bring to the program expertise in all aspects of the
Department of Engineering
nuclear fuel life cycle; fuel exploration and processing, nu-
TERRY PARKER, Professor and Division Director
MARK LUSK, Professor
clear power systems production, design and operation, fuel
KEVIN MOORE, Gerard August Dobelman Chair and Professor
recycling, storage and waste remediation, radiation detection
RAY ZHANG, Associate Professor
and radiation damage as well as the policy issues surround-
ing each of these activities. Related research is conducted in
Department of Environmental Science and Engineering
CSM's Nuclear Science and Engineering Center.
BRUCE D. HONEYMAN, Professor
For both the MS and PhD degrees, graduates of the Nu-
LINDA A. FIGUEROA, Associate Professor
JOHN R. SPEAR, Assistant Professor
clear Engineering program have been exposed to a broad sys-
ROBERT F. HOLUB, Research Professor
tems overview of the complete nuclear fuel cycle as well as
having detailed expertise in a particular component of the
Department of Geology and Geological Engineering
cycle. Breadth will be assured by requiring all students to
JOHN D. HUMPHREY, Associate Professor and Interim Department
complete a rigorous set of core courses. The core consists of
Head
a 21 credit-hour course sequence; initially delivered in part
SAMUEL B. ROMBERGER, Professor
by a collaborating institution through distance learning. The
remainder of the course and research work is obtained from
Department of Liberal Arts and International Studies
the multiple participating departments, as approved for each
CARL MITCHAM, Professor
student by the student's advisor and thesis committee.
Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
Combined Degree Program Option:
JOHN J. MOORE, Trustees Professor and Department Head
CSM undergraduate students have the opportunity to begin
STEPHEN LIU, Professor
work on a M.S. degree in Nuclear Engineering while com-
DAVID K. MATLOCK, Charles S. Fogarty Professor
pleting their Bachelor's degree. The CSM Combined Degree
BRAJENDRA MISHRA, Professor
Program provides the vehicle for students to use up to 6
DAVID L. OLSON, John H. Moore Distinguished Professor
credit hours of undergraduate coursework as part of their
IVAR E. REIMANIS, Professor
JOHN G. SPEER, Professor
Graduate Degree curriculum. For more information please
contact the Nuclear Engineering program director.
Department of Mining Engineering
Program Requirements:
TIBOR G. ROZGONYI, Professor and Department Head
M.S. Non-Thesis Option: 36 total credit hours, consisting
LEVENT OZDEMIR, Professor and Director of Earth Mechanics
of core coursework (21 h), seminar in a participating depart-
Institute
MARK KUCHTA, Associate Professor
ment (2h), additional elective courses (9 h) and Independent
Study (4 h) working on a research project with a faculty
Department of Physics
member working in nuclear science and engineering.
JAMES A. McNEIL, Professor and Department Head
M.S. Thesis Option: 36 total credit hours, consisting of
F. EDWARD CECIL, Professor Emeritus
core coursework (21 h), seminar in a participating depart-
FREDERIC SARAZIN, Assistant Professor
ment (2h) and research (13 h). Students must write and orally
Degrees Offered:
defend a research thesis.
Master of Science (Nuclear Engineering), Thesis option
Ph.D.: 72 total credit hours, consisting of coursework (21
h of core and at least 12 h electives), seminar in a participat-
Master of Science (Nuclear Engineering), Non-thesis option
ing department (4h) and research (at least 24 h).
Doctor of Philosophy (Nuclear Engineering)
Ph.D. students must also successfully complete the pro-
Program Description:
gram's quality control process (which includes a dissertation
The Nuclear Engineering program at the Colorado School
proposal and defense) as well as write and defend a doctoral
of Mines is interdisciplinary in nature and drawing substan-
dissertation. The quality of the research is expected to rise to
tial contributions from the Division of Engineering, the De-
the level where it can be submitted for publication in schol-
partment of Geology and Geological Engineering, the
arly journals.
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
167

