Annette Bunge

INVITED PRESENTATIONS (since 2000)

  1. Bioavailability and bioequivalence assessment of topical skin products by measuring drug in tape stripped skin: An update, Skin Forum, 11th Annual Meeting, Edinburgh, Scotland, July 6-7, 2010.

  2. Chemical absorption into skin: Interplay of thermodynamics, chemical structure and the skin barrier, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden, December 18, 2008.

  3. Opportunities to improve the dermatopharmacokinetic approach to topical bioequivalence determination, Symposium on Bioavailability-Bioequivalence of Topical Products, 11th International Conference, Perspectives in Percutaneous Penetration (PPP) 2008, March 25-29, 2008.

  4. Skin delivery of drugs: Basic principles. 6th International Congress of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ribeirão Preto, Sao Paolo, Brazil, September 2-5, 2007

  5. Skin exposure to chemically contaminated soils. Trailblazing the Skin Frontier. The George Washington University, August 11-13, 2007.

  6. Interplay of formulation thermodynamics, solute structure, and the skin barrier. Gordon Research Conference, Barrier Function of Mammalian Skin, Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island, August 5-10, 2007.

  7. Dermatopharmacokinetics (DPK): Improving the tape stripping method for assessing bioequivalence (BE) of topical dermatological products. Therapeutic Research Unit, School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Buranda, Queensland, Australia, December 7, 2006.

  8. Skin permeation and thermodynamic activity: Why higher concentrations don’t always produce higher permeation. Therapeutic Research Unit, School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Buranda, Queensland, Australia, December 7, 2006.

  9. Skin exposure to chemicals: The effect of vehicle and why concentration might not be a good indicator of skin permeation. Keynote Presentation (1 of 7 Keynote talks at conference). Australian Institute of Occupational Hygienists (AIOH) 24th Annual Conference, Surfers Paradise, Queensland, December 6, 2006. 

  10. Estimating the potential risk from skin exposure to chemicals (Invited short course, CES 10). Australian Institute of Occupational Hygienists (AIOH) 24th Annual Conference, Surfers Paradise, Queensland, December 3, 2006. (1/2 day course) 

  11. Barrier membranes for packaging. Invited tutorial on membranes. American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA, November 13, 2006. 

  12. Mathematically modeling dermal absorption to predict drug efficacy and safety. Pfizer Global Research & Development, Ann Arbor, MI, September 27, 2006.

  13. Skin permeation and thermodynamic activity: Why higher concentrations don’t always produce higher permeation. Altea Therapeutics, Tucker, GA, July 14, 2006.

  14. Why skin permeation data from neat and aqueous solutions of 2-butoxyethanol are not surprising. 10th International Perspectives in Percutaneous Penetration Conference, La Grande Motte, France, April 18-22, 2006.

  15. Mathematically modeling skin to predict chemical penetration. Vanderbilt University, Department of Chemical Engineering, October 17, 2005.

  16. Dermal exposure to soils and solvent deposited solids. Is absorption proportional to the exposed dose? Global Net on Consumer Exposure Modeling-Workshops on Framework/Policy and Research/Science Major Issues, Workshop I, Dermal Transfer and Penetration Algorithms, Intra/Verbania, Italy, June 20-21, 2005.

  17. Modeling percutaneous penetration. Occupational and Environmental Exposures of Skin to Chemicals (OEESC)-2005, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden, June 12-15, 2005.

  18. Estimating human health risk from dermal exposure to contaminated soils. U.S. EPA 2004 Science to Achieve Results (STAR) Progress Review Workshop – Human Health Symposium, Philadelphia, PA, October 28-29, 2004.
     
  19. Estimating dermal absorption from contaminated soils: It’s a dirty job. University of Wyoming, Departments of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering and Mechanical Engineering, March 29, 2004.

  20. Estimating dermal absorption from contaminated soils: It’s a dirty job. Colorado State University, Department of Chemical Engineering, March 26, 2004.

  21. Mathematical modeling of dermal risk factors, American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) Annual Meeting, Salt Lake City, UT, October 30, 2003.

  22. Dermatopharmacokinetics: Improvement of methodology for assessing bioequivalence of topical products, Food and Drug Administration, Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Sciences (ACPS), Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER), Public Advisory Meeting, Rockville, MD, October 22, 2003. (PresentationTranscript)

  23. Drug delivery. Gordon Research Conference, Barrier Function of Mammalian Epidermis, William Rogers University, Bristol, RI, August 6, 2003.

  24. Estimating dermal absorption from water, soil and sediments: What do we know now? U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), CERCLA (Superfund), Crystal City, VA, July 17, 2003.

  25. Estimating health risk from skin exposure to toxic chemicals: What do we know? What do we still need to know? U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Center for Exposure Assessment (NCEA), Washington, DC, July 17, 2003.

  26. Mathematically modelling skin to predict chemical penetration, A.L. Bunge, Skin Forum 2003, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, England, July 4, 2003.

  27. A new look at the membrane that surrounds us. Gordon Research Conference, Membranes: Materials and Process, Colby-Sawyer College, New London, NH, August 6, 2002.

  28. Modelling dermal absorption of chemicals, Chemical Engineering Department, University of Leeds, June 13, 2002.

  29. Physical and structure activity models of dermal absorption, Lhasa Limited, School of Chemistry, University of Leeds, June 6, 2002.

  30. Do solid chemicals absorb into skin? School of Pharmacy, University of Bradford, May 29, 2002.

  31. Modelling approaches to prediction of dermal absorption: Examples from the dermal absorption of pesticides, Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, The Medical School, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, May 22, 2002.

  32. Structure activity relationships for estimating dermal absorption of pesticides in rats, Health and Safety Laboratory, Sheffield, May 15, 2002.

  33. Does desquamation reduce permeation? Perspectives in Percutaneous Penetration (PPP), 8th International Conference, Antibes Juan-Les Pins, France, April 5, 2002.

  34. Does surface distribution of solid chemicals affect dermal absorption? Gordon Research Conference, Barrier Function of Mammalian Epidermis, Bristol, RI, August 5-10, 2001.

  35. Dermal absorption of chemicals: What does it take to get under your skin? Soft Condensed Matter Research Center, University of Colorado, April 6, 2001.

  36. What does it take to get under your skin? Math and Computer Science Department, CSM, March 20, 2001.

  37. Estimating dermal absorption of pesticides and other organic chemicals: Successes and limitations. The Practical Applicability of Toxicokinetic Models in the Risk Assessment of Chemicals, The Hague, The Netherlands, February 17, 2000.

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