Colorado Mines

Colorado School of Mines

MEGN 330

 

Introduction to Biomechanical Engineering

Fall 2016

Joel M. Bach, Ph.D.

Course Information

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:30-1:45pm

Hill Hall 202

The application of mechanical engineering principles and techniques to the human body presents many unique challenges.  The discipline of Biomedical Engineering has evolved over the past 50 years to address these challenges.  Biomedical Engineering is a diverse, seemingly all-encompassing field that includes such areas as biomechanics, biomaterials, bioinstrumentation, medical imaging, rehabilitation engineering, biosensors, biotechnology, and tissue engineering.

Although it is not possible to cover all the Biomechanical Engineering domains in any detail in a single course, this class will focus on many of the major fields of activity in which biomechanical engineers are engaged.  This course is intended to introduce the student to the field and to provide as a starting point for further study into the specific areas of Biomechanical Engineering.  The topics to be covered will include:

Anatomy and Physiology

Bioelectric Phenomenon

Biomechanical Sensors

Bioinstrumentation

Biosignal Processing

Biomechanics

Biomaterials

Human Motion

Tissue Engineering

Imaging Techniques

Rehabilitation Engineering

For additional information contact Dr. Bach at jmbach@mines.edu or 303-384-2161

 

Description from the course catalog

MEGN330. INTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICAL ENGINEERING (I) The application of mechanical engineering principles and techniques to the human body presents many unique challenges. The discipline of Biomedical Engineering (more specifically, Biomechanical Engineering) has evolved over the past 50 years to address these challenges. Biomechanical Engineering includes such areas as biomechanics, biomaterials, bioinstrumentation, medical imaging, and rehabilitation. This course is intended to provide an introduction to, and overview of, Biomechanical Engineering and to prepare the student for more advanced Biomechanical coursework. At the end of the semester, students should have a working knowledge of the special considerations necessary to apply various mechanical engineering principles to the human body. Prerequisites: CEEN311, PHGN200.  Co-requisites: MEGN315.  3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.