Thesis Committee Requirements
Description of Courses
Students must meet the general requirements listed in the
Nuclear Engineering courses are taken from existing
Graduate Bulletin section Graduate Degrees and Require-
courses at CSM. In addition to the core courses listed above,
ments. In addition, the student's advisor or co-advisor must
the elective courses approved by the Nuclear Engineering
be an active faculty members of CSM's Nuclear Engineering
faculty can be viewed at
program. For M.S. thesis students, at least two, for doctoral
http://www.mines.edu/Academic/nuclear .
students, at least three committee members must be a faculty
member of the Nuclear Engineering program.
Prerequisites:
-baccalaureate degree in a science or engineering disci-
pline
-mathematics coursework up to and including differential
equations
-physics coursework up to and including courses in mod-
ern physics and introductory nuclear physics
-engineering thermodynamics, heat transfer and fluid flow
(or equivalent courses)
Note that some pre-requisites may be completed in the
first semesters of the graduate program after consultation
with the student's advisor.
Required Curriculum:
All degree offerings within the Nuclear Engineering pro-
gram are based on a set of required courses. These include
the following:
Introduction to Nuclear Reactor Physics (PHGN590)
Radiation Detection and Measurement (PHGN514 )
Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (EGES590)
Materials Science and Engineering of Nuclear Materials
(MTGN590)
Radioactive Materials Management (ESEG590 )
Reactor Design (provided through distance learning)
Public Policy and Licensing (LAIS590)
PhD and non-thesis MS students will specialize in a partic-
ular aspect of Nuclear Engineering under the guidance of a
student advisory committee by selecting additional course-
work beyond the required core. This additional coursework
may include offerings from all of the academic units partici-
pating in the degree program: Engineering, Environmental
Sciences and Engineering, Geology and Geological Engi-
neering, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Mining
Engineering and Physics. Through these additional courses,
students will gain in-depth knowledge of one particular facet
of the Nuclear Engineering industry.
Students in research-based degree programs, thesis-based
MS and PhD degrees, are required to complete the minimum
research credit hour requirements leading to dissertation and
defense. Research is conducted under the direction of a mem-
ber of CSM's Nuclear Science and Engineering program and
could be tied to a research opportunity provided by industry
partners.
168
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

Nuclear Science and Engineering
UWE GREIFE, Interim Academic Program Director, Associate 
Degrees Offered:
Professor Physics
Master of Science (Nuclear Engineering), Thesis option
JOHN J. MOORE, Interim Research Program Director, Trustees 
Master of Science (Nuclear Engineering), Non­thesis option
Professor and Department Head Metallurgical and Materials 
Doctor of Philosophy (Nuclear Engineering)
Engineering
KEVIN W. MANDERNACK, Associate Professor Chemistry and 
In addition, students majoring in allied fields may complete a 
Geochemistry
minor degree program, consisting of 12 credit hours of 
JAMES F. RANVILLE, Associate Professor Chemistry and 
coursework, through the Nuclear Science and Engineering 
Geochemistry
Program. Minor programs are designed to allow students in 
E. CRAIG SIMMONS, Associate Professor Chemistry and 
allied fields to acquire and then indicate, in a formal way, 
Geochemistry
specialization in a nuclear­related area of expertise.
TERRY PARKER, Professor and Division Director Engineering
KEVIN MOORE, Gerard August Dobelman Chair and Professor 
Program Description:
Engineering
The Nuclear Science and Engineering program at the Colorado 
MARK LUSK, Professor Engineering (and Physics)
School of Mines is interdisciplinary in nature and drawing 
RAY ZHANG, Associate Professor Engineering
substantial contributions from the Department of Chemistry, 
Division of Engineering, the Division of Environmental Science 
BRUCE D. HONEYMAN, Professor Environmental Science and 
and Engineering, the Department of Geology and Geological 
Engineering
Engineering, the Division of Liberal Arts and International 
LINDA A. FIGUEROA, Associate Professor Environmental Science 
Studies, the Department of Metallurgical and Materials 
and Engineering
JOHN R. SPEAR, Assistant Professor Environmental Science and 
Engineering, the Department of Mining Engineering, and the 
Engineering
Department of Physics. While delivering a traditional Nuclear 
Engineering course core, the School of Mines program in 
JOHN D. HUMPHREY, Associate Professor and Interim Department 
Nuclear Science and Engineering emphasizes the nuclear fuel 
Head Geology and Geological Engineering
life cycle. Faculty bring to the program expertise in all aspects 
SAMUEL B. ROMBERGER, Professor Geology and Geological 
of the nuclear fuel life cycle; fuel exploration and processing, 
Engineering
nuclear power systems production, design and operation, fuel 
recycling, storage and waste remediation, radiation detection 
CARL MITCHAM, Professor Liberal Arts and International Studies
JENNIFER SCHNEIDER, Assistant Professor Liberal Arts and 
and radiation damage as well as the policy issues surrounding 
International Studies
each of these activities. Related research is conducted in CSM’s 
Nuclear Science and Engineering Center.
STEPHEN LIU, Professor Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
BRAJENDRA MISHRA, Professor Metallurgical and Materials 
Nuclear Engineering Degree Options and Requirements
Engineering
For both the MS and PhD degrees, graduates in Nuclear 
DAVID K. MATLOCK, Charles S. Fogarty Professor Metallurgical and  Engineering are exposed to a broad systems overview of the 
Materials Engineering
complete nuclear fuel cycle as well as having detailed expertise 
DAVID L. OLSON, John H. Moore Distinguished Professor 
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
in a particular component of the cycle. Breadth is assured by 
IVAR E. REIMANIS, Professor Metallurgical and Materials 
requiring all students to complete a rigorous set of core courses. 
Engineering
The core consists of a 21 credit­hour course sequence. The 
JOHN G. SPEER,  Professor Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
remainder of the course and research work is obtained from the 
PATRICK R. TAYLOR, George S. Ansell Distinguished Professor of 
multiple participating departments, as approved for each student 
Chemical Metallurgy Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
by the student's advisor and thesis committee.
EDGAR E. VIDAL, Assistant Professor Metallurgical and Materials 
Engineering
Martin Mataya, Assistant Professor Metallurgical and Materials 
Combined Degree Program Option
Engineering
CSM undergraduate students have the opportunity to begin 
work on a M.S. degree in Nuclear Engineering while 
TIBOR G. ROZGONYI, Professor and Department Head Mining 
completing their Bachelor’s degree. The CSM Combined 
Engineering
Degree Program provides the vehicle for students to use up to 6 
LEVENT OZDEMIR, Professor and Director of Earth Mechanics 
credit hours of undergraduate coursework as part of their 
Institute Mining Engineering
Graduate Degree curriculum. For more information please 
MARK KUCHTA, Associate Professor Mining Engineering
contact the Nuclear Engineering program director.
JAMES A. McNEIL, Professor Physics
F. EDWARD CECIL, Professor Emeritus Physics
FREDERIC SARAZIN, Assistant Professor Physics
ROBERT F. HOLUB, Research Professor Physics
Program Requirements
Replacement Page
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bulletin
2007-2008

M.S. Non­Thesis Option: 36 total credit hours, consisting of 

Reactor Design
core coursework (21 h), seminar in a participating department 

Public Policy and Licensing (LAIS590)
(2h), additional elective courses (9 h) and Independent Study (4 
h) working on a research project with a faculty member working  As part of the Program's quality control process, PhD students 
in nuclear science and engineering.
need to achieve a 3.0 grade point average in the seven core 
courses or pass oral examinations in areas of weakness 
M.S. Thesis Option: 36 total credit hours, consisting of core 
identified by the student's Thesis Committee.
coursework (21 h), seminar in a participating department (2h) 
and research (13 h). Students must write and orally defend a 
PhD and non­thesis MS students will specialize in a particular 
research thesis. 
aspect of Nuclear Engineering under the guidance of a student 
advisory committee by selecting additional coursework beyond 
Ph.D.: 72 total credit hours, consisting of coursework (21 h of 
the required core. This additional coursework may include 
core and at least 12 h electives), seminar in a participating 
offerings from all of the academic units participating in the 
department (4h) and research (at least 24 h). 
degree program:  Engineering, Environmental Sciences and 
Engineering, Geology and Geological Engineering, Liberal Arts 
Ph.D. students must also successfully complete the program’s 
and International Studies, Metallurgical and Materials 
quality control process (which includes a dissertation proposal  Engineering, Mining Engineering and Physics. Through these 
and defense) as well as write and defend a doctoral dissertation.  additional courses, students gain in­depth knowledge of one 
The quality of the research is expected to rise to the level where  particular facet of the Nuclear Engineering industry.
it can be submitted for publication in scholarly journals.
Students in research­based degree programs, thesis­based MS 
Thesis Committee Requirements
and PhD degrees, are required to complete the minimum 
Students must meet the general requirements listed in the 
research credit hour requirements leading to dissertation and 
Graduate Bulletin section Graduate Degrees and Requirements.  defense. Research is conducted under the direction of a member 
In addition, the student’s advisor or co­advisor must be an active  of CSM’s Nuclear Science and Engineering program and could 
faculty member of CSM’s  Nuclear Science and Engineering 
be tied to a research opportunity provided by industry partners. 
program.  For M.S. thesis students, at least two, for doctoral 
students, at least three committee members must be faculty 
Minor Degree Programs
members of the Nuclear Science and Engineering program.
Students majoring in allied fields may choose to complete 
minor degree programs through the Nuclear Science and 
Prerequisites
Engineering Program indicating specialization in a nuclear­
-
baccalaureate degree in a science or engineering 
related area of expertise. Minor programs require completion of 
discipline
12 credit hours of approved coursework. Existing minors and 
-
mathematics coursework up to and including 
their requirements are as follows; 
differential equations
-
physics coursework up to and including courses in 
Nuclear Engineering
modern physics and introductory nuclear physics

Introduction to Nuclear Reactor Physics (PHGN590)
-
engineering thermodynamics, heat transfer and fluid 

Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (EGES590 – taught in 
flow or equivalent
collaboration with the USGS)

Reactor Design
Note that some pre­requisites may be completed in the first 

Either Public Policy and Licensing (LAIS590) or 
semesters of the graduate program after consultation with the 
Radioactive Materials Management (ESEG590)
student’s advisor.
Nuclear Materials Processing
Required Curriculum

Introduction to Nuclear Reactor Physics (PHGN590)
All degree offerings within the Nuclear Engineering program 
are based on a set of required core courses. These include the 

Materials Science and Engineering of Nuclear 
following: 
Materials (MTGN590)

Chemical Processing of Nuclear Materials 
(MTGN591 )

Introduction to Nuclear Reactor Physics (PHGN590)

Radioactive Materials Management (ESEG590 )

Radiation Detection and Measurement (PGHN504 )

Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (EGES590 – taught in 
Nuclear Detection
collaboration with the USGS)

Nuclear Physics (PHGN422)

Materials Science and Engineering of Nuclear 
Materials (MTGN590)

Introduction to Nuclear Reactor Physics (PHGN590)

Radiation Detection and Measurement (PHGN504)

Radioactive Materials Management (ESGN590 )
Replacement Page
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bulletin
2007-2008


Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (EGES590 – taught in 
collaboration with the USGS)
Nuclear Geoscience and Geoengineering

Nuclear Physics (PHGN422), plus three of the 
following five courses

Nuclear and Isotope Geochemistry

In­situ Mining

Uranium Mining

Uranium Geology and Geochemistry (GEGN520)

Design of Geologic Radioactive Waste Repositories 
(MNGN543)
Description of Courses
Nuclear Science and Engineering  courses are taken from 
existing courses at CSM.  In addition to the core courses listed 
above, the elective courses approved by the Nuclear Science and 
Engineering faculty can be viewed at 
http://www.mines.edu/Academic/nuclear .
Replacement Page
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bulletin
2007-2008

Petroleum Engineering
6 credit hours of undergraduate course credits upon approval
RAMONA M. GRAVES, Professor and Interim Department Head
of the department.
HOSSEIN KAZEMI, Chesebro Distinguished Professor
Doctor of Philosophy
ERDAL OZKAN, Professor
Minimum 90 credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree
CRAIG W. VAN KIRK, Professor
of which no less than 30 credit hours earned by research, or
ALFRED W. EUSTES III, Associate Professor
TURHAN YILDIZ, Associate Professor
minimum 54 credit hours beyond the Master’s degree of
JENNIFER L. MISKIMINS, Assistant Professor
which no less than 30 credit hours earned by research.
LINDA BATTALORA, Lecturer
Petroleum Engineering, Geology and Geological Engi-
MARK G. MILLER, Lecturer
neering, and the Geophysics Departments share oversight for
BILLY J. MITCHELL, Professor Emeritus
the Professional Masters in Petroleum Reservoir Systems
RICHARD CHRISTIANSON, Associate Professor Emeritus
program through a committee consisting of one faculty mem-
Degrees Offered:
ber from each department. Students gain admission to the
Professional Masters in Petroleum Reservoir Systems
program by application to any of the three sponsoring depart-
ments. Students are administered by that department into
Master of Engineering (Petroleum Engineering)
which they first matriculate. A minimum of 36 credit hours
Master of Science (Petroleum Engineering)
of course credit is required to complete the Professional
Doctor of Philosophy (Petroleum Engineering)
Masters in Petroleum Reservoir Systems program. Up to 9
credits may be earned by 400 level courses. All other credits
Program Description:
toward the degree must be 500 level or above. At least 9
The Petroleum Engineering Department offers students a
hours must consist of:
choice of a Master of Science (MS) degree or a Master of
Engineering (ME) degree. For the MS degree, a thesis is
1 course selected from the following:
required in addition to course work. For the ME degree, no
GEGN439/GPGN439/PEGN439 Multidisciplinary
thesis is required, but the course work requirement is greater
Petroleum Design
than that for the MS degree. After admission to the graduate
1 course selected from the following:
program, students may change from ME to MS, or vice
GPGN419/ PEGN419 Well Log Analysis and Formation
versa, according to their needs and interests with the ap-
Evaluation or
proval of the student’s advisor. The Petroleum Engineering
GPGN519/PEGN519 Advanced Formation Evaluation
Department also offers CSM undergraduate students the op-
1 courses selected from the following:
tion of a Combined Undergraduate/Graduate Program. This
GEGN503/GPGN503/PEGN503 Integrated Exploration
is an accelerated program that provides the opportunity to the
and Development or
CSM students to have a head start on graduate education.
GEGN504/GPGN504/PEGN504 Integrated Exploration
Applications from students having an ME or MS in Petro-
and Development
leum Engineering, or in another discipline, will be considered
Also 9 additional hours must consist of one course each
for admission to the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) program.
from the 3 participating departments. The remaining 18
To obtain the Ph.D. degree, a student must demonstrate un-
hours may consist of graduate courses from any of the 3
usual competence, creativity, and dedication in the degree
participating departments, or other courses approved by the
field. In addition to extensive course work, a dissertation is
committee. Up to 6 hours may consist of independent study,
required for the Ph.D. degree.
including an industry project.
Program Requirements:
Candidates for the non-thesis Master of Engineering
Professional Masters in Petroleum Reservoir Systems
degree must complete a minimum of 36 hours of graduate
Minimum 36 hours of course credit
course credit. At least 18 of the credit hours must be from the
Master of Engineering
Petroleum Engineering Department. Up to 12 graduate credit
Minimum 36 hours of course credit
hours can be transferred from another institution, and up to 9
credit hours of senior-level courses may be applied to the de-
Master of Science
gree. All courses must be approved by the student’s advisor.
Minimum 36 hours, of which no less than 12 credit hours
No graduate committee is required. No more than six credit
earned by research and 24 credit hours by course work
hours can be earned through independent study.
Combined Undergraduate/Graduate Program
Candidates for the Master of Science degree must complete
The same requirements as Master of Engineering after the
at least 24 graduate credit hours of course work, approved by
student is granted full graduate status. Students in the Com-
the candidate’s graduate committee, and a minimum of 12
bined Undergraduate/Graduate Program may fulfill part of
hours of research credit. At least 12 of the course credit hours
the requirements of their graduate degree by including up to
must be from the Petroleum Engineering Department. Up to
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
169

9 credit hours may be transferred from another institution.
Dismissal.” For other requirements, refer to the general di-
Up to 9 credit hours of senior-level courses may be applied
rections of the Graduate School in this bulletin.
to the degree. For the MS degree, the student must demon-
Applying for Admission:
strate ability to observe, analyze, and report original scien-
To apply for admission, follow the procedure outlined in
tific research. For other requirements, refer to the general
the general section of this bulletin. Three letters of recom-
instructions of the Graduate School in this bulletin.
mendation must accompany the application. The Petroleum
The requirements for the Combined Undergraduate/
Engineering Department requires the General test of the
Graduate Program are defined in the section of this Bul-
Graduate Record Examination (GRE). The applicants for the
letin titled “Graduate Degrees and Requirements—V. Com-
Master of Science and Master of Engineering programs are
bined Undergraduate/Graduate Programs.” After the student
required to have 700 or better and applicants for the Ph.D.
is granted full graduate status, the requirements are the same
program are expected to have 750 or better on the quantita-
as those for the non-thesis Master of Engineering degree. The
tive part of the GRE exam. The applicants whose native lan-
Combined Undergraduate/Graduate Program allows students
guage is not English are also expected to provide satisfactory
to fulfill part of the requirements of their graduate degree by
scores on the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language)
including up to 6 credit hours of their undergraduate course
exam as specified in the general section of this bulletin.
credits upon approval of the department. For other require-
ments, refer to the general directions of the Graduate School
Required Curriculum:
in this bulletin.
A student in the graduate program selects course work by
consultation with the Faculty Advisor and with the approval
A candidate for the Ph.D. must complete at least 60 hours
of the graduate committee. Course work is tailored to the
of course credit and a minimum of 30 credit hours of re-
needs and interests of the student.
search beyond the Bachelor’s degree or at least 24 hours of
course credit and a minimum of 30 credit hours of research
All PE graduate students are required to complete 3 credit
beyond the Master’s degree. The credit hours to be counted
hours of course work in writing, research, or presentation
toward a Ph.D. are dependent upon approval of the student’s
intensive classes, such as LICM501, LICM598, SYGN501,
thesis committee. Students who enter the Ph.D. program
and SYGN600, as agreed by their graduate advisor. Also,
with a Bachelor’s degree may transfer up to 33 graduate
students who do not have a BS degree in PE must take the
credit hours from another institution with the approval of the
deficiency courses as required by the department as soon as
graduate advisor. Students who enter the Ph.D. program with
possible in their graduate programs.
a master’s degree may transfer up to 45 credit hours of
Fields of Research:
course and research work from another institution upon ap-
Current research topics include
proval by the graduate advisor. Ph.D. students must complete
Rock and fluid properties, phase behavior, and rock
a minimum of 12 credit hours of their required course credit
mechanics
in a minor program of study. The student’s faculty advisor,
Analytical and numerical modeling of fluid flow in
thesis committee, and the department head must approve the
porous media
course selection. The Ph.D. students are also required to
Formation evaluation, well test analysis, and reservoir
demonstrate proficiency in a second language other than
characterization
English. Full-time Ph.D. students must satisfy the following
Oil recovery processes
requirements for admission to candidacy within the first two
Natural gas engineering, coalbed methane, and
calendar years after enrolling in the program:
geothermal energy
iii) have a thesis committee appointment form on file,
Completion and stimulation of wells
iii) complete all prerequisite and core courses success-
Horizontal and multilateral wells
fully,
Fluid flow in wellbores, and artificial lift
Drilling mechanics, directional drilling, extraterrestrial
iii) demonstrate adequate preparation for and satisfactory
drilling, ice coring and drilling
ability to conduct doctoral research by successfully
Bit vibration analysis, tubular buckling and stability,
completing a series of written and/or oral examina-
wave propagation in drilling tubulars
tions and fulfilling the other requirements of their
Laser technology in penetrating rocks
graduate committees.
Remediation of contaminated soils and aquifers
Failure to fulfill these requirements within the time limits
Economics and management
specified above may result in immediate mandatory dis-
Research projects may involve professors and graduate
missal from the Ph.D. program according to the procedure
students from other disciplines. Projects often include off-
outlined in the section of this Bulletin titled “General Regula-
campus laboratories, institutes, and other resources.
tions—Unsatisfactory Academic Performance—Unsatisfactory
Academic Progress Resulting in Probation or Discretionary
170
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008

The Petroleum Engineering Department houses two re-
take up to 9 credit hours of 400-level courses provided that
search centers and two consortia.
these courses are not required for the BS PE program at
Research Centers
CSM. The department should approve all such courses. The
following 400-level courses in the Petroleum Engineering
Marathon Center of Excellence for Reservoir Studies
Department are not required for BS PE degree and may be
(MCERS)
considered for graduate degree credit. Other 400-level
Center for Earth Mechanics, Materials, and
courses may be available in the other departments.
Characterization (EM2C).
PEGN428. ADVANCED DRILLING ENGINEERING (II)
Research Consortia
Rotary drilling systems with emphasis on design of drilling
Fracturing, Acidizing, Stimulation Technology (FAST)
programs, directional and horizontal well planning, bit selec-
Consortium.
tion, bottom hole assembly and drillstring design. This elec-
Marathon Center of Excellence for Reservoir Studies,
tive course is recommended for petroleum engineering
Multi-Scale Simulation Consortium
majors interested in drilling. Prerequisite: PEGN311,
PEGN361. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Special Features:
PEGN450. ENERGY ENGINEERING (I or II) Energy
In the exchange programs with the Petroleum Engineering
Engineering is an overview of energy sources that will be
Departments of the Mining University of Leoben, Austria,
available for use in the 21st century. After discussing the
Technical University in Delft, Holland, and the University of
history of energy and its contribution to society, we survey
Adelaide, Australia, a student may spend one semester abroad
the science and technology of energy, including geothermal
during graduate studies and receive full transfer of credit
energy, fossil energy, solar energy, nuclear energy, wind
back to CSM with prior approval of the Petroleum Engi-
energy, hydro energy, bio energy, energy and the environ-
neering Department at CSM.
ment, energy and economics, the hydrogen economy, and
The Petroleum Engineering Department is located in a
energy forecasts. This broad background will give you addi-
recently renovated structure in the foothills west of Denver.
tional flexibility during your career and help you thrive in an
The laboratory wing, completed in late 1993, has 20,000
energy industry that is evolving from an industry dominated
square feet of space, with about $2 million of equipment ac-
by fossil fuels to an industry working with many energy
quired in recent years.
sources. Prerequisite: MATH213, PHGN200. 3 hours lec-
The Petroleum Engineering Department enjoys strong
ture; 3 semester hours.
association with the Geology and Geophysics Departments at
PEGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS (I, II) Group or individual
CSM. Courses that integrate the faculty and interests of the
study of any topic in the field of, or closely related to petro-
three departments are taught at the undergraduate and gradu-
leum engineering. By consent of instructor. Hours per week
ate levels.
and credit to be determined at time of registration.
The department is close to oil and gas field operations, oil
Graduate Courses
companies and laboratories, and geologic outcrops of pro-
The 500-level courses are open to qualified seniors with
ducing formations. There are many opportunities for summer
permission of the department and the Dean of the Graduate
and part-time employment in the oil and gas industry in the
School. The 600-level courses are open only to students en-
Denver metropolitan region.
rolled in Graduate School. Certain courses may vary from
Each summer, some graduate students assist with the field
year to year, depending upon the number of students and
sessions for undergraduate students. In the past, the field ses-
their particular needs.
sion students have visited oil and gas operations in Europe,
PEGN501. APPLICATIONS OF NUMERICAL METHODS
Alaska, Canada, Southern California, the Gulf Coast, and
TO PETROLEUM ENGINEERING The course will solve
western Colorado.
problems of interest in Petroleum Engineering through the
The Petroleum Engineering Department encourages student
use of spreadsheets on personal computers and structured
involvement with the Society of Petroleum Engineers and the
FORTRAN programming on PCs or mainframes. Numerical
American Association of Drilling Engineers. The department
techniques will include methods for numerical quadrature,
provides financial support for students attending the SPE
differentiation, interpolation, solution of linear and non-
Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition.
linear ordinary differential equations, curve fitting and direct
or iterative methods for solving simultaneous equations. Pre-
Description of Courses
requisites: PEGN414 and PEGN424 or consent of instructor.
Undergraduate Courses
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Students in Professional Masters in Petroleum Reservoir
Systems, Master of Engineering, Master of Science, and
PEGN502. ADVANCED DRILLING FLUIDS The physical
Combined Undergraduate/Graduate Degree programs may
properties and purpose of drilling fluids are investigated.
Emphasis is placed on drilling fluid design, clay chemistry,
Colorado School of Mines
Graduate Bulletin
2007–2008
171

design, and testing; and solids control. Prerequisite: PEGN311
rock properties, subsidence, reservoir compaction, and sand
or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 se-
control. Prerequisite: PEGN423 and PEGN426 or consent of
mester hours.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester