Table of Contents
Directory of the School ................................................................ 152
Board of Trustees .................................................................. 152
Home ................................................................................................ 2
Emeritus Members of BOT .................................................... 153
Graduate .......................................................................................... 3
Administration Executive Staff ............................................... 154
Academic Calendar ................................................................... 4
Emeriti ................................................................................... 157
General Information ................................................................... 5
Professors ............................................................................. 161
The Graduate School ................................................................ 7
Associate Professors ............................................................. 164
Admission to the Graduate School ............................................ 8
Assistant Professors .............................................................. 166
Student Life at CSM ................................................................ 10
Teaching Professors .............................................................. 168
Registration and Tuition Classification .................................... 15
Teaching Associate Professor ............................................... 169
Academic Regulations ............................................................. 20
Teaching Assistant Professors .............................................. 170
Tuition, Fees, Financial Assistance ......................................... 27
Library Faculty ....................................................................... 171
Graduate Departments and Programs .................................... 29
Coaches/Athletics Faculty ..................................................... 172
College of Engineering & Computational Sciences ........... 36
Index ............................................................................................ 173
Applied Mathematics & Statistics ............................... 36
Civil & Environmental Engineering ............................. 40
Electrical Engineering & Computer Science ............... 49
Engineering Systems ................................................. 58
Mechanical Engineering ............................................. 60
Earth Sciences and Engineering ...................................... 65
Economics and Business ........................................... 65
Geology and Geological Engineering ......................... 74
Geophysics ................................................................ 85
Liberal Arts and International Studies ........................ 92
Mining Engineering .................................................... 97
Petroleum Engineering ............................................. 103
Applied Sciences and Engineering ................................. 110
Chemical and Biological Engineering ....................... 110
Chemistry and Geochemistry ................................... 115
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering ................... 120
Physics ..................................................................... 128
Interdisciplinary Programs .............................................. 131
Geochemistry ........................................................... 131
Hydrologic Science and Engineering ....................... 134
Interdisciplinary ........................................................ 136
Materials Science ..................................................... 139
Nuclear Engineering ................................................. 145
Policies and Procedures ........................................................ 148

2 Home
Colorado School of Mines Bulletin
Mission and Goals
Colorado School of Mines is a public research university devoted to
engineering and applied science related to resources. It is one of the
leading institutions in the nation and the world in these areas. It has the
highest admission standards of any university in Colorado and among
the highest of any public university in the U.S. CSM has dedicated itself
to responsible stewardship of the earth and its resources. It is one of
a very few institutions in the world having broad expertise in resource
exploration, extraction, production and utilization which can be brought to
bear on the world’s pressing resource-related environmental problems.
As such, it occupies a unique position among the world’s institutions of
higher education.
The school’s role and mission has remained constant and is written
in the Colorado statutes as: The Colorado School of Mines shall be a
specialized baccalaureate and graduate research institution with high
admission standards. The Colorado School of Mines shall have a unique
mission in energy, mineral, and materials science and engineering
and associated engineering and science fields. The school shall be
the primary institution of higher education offering energy, mineral
and materials science and mineral engineering degrees at both the
graduate and undergraduate levels. (Colorado revised Statutes, Section
23-41-105)
Throughout the school’s history, the translation of its mission into
educational programs has been influenced by the needs of society.
Those needs are now focused more clearly than ever before. We believe
that the world faces a crisis in balancing resource availability with
environmental protection and that CSM and its programs are central to
the solution to that crisis. Therefore the school’s mission is elaborated
upon as follows:
Colorado School of Mines is dedicated to educating students and
professionals in the applied sciences, engineering, and associated fields
related to
the discovery and recovery of the Earth’s resources
their conversion to materials and energy
their utilization in advanced processes and products
the economic and social systems necessary to ensure their prudent
and provident use in a sustainable global society
This mission will be achieved by the creation, integration, and exchange
of knowledge in engineering, the natural sciences, the social sciences,
the humanities, business and their union to create processes and
products to enhance the quality of life of the world’s inhabitants.
The Colorado School of Mines is consequently committed to serving the
people of Colorado, the nation, and the global community by promoting
stewardship of the Earth upon which all life and development depend.
(Colorado School of Mines Board of Trustees, 2000)

Colorado School of Mines 3
Graduate
To Mines Graduate Students:
This Bulletin is for your use as a source of continuing reference. Please
save it.
Published by:
Colorado School of Mines,
Golden, CO 80401
Address correspondence to:
Office of Graduate Studies
Colorado School of Mines
1500 Illinois Street
Golden, CO 80401-1887
Main Telephone: 303-273-3247
Toll Free: 800-446-9488
http://gradschool.mines.edu/GS-Graduate-Office-Staff

4 Graduate
Academic Calendar
Last day to withdraw from
April 9
Tuesday
a course—Continuing
Fall Semester 2012
students
E-Days
April 4-6
Thursday-Saturday
Description
Date(s)
Day(s) of Week
Priority Registration,
April 8-12
Monday-Friday
Confirmation deadline
Aug. 20
Monday
Summer and Fall Terms
Faculty Conference
Aug. 20
Monday
Engineering Exam
April 13
Saturday
Classes start (1)
Aug. 21
Tuesday
Last day to withdraw from
April 26
Friday
Graduate Students—last
Aug. 24
Friday
a course—New students in
day to register without late
1st or 2nd semester at CSM
fee
Last day to completely
May 2
Thursday
Labor Day (Classes held)
Sept. 3
Monday
withdraw from CSM
Last day to register, add
Sept. 5
Wednesday
Classes end
May 2
Thursday
or drop courses without a
Dead Week - no exams
April 29 - May 3
Monday - Friday
“W” (Census Day)New Row
Dead Day - no academic
May 3
Friday
Fall Break
Oct. 15 & 16
Monday & Tuesday
activities
Midterm grades due
Oct. 15
Monday
Final exams
May 4, 6-9
Saturday, Monday-
Last day to withdraw from
Nov. 13
Tuesday
Thursday
a course—Continuing
Semester ends
May 10
Friday
students
Commencement
May 10
Friday
Priority Registration Spring
Nov. 12-16
Monday-Friday
Final grades due
May 13
Monday
Semester
Non-class day prior to
Nov. 21
Wednesday
Summer Sessions 2013
Thanksgiving Break
Description
Date(s)
Day(s) of Week
Thanksgiving Break
Nov. 22 - Nov. 23
Thursday-Friday
Summer I - First Day of
May 13
Monday
Last day to withdraw from
Nov. 30
Friday
Class (1)
a course—New students in
Summer I (Census Day)
May 17
Friday
1st or 2nd semester at CSM
Memorial Day (Holiday—No May 27
Monday
Last day to completely
Dec. 6
Thursday
classes held)
withdraw from CSM
Last day to withdraw
June 7
Friday
Classes end
Dec. 6
Thursday
from Summer I Term (all
Dead Week - no exams
Dec. 3 - Dec. 7
Monday-Friday
students)
Dead Day - no academic
Dec. 7
Friday
Summer I ends
June 21
Friday
activities
Summer I grades due
June 24
Monday
Final exams
Dec. 8, 10-13
Saturday, Monday-
Summer II First Day of
June 24
Monday
Thursday
Class (1)
Semester ends
Dec. 14
Friday
Summer II Census Day
June 28
Friday
Midyear Degree
Dec. 14
Friday
Independence Day (Holiday July 4
Thursday
Convocation
—No classes held)
Final grades due
Dec. 17
Monday
Last day to withdraw
July 19
Friday
Winter Recess
Dec. 15 - Jan 8
Saturday-Tuesday
from Summer II Term (all
Spring Semester 2013
students)
Summer II ends (2)
Aug. 2
Friday
Description
Date(s)
Day(s) of Week
Summer II grades due
Aug. 5
Monday
Confirmation deadline
Jan. 8
Tuesday
Classes start (1)
Jan. 9
Wednesday
1
Petition for changes in tuition classification due in the Registrar’s
office for this term.
Grad Students—last day to
Jan. 11
Friday
register without late fee
2
PHGN courses end two weeks later on Friday, August 16th.
Last day to register, add
Jan. 24
Thursday
or drop courses without a
“W” (Census Day)
Non-class day - Presidents’ Feb. 18
Monday
Day
Midterms grades due
March 4
Monday
Spring Break
March 11-15
Monday-Friday

Colorado School of Mines 5
General Information
Institutional Student Outcomes:
1. Demonstrate of exemplary disciplinary expertise.
Institutional Values and Principles
2. Demonstration of the ability to assimilate and assess scholarship
Graduate Education
and then apply it in creative and productive ways.
3. Demonstration of a set of professional skills (e.g., oral and written
The Colorado School of Mines is dedicated to serving the people
communication, time-management, project planning, teaching,
of Colorado, the nation and the global community by providing high
teamwork and team leadership, cross-cultural and diversity
quality educational and research experiences to students in science,
awareness, etc.) necessary to succeed in a student’s chosen career
engineering and related areas that support the institutional mission.
path.
Recognizing the importance of responsible earth stewardship, Mines
places particular emphasis on those fields related to the discovery,
*Draft of Institutional Objectives and Student Learning Outcomes to be
production and utilization of resources needed to improve the quality
vetted by the academic community Fall, 2012 as part of the ongoing HLC
of life of the world’s inhabitants and to sustain the earth system upon
Quality Initiative.
which all life and development depend. To this end, Mines is devoted to
creating a learning community that provides students with perspectives
Research
informed by the humanities and social sciences, perspectives that
The creation and dissemination of new knowledge are primary
also enhance students’ understanding of themselves and their role in
responsibilities of all members of the university community and
contemporary society. Mines therefore seeks to instill in all graduate
fundamental to the educational and societal missions of the institution.
students a broad class of developmental and educational attributes that
Public institutions have an additional responsibility to use that knowledge
are guided by a set of institutionally vetted educational objectives and
to contribute to the economic growth and public welfare of the society
student learning outcomes. For doctoral and masters degree programs,
from which they receive their charter and support. As a public institution
these are summarized below.
of higher education, a fundamental responsibility of Mines is to provide an
environment that enables contribution to the public good by encouraging
Doctoral Programs
creative research and ensuring the free exchange of ideas, information,
Institutional Educational Objectives:
and results. To this end, the institution acknowledges the following
1. PhD graduates will advance the state of the art of their discipline
responsibilities:
(integrating existing knowledge and creating new knowledge)
• To insure that these activities are conducted in an environment of
by conducting independent research that addresses relevant
minimum influence and bias, it is essential that Mines protect the
disciplinary issues and by disseminating their research results to
academic freedom of all members of its community.
appropriate target audiences.
• To provide the mechanisms for creation and dissemination of
2. PhD graduates will be scholars and international leaders who
knowledge, the institution recognizes that access to information and
exhibit the highest standards of integrity.
information technology (e.g. library, computing and internet resources)
3. PhD graduates will advance in their professions and assume
are part of the basic infrastructure support to which every member of
leadership positions in industry, government and academia.
the community is entitled.
• To promote the utilization and application of knowledge, it is incumbent
Institutional Student Outcomes:
upon Mines to define and protect the intellectual-property rights and
1. Demonstration of exemplary disciplinary expertise.
responsibilities of faculty members, students, as well as the institution.
2. Demonstration of a set of skills and attitudes usually associated
• To insure integration of research activities into its basic educational
with our understanding of what it is to be an academic scholar (e.g.,
mission, its research policies and practices conform to the state non-
intellectual curiosity, intellectual integrity, ability to think critically
competition law requiring all research projects have an educational
and argue persuasively, the exercise of intellectual independence, a
component through the involvement of students and/or post-doctoral
passion for life-long learning, etc.).
fellows.
3. Demonstration of a set of professional skills (e.g., oral and written
communication, time-management, project planning, teaching,
Intellectual Property
teamwork and team leadership, cross-cultural and diversity
The creation and dissemination of knowledge are primary responsibilities
awareness, etc.) necessary to succeed in a student’s chosen career
of all members of the university community. As an institution of higher
path.
education, a fundamental mission of Mines is to provide an environment
that motivates the faculty and promotes the creation, dissemination, and
Masters Programs*
application of knowledge through the timely and free exchange of ideas,
Institutional Educational Objectives:
information, and research results for the public good. To insure that
these activities are conducted in an environment of minimum influence
1. Masters graduates will contribute to the advancement of their
and bias, so as to benefit society and the people of Colorado, it is
chosen fields through adopting, applying and evaluating state-of-
essential that Mines protect the academic freedom of all members of its
the-art practices.
community. It is incumbent upon Mines to help promote the utilization
2. Masters graduates will be viewed within their organizations as
and application of knowledge by defining and protecting the rights and
technologically advanced and abreast of the latest scholarship.
responsibilities of faculty members, students and the institution, with
3. Masters graduates will exhibit the highest standards of integrity in
respect to intellectual property which may be created while an individual
applying scholarship.
is employed as a faculty member or enrolled as a student.
4. Masters graduates will advance in their professions.

6 Graduate
History of Colorado School of Mines
loan programs; athletic or other school-administered programs; or
employment.
In 1865, only six years after gold and silver were discovered in the
Colorado Territory, the fledgling mining industry was in trouble. The
Inquiries, concerns, or complaints should be directed by subject content
nuggets had been picked out of streams and the rich veins had been
as follows:
worked, and new methods of exploration, mining, and recovery were
The Employment-related EEO and discrimination contact is:
needed.
Mike Dougherty, Associate Vice President for Human Resources
Early pioneers like W.A.H. Loveland, E.L. Berthoud, Arthur Lakes,
Guggenheim Hall, Room 110
George West and Episcopal Bishop George M. Randall proposed a
Golden, Colorado 80401
school of mines. In 1874 the Territorial Legislature appropriated $5,000
(Telephone: 303.273.3250)
and commissioned Loveland and a Board of Trustees to found the
The ADA Coordinator and the Section 504 Coordinator for employment
Territorial School of Mines in or near Golden. Governor Routt signed the
is:
Bill on February 9, 1874, and when Colorado became a state in 1876,
Ann Hix, Benefits Manager, Human Resources
the Colorado School of Mines was constitutionally established. The first
Guggenheim Hall, Room 110
diploma was awarded in 1883.
Golden, Colorado 80401
As Mines grew, its mission expanded from the rather narrow initial
(Telephone: 303.273.3250)
focus on nonfuel minerals to programs in petroleum production and
The ADA Coordinator and the Section 504 Coordinator for students and
refining as well. Recently it has added programs in materials science
academic educational programs is:
and engineering, energy and environmental engineering, and a broad
Ron Brummett, Director of Career Planning & Placement / Student
range of other engineering and applied science disciplines. Mines sees
Development Services
its mission as education and research in engineering and applied science
1600 Maple Street, Suite 8
with a special focus on the earth science disciplines in the context of
Golden, Colorado 80401
responsible stewardship of the earth and its resources.
(Telephone: 303.273.3297)
Mines long has had an international reputation. Students have come
The Title IX Coordinator is:
from nearly every nation, and alumni can be found in every corner of the
Maureen Durkin, Director of Policy and Planning
globe.
Guggenheim Hall, Room 212A
Location
Golden, Colorado 80401
(Telephone: 303.384.2236)
Golden, Colorado, has always been the home of Mines. Located
in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains 20 minutes west of Denver,
The ADA Facilities Access Coordinator is:
this community of 15,000 also serves as home to the Coors Brewing
Gary Bowersock, Director of Facilities Management
Company, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and a major U.S.
1318 Maple Street
Geological Survey facility that also contains the National Earthquake
Golden, Colorado 80401
Center. The seat of government for Jefferson County, Golden once
(Telephone: 303.273.3330)
served as the territorial capital of Colorado. Skiing is an hour away to the
west.
Administration
By State statute, the school is managed by a seven-member board
of trustees appointed by the governor, and the student and faculty
bodies elect one nonvoting board member each The school is supported
financially by student tuition and fees and by the State through annual
appropriations. These funds are augmented by government and privately
sponsored research, and private gift support from alumni, corporations,
foundations and other friends.
Colorado School of Mines Non-
Discrimination Statement
In compliance with federal law, including the provisions of Titles VI and
VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendment
of 1972, Sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, the ADA Amendments Act
of 2008, Executive Order 11246, the Uniformed Services Employment
and Reemployment Rights Act, as amended, the Genetic Information
Nondiscrimination Act of 2008, and Board of Trustees Policy 10.6, the
Colorado School of Mines does not discriminate against individuals
on the basis of age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender
expression, race, religion, ethnicity, national origin, disability, military
service, or genetic information in its administration of educational
policies, programs, or activities; admissions policies; scholarship and

Colorado School of Mines 7
The Graduate School
Degree Programs
Prof.
M.S.
M.E.
Ph.D.
Applied Mathematics and Statistics
x
x
http://gradschool.mines.edu
Applied Physics
x
x
Unique Programs
Chemical Engineering
x
x
Chemistry
x
Because of its special focus, Colorado School of Mines has unique
programs in many fields. For example, Mines is the only institution in
Applied Chemistry
x
the world that offers doctoral programs in all five of the major earth
Civil & Environmental Engineering
x
x
science disciplines: Geology and Geological Engineering, Geophysics,
Computer Sciences
x
x
Geochemistry, Mining Engineering, and Petroleum Engineering. It also
Electrical Engineering
x
x
has one of the few Metallurgical and Materials Engineering programs in
Engineering Systems
x
x
the country that still focuses on the complete materials cycle from mineral
Engineering & Technology Management
x
processing to finished advanced materials.
Environmental Geochemistry
x
In addition to the traditional programs defining the institutional focus,
Environmental Engineering & Science
x
x
Mines is pioneering both undergraduate and graduate interdisciplinary
programs. The School understands that solutions to the complex
Geochemistry
x
x
problems involving global processes and quality of life issues require
Geological Engineering
x
x
x
cooperation among scientists, engineers, economists, and the
Geology
x
x
humanities.
Geophysical Engineering
x
x
Mines offers interdisciplinary programs in areas such as materials
Geophysics
x
x
science, hydrology, nuclear engineering and geochemistry. These
Hydrology
x
x
programs make interdisciplinary connections between traditional fields of
International Political Economy &
x*
engineering, physical science and social science, emphasizing a broad
Resources
exposure to fundamental principles while cross-linking information from
Materials Science
x
x
traditional disciplines to create the insight needed for breakthroughs
in the solution of modern problems. Additional interdisciplinary degree
Mechanical Engineering
x
x
programs may be created by Mines’ faculty as need arises and offered
Metallurgical & Materials Engineering
x
x
x
with the degree title "Interdisciplinary". Currently, one additional
Mineral & Energy Economics
x
x
interdisciplinary degree is offered through this program. It is a specialty
Mineral Exploration
x
offering in operations research with engineering.
Mining & Earth Systems Engineering
x
x
x
Lastly, Mines offers a variety of non-thesis Professional Master degrees
Nuclear Engineering
x
x
to meet the career needs of working professionals in Mines’ focus areas.
Operations Research with Engineering**
x
Graduate Degrees Offered
Petroleum Engineering
x
x
x
Petroleum Reservoir Systems
x
Mines offers professional masters, master of science (M.S.), master
of engineering (M.E.) and doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees in the
*
Master of International Political Economy of Resources
disciplines listed in the chart at right.
**
Interdisciplinary degree with specialty in Operations Research with
In addition to masters and Ph.D. degrees, departments and divisions
Engineering
can also offer graduate certificates. Graduate certificates are designed to
have selective focus, short time to completion and consist of course work
only.
Accreditation
Mines is accredited through the doctoral degree by:
the Higher Learning Commission (HLC) of the North Central Association
230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500
Chicago, Illinois 60604-1413
telephone (312) 263-0456
The Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for
Engineering and Technology
111 Market Place, Suite 1050
Baltimore, MD 21202-4012
telephone (410) 347-7700
accredits undergraduate degree programs in chemical engineering,
engineering, engineering physics, geological engineering, geophysical
engineering, metallurgical and materials engineering, mining engineering
and petroleum engineering. The American Chemical Society has
approved the degree program in the Department of Chemistry and
Geochemistry.

8 Graduate
Admission to the Graduate
enroll for regular courses as foreign exchange students. Inquiries and
applications should be made to:
School
The Office of International Programs, CSM
Admission Requirements
Golden, CO 80401-0028
Phone: 303-384-2121
The Graduate School of Colorado School of Mines is open to graduates
A person admitted as a foreign exchange student who subsequently
from four-year programs at recognized colleges or universities. Admission
decides to pursue a regular degree program must apply and gain
to all graduate programs is competitive, based on an evaluation of prior
admission to the Graduate School. All credits earned as a foreign
academic performance, test scores and references. The academic
exchange student may be transferred into the regular degree program if
background of each applicant is evaluated according to the requirements
the student’s graduate committee and department head approve.
of each department outlined later in this section of the Bulletin.
Combined Undergraduate/Graduate
To be a candidate for a graduate degree, students must have completed
an appropriate undergraduate degree program. Colorado School of
Programs
Mines undergraduate students in the Combined Degree Program may,
Several degree programs offer Mines undergraduate students the
however, work toward completion of graduate degree requirements prior
opportunity to begin work on a Graduate Degree while completing
to completing undergraduate degree requirements. See the Combined
the requirements of their Bachelor Degree. These programs can give
Undergraduate/Graduate Degree section of the Graduate Bulletin for
students a head start on graduate education. An overview of these
details of this program.
combined programs and description of the admission process and
Categories of Admission
requirements are found in the Graduate Degrees and Requirements
(bulletin.mines.edu/graduate/graduatedepartmentsandprograms) section
There are four categories of admission to graduate studies at Colorado
of this Bulletin.
School of Mines: regular, provisional, graduate nondegree and foreign
exchange.
Admission Procedure
Regular Degree Students
Applying for Admission
Applicants who meet all the necessary qualifications as determined by
Apply electronically for admission on the World Wide Web. Our Web
the program to which they have applied are admitted as regular graduate
address is
students.
http://www.mines.edu/graduate_admissions
Provisional Degree Students
Follow the procedure outlined below.
Applicants who are not qualified to enter the regular degree program
1. Application: Go to the online application form at http://
directly may be admitted as provisional degree students for a trial period
www.mines.edu/gradschoolapp/onlineapp.html. You may download
not longer than 12 months. During this period students must demonstrate
a paper copy of the application from our website or contact
their ability to work for an advanced degree as specified by the admitting
303-273-3247 or grad-school@Mines.edu (bulletin.mines.edu/
degree program. After the first semester, the student may request
graduate/admissiontothegraduateschool/mailto://grad-
that the department review his or her progress and make a decision
school@Mines.edu) to have one sent my mail. Students wishing to
concerning full degree status. With department approval, the credits
apply for graduate school should submit completed applications by
earned under the provisional status can be applied towards the advanced
the following dates:
degree.
for Fall admission*
January 15 - Priority consideration for financial support
Nondegree Students
May 1 - International student deadline
Practicing professionals may wish to update their professional knowledge
July 1 - Domestic student deadline
or broaden their areas of competence without committing themselves to
for Spring Admission*
a degree program. They may enroll for regular courses as nondegree
October 1
students. Inquiries and applications should be made to:
*
Some programs have different application deadlines. Please
refer to http://www.mines.edu/Deadlines_GS for current
The Graduate Office, CSM
deadline information for specific programs.
Golden, CO 80401-0028
Phone: 303-273-3247
Students wishing to submit applications beyond the final deadline
FAX 303-273-3244
should make a request to the individual academic department.
2. Transcripts: Send to the Graduate School one official transcript from
A person admitted as a nondegree student who subsequently decides
each school previously attended. The transcripts should be sent
to pursue a regular degree program must apply and gain admission to
directly by the institution attended. International students’ transcripts
the Graduate School. All credits earned as a nondegree student may
must be in English or have an official English translation attached.
be transferred into the regular degree program if the student’s graduate
committee and department head approve.
3. Letters of Recommendation: Three (3) letters of recommendation
are required. Individuals who know your personal qualities and
Foreign Exchange Students
scholastic or professional abilities can use the online application
Graduate level students living outside of the U.S. may wish to take
system to submit letters of recommendation on your behalf. Letters
courses at Colorado School of Mines as exchange students. They may
can also be mailed directly to the Graduate Office.

Colorado School of Mines 9
4. Graduate Record Examination: Most departments require the
The Health Center telephone numbers are 303-273-3381 and
General test of the Graduate Record Examination for applicants
303-279-3155.
seeking admission to their programs. Refer to the section Graduate
International Students
Degree Programs and Courses by Department or the Graduate
School application packet to find out if you must take the GRE
Qualifying international students (see Admission Requirements above)
examination. For information about the test, write to:
apply for graduate study by following steps one through six listed above.
Graduate Record Examinations
Educational Testing Service
Summer Courses For New Students
PO Box 6000
New graduate students entering during the fall semester will be expected
Princeton, NJ 08541- 6000
to pay full student fees for any courses taken in the summer sessions
(Telephone 609-771-7670)
prior to the fall term of entry.
or visit online at www.gre.org (bulletin.mines.edu/graduate/
admissiontothegraduateschool/http://www.gre.org)
5. English Language Requirements: Applicants whose native
language is not English must prove proficiency. Language
examination results must be sent to the Graduate School as part
of the admission process. The institution has minimum English
proficiency requirements - learn more at: http://www.mines.edu/
Intl_GS.
English proficiency may be proven by achieving one of the
following:
A. A TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) minimum
score of 550 on the paper-based test, or a computer- based
score of 213, or a score of 79 on the internet Based TOEFL
(iBT).
B. At IELTS (International English Language Testing System)
Score of 6.5, with no band below a 6.0.
C. A PTE A (Pearson test of English) score of 70 or higher.
D. Independent evaluation and approval by the admission-
granting department.
6. Additional instructions for admission to graduate school specific
to individual departments are contained in the application for
admission.
Financial Assistance
To apply for Mines financial assistance, check the box in the Financial
Information section of the online graduate application or complete the
Financial Assistance section on the paper application.
Application Review Process
When application materials are received by the Graduate School, they
are processed and sent to the desired degree program for review. The
review is conducted according to the process developed and approved
by the faculty of that degree program. The degree program transmits
its decision to the Dean of the Graduate School, who then notifies the
applicant. The decision of the degree program is final and may not be
appealed.
Health Record and Additional Steps
When students first enroll at Mines, they must complete the student
health record form which is sent to them when they are accepted for
enrollment. Students must submit the student health record, including
health history, medical examination, and record of immunization, in order
to complete registration.
Questions can be addressed to:
The Coulter Student Health Center
1225 17th Street
Golden, CO 80401-1869

10 Graduate
Student Life at CSM
W. Lloyd Wright Student Wellness Center
The W. Lloyd Wright Student Wellness Center, 1770 Elm Street, houses
Housing
four health and wellness programs for Mines students: the Coulter
Graduate students may choose to reside in campus-owned apartment
Student Health Center, the Student Health Benefits Plan, the Counseling
housing areas on a space-available basis. The Mines Park apartment
Center and Student Disability Services. The wellness center is open from
complex is located west of the 6th Avenue and 19th Street intersection
8:00 am to 5:00 pm, Monday through Friday, during the fall and spring
on 55 acres owned by Mines. The complex houses upperclass
semesters.
undergraduate students, graduate students, and families. Jones Road
Coulter Student Health Center: Services are provided to all students
apartments are located on Jones Road, south of 19th St. and consists of
who have paid the student health center fee. The Coulter Student Health
one-bedroom apartments for single students. Residents must be full-time
Center (303) 273-3381, FAX (303) 273-3623 is located on the first floor
students.
of the W. Lloyd Wright Student Wellness Center at the corner of 18th
Units are complete with refrigerators, stoves, dishwashers, cable
and Elm Streets (1770 Elm Street). Nurse practitioners and registered
television, wired and wireless internet connections, and an optional
nurses provide services Monday through Friday 8:00 am to 12:00 pm
campus phone line for an additional fee. There are two community
and 1:00 pm to 4:45 pm and family medicine physicians provide services
centers which contain the laundry facilities, recreational and study space,
by appointment several days a week. After hours students can call New
and meeting rooms. For more information or to apply for apartment
West Physicians at (303) 278-4600 to speak to the physician on call
housing, go to the Apartment Housing website.
(identify yourself as a CSM student). The Health Center offers primary
health and dental care. For X-rays, specialists or hospital care, students
For all Housing & Dining rates, go to Tuition, Fees, Financial
are referred to appropriate providers in the community. More information
Assistance, Housing (https://nextbulletin.mines.edu/undergraduate/
is available at http://healthcenter.mines.edu.
tuitionfeesfinancialassistancehousing)
Dental Clinic: The Dental Clinic is located on the second floor of the W.
Facilities
Lloyd Wright Wellness Center. Services include cleanings, restoratives,
and x-rays. Students who have paid the student health fee are eligible
for this service. The dental clinic is open Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and
Student Center
Fridays during the academic year with fewer hours in the summer.
Services are by appointment only and can be made by calling the Dental
The Ben H. Parker Student Center contains the offices for the Vice
Clinic. Dental care is on a fee-for-service basis, and students enrolled in
President of Student Life and Dean of Students, Associate Dean
the CSM Student Health Benefits Plan pay lower rates for dental care.
of Students, Apartment Housing, Student Activities and Greek Life,
The Dental Clinic takes cash or checks, no credit/debit cards
Student Government (ASCSM), Admissions and Financial Aid, Cashier,
International Student and Scholar Services, Career Services, Registrar,
Fees: Students are charged a mandatory Health Services fee each
BlasterCard, Conference Services, and student organizations. The
semester, which allows them access to services at the Health Center.
Student Center also contains the student dining hall (known as the Slate
Spouses of enrolled CSM students can choose to pay the health center
Cafe), Diggers Den food court, bookstore, student lounges, meeting
fee and are eligible for services. Dental services are not available to
rooms, and banquet facilities.
spouses.
Immunization Requirement: The State of Colorado requires that
Student Recreation Center
all students enrolled have proof of two MMR’s (measles, mumps
and rubella). A blood test showing immunity to all three diseases is
Completed in May 2007, the 108,000 square foot Student Recreation
acceptable. History of disease is not acceptable.
Center, located at the corner of 16th and Maple Streets in the heart
Student Health Benefits Plan: The SHBP office is located on the
of campus, provides a wide array of facilities and programs designed
second floor of the W. Lloyd Wright Student Wellness Center.
to meet student’s recreational and leisure needs while providing for a
healthy lifestyle. The Center contains a state-of-the-art climbing wall,
Adequate Health Insurance Requirement: All degree seeking U.S.
an eight-lane, 25 meter swimming and diving pool, a cardiovascular
citizen and permanent resident students, and all international students
and weight room, two multi-purpose rooms designed and equipped
regardless of degree status, are required to have health insurance.
for aerobics, dance, martial arts programs and other similar activities,
Students are automatically enrolled in the Student Health Benefits Plan
a competition gymnasium containing three full-size basketball courts
and may waive coverage if they have comparable coverage under a
as well as seating for 2500 people, a separate recreation gymnasium
personal or employer plan. International students must purchase the
designed specifically for a wide variety of recreational programs,
SHBP, unless they meet specific requirements. Information about the
extensive locker room and shower facilities, and a large lounge intended
CSM Student Health Benefits Plan, as well as the criteria for waiving,
for relaxing, playing games or watching television. In addition to
is available online at http://shbp.mines.edu or by calling 303.273.3388.
housing the Outdoor Recreation Program as well as the Intramurals
Coverage for spouses and dependents is also available. Enrollment
and Club Sports Programs, the Center serves as the competition
confirmation or waiver of the CSM Student Health Benefits Plan is done
venue for the Intercollegiate Men and Women’s Basketball Programs,
online for U.S. Citizens and Permanent Residents. International students
the Intercollegiate Volleyball Program and the Men and Women’s
must compete a paper enrollment/waiver form. The deadline is Census
Intercollegiate Swimming and Diving Program.
Day.
Counseling Center: Located on the second floor of the W. Lloyd Wright
Student Wellness Center, phone 303-273-3377. Services are available
for students who have paid the Student Services fee. Individual personal,
academic, and career counseling is offered on a short-term basis to

Colorado School of Mines 11
all enrolled CSM students. In cases where a student requires longer-
to develop the skills and technique of studying well in college – such as
term counseling, referrals are made to providers in the local community.
test-prep and cognitive learning development. CASA hosts late-night
The Counseling Center also provides education and assessment on
programs in the residence halls and Greek houses.
alcohol and other drug use. More information is available at http://
Academic Excellence Workshops (AEW): First-Year students are
counseling.mines.edu/.
encouraged to attend our AEW workshops. These workshops run
Student Disability Services: Located on the second floor of the W.
concurrent to many of the first-year classes (Calc, Chem, Physics, etc.)
Lloyd Wright Student Wellness Center, phone 303-273-3377. Student
and reiterate/strengthen material taught in class. They are offered in the
Disability Services provides students with disabilities an equal opportunity
evening and are free to all students.
to access the institution’s courses, programs and activities. Services
Faculty in CASA: Faculty from various departments host their regular
are available to students with a variety of disabilities, including but not
office hours in CASA. Students are encouraged to utilize these
limited to attention deficit hyperactivity disorders, learning disorders,
professors for assistance with material and/or questions on course
psychological disorders, vision impairment, hearing impairment, and
planning.
other disabilities. A student requesting disability accommodations at
the Colorado School of Mines must comply with the Documentation
Website: CASA maintains an extensive website with resources, helpful
Guidelines and submit required documents, along with a completed
tips, and guides. Check out CASA at http://casa.mines.edu.
Request for Reasonable Accommodations form to Student Disability
Services.
Motor Vehicles Parking
Documentation Guidelines and the Request form are available at http://
disabilities.mines.edu/.
All motor vehicles on campus must be registered with the campus
Parking Services Division of Facilities Management, 1318 Maple Street,
and must display a CSM parking permit. Vehicles must be registered at
Services
the beginning of each semester or upon bringing your vehicle on campus,
and updated whenever you change your address.
Academic Advising & Support Services
Public Safety
The Colorado School of Mines Department of Public Safety is a full
Center for Academic Services and Advising
service, community oriented law enforcement agency, providing 24/7
(CASA)
service to the campus. It is the mission of the Colorado School of Mines
Police Department to make the Mines campus the safest campus in
Academic Advising: All students entering CSM are assigned an
Colorado.
Academic Advising Coordinator. This assignment is made by last name.
This Coordinator serves as the student’s academic advisor until they
The department is responsible for providing services such as:
formally declare their major or intended degree. This declaration occurs in
• Proactive patrol of the campus and its facilities
their sophomore year. Incoming students have only noted an interest and
• Investigation and reporting of crimes and incidents
are not declared.
• Motor vehicle traffic and parking enforcement
The Coordinators will host individual, walk-in, and group advising
• Crime and security awareness programs
sessions throughout the semester. Every student is required to meet
with their Coordinator at least once per semester. The Coordinator will
• Alcohol / Drug abuse awareness / education
administer a PIN for course registration, each semester. Students unsure
• Self defense classes
of their academic path (which major to choose) should work with their
• Consultation with campus departments for safety and security matters
Coordinator to explore all different options.
• Additional services to the campus community such as: vehicle unlocks
CASA also hosts Peer 2 Peer advising. Students may walk-in and speak
and jumpstarts, community safe walks (escorts), authorized after-
with a fellow student on various issues pertaining to course, such as
hours building and office access, and assistance in any medical, fire,
course registration).
or other emergency situation.
CSM101: The First-Year Symposium, , is a required, credit-bearing class.
The police officers employed by the Department of Public Safety are fully
CSM101 aims to facilitate the transition from high school to college;
trained police officers in accordance with the Peace Officer Standards
create community among peers and upper-class students; assess and
and Training (P.O.S.T.) Board and the Colorado Revised Statute.
monitor academic progress; and provide referrals to appropriate campus
resources. CSM101 is taught by 38 professional staff members (including
faculty) and 76 Peer Mentor students.
Career Center
Tutoring Services: CASA offers weekly tutoring services for all core-
The Mines Career Center mission is to assist students in developing,
curriculum courses. Our services run Sunday through Thursday and are
evaluating, and/or implementing career, education, and employment
hosted in CASA, the Student Center, and the Library. Students may also
decisions and plans. Career development is integral to the success
request to meet with a private tutor at a time, location, and date of their
of Mines graduates and to the mission of Mines. All Colorado School
mutual choosing. All tutoring services are free to students.
of Mines graduates will be able to acquire the necessary job search
and professional development skills to enable them to successfully
Academic Support Services: Routinely, CASA offers great support
take personal responsibility for the management of their own careers.
workshops and events. CASA hosts pre-finals workshops as well as
Services are provided to all students and for all recent graduates, up
mid-term exam prep session. As well, students can work with our staff

12 Graduate
to 24 months after graduation. Students must adhere to the ethical and
to make purchases at the campus residence halls, and may be required
professional business and job searching practices as stated in the Career
to attend various CSM campus activities.
Center Student Policy, which can be found in its entirety on the Student’s
Please visit the website at http://www.is.mines.edu/BlasterCard for more
Homepage of DiggerNet.
information.
In order to accomplish our mission, we provide a comprehensive array of
career services:
Standards, Codes of Conduct
Students can access campus rules and regulations, including the student
Career, Planning, Advice, and Counseling
code of conduct, student honor code, alcohol policy, sexual misconduct
• “The Mines Strategy" a practical, user-friendly career manual with
policy, the unlawful discrimination policy and complaint procedure, public
interview strategies, resume and cover letter examples, career
safety and parking policies, and the distribution of literature and free
exploration ideas, and job search tips;
speech policy, by visiting the Planning and Policy Analysis website at
• Online resources for exploring careers and employers at http://
http://inside.mines.edu/Student_policies. We encourage all students
careers.mines.edu;
to review the electronic document and expect that students know and
• Individual resume and cover letter critiques;
understand the campus policies, rules and regulations as well as their
rights as a student. Questions and comments regarding the above
• Individual job search advice;
mentioned policies can be directed to the Associate Dean of Students
• Practice video-taped interviews;
located in the Student Center, Suite 218.
• Job Search Workshops - successful company research, interviewing,
resumes, business etiquette, networking skills;
• Salary and overall outcomes data;
Student Publications
• Information on applying to grad school;
Two student publications are published at CSM by the Associated
• Career resource library.
Students of CSM. Opportunities abound for students wishing to
participate on the staffs.
The Oredigger is the student newspaper, published weekly during the
Job Resources and Events
school year. It contains news, features, sports, letters and editorials of
• Career Day (Fall and Spring);
interest to students, faculty, and the Golden community.
• Online and in-person job search assistance for internships, CO-OPs,
The literary magazine, High Grade, is published each semester.
and full-time entry-level job postings;
Contributions of poetry, short stories, drawings, and photographs
• Virtual Career Fairs and special recruiting events;
are encouraged from students, faculty and staff. A Board of Student
• On-campus interviewing - industry and government representatives
Publications acts in an advisory capacity to the publications staffs
visit the campus to interview students and explain employment
and makes recommendations on matters of policy. The Public Affairs
opportunities;
Department staff members serve as daily advisors to the staffs of the
• General employment board;
Oredigger and Prospector. The Division of Liberal Arts and International
Studies provides similar service to the High Grade.
• Employer searching resource;
• Cooperative Education Program - available to students who have
completed three semesters at Mines (two for transfer students). It is
Veterans Services
an academic program which offers 3 semester hours of credit in the
major for engineering work experience, awarded on the basis of a term
The Registrar’s Office provides veterans services for students
paper written following the CO-OP term. The type of credit awarded
attending the School and using educational benefits from the Veterans
depends on the decision of the department, but in most cases is
Administration.
additive credit. CO-OP terms usually extend from May to December,
or from January to August, and usually take a student off cam- pus
full time. Students must apply for CO-OP before beginning the job (a
Tutoring
no credit, no fee class), and must write learning objectives and sign
Individual tutoring in most courses is available through the Office for
formal contracts with their company’s representative to ensure the
Student Development and Academic Services. This office also sponsors
educational component of the work experience.
group tutoring sessions and Academic Excellence Workshops which
are open to all interested CSM students. For more information about
services and eligibility requirements, contact the Student Development
Identification Cards (BLASTER CARD)
and Academic Services office.
Blaster Cards are made in the Student Activities Office in the Parker
Student Center, and all new students must have a card made as soon
as possible after they enroll. Each semester the Student Activities Office
Activities
issues RTD Bus Pass stickers for student ID’s. Students can replace lost,
stolen, or damaged Blaster Cards for a small fee.
Student Activities Office
The Blaster Card can be used as a debit card to make purchases at all
campus food service facilities, to check material out of the CSM Library,
The Office of Student Activities coordinates the various activities and
student organizations on the Mines campus. Student government,

Colorado School of Mines 13
professional societies, living groups, honor societies, interest groups
Residence Hall Association (RHA)
and special events add a balance to the academic side of the CSM
Residence Hall Association (RHA) is a student-run organization
community. Participants take part in management training, event
developed to coordinate and plan activities for students living in the
planning, and leadership development. To obtain an up-to-date listing of
Residence Halls. Its membership is represented by students from each
the recognized campus organizations or more information about any of
hall floor. Officers are elected each fall for that academic year. For more
these organizations, contact the Student Activities office.
information, go to RHA (http://residence-life.mines.edu/RSL-Residence-
Hall-Association).
Student Government
Associated Students of CSM (ASCSM) is sanctioned by the Board of
Social Fraternities and Sororities
Trustees of the School. The purpose of ASCSM is, in part, to advance the
There are seven national fraternities and three national sororities
interest and promote the welfare of CSM and all of the students and to
active on the CSM campus. Fraternities and Sororities offer the unique
foster and maintain harmony among those connected with or interested in
opportunity of leadership, service to one’s community, and fellowship.
the School, including students, alumni, faculty, trustees and friends.
Greeks are proud of the number of campus leaders, athletes and
Through funds collected as student fees, ASCSM strives to ensure
scholars that come from their ranks. Additionally, the Greek social life
a full social and academic life for all students with its organizations,
provides a complement to the scholastic programs at Mines. Colorado
publications, and special events. As the representative governing body
School of Mines chapters are:
of the students ASCSM provides leadership and a strong voice for the
• Alpha Phi
student body, enforces policies enacted by the student body, works to
integrate the various campus organizations, and promotes the ideals and
• Alpha Tau Omega
traditions of the School.
• Beta Theta Pi
• Kappa Sigma
The Graduate Student Association was formed in 1991 and
is recognized by CSM through the student government as the
• Phi Gamma Delta
representative voice of the graduate student body. GSA’s primary goal is
• Pi Beta Phi
to improve the quality of graduate education and offer academic support
• Sigma Alpha Epsilon
for graduate students.
• Sigma Kappa
The Mines Activity Council (MAC) serves as the campus special
• Sigma Nu
events board. The majority of all-student campus events are planned by
• Sigma Phi Epsilon
MAC. Events planned by MAC include comedy shows to the campus on
most Fridays throughout the academic year, events such as concerts,
hypnotists, and one time specialty entertainment; discount tickets to
Honor Societies
local sporting events, theater performances, and concerts, movie nights
bringing blockbuster movies to the Mines campus; and E-Days and
Honor societies recognize the outstanding achievements of their
Homecoming.
members in the areas of scholarship, leadership, and service. Each of the
CSM honor societies recognizes different achievements in our students.
Special Events
Special Interest Organizations
Engineers’ Days festivities are held each spring. The three day affair is
organized entirely by students. Contests are held in drilling, hand-spiking,
Special interest organizations meet the special and unique needs of the
mucking, and oil-field olympics to name a few. Additional events include
CSM student body by providing co-curricular activities in specific areas.
a huge fireworks display, the Ore-Cart Pull to the Colorado State Capitol,
the awarding of scholarships to outstanding Colorado high school seniors
and an Engineers’ Day concert.
International Student Organizations
Homecoming weekend is one of the high points of the entire year’s
The International Student Organizations provide the opportunity to
activities. Events include a football rally and game, campus decorations,
experience a little piece of a different culture while here at Mines, in
election of Homecoming queen and beast, parade, burro race, and other
addition to assisting the students from that culture adjust to the Mines
contests.
campus.
International Day is planned and conducted by the International Council.
It includes exhibits and programs designed to further the cause of
Professional Societies
understanding among the countries of the world. The international dinner
and entertainment have come to be one of the campus social events of
Professional Societies are generally student chapters of the national
the year.
professional societies. As a student chapter, the professional societies
offer a chance for additional professional development outside the
Winter Carnival, sponsored by Blue Key, is an all-school ski day held
classroom through guest speakers, trips, and interactive discussions
each year at one of the nearby ski areas. In addition to skiing, there are
about the current activities in the profession. Additionally, many of the
also fun competitions (snowman contest, sled races, etc.) throughout the
organizations offer internship, fellowship and scholarship opportunities.
day.

14 Graduate
Recreational Organizations
The recreation organizations provide the opportunity for students with
similar interests to participate as a group in these recreational activities.
Most of the recreational organizations compete on both the local and
regional levels at tournaments throughout the year.
Outdoor Recreation Program
The Outdoor Recreation Program is housed at the Mines Park
Community Center. The Program teaches classes in outdoor
activities; rents mountain bikes, climbing gear, backpacking and other
equipment; and sponsors day and weekend activities such as camping,
snowshoeing, rock climbing, and mountaineering.
For a complete list of all currently registered student organizations,
please visit the Student Activities office or website at http://
studentactivities.mines.edu/.

Colorado School of Mines 15
Registration and Tuition
Eligibility for Reduced Registration
Classification
Students enrolled in thesis-based degree programs who have completed
a minimum number of course and research credit hours in their degree
General Registration Requirements
programs are eligible to continue to pursue their graduate program as full-
time students at a reduced registration level. In order to be considered
The normal full load for graduate students is 9 credit hours per term.
for this reduced, full-time registration category, students must satisfy the
Special cases outlined below include first-year international students
following requirements:
who must receive special instruction to improve their language skills, and
1. For M.S. students, completion of 36 hours of eligible course,
students who have completed their credit-hour requirements and are
research and transfer credits combined
working full time on their thesis.
2. For Ph.D. students, completion of 72 hours of eligible course,
Full-time graduate students may register for an overload of up to 6 credit
research, and transfer credits combined
hours (up to 15 credit hours total) per term at no increase in tuition.
3. For all students, an approved Admission to Candidacy form must
Subject to written approval by their advisor and department head or
be on file in the Graduate Office the semester prior to one for which
division director, students may register for more than 15 credit hours per
you are applying for reduced thesis registration.
term by paying additional tuition at the regular part-time rate for all hours
over 15. The maximum number of credits for which a student can register
4. Candidates may not count more than 12 credit hours per semester
during the summer is 12.
in determining eligibility for reduced, full-time registration.
Except for students meeting any of the following conditions, students may
Students who are eligible for reduced, full-time registration are
register at less than the required full-time registration.
considered full time if they register for 4 credit hours of research under
course numbers 705 (M.S.) or 706 (Ph.D.) as appropriate.
• International students subject to immigration requirements. This
applies to international students holding J-1 and F-1 visas.
Graduation Requirements
• Students receiving financial assistance in the form of graduate
To graduate, students must be registered during the term in which
teaching assistantships, research assistantships, fellowships or hourly
they complete their program. In enforcing this registration requirement,
contracts.
the Graduate School allows students to complete their checkout
• Students enrolled in academic programs that require full-time
requirements past the end of the semester. Late checkout is accepted
registration. Refer to the degree program sections of this bulletin to
by the Graduate School through the last day of registration in the term
see if this applies to a particular program.
immediately following the semester in which a student has completed
his or her academic degree requirements; the Spring for Fall completion,
Students for whom any one of these conditions apply must register at the
the Summer I for Spring completion, and Fall for Summer II completion.
appropriate full-time credit hour requirement.
Students not meeting this checkout deadline are required to register
To remain active in their degree program, students must register
for an additional semester before the Graduate School will process
continuously each fall and spring semester. If not required to register full-
their checkout request. For additional information, refer to http://
time, part-time students may register for any number of credit hours less
inside.mines.edu/admiss/grad/graduation_rqmts.htm.
than the full-time credit hour load.
Full-time Status - Required Course Load
Summer registration is not required to maintain an active program.
Students who continue to work on their degree program and utilize Mines
To be deemed full-time during the fall and spring semesters, students
facilities during the summer, however, must register. Students registered
must register for at least 9 credit hours. However, international students
during the summer are assessed regular tuition and fees.
need only register for 6 credit hours during their first year, if they
are required to take special language instruction or are accepted in
New graduate students entering during the fall semester will be expected
Provisional Status. In the event a thesis-based student has completed
to pay full student fees for any courses taken in the summer sessions
his or her required course work and research credits and is eligible for
prior to the fall term of entry.
reduced, full-time registration, the student will be deemed full-time if he or
Research Registration
she is registered for at least 4 credit hours of research credit.
To be deemed full-time during the summer semester, students must
In addition to completing prescribed course work and defending a
register for a minimum of 3 credit hours.
thesis, students in thesis-based degree programs must complete a
research experience under the direct supervision of their faculty advisor.
Internships and Academic-Year
Master students must complete a minimum of 6 hours of research
Registration Requirements
credit, and doctoral students must complete a minimum of 24 hours of
research credit at Mines. While completing this experience, students
Thesis-based graduate students may participate in corporate-sponsored
register for research credit under course numbers 705 (M.S.) or 706
internship opportunities during the academic year. The intent of graduate
(Ph.D.) as appropriate. Faculty assign grades indicating satisfactory
internships is to allow students to continue to advance toward degree
or unsatisfactory progress based on their evaluation of the student’s
while pursuing research activities off campus, that are of interest to both
work. Students registered for research during the summer semester and
the student and a corporate sponsor. To qualify for an internship during
working on campus must pay regular tuition and thesis research fees for
the academic year, the work done while in residency at the corporate
summer semester.
sponsor must be directly related to a student’s thesis/dissertation,
the internship shall last for no longer than one regular academic-year
semester, and the scope of the activities completed during the internship
must be agreed upon by the student, the student’s advisor and the

16 Graduate
corporate sponsor prior to the start of the internship. Students not
students to maintain full-time status in research-based degree programs
meeting these requirements are not eligible for the internship registration
while taking a leave from that program to care for their new child, and
defined below.
facilitate planning for continuance of their degree program.
Graduate students completing a one semester of corporate-sponsored
Nothing in the Parental Leave policy can, or is intended to replace
internship, either domestic or international, during the academic year
communication and cooperation between the student and his or her
should register for zero credit hours of off-campus work experience
advisor, and the good-faith efforts of both to accommodate the birth or
under the course number 597. This registration will maintain a student’s
adoption of a child within the confines and expectations of participating
full-time academic standing for the internship semester. Student’s
in a research-active graduate degree program. It is the intent of this
registered for an internship experience under course number 597 are
Policy to reinforce the importance of this cooperation, and to provide a
not assessed tuition nor regular academic fees and as such do not have
framework of support and guidance.
access to Mines facilities, services or staff. The Mines Health Insurance
Eligibility
requirement applies to all students participating in an academic program
(such as, but not limited to, undergraduate cooperative education,
In order to be eligible for Parental Leave, a graduate student must:
study abroad, and graduate internships) regardless of the domestic
• be the primary child care provider;
or international location of the academic program. As such, students
• have been a full-time graduate student in his/her degree program
enrolled in the Mines Health Insurance program are charged health
during at least the two (2), prior consecutive semesters;
insurance fees during their internship semester. Students participating
in an international internship are required to complete the Office of
• be enrolled in a thesis-based degree program (i.e., Doctoral or thesis-
International Programs paperwork in fulfillment of security and safety
based Masters);
requirements.
• be in good academic standing as defined in the Unsatisfactory
Academic Performance section of this Bulletin;
Late Registration Fee
• provide a letter from a physician or other health care professional
Students must complete their registration by the date specified in the
stating the anticipated due date of the child, or provide appropriate
Academic Calendar. Students who fail to complete their registration
documentation specifying an expected date of adoption of the child;
during this time will be assessed a $100 late registration fee and will not
• notify advisor of intent to apply for Parental Leave at least four (4)
receive any tuition fellowships for which they might otherwise be eligible.
months prior to the anticipated due date or adoption date; and
Leave of Absence
• at least two (2) months prior to the expected leave date complete, and
have approved, the Request for Parental Leave Form that includes an
Leaves of absence are granted only when unanticipated circumstances
academic Program Plan for program continuance.
make it temporarily impossible for students to continue to work toward
a degree. Leave of absence requests for the current semester must be
Exceptions and Limitations
received by the Dean of Graduate Studies prior to the last day of classes.
This Policy has been explicitly constructed with the following limitations:
Leave of absence requests for prior semesters will not be considered.
• part-time and non-thesis students are not eligible for Parental Leave.
Any request for a leave of absence must have the prior approval of the
These students may, however, apply for a Leave of Absence through
student’s faculty advisor, the department head or division or program
the regular procedure defined above;
director and the Dean of Graduate Studies. The request for a leave of
absence must be in writing and must include
• if both parents are Mines graduate students who would otherwise
qualify for leave under this Policy, each is entitled to a Parental Leave
1. The reasons why the student must interrupt his or her studies and
period immediately following the birth or adoption of a child during
2. A plan (including a timeline and deadlines) for resuming and
which he or she is the primary care provider, but the leaves may not
completing the work toward the degree in a timely fashion.
be taken simultaneously; and
• leaves extending beyond eight (8) weeks are not covered by this
Students on leaves of absence remain in good standing even though they
Policy. The regular Leave of Absence policy defined in the Graduate
are not registered for any course or research credits.
Bulletin applies to these cases.
Thesis-based students will not have access to Mines resources while
on a leave of absence. This includes, but is not limited to, office space,
Benefits
computational facilities, library and faculty.
Under this Policy students will receive the following benefits and
Students who fail to register and who are not on approved leaves of
protections:
absence have their degree programs terminated. Students who wish to
• a one-semester extension of all academic requirements (e.g.,
return to graduate school after an unauthorized leave of absence must
qualifying examinations, time to degree limitations, etc.);
apply for readmission and pay a $200 readmission fee.
• maintenance of full-time status in degree program while on Parental
The financial impact of requesting a leave of absence for the current
Leave;
semester is covered in the section on “Payments and Refunds (p. 5)”
• documentation of an academic plan that specifies both how a student
Parental Leave
will continue work toward his or her degree prior to the leave period
and how a student will reintegrate into a degree program after
Graduate students in thesis-based degree programs, who have full-
returning from leave; and
time student status, may be eligible to request up to eight (8) weeks of
• continuance of assistantship support during the semester in which the
parental leave. The Parental Leave Policy is designed to assist students
leave is taken.
who are primary child-care providers immediately following the birth
or adoption of a child. The Policy is designed to make it possible for

Colorado School of Mines 17
Planning and Approval
source of funding for the research or teaching assistantship and the
Office of Graduate Studies.
It is the student’s responsibility to initiate discussions with his/her
advisor(s) at least four (4) months prior to the anticipated birth or
Stipend Support: Stipends associated with the assistantship will be
adoption. This notice provides the lead time necessary to rearrange
provided at their full rate for that portion of the semester(s) during which
teaching duties (for those students supported by teaching assistantships),
the student is not on Parental Leave. No stipend support need be
to adjust laboratory and research responsibilities and schedules, to
provided during the time period over which the Parental Leave is taken.
identify and develop plans for addressing any new health and safety
The student may, however, choose to have the stipend he or she would
issues, and to develop an academic Program Plan that promotes
receive during the semester(s) in which the Leave is taken delivered in
seamless reintegration back into a degree program.
equal increments over the entire semester(s).
While faculty will make every reasonable effort to meet the needs of
While on Leave, students may elect to continue to work in some modified
students requesting Parental Leave, students must recognize that faculty
capacity and Faculty, Departments and Programs may elect to provide
are ultimately responsible for ensuring the rigor of academic degree
additional stipend support in recognition of these efforts. Students,
programs and may have a direct requirement to meet specific milestones
however, are under no obligation to do so, and if they choose to not work
defined in externally funded research contracts. Within this context,
during their Leave period this will not be held against them when they
faculty may need to reassess and reassign specific work assignments,
return from Leave. Upon return, students on Research Assistantships are
modify laboratory schedules, etc. Without good communication, such
expected to continue their normal research activities as defined in their
efforts may lead to significant misunderstandings between faculty and
Academic Plans. Students on Teaching Assistantships will be directed by
students. As such, there must be good-faith, and open communication
the Department, Division or Program as to specific activities in which they
by each party to meet the needs and expectations of each during this
will engage upon return from Parental Leave.
potentially stressful period.
Registration
The results of these discussions are to be formalized into an academic
Students on Parental Leave should register at the full-time level for
Program Plan that is agreed to by both the student and the advisor(s).
research credit hours under the direction of their Thesis Advisor. The
This Plan, to be accepted, must also receive approval by the appropriate
advisor will evaluate student progress toward degree for the semester in
Department Head, Division or Program Director and the Graduate Dean.
which Parental Leave is taken only on those activities undertaken by the
Approval of the Dean should be sought by submitting to the Office of
student while he or she is not on Leave.
Graduate Studies a formal Parental Leave request, with all necessary
signatures along with the following documentation;
Reciprocal Registration
• letter from a physician or other health care professional stating the
Under the Exchange Agreement Between the State Supported
anticipated due date of the child or other appropriate documentation
Institutions in Northern Colorado, Mines graduate students who are
specifying an expected date of adoption of the child; and
paying full-time tuition may take courses at Colorado State University,
• the advisor(s) and Department Head, Division or Program Director
University of Northern Colorado, and University of Colorado (Boulder,
approved academic Program Plan.
Denver, Colorado Springs, and the Health Sciences Center) at no charge
by completing the request form and meeting the required conditions on
These materials should be delivered to the Office of Graduate Studies no
registration and tuition, course load, and course and space availability.
less than two (2) months prior to the anticipated date of leave.
Request forms are available from the Registrar’s office.
If a student and faculty member can not reach agreement on a Program
Courses completed under the reciprocal agreement may be applied to
Plan, they should consult with the appropriate Department Head, Division
a student’s degree program. These are, however, applied as transfer
or Program Director to help mediate and resolve the outstanding issues.
credit into the degree program. In doing so, they are subject to all the
As appropriate, the Department Head, Division or Program Director may
limitations, approvals and requirements of any regularly transferred
request the Dean of Graduate Studies and the Director of the Women
course.
in Science, Engineering and Mathematics program provide additional
assistance in finalizing the Program Plan.
In-State Tuition Classification Status
Graduate Students with Appointments as
General Information
Graduate Research and Teaching Assistants
The State of Colorado partially subsidizes the cost of tuition for all
students whose domicile, or permanent legal residence, is in Colorado.
A graduate student who is eligible for Parental Leave and has a
Each Mines student is classified as either an “in-state resident” or a “non-
continuing appointment as a research or teaching assistant is eligible for
resident” at the time of matriculation. These classifications, which are
continued stipend and tuition support during the semester(s) in which the
governed by Colorado law, are based upon information furnished by each
leave is taken. For consideration of this support, however, the timing of a
student on his or her application for admission to Mines. A student who
leave with continued stipend and tuition support must be consistent with
willfully furnishes incorrect information to Mines to evade payment of non-
the academic unit’s prior funding commitment to the student. No financial
resident tuition shall be subject to serious disciplinary action.
support will be provided during Leave in a semester in which the student
would have otherwise not been funded.
It is in the interest of each graduate student who is a U.S. citizen and
who is supported on an assistantship or fellowship to become a legal
Tuition and Fee Reimbursement: If the assistantship, either teaching or
resident of Colorado at the earliest opportunity. Typically, tuition at the
research, would have normally paid a student’s tuition and mandatory
non-resident rate will be paid by Mines for these students during their first
fees, it will continue to do so for the semester(s) in which the Leave is
year of study only. After the first year of study, these students may be
taken. Costs for tuition will be shared proportionally between the normal
responsible for paying the difference between resident and non-resident
tuition.

18 Graduate
Requirements for Establishing In-State
Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming who
Residency
are enrolled in qualifying graduate programs may be eligible for in-state
tuition classification. Current qualifying programs include:
The specific requirements for establishing residency for tuition
• Applied Chemistry (Ph.D.)
classification purposes are prescribed by state law (Colorado Revised
Statutes, Title 23, Article 7). Because Colorado residency status is
• Chemistry (M.S.)
governed solely by Colorado law, the fact that a student might not qualify
• Engineering Systems (M.S. and Ph.D.)
for in-state status in any other state does not guarantee in-state status in
• Environmental Science & Engineering (M.S. and Ph.D.)
Colorado. The tuition classification statute places the burden of proof on
• Geochemistry (M.S. and Ph.D.)
the student to provide clear and convincing evidence of eligibility.
• Geological Engineering (M.S., M.E., and Ph.D.)
In-state or resident status generally requires domicile in Colorado for the
• Hydrology (M.S. and Ph.D.)
year immediately preceding the beginning of the semester in which in-
• Mineral Economics (M.S. and Ph.D.)
state status is sought. “Domicile” is “a person’s true, fixed and permanent
• Mining and Earth Systems Engineering (M.S. and Ph.D.)
home and place of habitation.” An unemancipated minor is eligible for in-
state status if at least one parent (or his or her court-appointed guardian)
• Petroleum Engineering (M.S. and Ph.D.)
has been domiciled in Colorado for at least one year. If neither of the
Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information about
student’s parents are domiciliaries of Colorado, the student must be a
WICHE.
qualified person to begin the one-year domiciliary period. A “qualified
person” is someone who is at least twenty-two years old, married, or
Dropping and Adding Courses
emancipated. A student may prove emancipation if:
Students may drop or add courses through web registration without
1. The student’s parents have entirely surrendered the right to the
paying a fee during the first 11 school days of a regular semester, the first
student’s custody and earnings;
four school days of a six-week field course, or the first six school days of
2. The student’s parents are no longer under any duty to financially
an eight-week summer term.
support the student; and
After the 11th day of classes through the 12th week, continuing students
3. The student’s parents have made no provision for the continuing
may drop any course for any reason with a grade of “W”. Graduate
support of the student.
students in their first or second semesters at Mines have through the 14th
week of that semester to drop a course. A student must process a drop-
To begin the one-year domiciliary period, a qualified person must be
add form and pay a $5.00 fee for any change in class schedule after the
living in Colorado with the present intention to reside permanently in
first 11 days of class, except in cases of withdrawal from school. Forms
Colorado. Although none of the following indicia are determinative, voter
are available in the Registrar’s Office.
registration, driver’s license, vehicle registration, state income tax filings,
real property interests, and permanent employment (or acceptance of
After the 12th (or 14th) week, no drops are permitted except in case of
future employment) in Colorado will be considered in determining whether
withdrawal from school or for extenuating circumstances. To request
a student has the requisite intention to permanently reside in Colorado.
consideration of extenuating circumstances, a student must submit a
Once a student’s legal residence has been permanently established in
written request to the Graduate Dean, which includes the following:
Colorado, he or she may continue to be classified as a resident student
1. A list of the courses from which they wish to withdraw. This must
so long as such residence is maintained, even though circumstances may
include all courses for which they are registered.
require extended temporary absences from Colorado.
2. Documentation of the problem which is the basis for the request.
For more information about the requirements for establishing in-state
3. If the problem involves a medical condition, the documentation must
residency, please contact the Registrar’s Office.
be signed by a licensed medical doctor or a representative of the
Petitioning for In-State Tuition Classification
Mines Counseling Office.
4. Signatures indicating approval by the student’s advisor and
A continuing, non-resident student who believes that he or she has
department head or division director.
become eligible for in-state resident tuition due to events that have
occurred subsequent to his or her initial enrollment may file a Petition for
A student who is allowed to withdraw from courses under this policy will
In-State Tuition Classification with the Registrar’s Office. This petition is
receive a grade of “W” for each course and will be placed on automatic
due in the Registrar’s Office no later than the first day of the semester for
leave of absence. In order to resume their graduate program, they
which the student is requesting in-state resident status. Upon receipt of
must submit a written application that includes documentation that the
the petition, the Registrar will initially decide whether the student should
problems which caused the withdrawal have been corrected. The student
be granted in-state residency status. The Registrar’s decision may be
will be reinstated to active status upon approval of their application by
appealed by petition to the Tuition Classification Review Committee.
their advisor and their department head or division director.
For more information about this process, please contact the Registrar’s
The financial impact of a withdrawal is covered in the section on
Office.
“Payments and Refunds.”
In-State Tuition Classification for WICHE
Auditing Courses
Program Participants
As part of the maximum of 15 semester hours of graduate work, students
WICHE, the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education,
may enroll for no credit (NC) in a course with the permission of the
promotes the sharing of higher education resources among the
instructor. Tuition charges are the same for no credit as for credit
participating western states. Under this program, residents of Alaska,
enrollment.
Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North

Colorado School of Mines 19
Students must enroll for no credit before cencus day, the last day of
registration. The form to enroll for a course for no credit is available in
the Registrar’s Office. NC designation is awarded only if all conditions
stipulated by course instructors are met.
Mines requires that all U.S. students who are being supported by the
institution register full time, and federal financial aid regulations prohibit
us from counting NC registration in determining financial aid eligibility.
In addition, the INS requires that international students register full
time, and recent anti-terrorism proposals discourage us from counting
NC registration toward that requirement. Furthermore, there are no
consistent standards for expectations of students who register for NC
in a course. Therefore, in order to treat all Mines students consistently,
NC registration will not count toward the minimum number of hours
for which students are required to register. This includes the minimum
continuous registration requirement of part-time students and the 3-, or 9-
hour requirement for students who must register full time.
The reduced registration policy is based on the principle that the
minimum degree requirement (36 or 72 hours) would include only the
credits applied toward that degree. Deficiency and extra courses are
above and beyond that minimum. NC courses fall into the latter category
and may not be applied toward the degree. Therefore, NC registration will
not count toward the number of hours required to be eligible for reduced
thesis registration.
NC registration may involve additional effort on the part of faculty to
give and/or grade assignments or exams, so it is the institution’s policy
to charge tuition for NC courses. Therefore, NC registration will count
toward the maximum number of credits for which a graduate student may
be allowed to register. This includes a tuition surcharge for credits taken
over 15.
Off-Campus Study
A student must enroll in an official Mines course for any period of off-
campus, course-related study, whether U.S. or foreign, including faculty-
led short courses, study abroad, or any off-campus trip sponsored by
Mines or led by a Mines faculty member. The registration must occur in
the same term that the off-campus study takes place. In addition, the
student must complete the necessary release, waiver, and emergency
contact forms, transfer credit pre-approvals, and FERPA release, and
provide adequate proof of current health insurance prior to departure. For
additional information concerning study abroad requirements, contact the
Office of International Programs at (303) 384-2121; for other information,
contact the Registrar’s Office.

20 Graduate
Academic Regulations
practicing these principles, I will strive to uphold the principles of integrity
and academic excellence at Mines. I will not participate in or tolerate any
Graduate School Bulletin
form of discrimination or mistreatment of another individual.
It is the responsibility of the graduate student to become informed and
Policy on Academic Integrity/Misconduct
to observe all regulations and procedures required by the program the
1.0 ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
student is pursuing. Ignorance of a rule does not constitute a basis for
waiving that rule. The current Graduate Bulletin when a graduate student
The Colorado School of Mines affirms the principle that all individuals
first enrolls, gives the academic requirements the student must meet
associated with the Mines academic community have a responsibility
to graduate. However, with department consent, a student can change
for establishing, maintaining and fostering an understanding and
to the requirements in a later catalog published while the student is
appreciation for academic integrity. In broad terms, this implies protecting
enrolled in the graduate school. Changes to administrative policies and
the environment of mutual trust within which scholarly exchange occurs,
procedures become effective for all students as soon as the campus
supporting the ability of the faculty to fairly and effectively evaluate every
community is notified of the changes.
student’s academic achievements, and giving credence to the university’s
educational mission, its scholarly objectives and the substance of the
The Graduate Bulletin is available to students in both print and electronic
degrees it awards. The protection of academic integrity requires there to
forms. Print bulletins are updated annually. Electronic versions of the
be clear and consistent standards, as well as confrontation and sanctions
Graduate Bulletin may be updated more frequently to reflect changes
when individuals violate those standards. The Colorado School of Mines
approved by the campus community. As such, students are encouraged
desires an environment free of any and all forms of academic misconduct
to refer to the most recently available electronic version of the Graduate
and expects students to act with integrity at all times.
Bulletin. This version is available at the CSM website. The electronic
version of the Graduate Bulletin is considered the official version of this
2.0 POLICY ON ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT
document. In case of disagreement between the electronic and print
Academic misconduct is the intentional act of fraud, in which an
versions, the electronic version takes precedence.
individual seeks to claim credit for the work and efforts of another
Resolution of Conflicting Bulletin
without authorization, or uses unauthorized materials or fabricated
information in any academic exercise. Student Academic Misconduct
Provisions
arises when a student violates the principle of academic integrity. Such
If a conflict or inconsistency is found to exist between these policies and
behavior erodes mutual trust, distorts the fair evaluation of academic
any other provision of the Mines Graduate Bulletin, the provisions of
achievements, violates the ethical code of behavior upon which education
these policies shall govern the resolution of such conflict or inconsistency.
and scholarship rest, and undermines the credibility of the university.
Because of the serious institutional and individual ramifications, student
Curriculum Changes
misconduct arising from violations of academic integrity is not tolerated
at Mines. If a student is found to have engaged in such misconduct
The Mines Board of Trustees reserves the right to change any course
sanctions such as change of a grade, loss of institutional privileges, or
of study or any part of the curriculum to respond to educational and
academic suspension or dismissal may be imposed. As a guide, some
scientific developments. No statement in this Bulletin or in the registration
of the more common forms of academic misconduct are noted below.
of any student shall be considered as a contract between Colorado
This list is not intended to be all inclusive, but rather to be illustrative of
School of Mines and the student.
practices the Mines faculty have deemed inappropriate:
Student Honor Code
1. Dishonest Conduct - general conduct unbecoming a scholar.
1.0 PREAMBLE
Examples include issuing misleading statements; withholding
pertinent information; not fulfilling, in a timely fashion, previously
The students of Colorado School of Mines have adopted the following
agreed to projects or activities; and verifying as true, things that are
Student Honor Code in order to establish a high standard of student
known to the student not to be true or verifiable.
behavior at Mines. The Code may only be amended through a student
referendum supported by a majority vote of the Mines student body.
2. Plagiarism - presenting the work of another as one’s own. This
Mines students shall be involved in the enforcement of the Code through
is usually accomplished through the failure to acknowledge
their participation in the Student Conduct Appeals Board.
the borrowing of ideas, data, or the words of others. Examples
include submitting as one’s own work the work of another
2.0 CODE
student, a ghost writer, or a commercial writing service; quoting,
Mines students believe it is our responsibility to promote and maintain
either directly or paraphrased, a source without appropriate
high ethical standards in order to ensure our safety, welfare, and
acknowledgment; and using figures, charts, graphs or facts without
enjoyment of a successful learning environment. Each of us, under
appropriate acknowledgment. Inadvertent or unintentional misuse or
this Code, shall assume responsibility for our behavior in the area of
appropriation of another’s work is nevertheless plagiarism.
academic integrity. As a Mines student, I am expected to adhere to
3. Falsification/Fabrication - inventing or altering information.
the highest standards of academic excellence and personal integrity
Examples include inventing or manipulating data or research
regarding my schoolwork, exams, academic projects, and research
procedures to report, suggest, or imply that particular results
endeavors. I will act honestly, responsibly, and above all, with honor
were achieved from procedures when such procedures were
and integrity in all aspects of my academic endeavors at Mines. I will
not actually undertaken or when such results were not actually
not misrepresent the work of others as my own, nor will I give or receive
supported by the pertinent data; false citation of source materials;
unauthorized assistance in the performance of academic coursework.
reporting false information about practical, laboratory, or clinical
I will conduct myself in an ethical manner in my use of the library,
experiences; submitting false excuses for absence, tardiness, or
computing center, and all other school facilities and resources. By
missed deadlines; and, altering previously submitted examinations.

Colorado School of Mines 21
4. Tampering - interfering with, forging, altering or attempting to
• Assign a grade of "F" in the course to the student(s) that
alter university records, grades, assignments, or other documents
committed academic misconduct. A faculty member may impose
without authorization. Examples include using a computer or a
a lesser penalty if the circumstances warrant, however the typical
false-written document to change a recorded grade; altering,
sanction is a grade of "F".
deleting, or manufacturing any academic record; and, gaining
• Contact the Associate Dean of Students and his/her Department
unauthorized access to a university record by any means.
Head/Division Director to officially report the violation in writing
5. Cheating - using or attempting to use unauthorized materials or
within 5 business days of the charge of academic misconduct.
aid with the intent of demonstrating academic performance through
The Associate Dean of Students will communicate the final
fraudulent means. Examples include copying from another student’s
resolution in writing to the student, the faculty member, the
paper or receiving unauthorized assistance on a homework
Office of Academic Affairs, the Office of Graduate Studies and
assignment, quiz, test or examination; using books, notes or
the student’s advisor. The Associate Dean of Students will also
other devices such as calculators, PDAs and cell phones, unless
keep official records on all students with academic misconduct
explicitly authorized; acquiring without authorization a copy of
violations.
the examination before the scheduled examination; and copying
• Prescribed disciplinary action for misconduct associated with
reports, laboratory work or computer files from other students.
regular coursework:
Authorized materials are those generally regarded as being
• 1st Offense: A grade of "F" in the course.
appropriate in an academic setting, unless specific exceptions have
• 2nd Offense: A grade of "F" in the course, one-year academic
been articulated by the instructor.
suspension, and permanent notation of Academic Misconduct
6. Impeding - negatively impacting the ability of other students to
on the student’s transcript.
successfully complete course or degree requirements. Examples
include removing pages from books and removing materials that
• In the case of an allegation of academic misconduct associated with
are placed on reserve in the Library for general use; failing to
activities not a part of regular coursework (e.g, an allegation
provide team members necessary materials or assistance; and,
of cheating on a comprehensive examination), if after talking with
knowingly disseminating false information about the nature of a test
the student, faculty member(s) feel the student is responsible for
or examination.
misconduct, the faculty should:
7. Sharing Work - giving or attempting to give unauthorized materials
• Assign an outcome to the activity that constitutes failure. If
or aid to another student. Examples include allowing another
appropriate, the student’s advisor may also assign a grade of
student to copy your work; giving unauthorized assistance on
"PRU" (unsatisfactory progress) for research credits in which
a homework assignment, quiz, test or examination; providing,
the student is enrolled. Regular institutional procedures resulting
without authorization, copies of examinations before the scheduled
from either of these outcomes are then followed. Faculty
examination; posting work on a website for others to see; and
members may impose a lesser penalty if the circumstances
sharing reports, laboratory work or computer files with other
warrant, however, the typical sanction is failure.
students.
• Contact the Associate Dean of Students, Graduate Dean and the
3.0 PROCEDURES FOR ADDRESSING ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT
student’s Department Head/Division Director to officially report
the violation in writing within 5 business days of the charge of
Faculty members and thesis committees have discretion to address and
misconduct. The Associate Dean of Students will communicate
resolve misconduct matters in a manner that is commensurate with the
the final resolution in writing to the student, the faculty member,
infraction and consistent with the values of the Institution. This includes
the OFfice of Graduate Studies, and the student’s advisor. The
imposition of appropriate academic sanctions for students involved in
Associate Dean of Students will also keep official records on all
academic misconduct. However, there needs to be a certain amount of
students with academic misconduct violations.
consistency when handling such issues, so if a member of the Mines
community has grounds for suspecting that a student or students have
• In the case of an allegation of academic misconduct associated with
engaged in academic misconduct, they have an obligation to act on
research activities, investigation and resolution of the misconduct
this suspicion in an appropriate fashion. The following procedure will be
is governed by the Institution’s Research Integrity Policy. The
followed:
Research Integrity Policy is available as section 10.3 of the Faculty
• The faculty member or thesis committee informs the student(s) of the
Handbook. If, after talking with the student, the faculty member
allegations and charge of academic misconduct within 10 business
feels the student is responsible for misconduct of this type, the
days. This involves verbal communication with the student(s). The
faculty member should proceed as indicated in the Research
faculty member/thesis committee must have a meeting with the
Integrity Policy. If appropriate, the student’s advisor may also
students(s) regarding the incident. This meeting allows the student
assign a grade of "PRU" for research credits in which the student is
the opportunity to give his/her perspective prior to an official decision
enrolled. Regular institutional procedures resulting from this grade
being made. It also allows the faculty member to have a conversation
assignment are then followed.
with the student(s) to educate him/her on appropriate behavior.
• Students who suspect other students of academic misconduct
• The circumstances of the academic misconduct dictate the process to
should report the matter to the appropriate faculty member, the
be followed:
appropriate Department Head/Division/Program Director, the Dean
• In the case of an allegation of academic misconduct associated with
of Undergraduate Students, the Dean of Graduate Students, or the
regular coursework, if after talking with the student(s), the faculty
Associate Dean of Students. The information is then provided to the
member feels the student is responsible for academic misconduct
faculty member concerned.
the faculty member should:
4.0 APPEAL PROCESS FOR STUDENT ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT

22 Graduate
The academic misconduct appeal process is under revision. For the most
Unsatisfactory Academic Performance
up-to-date version of this procedure, please see the student section of
Resulting in Mandatory Dismissal
the policy website (http://inside.mines.edu/Student_policies).
Unsatisfactory performance as gauged by any of the following measures
Unsatisfactory Academic Performance
shall result in immediate, mandatory dismissal of a graduate student:
Unsatisfactory Academic Progress Resulting
1. Failure to successfully defend the thesis after two attempts;
in Probation or Discretionary Dismissal
2. Failure to be admitted to candidacy; or
A student’s progress toward successful completion of a graduate degree
3. Failure by a student subject to discretionary dismissal to achieve a
shall be deemed unsatisfactory if any of the following conditions occur:
performance milestone or meet a deadline contained in his or her
remedial plan.
• Failure to maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or greater
(see Grading System section);
The Dean of Graduate Studies shall be notified promptly of any situation
• Receipt of an “Unsatisfactory Progress” grade for research; or
that may subject a student to mandatory dismissal. In this event, the
Dean shall notify the student of his or her dismissal and inform the
• Receipt of an “Unsatisfactory Progress” recommendation from:
student of his or her right to appeal the dismissal as outlined below.
• the head or director of the student’s home department or division,
• the student’s thesis committee, or
Students who have been notified of mandatory dismissal will be placed in
non-degree status. They may request re-admission to either the same or
• a departmental committee charged with the responsibility of
a different degree program by submitting a full application for admission
monitoring the student’s progress.
to the Graduate Office. The application will be reviewed through the
normal admission process.
Unsatisfactory academic progress on the part of a graduate student
shall be reported to the Dean of Graduate Studies in a timely manner.
If a student who has been reinstated or readmitted to his or her former
Students making unsatisfactory progress by any of the measures listed
degree program and is subsequently found to be making unsatisfactory
above shall be placed on academic probation upon the first occurrence
progress, the student will immediately be subject to mandatory dismissal.
of such indication. Upon the second occurrence of an unsatisfactory
Appeal Procedures
progress indication, the Dean shall notify the student that he or she is
subject to discretionary dismissal according to the procedure outlined
Both mandatory and discretionary dismissals may be appealed by a
below.
graduate student pursuant to this procedure. To trigger review hereunder,
an appeal must:
In addition, students in thesis-based degree programs who are not
admitted to candidacy within the time limits specified in this Bulletin may
1. Be in writing;
be subject to immediate mandatory dismissal according to the procedure
2. Contain a succinct description of the matter being appealed; and
outlined below. Failure to fulfill this requirement must be reported to the
3. Be filed with the Office of the Dean of Graduate Studies no later
Dean of Graduate Studies in a timely manner by the department head or
than 20 business days from the date upon which the student
division/program director.
received official notification from the Dean regarding his or her
Probation and Discretionary Dismissal
dismissal.
Procedures
Upon receipt of a timely appeal of a discretionary or mandatory dismissal,
the Dean shall appoint a review committee composed of three tenured
If a student is subject to academic probation as a result of an initial
faculty members who are not members of the student’s home or minor
indication of unsatisfactory academic progress, the Dean of Graduate
department or division. The review committee shall review the student’s
Studies shall notify the student of his or her probationary status in a
appeal and issue a written recommendation thereon to the Dean within
timely manner.
20 business days. During the course of performing this function, the
If a student is subject to discretionary dismissal by one of the
committee may:
mechanisms defined above, the Dean shall notify the student and invite
1. Interview the student, the student’s advisor, and, if appropriate, the
him or her to submit a written remedial plan, including performance
student’s thesis committee;
milestones and deadlines, to correct the deficiencies that caused or
contributed to the student’s unsatisfactory academic progress. The
2. Review all documentation related to the appeal under
remedial plan, which must be approved by the student’s faculty advisor
consideration;
and the department head, division or program director, shall be submitted
3. Secure the assistance of outside expertise, if needed; and
to the Dean no later than 15 business days from the date of official
4. Obtain any other relevant information necessary to properly
notification to the student of the potential discretionary dismissal. If the
consider the appeal.
Dean concludes that the remedial plan is likely to lead to successful
completion of all degree requirements within an acceptable time frame,
The authority to render a final decision regarding all graduate student
the Dean may halt the discretionary dismissal process and allow the
appeals filed hereunder shall rest with the Dean of Graduate Studies.
student to continue working toward his or her degree. If the Dean
Exceptions and Appeals
concludes that the remedial plan is inadequate, or that it is unlikely
to lead to successful completion of all degree requirements within an
Academic Policies and Requirements
acceptable time frame, the Dean shall notify the student of his or her
Academic policies and requirements are included in the Bulletin on the
discretionary dismissal and inform the student of his or her right to appeal
authority of the Mines Board of Trustees as delegated to the Faculty
the dismissal as outlined below.
Senate. These include matters such as degree requirements, grading
systems, thesis and dissertation standards, admission standards and

Colorado School of Mines 23
new and modified degree programs, certificates, minors and courses. No
Making up Undergraduate Deficiencies
Mines administrator, faculty or staff member may change, waive or grant
If the department or division decides that new students do not have
exceptions to such academic policies and requirements without approval
the necessary background to complete an advanced degree, they will
of the Graduate Council, the Senate and/or the Board of Trustees as
be required to enroll in courses for which they will receive no credit
appropriate.
toward their graduate degree, or complete supervised readings, or
Administrative Policies and Procedures
both. Students are notified of their apparent deficiency areas in their
acceptance letter from the Graduate School or in their first interview with
Administrative Policies and Procedures are included in this Bulletin on the
their department advisor.
authority of the Mines Board of Trustees as delegated to the appropriate
administrative office. These include (but are not limited to) matters such
Graduate students must attain a B average in deficiency courses,
as student record keeping, thesis and dissertation formats and deadlines,
and any student receiving a grade of D in a deficiency course will be
registration requirements and procedures, assessment of tuition and
required to repeat the course. Grades for these deficiency courses
fees, and allocation of financial aid. The Dean of Graduate Studies may
are recorded on the student’s transcript, become part of the student’s
waive or grant exceptions to such administrative policies and procedures
permanent record, and are calculated into the overall GPA. Students
as warranted by the circumstances of individual cases.
whose undergraduate records are deficient should remove all deficiencies
as soon as possible after they enroll for graduate studies.
Any graduate student may request a waiver or exception by the following
process:
Graduate Students in Undergraduate
1. Contact the Graduate Office to determine whether a standard form
Courses
exists. If so, complete the form. If a standard form does not exist,
Students may apply toward graduate degree requirements a maximum
prepare a memo with a statement of the request and a discussion
of nine (9) semester hours of department-approved 400-level course
of the reasons why a waiver or exception would be justified.
work not taken to remove deficiencies upon the recommendation of the
2. Have the memo or the form approved by the student’s advisor and
graduate committee and the approval of the Graduate Dean.
department head or division director, then submit it to the Dean of
Graduate Studies.
Students may apply toward graduate degree requirements 300-level
3. If the request involves academic policies or requirements, the Dean
courses only in those programs which have been recommended by the
of Graduate Studies will request Graduate Council approval at the
department and have been approved by the Graduate Council before the
Council’s next regularly scheduled meeting.
student enrolls in the course. In that case a maximum of nine (9) total
hours of 300- and 400-level courses will be accepted for graduate credit.
4. The Dean of Graduate Studies will notify the student of the
decision. The student may file a written appeal with the Provost
Independent Study (X99)
within 10 business days of being notified of the decision. The
For each semester credit hour awarded for independent study a student
Provost will investigate as appropriate to the issue under
is expected to invest approximately the same effort that would be
consideration and render a decision. The decision of the Provost is
required for an equivalently credited traditional course. To register for
final.
independent study course, a student should get from the Registrar’s
5. At the next graduate Council meeting, the Dean will notify the
Office the form provided for that purpose, have it completed by the
Graduate Council of the request, the decision and the reasons for
instructor involved and appropriate department/division head, and return
the decision. If the Graduate Council endorses the decision, then
it to the Registrar’s Office.
any other student in the same situation having the same justification
can expect the same decision.
Course and Research Grades
Public Access to the Graduate Thesis
All candidates for graduate degrees must maintain a cumulative grade
point average of at least 3.0 in all courses taken after acceptance into
The award of a thesis-based graduate degree is conditioned on the
a degree program. This includes both graduate and undergraduate
student’s deposit of his or her completed thesis in the Mines library to
courses. Any grade lower than “C-” is not acceptable for credit toward
ensure its availability to the public. Although the student retains the
graduate degree requirements or graduate deficiencies.
copyright in the thesis, by depositing the thesis with the library, the
student assigns a perpetual, non-exclusive, royalty-free license to Mines
For research credits, students receive either an “In Progress-Satisfactory”
to permit Mines to copy the thesis and allow the public reasonable access
or an “In Progress-Unsatisfactory” grade based on their faculty advisor’s
to it.
evaluation of their work. Research grades do not enter into the
calculation of the student’s grade point average.
Under special circumstances, Mines may agree to include proprietary
research in a graduate student’s thesis. The nature and extent of the
Students who fail to maintain a grade point average of at least 3.0, or
proprietary research reported in the thesis must be agreed upon in writing
who receive an In Progress-Unsatisfactory research grade are placed
by the principal investigator, student and Dean of Graduate Studies.
on academic probation by the Graduate Dean and may be subject to
In some cases, the proprietary nature of the underlying research may
discretionary dismissal as defined by the Unsatisfactory Academic
require the school to delay public access to the completed thesis for
Performance (p. 8) section of this Bulletin.
a limited period of time. In no case will public access to the thesis be
Grade Appeal Process
denied for more than12 months from the date the Statement of Work
Completion form is submitted to the Graduate School.
Mines faculty have the responsibility, and sole authority for, assigning
grades. As instructors, this responsibility includes clearly stating the
instructional objectives of a course, defining how grades will be assigned
in a way that is consistent with these objectives, and then assigning
grades. It is the student’s responsibility to understand the grading criteria

24 Graduate
and then maintain the standards of academic performance established
Upon request, the Faculty Affairs Committee may share
for each course in which he or she is enrolled.
summaries of testimony and other information examined
by the Committee with both the student and the instructor.
If a student believes he or she has been unfairly graded, the student may
Certain information, however, may be redacted from materials
appeal the grade to the Faculty Affairs Committee of the Faculty Senate.
forwarded to the student and instructor to maintain other
The Faculty Affairs Committee is the faculty body authorized to review
students’ rights subject to protection under the Family
and modify course grades, in appropriate circumstances. Any decision
Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), or other state
made by the Faculty Affairs Committee is final. In evaluating a grade
and federal law.
appeal, the Faculty Affairs Committee will place the burden of proof on
Based on its investigation, the Faculty Affairs Committee will
the student. For a grade to be revised by the Faculty Affairs Committee,
determine whether the grade should be revised. The decision
the student must demonstrate that the grading decision was unfair by
rendered will be either:
documenting that one or more of the following conditions applied:
i The original grading decision is upheld, or
1. The grading decision was based on something other than course
ii Sufficient evidence exists to indicate a grade has been
performance; unless the grade was a result of penalty for academic
assigned unfairly.
dishonesty or the grade was WI (withdrawn involuntarily).
In this latter case, the Faculty Affairs Committee
2. The grading decision was based on standards that were
will assign the student a new grade for the course.
unreasonably different from those applied to other students in the
The Committee’s written decision and supporting
same section of that course.
documentation will be delivered to the President of
3. The grading decision was based on standards that differed
the Faculty Senate, the office of the EVPAA, the
substantially and unreasonably from those previously articulated by
student, the instructor, and the instructor’s Department
the instructor.
Head/Division Director no later than 25 business days
following the Senate’s receipt of the grade appeal. The
To appeal a grade, the student must proceed as follows:
Faculty Affairs Committee’s decision shall constitute the
1. The student must prepare a written appeal of the grade received in
final decision of the grade appeal. There is no further
the course. This appeal must clearly define the basis for the appeal
internal appeal available to the parties.
and must present all relevant evidence supporting the student’s
case.
The schedule, but not the process, outlined above may be modified upon
2. After preparing the written appeal, the student must deliver this
mutual agreement of the student, the instructor, and the Faculty Affairs
appeal to the course instructor and attempt to resolve the issue
Committee
directly with the instructor. Written grade appeals must be delivered
to the instructor no later than 10 business days after the start of the
Graduation
regular (fall or spring) semester immediately following the semester
in which the contested grade was received. In the event that the
All students expecting to graduate must
course instructor is unavailable, the course coordinator (first) or
submit a graduation application to the Office
the Department Head/Division Director (second) will represent the
of Graduate Studies.
instructor.
Graduation application deadlines are scheduled well in advance of
3. If after discussion with the instructor, the student is still dissatisfied,
the date of Commencement to allow time for ordering diploma covers
he or she can proceed with the appeal by submitting three copies of
and for printing graduation invitations and programs. Students who
the written appeal plus three copies of a summary of the instructor/
submit applications after the stated deadline cannot be guaranteed a
student meetings held in connection with the previous step to the
diploma dated for that graduation, and cannot be assured inclusion
President of the Faculty Senate. These must be submitted to the
in the graduation program or ceremony. Graduation applications are
President of the Faculty Senate no later than 25 business days after
accepted only for students who have previously submitted to, and had
the start of the regular semester immediately following the semester
approved by the Office of Graduate Studies, the appropriate Advisor/
in which the contested grade was received. The President of the
Thesis Committee and Admission to Candidacy forms as applicable to
Faculty Senate will forward the student’s appeal and supporting
the degree sought.
documents to the Faculty Affairs Committee, the course instructor’s
Department Head/Division Director, and the instructor.
All graduating students must officially check out of their degree program.
4. The Faculty Affairs Committee will request a response to the appeal
Checkout cards may be obtained from the Graduate Office and must
from the instructor and begin an investigation of the student’s
be completed and returned by the established deadline. Students must
allegations and basis for appealing the grade. During the course of
register for the next term unless the graduation checkout process is
performing its investigation, the Committee may:
completed by the last day of registration for the following semester.
A. Interview the student, the student’s advisor, the course
The awarding of a degree is contingent upon the student’s successful
instructor and other witnesses deemed relevant to the
completion of all program requirements with at least a 3.000 GPA before
investigation;
the date of graduation. Students who fail to graduate at the time originally
B. Review all documentation related to the appeal under
anticipated must reapply for the next graduation before the appropriate
consideration;
deadline date stated in the Graduate Handbook.
C. Secure the assistance of outside expertise, if needed; and
Students who have completed all of their degree requirements before
D. Obtain any other information deemed necessary to consider
the specific graduation date, but who have not applied for graduation
and resolve the appeal.
can, if necessary, request a letter from the Graduate Office certifying

Colorado School of Mines 25
the completion of their programs. The student should apply for the next
B
Acceptable for Graduate credit
graduation, and the diploma will show the date of that graduation.
B-
Graduation exercises are held in December and May. Students eligible
C+
to graduate at these times are expected to attend their respective
C
May be acceptable for Graduate
graduation exercises. Students in thesis-based degree programs may
credit
not, under any circumstances, attend graduation exercises before
C-
completing all degree requirements.
D+
Diplomas, transcripts, and letters of completion will not be released by
D
Not accdeptable for graduate credit
the School for any student or graduate who has an unsettled obligation of
D-
any kind to the School.
F
Failed
Withdrawing from School
S Satisfactory
C- or better, used only as a mid-
To officially withdraw from Mines, a graduate student must communicate
term grade
directly with the Graduate Dean or process a withdrawal form through
U
Unsatisfactory below C-, used only
the Graduate Office. When the form is completed, the student will
as a mid-term grade
receive grades of W in courses in progress. If the student does not
INC
Incomplete
officially withdraw the course grades are recorded as F’s. Leaving school
PRG
Satisfactory Progress
without having paid tuition and fees will result in the encumbrance of the
PRU
Unsatisfactory Progress
transcript. Federal aid recipients should check with the financial aid office
to determine what impact a withdrawal may have on current or future aid.
Graduate students enrolled in undergraduate-level courses (400-level
and below) are graded using the undergraduate grading system. See the
Nondegree Students
Mines Undergraduate Bulletin (bulletin.mines.edu/undergraduate) for a
A nondegree student is one who has not applied to pursue a degree
description of this system.
program at Mines but wishes to take courses regularly offered on
In addition to these performance symbols, the following is a list of
campus. Nondegree students register for courses through the Registrar’s
additional registration symbols that may appear on a CSM transcript.
office after degree students have registered. Such students may take
any course for which they have the prerequisites as listed in the Mines
Grade
Numerical Value
Bulletin or have the permission of the instructor. Transcripts or evidence
WI
Involuntarily Withdrawn
of the prerequisites are required. Nondegree students pay all applicable
W
Withdrew, No Penalty
tuition and student fees.
T
Transfer Credit
Veterans’ Benefits
NC
Not for Credit
Colorado School of Mines is approved by the Colorado State Approving
Z
Grade not yet Submitted
Agency for Veteran Benefits under chapters 30, 31, 32, 35, and 1606.
Incomplete Grade
Graduate students must register for and maintain nine hours of graduate
work in any semester to be certified as a full-time student for full-time
If a graduate student fails to complete a course because of illness or
benefits. Any hours taken under the full-time category will decrease the
other reasonable excuse, the student receives a grade of Incomplete,
benefits to 3/4 time, 1/2 time, or tuition payment only.
a temporary grade which indicates a deficiency in the quantity of work
done. A graduate student must remove all Incomplete grades within
Students receiving benefits must report all changes in hours, addresses,
the first four weeks of the first semester of attendance following that in
marital status, or dependents to the Veterans’ Counseling Office located
which the grade was received. If not removed within the four weeks, the
in the Registrar’s Office as soon as possible to avoid overpayment
Incomplete will become an F.
or underpayment. Veterans must see the Veterans’ Counselor each
semester to be certified for any benefits for which they may be eligible.
Satisfactory Progress Grades
In order for veterans to continue to receive benefits, they must make
A graduate student may receive a grade of Satisfactory Progress, PRG,
satisfactory progress as defined by CSM.
in either one of three possible situations:
Graduate Grading System
1. As a passing grade given in a course that is graded pass-fail,
Grades
2. As a grade for a course extending more than one semester or
3. As a grade indicating completion of research credit hours.
When a student registers in a graduate (500 and 600 level ) course,
one of the following grades will appear on the academic record. Grades
When applied to pass-fail courses, the Satisfactory Progress grade, PRG,
are based on the level of performance and represent the extent of the
indicates successful completion of the requirements of the course. A
student’s demonstrated mastery of the material listed in the course
grade of Unsatisfactory Progress, PRU, as applied to pass-fail courses,
outline and achievement of the stated course objectives. These are
indicates the student failed to meet the requirements for successful
CSM’s grade symbols and their qualitative interpretations:
completion the course. The PRG and PRU grades have no point value
toward a student’s GPA. As described in the Unsatisfactory Academic
Grade
Numerical Value
Performance (p. 8) portion of this Bulletin programs may determine that
A
a PRU received in a course indicates unsatisfactory progress toward
A-
degree completion and trigger academic disciplinary proceedings.
B+

26 Graduate
For students completing independent study or seminar courses extending
point average, the number of cumulative quality hours is divided into the
over multiple semesters, the progress grade has no point value. In
cumulative quality points earned. Grades of W, WI, INC, PRG, PRU, or
such cases, the student receives a grade of PRG, which indicates that
NC are not counted in quality hours.
the work is not yet completed. For multi-semester independent study
Semester Hours
courses, upon completion of course requirements, final grades are
assigned to all semesters in which the student enrolled in the course,
The number of times a class meets during a week (for lecture, recitation,
replacing previous PRG grades as appropriate. In seminar courses which
or laboratory) determines the number of semester hours assigned to that
may not be repeated for credit, even if continuous enrollment is required
course. Class sessions are normally 50 minutes long and represent one
by the degree program, the PRG grade remains with a final grade being
hour of credit for each hour meeting. Two to four hours of laboratory work
assigned to last semester of attendance only.
per week are equivalent to 1-semester hour of credit. For the average
student, each hour of lecture and recitation requires at least two hours of
For all multi-semester courses, independent study and seminar, students
preparation.
must register for the same course in each regular (Fall or Spring)
semester of attendance until such time as a final grade is assigned."
Grade-Point Averages
When applied to research credits, the Satisfactory Progress grade,
Grade-Point Averages shall be specified, recorded, reported, and used to
PRG, also has no point value toward a student’s GPA, but indicates
three figures following the decimal point for any and all purposes to which
satisfactory progress toward completion of the research component of
said averages may apply.
a student’s thesis-based degree program. In this situation, a grade of
All graduate degree programs require students have a minimum overall
PRU, Unsatisfactory Progress, may be given, and if given, indicates
grade point average of 3.000 in order to be eligible to receive the degree.
that a student has not made satisfactory progress toward the research
All courses (including deficiency courses) taken at the Colorado School
component of a thesis-based degree program. In this case, receipt
of Mines after first enrolling in a graduate degree program are included
of a grade of PRU may trigger academic disciplinary proceedings as
in the calculation of the overall grade point average for that program.
described in the Unsatisfactory Academic Performance (p. 8) portion of
Grades for courses applied to a degree program as transfer credit are not
this Bulletin.
included in any grade point average calculation. Specifics in calculating
Unless faculty submit change of grade forms to the Registrar, grades of
the overall, and other grade point averages are defined below.
PRU delivered for unsatisfactory research performance, are not changed
to PRG upon the successful completion of a student’s degree program.
Overall Grade-Point Average
NC Grade
Beginning Fall 2011, all attempts at every CSM course will count in the
overall grade point average. No repeat exclusions apply.
For special reasons and with the instructor’s permission, a student may
The overall grade-point average includes all attempts at courses taken at
register in a course for no credit (NC). To have the grade NC appear on
Colorado School of Mines with the exception of courses which fall under
the transcript, the student must enroll at registration time as a NC student
the repeat policy in effect from Fall 2007 through Summer 2011.
in the course and comply with all conditions stipulated by the course
instructor. If a student registered as NC fails to satisfy all conditions, no
If a course completed during the Fall 2007 term through Summer 2011
record of this registration in the course will be made.
was a repeat of a course completed in any previous term and the course
was not repeatable for credit, the grade and credit hours earned for the
Quality Hours and Quality Points
most recent occurrence of the course will count toward the student’s
For graduation a student must successfully complete a certain number
grade-point average and the student’s degree requirements. The most
of required semester hours and must maintain grades at a satisfactory
recent course occurrence must be an exact match to the previous course
level. Numerical values assigned to each letter grade are given in the
completed (subject and number). The most recent grade is applied to the
table below.
overall grade-point average even if the previous grade is higher.
Grade
Numerical Value
Courses from other institutions transferred to Colorado School of Mines
A
4.000
are not counted in any grade-point average, and cannot be used under
this repeat policy. Only courses originally completed and subsequently
A-
3.700
repeated at Colorado School of Mines during Fall 2007 through Summer
B+
3.300
2011 with the same subject code and number apply to this repeat policy.
B
3.000
All occurrences of every course taken at Colorado School of Mines will
B-
2.700
appear on the official transcript along with the associated grade. Courses
C+
2.300
from other institutions transferred to Colorado School of Mines are not
C
2.000
counted in any grade-point average.
C-
1.700
D+
1.300
D
1.000
D-
0.700
F
0.000
The number of quality points earned in any course is the number of
semester hours assigned to that course multiplied by the numerical
value of the grade received. The quality hours earned are the number
of semester hours in which grades are awarded. To compute a grade-

Colorado School of Mines 27
Tuition, Fees, Financial
The amount of tuition and fee assessment is based primarily on each
student’s enrolled courses. In the event a student withdraws from a
Assistance
course or courses, assessments will be adjusted as follows:
• If the withdrawal is made prior to the end of the add/drop period for the
Tuition and fees are established by the Board of Trustees of the Colorado
term of enrollment, as determined by the Registrar, tuition and fees will
School of Mines following the annual budget process and action by the
be adjusted to the new course level without penalty.
Colorado General Assembly and Governor.
• If the withdrawal from a course or courses is made after the add/drop
Graduate Tuition
period, and the student does not officially withdraw from school, no
The official tuition and approved charges for the 2012-2013 academic
adjustment in charges will be made.
year will be available prior to the start of the 2012-2013 academic
• If the withdrawal from courses is made after the add/drop period, and
year located at http://www.is.mines.edu/budget/budget_current/
the student withdraws from school, tuition and fee assessments will be
tuition_rates.pdf.
reduced according to the following schedule:
• Within the 7 calendar days following the end of the add/drop period,
Fees
60 percent reduction in charges.
The official fees, approved charges, and fee descriptions for the
• Within the next following 7 calendar days, a 40 percent reduction in
2012-2013 academic year will be available prior to the start of the
charges.
2012-2013 academic year and can be found at: http://www.is.mines.edu/
• Within the next following 7 calendar days, a 20 percent reduction in
budget/budget_current/fees.pdf.
charges.
Please note that graduate students who register for undergraduate
• After that period, no reduction of charges will be made.
courses to satisfy deficiencies may be assessed the same fee that an
undergraduate student would pay.
The schedule above applies to the Fall and Spring semesters. The time
Payments and Refunds
periods for the Summer sessions - Field and Summer - will be adjusted in
proportion to the reduced number of days in these semesters.
Payment Information
Room and board refunds are prorated to the date of checkout from the
A student is expected to complete the registration process, including the
Residence Hall. Arrangements must be made with the Housing Office.
payment of tuition and fees, before attending class. Students should mail
Student health insurance charges are not refundable. The insurance
their payments to:
remains in effect for the entire semester.
Cashier Colorado School of Mines
PLEASE NOTE: Students receiving federal financial aid under the Title IV
1500 Illinois St.
programs may have a different refund determined as required by federal
Golden, CO 80401-1869 or
law or regulations.
pay at the Cashier’s Office in The Ben Parker Student Center. Please
Financial Assistance for Graduate Studies
write your student ID on payment.
Graduate study is a considerable investment of time, energy, and
Late Payment Penalties
money by serious students who expect a substantial return not only
in satisfaction but also in future earnings. Applicants are expected to
A penalty will be assessed against a student if payment is not received
weigh carefully the investment they are willing to make against expected
in full by the official day of registration. The penalty is described in the
benefits before applying for admission.
schedule of courses for each semester. If payment is not completed
by the sixth week of class, the student may be officially withdrawn from
Students are also expected to make full use of any resources available,
classes.
including personal and loan funds, to cover expenses, and the School
can offer some students financial aid through graduate research
Financial Responsibility
and teaching assistantships and through industry, state, and federal
Registration for classes at CSM implies an obligation by the student to
fellowships.
meet all related financial responsibilities in a timely manner. Students
Purpose of Financial Aid
who do not fulfill their financial obligations according to published
deadlines are subject to the following: late payment penalties accrued
The Graduate School’s limited financial aid is used
on any outstanding balance, and the withholding of transcripts. Past due
1. To give equal access to graduate study by assisting students with
accounts will be turned over to Colorado Central Collection Services
limited personal resources;
in accordance with Colorado law. Collection costs will be added to the
2. To compensate graduate students who teach and do research;
student’s account, and delinquencies may be reported to national credit
bureaus.
3. To give an incentive to exceptional students who can provide
academic leadership for continually improving graduate programs.
Encumbrances
Employment Restrictions and Agreements
A student will not be permitted to register for future classes, to graduate,
or to get an official transcript of his academic record while indebted in any
Students who are employed full time or who are enrolled part time are not
way to CSM.
eligible for financial aid through the Graduate School.
Refunds
Students who are awarded assistantships must sign an appointment
agreement, which gives the terms of appointment and specifies the
Refunds for tuition and fees are made according to the following policy:
amount and type of work required. Graduate assistants who hold

28 Graduate
regular appointments are expected to devote all of their efforts to their
educational program and may not be otherwise employed without the
written permission of their supervisor and the Graduate Dean. Students
with assistantships during the academic year must be registered as
full time. During the summer session they must be registered for a
minimum of three credit hours, unless they qualify for the summer
research registration exception. Please see http://www.mines.edu/
graduate_admissions for details on summer registration exception
eligibility.
Aid Application Forms
New students interested in applying for financial aid are encouraged
to apply early. Financial aid forms are included in Graduate School
application packets and may be filled out and returned with the other
application papers.
Graduate Fellowships
The departments and divisions may award fellowships based on the
student’s academic performance.
Graduate Student Loans
Need-based federal student loans are available for graduate students
who need additional funding beyond their own resources and any
assistantships or fellowships they may receive. The Free Application for
Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) must be completed to apply for these loan
funds. Students must be degree seeking and attending at least part-time
(4.5 hrs) per semester to be eligible. Degree seeking students who are
approved for reduced registration (4 hrs/semester) are also eligible.
Specific information and procedures for filing the FAFSA can be
found on the Financial Aid Office web site at http://finaid.mines.edu/
Grad_TOC.html. The Financial Aid Office telephone number is
303-273-3220, and the email address is finaid@mines.edu.
Satisfactory Academic Progress for Federal
Student Loans and Colorado Grad Grant
To maintain eligibility for federal student loans, students are expected
to achieve a minimum 3.000 cumulative grade average at the end of
each semester. In addition, if students enroll full time (9 credits or more)
they must pass at least 9 credits. If enrolled for fewer than 9 credits,
students must pass all of the credits for which they are registered. If this
is not done, the student will be given a financial aid warning semester,
after which the student must return to satisfactory academic standing to
maintain eligibility. Satisfactory academic progress is determined after
each semester, including summer.

Colorado School of Mines 29
Graduate Departments and
by individual degree programs. To apply toward meeting this requirement,
these must have been formally approved by the Ethics Across the
Programs
Curriculum Committee. Refer to the individual program sections of this
Bulletin for a description of equivalent means of satisfying the RCR
Colorado School of Mines offers post-baccalaureate programs leading
requirement that may exist within individual degree programs.
to the awarding of Graduate Certificates, Professional Masters degrees,
Students and advisors are required to certify successful completion of the
thesis and non-thesis Master of Science and Master of Engineering
NSF-RCR requirement as part of the Admission to Candidacy process
degrees, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. This section describes these
described in the sections below.
degrees and explains the minimum institutional requirements for each.
Students may apply to, and be admitted in, multiple graduate degrees
III. Professional Programs
simultaneously. In this case, a student may use the same graduate
course credits to satisfy the degree requirements for each degree.
A. Graduate Certificate Program
Students enrolled simultaneously in two Masters degree programs may
Graduate Certificate Programs at CSM are designed to have selective
double count up to half of the course credits required for the Masters
focus, short time to completion and consist of course work only. For more
degree program with the smallest course credit hour requirement toward
information about specific professional programs, please refer to the
both degree programs. Students simultaneously enrolled in a Masters
“Graduate Degree Programs and Description of Courses” portion of this
degree and Doctoral degree may double count course credits toward
Bulletin.
each degree without limit. Course credits, however, may never be applied
1. Academic Requirements
(i.e., double counted in the case of concurrent degree enrollment or used
as transfer credit in the case of sequential degree enrollment) toward
Each Graduate Certificate requires a minimum of 12 total credit hours.
more than two graduate degrees.
No more than 3 credit hours at the 400 level may be applied toward the
minimum credit-hours requirement. All other credits must be at or above
Before the Graduate School will count these credits toward each degree
the 500 level. Students may not, on an individual basis, request credit
requirement, the student must obtain written permission to do so from
hours be transferred from other institutions as part of the Certificate
each department, division or program granting degree. This permission
requirements. Some Graduate Certificates, however, may allow the
should be submitted with the student’s Admission to Candidacy forms
application of specific, pre-approved transfer credits, or credits from other
and should clearly indicate that each degree program is aware that
institutions with whom CSM has formal agreements for this purpose
credits are being counted toward the requirements of multiple degrees.
toward fulfilling the requirements of the Certificate. All courses applied to
For thesis-based students this permission should be provided by the
a Graduate Certificate are subject to approval by the program offering the
student’s thesis committee. For non-thesis and certificate programs,
certificate.
permission should be obtained from program coordinators or department/
division chairs.
If a student has earned a Graduate Certificate and subsequently applies,
and is accepted into a Master’s or PhD program at Mines, credits earned
I. Degree Retirement Notification and
in the Certificate Program may, with the approval of the advanced degree
Requirement Definition
program, be applied to the advanced degree subject to all the applicable
restrictions on credit hours that may be applied toward fulfilling the
Admission into the following degree programs (Masters and Doctoral) is
requirements of the advanced degree.
suspended after the Fall, 2012 semester.
2. Admission to Candidacy
• Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Full-time students must complete the following requirements within the
• Engineering with specialities in Systems, Civil, Electrical, Mechanical
first semester after enrolling into a Graduate Certificate degree program.
• Environmental Science and Engineering
• complete all prerequisites and core curriculum course requirements of
Both continuing students and students admitted into these degree
their program, and
programs Fall, 2012 are encouraged to change programs to the
• be admitted into full candidacy for the certificate.
newly approved programs replacing these older programs. Program
requirements for students admitted Fall, 2012 wishing to remain in
A list of prerequisites and core curriculum requirements for Graduate
the discontinued programs are as defined in the 2011-2012 Graduate
Certificate degrees is published by each program. When a student is
Bulletin.
admitted with deficiencies, the appropriate department head, division
director or program director will provide the student with a written list of
II. Responsible Conduct of Research
courses required to remove these deficiencies. This list will be given to
Requirement
the student no later than one week after the start of classes of his/her first
semester in order to allow for adding/dropping courses as necessary.
All students supported at any time in their graduate career through the
National Science Foundation (NSF), as research assistants, hourly
Upon completion of the above-defined requirements, a student must
employees or fellowship awardees, must complete training in the
submit an Admission to Candidacy and a Statement of Work Completion
responsible conduct of research (RCR). This requirement is in addition to
forms documenting satisfactory completion of the prerequisites and core
all other institutional and program requirements described below and in
curriculum requirements. The form must have the written approval of the
the appropriate program sections of this Bulletin.
program offering the Graduate Certificate.
To satisfy the RCR requirement students must as a minimum complete
B. Professional Master’s Program
the one credit hour course; SYGN502, or an equivalent. This may be
CSM awards specialized, career-oriented non-thesis Master degrees with
done at any time prior a student’s formal Admission to Candidacy.
the title of “Professional Master (descriptive title).” These are custom-
Equivalent programs may include alternative RCR training options offered
designed, interdisciplinary degrees, each with a curriculum meeting the

30 Graduate
career advancement needs of a particular group of professionals in a
be completed as transfer credits into the degree program. For thesis
field that is part of CSM’s role and mission. For more information about
Master’s degrees, no more than 9 credits may transfer. The transfer
these programs, please refer to the “Graduate Degree Programs and
credit limit includes Mines distance learning courses. Transfer credits
Description of Courses” portion of this Bulletin.
must not have been used as credit toward a Bachelor degree. Requests
for transfer credit must be approved by the faculty according to the
1. Academic Requirements
process defined by a student’s home department or division. All credits
Each Professional Master’s degree consists of a minimum of 30 total
applied toward degree, except transfer credits, must be earned on
credit hours. Students must complete at least 21 credit hours at CSM in
campus. Students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0
the degree program. The remaining hours may be transferred into the
or better in Mines course work.
program. Requests for transfer credit must be approved by the faculty
2. Minor Programs
according to a process defined by the student’s home department or
division. Transfer credits must not have been used as credit toward
Students may choose to have a minor program or programs at the
a Bachelor degree. The transfer limit includes CSM distance learning
Master’s level. A minor program may not be taken in the student’s major
courses. Up to six credit hours of Special Topic or Independent Study
area of study. A designated minor requires a minimum of 9 semester
may be in the form of project credits done on the job as an employee or
hours of course work and must be approved by the student’s advisor,
as a graduate intern. If project credits are to be used, the project proposal
home department head, and a faculty representative of the minor area of
and final report must be approved by a CSM faculty advisor, although
study.
direct supervision may be provided by the employer. Students must
3. Admission to Candidacy
maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better in CSM course
work.
Full-time students must complete the following requirements within one
calendar year of enrolling into the Master’s degree program.
2. Admission to Candidacy
• have a thesis committee appointment form on file in the Graduate
Full-time students must complete the following requirements within the
Office;
first calendar year after enrolling into a Professional Master’s degree
• complete all prerequisite and core curriculum course requirements of
program.
their department, division or program; and
• complete all prerequisite and core curriculum course requirements of
• be admitted into full candidacy for the degree.
their program, and
• be admitted into full candidacy for the degree.
Each degree program publishes a list of prerequisite and core curriculum
requirements for that degree. If students are admitted with deficiencies,
Each program publishes a list of prerequisites and core curriculum
the appropriate department heads, division directors or program directors
requirements for Professional Master’s degrees. When a student is
will provide the students written lists of courses required to remove the
admitted with deficiencies, the appropriate department head, division
deficiencies. These lists will be given to the students no later than one
director or program director will provide the student with a written list of
week after the start of classes of their first semester in order to allow
courses required to remove these deficiencies. This list will be given to
them to add/drop courses as necessary.
the student no later than one week after the start of classes of his/her first
Upon completion of the above defined requirements, students must
semester in order to allow for adding/dropping courses as necessary.
submit an Admission to Candidacy form documenting satisfactory
Upon completion of the above-defined requirements, a student must
completion of the prerequisite and core curriculum requirements and
submit an Admission to Candidacy form documenting satisfactory
granting permission to begin Master’s level research. The form must have
completion of the prerequisites and core curriculum requirements.
the written approval of all members of the advisor and thesis committee, if
The form must have the written approval of the program offering the
appropriate.
Professional Masters degree.
B. Non-thesis Option
IV. Master of Science and Engineering
Non-thesis Master’s degrees (both non-thesis Master of Science and
Programs
Master of Engineering) are offered by a number of departments, divisions
A. General Requirements
and programs. In lieu of preparing a thesis, non-thesis master’s program
students are required to complete a research or design experience
Graduate study at CSM can lead to one of a number of thesis and non-
taken as a special problem or as an independent study course. See
thesis based Master’s degrees, depending on the interests of the student.
the department/division section of the “Graduate Degree Programs and
All Master’s degree programs share the same academic requirements for
Description of Courses” portion of this Bulletin for more information.
grades, definition of minor programs, and the need to apply for admission
Although non-thesis master’s students are not assigned a Thesis
to candidacy.
Committee, students in this program do select a faculty advisor, subject
1. Academic Requirements
to the approval of the student’s home department.
A Master’s degree at Mines requires a minimum of 30 total credit hours.
C. Thesis Option
As part of this 30 hours, departments and divisions are required to
Thesis-based Master of Science degrees require completion of a
include a research or design experience supervised by Mines faculty. For
satisfactory thesis and successful oral defense of this thesis. Academic
more information about the specific research/design requirements, please
credit toward completion of the thesis must include successful completion
refer to the appropriate department/division section of the “Graduate
of no fewer than 6 credit hours of masters-level research credit. The
Degree Programs and Description of Courses” portion of this Bulletin.
thesis is expected to report on original research that results in new
For non-thesis Master’s degrees, students must complete at least 21
knowledge and/or techniques or on creative engineering design that
credit hours at Mines in the degree program. All other credits may
applies state-of-the-art knowledge and techniques to solve an important

Colorado School of Mines 31
problem. In either case, the thesis should be an exemplary product that
writing a thesis acceptable to the student’s faculty advisor and Thesis
meets the rigorous scholarship standards of the Colorado School of
Committee.
Mines. The student’s faculty advisor and the Master’s Thesis Committee
3. Thesis Defense
must approve the program of study and the topic for the thesis. The
format of the thesis must comply with the appropriate guidelines
The student submits an initial draft of his or her thesis to the faculty
promulgated by the Graduate School.
advisor, who will work with the student on necessary revisions. Upon
approval of the student’s advisor, the revised thesis is circulated to the
1. Faculty Advisor Appointment
Thesis Committee members at least one week prior to the oral defense
Each thesis-based Master’s student must select a faculty advisor to
of the thesis. The oral defense of the thesis is scheduled during the
provide advice regarding the student’s thesis direction, research and
student’s final semester of study. Students must be registered to defend.
selection of courses. Master’s students must select faculty advisors
This defense session, which may include an examination of material
by the end of the second semester at CSM. Advisors must be full-
covered in the student’s course work, will be open to the public.
time permanent members of the CSM faculty. In this context, full-time
Following the defense, the Thesis Committee will meet privately to vote
permanent members of the CSM faculty are those that hold the rank of
on whether the student has successfully defended the thesis. Three
professor, associate professor, assistant professor, research professor,
outcomes are possible: the student may pass the oral defense; the
associate research professor or assistant research professor. Upon
student may fail the defense; or the Committee may vote to adjourn
approval by the Graduate Dean, adjunct faculty, teaching faculty, visiting
the defense to allow the student more time to address and remove
professors, emeritus professors and off-campus representatives may be
weaknesses or inadequacies in the thesis or underlying research.
designated additional co-advisors.
Two negative votes will constitute a failure regardless of the number
The Director of the degree program, often times the head of the student’s
of Committee members present at the thesis defense. In the event of
home department or division, and the Graduate Dean must approve all
either failure or adjournment, the Chair of the Thesis Committee will
faculty advisor appointments.
prepare a written statement indicating the reasons for this action and
will distribute copies to the student, the Thesis Committee members, the
2. Thesis Committee
student’s department head and the Graduate Dean. In the case of failure
The Graduate Dean appoints a Thesis Committee whose members have
or adjournment, the student may request a re-examination, which must
been recommended by the student, the student’s faculty advisor, and the
be scheduled no less than one week after the original defense. A second
student’s department head. Students should have a thesis committee
failure to defend the thesis satisfactorily will result in the termination of the
appointed by the end of their second semester. This Committee will have
student’s graduate program.
a minimum of three voting members, including the student’s advisor,
Upon passing the oral defense of thesis or report, the student must make
who are familiar with the student’s area of study. Of these Committee
any corrections in the thesis required by the Thesis Committee. The final,
members, two must be from the home department or, in the case of
corrected copy and an executed signature page indicating approval by
interdisciplinary degree programs, an allied department. Off-campus
the student’s advisor and department head must be submitted to the
members can be assigned to the Committee to serve either with full
Office of Graduate Studies for format approval. (Format instructions are
voting status or in a non-voting capacity. Off-campus members with
available in the Office of Graduate Studies and should be obtained before
voting status assume all of the responsibilities of on-campus Committee
beginning work on the thesis.)
members with respect to attendance of Committee meetings, review of
thesis drafts and participation in oral examinations and thesis defense
4. Time Limitations
sessions. If a thesis co-advisor is assigned, an additional faculty member
A candidate for a thesis-based Masters degree must complete all
from the home or allied department must be added to the committee.
requirements for the degree within five years of the date of admission
Students who choose to have a minor program at the Master’s level must
into the degree program. Time spent on approved leaves of absence
select a representative from their minor area of study to serve on the
is included in the five-year time limit. Candidates not meeting the time
Thesis Committee. Minor representatives must be full-time members of
limitation will be notified and withdrawn from their degree programs.
the CSM faculty.
Candidates may apply for a one-time extension of this time limitation.
A Thesis Committee Chairperson is designated by the student at
This application must be made in writing and approved by the candidate’s
the time he/she requests the formation of his/her thesis committee.
advisor, thesis committee, department and Dean of Graduate Studies.
The chairperson is responsible for leading all meetings of the thesis
The application must include specific timelines and milestones for degree
committee and for directing the student’s thesis defense. In selecting a
completion. If an extension is approved, failure to meet any timeline or
Thesis Committee chairperson, the following guidelines must be met:
milestone will trigger immediate withdrawal from the degree program.
1. The chairperson cannot be the student’s advisor or co-advisor and
If the Dean of Graduate Studies denies an extension request, the
2. The chairperson must be a full-time CSM faculty member.
candidate may appeal this decision to the Provost. The appeal must
be made in writing, must specifically state how the candidate believes
Shortly after its appointment, the Committee will meet with the student
the request submitted to the Dean met the requirements of the policy,
to hear a presentation of the proposed course of study and thesis topic.
and must be received no later than 10 business days from the date of
The Committee and the student must agree on a satisfactory program
notification of the Dean’s denial of the original request.
and the student must obtain the Committee approval of the written thesis
proposal at least one semester prior to the thesis defense. The student’s
If a candidate is withdrawn from a degree program through this process
faculty advisor assumes the primary responsibility for monitoring the
(i.e., either by denial of an extension request or failure to meet a timeline
program and directing the thesis work. The award of the thesis-based
or milestone) and wishes to reenter the degree program, that candidate
Master’s degree is contingent upon the student’s researching and
must formally reapply for readmission. The program has full authority
to determine if readmission is to be granted and, if granted to fully re-

32 Graduate
evaluate the Candidate’s work to date and determine its applicability to
or division. Transfer credits are not included in calculating the student’s
the new degree program.
grade point average at CSM.
V. Doctor of Philosophy
In lieu of transfer credit for individual courses defined above, students
who enter the PhD program with a thesis-based Master’s degree from
A. Credits, Hour and Academic Requirements
another institution may transfer up to 36 semester hours in recognition
The Doctor of Philosophy degree requires completion of a minimum of 72
of the course work and research completed for that degree. The request
semester hours beyond the Bachelor degree. At least 24 semester hours
must be approved by the faculty according to a process defined by the
must be research credits earned under the supervision of a Mines faculty
student’s home department or division.
advisor and at least 18 credit hours of course work must be applied to the
D. Faculty Advisor Appointments
degree program. Course requirements for each department or division
are contained in the "Graduate Degree Programs and Description of
Each doctoral student must select a faculty advisor to advise with respect
Courses" section of this Bulletin.
to the student’s thesis direction and research and selection of courses.
Doctoral students must select faculty advisors by the end of the second
The degree also requires completion of a satisfactory doctoral thesis and
semester at CSM. Advisors must be full-time permanent members of the
successful oral defense of this thesis. The Doctoral Thesis is expected
CSM faculty. In this context, full-time permanent members of the CSM
to report on original research that results in a significant contribution of
faculty are those that hold the rank of professor, associate professor,
new knowledge and/or techniques. The student’s faculty advisor and the
assistant professor, research professor, associate research professor
Doctoral Thesis Committee must approve the program of study and the
or assistant research professor. Upon approval by the Graduate Dean,
topic for the thesis.
adjunct faculty, teaching faculty, visiting professors, emeritus professors
B. Residency Requirements
and off-campus representatives may be designated additional co-
advisors.
Doctoral students must complete a residency requirement during the
course of their graduate studies. The purpose of this requirement is to:
The Director of the doctoral degree program, often times the head of the
student’s home department or division, and the Graduate Dean must
• require students to become engaged in extended and focused
approve all faculty advisor appointments.
research activities under the direct supervision of Mines faculty;
• allow students to become immersed in the culture of an academic
E. Minor Programs
environment;
Students may choose a minor program or programs at the PhD level
• allow students to engage in the professional activities associated with
consisting of 12 course credits in the minor program. The student’s
their research discipline;
faculty advisor and Doctoral Thesis Committee, including an appropriate
• ensure students have access to the research tools and expertise
minor committee member as described below, approve the course
needed for their chosen research activity;
selection and sequence in the selected minor program. Students may
choose to complete multiple minor programs. Each program must consist
• ensure the conduct of cutting-edge research with the expectation that
of at least 12 credit hours approved by the faculty advisor and Doctoral
this research will be completed in a timely fashion so that it is still
Thesis Committee, including the appropriate minor committee members.
relevant to the larger research community;
• provide Mines faculty with the ability to directly evaluate the research
F. Doctoral Thesis Committees
and academic credentials of a student and as such protect the integrity
The Graduate Dean appoints a Doctoral Thesis Committee whose
of the degree, department and the institution;
members have been recommended by the student’s doctoral degree
• ensure the research produced by students claiming a Mines degree is
program. Students should have a thesis committee appointed by the end
actually the product of Mines’ intellectual environment; and
of their second semester. This Committee must have a minimum of four
• make it clear that the intellectual property developed while in the
voting members that fulfill the following criteria:
degree program is the property of Mines as defined in the Faculty
1. The Committee must include an advisor who meets the
Handbook.
qualifications defined above. If two advisors are appointed, both
The residency requirement may be met by completing two semesters of
shall be voting members of the Committee.
full-time registration at Mines. The semesters need not be consecutive.
2. The Committee must have at least two voting members
Students may request an exception to the full-time registration
knowledgeable in the technical areas of the thesis in addition to the
requirement from the Dean of Graduate Studies. Requests for exception
advisor(s) and who are full-time permanent CSM faculty members.
must be in writing, must clearly address how the student’s learning
3. The fourth, required member of the Committee must be a full-
experience has met the goals of the residency requirement, as articulated
time permanent CSM faculty member, may not be an advisor, and
above, and must be submitted by both the student and the student’s
must be from outside of the student’s doctoral degree program,
thesis advisor and be approved by the student’s Department Head/
home department and minor program area(s) – if appropriate. This
Division Director.
committee member acts as Thesis Committee Chairperson.
C. Transfer of Credits
4. If a minor field is designated, an additional committee member must
be included who is an expert in that field. Minor representatives
Up to 24 semester hours of graduate-level course work may be
must be full-time permanent members of the CSM faculty who are
transferred from other institutions toward the PhD degree subject to the
participating members of the minor program area. If multiple minor
restriction that those courses must not have been used as credit toward
programs are pursued, each must have a committee representative
a Bachelor degree. Requests for transfer credit must be approved by the
as defined above.
faculty according to a process defined by the student’s home department

Colorado School of Mines 33
5. Off-campus representatives may serve as additional committee
the Committee on any significant change in the nature of the work. The
members. If off-campus members are nominated for voting status,
student submits an initial draft of his or her thesis to the advisor, who
the committee request form must include a brief resume of their
will work with the student on necessary revisions. Upon approval of the
education and/or experience that demonstrates their competence to
student’s advisor, the revised thesis is distributed to the other members of
judge the quality and validity of the thesis. Such members also must
the Committee at least one week prior to the oral defense of the thesis.
agree to assume the same responsibilities expected of on-campus -
The student must pass an oral defense of his or her thesis during the final
Committee members including, but not limited to, attendance at
semester of studies. Students must be registered to defend. This oral
Committee meetings, review of thesis proposals and drafts, and
defense may include an examination of material covered in the student’s
participation in oral examinations and defense.
course work. The defense will be open to the public.
Shortly after its appointment, the Doctoral Thesis Committee meets with
Following the defense, the Doctoral Thesis Committee will meet privately
the student to hear a presentation of the proposed course of study and
to vote on whether the student has successfully defended the thesis.
thesis topic. The Committee and student must agree on a satisfactory
Three outcomes are possible: the student may pass the oral defense;
program. The student’s faculty advisor then assumes the primary
the student may fail the defense; or the Committee may vote to adjourn
responsibility for monitoring the program, directing the thesis work,
the defense to allow the student more time to address and remove
arranging qualifying examinations, and scheduling the thesis defense.
weaknesses or inadequacies in the thesis or underlying research. Two
G. Admission to Candidacy
negative votes will constitute a failure regardless of the number of
Committee members present at the thesis defense. In the event of either
Full-time students must complete the following requirements within the
failure or adjournment, the Chair of the Doctoral Thesis Committee will
first two calendar years after enrolling into the PhD program.
prepare a written statement indicating the reasons for this action and
• have a thesis committee appointment form on file in the Graduate
will distribute copies to the student, the Thesis Committee members, the
Office;
student’s department head and the Graduate Dean. In the case of failure,
the student may request a re-examination, which must be scheduled no
• complete all prerequisite and core curriculum course requirements of
less than one week after the original defense. A second failure to defend
their department, division or program;
the thesis satisfactorily will result in the termination of the student’s
• demonstrate adequate preparation for, and satisfactory ability to
graduate program.
conduct, doctoral research; and
• be admitted into full candidacy for the degree.
Upon passing the oral defense of thesis, the student must make any
corrections in the thesis required by the Doctoral Thesis Committee. The
Each degree program publishes a list of prerequisite and core curriculum
final, corrected copy and an executed signature page indicating approval
requirements for that degree. If students are admitted with deficiencies,
by the student’s advisor and department head must be submitted to the
the appropriate department heads, division directors or program directors
Office of Graduate Studies for format approval.
will provide the students written lists of courses required to remove the
deficiencies. These lists will be given to the students no later than one
I. Time Limitations
week after the start of classes of their first semester in order to allow
A candidate for a thesis-based Doctoral degree must complete all
them to add/drop courses as necessary. Each program also defines
requirements for the degree within nine years of the date of admission
the process for determining whether its students have demonstrated
into the degree program. Time spent on approved leaves of absence
adequate preparation for, and have satisfactory ability to do, high-quality,
is included in the nine-year time limit. Candidates not meeting the time
independent doctoral research in their specialties. These requirements
limitation will be notified and withdrawn from their degree programs.
and processes are described under the appropriate program headings in
Candidates may apply for a one-time extension of this time limitation.
the section of this Bulletin on Graduate Degree Programs and Description
This application must be made in writing and approved by the candidate’s
of Courses.
advisor, thesis committee, department and Dean of Graduate Studies.
Upon completion of these requirements, students must submit an
The application must include specific timelines and milestones for degree
Admission to Candidacy form documenting satisfactory completion of the
completion. If an extension is approved, failure to meet any timeline or
prerequisite and core curriculum requirements and granting permission
milestone will trigger immediate withdrawal from the degree program.
to begin doctoral research. The form must have the written approval of all
If the Dean of Graduate Studies denies an extension request, the
members of the Ph.D. Committee.
candidate may appeal this decision to the Provost. The appeal must
H. Thesis Defense
be made in writing, must specifically state how the candidate believes
the request submitted to the Dean met the requirements of the policy,
The doctoral thesis must be based on original research of excellent
and must be received no later than 10 business days from the date of
quality in a suitable technical field, and it must exhibit satisfactory literary
notification of the Dean’s denial of the original request. The Provost’s
merit. In addition, the format of the thesis must comply with guidelines
decision is final.
promulgated by the Office of Graduate Studies. (Students should obtain
a copy of these guidelines from the Office of Graduate Studies before
If a candidate is withdrawn from a degree program through this process
beginning work on the thesis.)
(i.e., either by denial of an extension request or failure to meet a timeline
or milestone) and wishes to reenter the degree program, that candidate
The thesis topic must be submitted in the form of a written proposal to
must formally reapply for readmission. The program has full authority
the student’s faculty advisor and the Committee. The Committee must
to determine if readmission is to be granted and, if granted to fully re-
approve the proposal at least one year before the thesis defense.
evaluate the Candidate’s work to date and determine its applicability to
The student’s faculty advisor is responsible for supervising the student’s
the new degree program.
research work and consulting with other Doctoral Thesis Committee
members on the progress of the work. The advisor must consult with

34 Graduate
VI. Roles and Responsibilities of
• participate in, as appropriate, the student’s qualifying and
Committee Members and Students
comprehensive examination process to certify completion of minor
degree requirements; and
Below, are the roles and expectations Mines has of faculty as members
• work individually with the student on the thesis aspects for which the
of Thesis Committees and of students engaged in research-based
Minor Committee member has expertise.
degree programs.
Thesis Committee Chairperson
Thesis Advisor(s)
In addition to the responsibilities of a Regular Committee Member, the
The Thesis Advisor has the overall responsibility for guiding the student
Chairperson of Committee has the following added responsibilities:
through the process of the successful completion of a thesis that fulfills
the expectations of scholarly work at the appropriate level as well as
• chair all meetings of the Thesis Committee including the thesis
meets the requirements of the Department/Division and the School. The
defense;
Advisor shall:
• represent the broad interests of the Institution with respect to high
standards of scholarly performance;
• be able and willing to assume principal responsibility for advising the
student;
• represent the Office of Graduate Studies by ensuring that all
procedures are carried out fairly and in accordance with institutional
• have adequate time for this work and be accessible to the student;
guidelines and policies; and
• provide adequate and timely feedback to both the student and the
• ensure there any potential conflicts of interest between student,
Committee regarding student progress toward degree completion;
advisor or any other committee member are effectively identified and
• guide and provide continuing feedback on the student’s development
managed.
of a research project by providing input on the intellectual
appropriateness of the proposed activities, the reasonableness of
Student Responsibilities
project scope, acquisition of necessary resources and expertise,
While it is expected that students receive guidance and support from
necessary laboratory or computer facilities, etc.;
their advisor and all members of the Thesis Committee, the student is
• establish key academic milestones and communicate these to the
responsible for actually defining and carrying out the program approved
student and appropriately evaluate the student on meeting these
by the Thesis Committee and completing the thesis/dissertation. As such,
milestones.
it is expected that the student assumes a leadership role in defining and
Regular Committee Member
carrying out all aspects of his/her degree program and thesis/dissertation
project. Within this context, students have the following responsibilities:
With the exception of the student’s advisor, all voting members of the
• to formally establish a Thesis Advisor and Committee by the end of
Thesis Committee are considered Regular Committee Members. The
their first year of residence in their degree program;
Regular Committee Member shall:
• to call meetings of the Thesis Committee as needed;
• have adequate time to assume the responsibilities associated with
• to actively inform and solicit feedback from the student’s Advisor and
serving on a student’s Thesis Committee;
Committee on progress made toward degree;
• be accessible to the student (at a minimum this implies availability
• to respond to, and act on feedback from the student’s Advisor and
for Committee meetings and availability to participate in a student’s
Committee in a timely and constructive manner;
qualifying/comprehensive examinations – as dictated by the practices
employed by the degree program – and the thesis defense);
• to understand and and then apply the institutional and programmatic
standards related to the ethical conduct of research in the completion
• ensure that the student’s work conforms to the highest standards
of the student’s thesis/dissertation; and
of scholarly performance within the discipline, within the expertise
provided by the Committee member;
• to know, understand and follow deadlines defined by the institution
and the degree program related to all aspects of the student’s degree
• provide advice to both the student and the student’s advisor(s) on the
program.
quality, suitability and timeliness of the work being undertaken;
• approve the student’s degree plan (e.g., courses of study, compliance
VII. Combined Undergraduate/Graduate
with program’s qualifying process, thesis proposal, etc.), assuring that
Degree Programs
the plan not only meets the intellectual needs of the student, but also
all institutional and program requirements;
A. Overview
• review dissertation drafts as provided by the student and the advisor
Many degree programs offer CSM undergraduate students the
and provide feedback in a timely fashion; and
opportunity to begin work on a Graduate Certificate, Professional
• participate in, and independently evaluate student performance in the
Master’s Degree, Master’s Degree or Doctoral Degree while completing
final thesis defense.
the requirements for their Bachelor’s Degree. These combined
Bachelors-Masters/Doctoral programs have been created by Mines
Minor Field Committee Representative
faculty in those situations where they have deemed it academically
In addition to the responsibilities of a Regular Committee Member,
advantageous to treat undergraduate and graduate degree programs as
the Minor Field Committee Representative has the following added
a continuous and integrated process. These are accelerated programs
responsibilities:
that can be valuable in fields of engineering and applied science where
advanced education in technology and/or management provides the
• provide advice for, and approval of coursework required as part of a
opportunity to be on a fast track for advancement to leadership positions.
student’s minor degree program in a manner that is consistent with
institutional and minor program requirements;

Colorado School of Mines 35
These programs also can be valuable for students who want to get a
C. Requirements
head start on graduate education.
Combined Degree Program students are considered undergraduate
The combined programs at Mines offer several advantages to students
students until such time as they complete their undergraduate degree
who choose to enroll in them:
requirements. Combined Degree Program students who are still
considered undergraduates by this definition have all of the privileges
1. Students can earn a graduate degree in their undergraduate major
and are subject to all expectations of both their undergraduate and
or in a field that complements their undergraduate major.
graduate programs. These students may enroll in both undergraduate
2. Students who plan to go directly into industry leave Mines with
and graduate courses (see section D below), may have access to
additional specialized knowledge and skills which may allow them to
departmental assistance available through both programs, and may
enter their career path at a higher level and advance more rapidly.
be eligible for undergraduate financial aid as determined by the Office
Alternatively, students planning on attending graduate school can
of Financial Aid. Upon completion of their undergraduate degree
get a head start on their graduate education.
requirements, a Combined Degree Program student is considered
3. Students can plan their undergraduate electives to satisfy
enrolled full-time in his/her graduate program. Once having done so, the
prerequisites, thus ensuring adequate preparation for their graduate
student is no longer eligible for undergraduate financial aid, but may now
program.
be eligible for graduate financial aid. To complete their graduate degree,
4. Early assignment of graduate advisors permits students to plan
each Combined Degree Program student must register as a graduate
optimum course selection and scheduling in order to complete their
student for at least one semester.
graduate program quickly.
Once admitted into a graduate program, undergraduate Combined
5. Early acceptance into a Combined Degree Program leading to a
Program students must maintain good standing in the Combined
Graduate Degree assures students of automatic acceptance into
Program by maintaining a minimum semester GPA of 3.0 in all courses
full graduate status if they maintain good standing while in early-
taken. Students not meeting this requirement are deemed to be making
acceptance status.
unsatisfactory academic progress in the Combined Degree Program.
6. In many cases, students will be able to complete both a Bachelor’s
Students for whom this is the case are subject to probation and, if
and a Master’s Degrees in five years of total enrollment at Mines.
occurring over two semesters, subject to discretionary dismissal from
the graduate portion of their program as defined in the Unsatisfactory
Certain graduate programs may allow Combined Degree Program
Academic Performance section of this Bulletin.
students to fulfill part of the requirements of their graduate degree by
including up to six hours of specified course credits which also were
Upon completion of the undergraduate degree requirements, Combined
used in fulfilling the requirements of their undergraduate degree. These
Degree Program students are subject to all requirements (e.g., course
courses may only be applied toward fulfilling Doctoral degree or, Master’s
requirements, departmental approval of transfer credits, research credits,
degree requirements beyond the institutional minimum Master’s degree
minimum GPA, etc.) appropriate to the graduate program in which they
requirement of 30 credit hours. Courses must meet all requirements
are enrolled.
for graduate credit, but their grades are not included in calculating
D. Enrolling in Graduate Courses as a Senior
the graduate GPA. Check the departmental section of the Bulletin to
determine which programs provide this opportunity.
in a Combined Program
B. Admission Process
As described in the Undergraduate Bulletin, seniors may enroll in 500-
level courses. In addition, undergraduate seniors who have been granted
A student interested in applying into a graduate degree program as a
admission through the Combined Degree Program into thesis-based
Combined Degree Program student should first contact the department or
degree programs (Masters or Doctoral) may, with graduate advisor
division hosting the graduate degree program into which he/she wishes
approval, register for 700-level research credits appropriate to Masters-
to apply. Initial inquiries may be made at any time, but initial contacts
level degree programs. With this single exception, while a Combined
made soon after completion of the first semester, Sophomore year are
Degree Program student is still completing his/her undergraduate
recommended. Following this initial inquiry, departments/ divisions will
degree, all of the conditions described in the Undergraduate Bulletin
provide initial counseling on degree application procedures, admissions
for undergraduate enrollment in graduate-level courses apply. 700-
standards and degree completion requirements.
level research credits are always applied to a student’s graduate degree
Admission into a graduate degree program as a Combined Degree
program.
Program student can occur as early as the first semester, Junior
If an undergraduate Combined Degree Program student would like to
year, and must be granted no later than the end of registration, last
enroll in a 500-level course and apply this course directly to his/her
semester Senior year. Once admitted into a graduate degree program,
graduate degree, he/she must notify the Registrar of the intent to do
students may enroll in 500-level courses and apply these directly to
so at the time of enrollment in the course. The Registrar will forward
their graduate degree. To apply, students must submit the standard
this information to Financial Aid for appropriate action. Be aware that
graduate application package for the graduate portion of their Combined
courses taken as an undergraduate student but applied directly toward
Degree Program. Upon admission into a graduate degree program,
a graduate degree are not eligible for undergraduate financial aid or the
students are assigned graduate advisors. Prior to registration for the next
Colorado Opportunity Fund. If prior consent is not received, all 500-level
semester, students and their graduate advisors should meet and plan a
graduate courses taken as an undergraduate Combined Degree Program
strategy for completing both the undergraduate and graduate programs
student will be applied to the student’s undergraduate degree transcript.
as efficiently as possible. Until their undergraduate degree requirements
If these are not used toward an undergraduate degree requirement, they
are completed, students continue to have undergraduate advisors in the
may, with program consent, be applied to a graduate degree program as
home department or division of their Bachelor’s Degrees.
transfer credit. All regular regulations and limitations regarding the use of
transfer credit to a graduate degree program apply to these credits.

36 Graduate
Applied Mathematics & Statistics
MATH514
APPLIED MATHEMATICS I
3
MATH551
COMPUTATIONAL LINEAR ALGEBRA
3
http://ams.mines.edu
MATH510
ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS AND
3
Degrees Offered
DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS
or MATH557
INTEGRAL EQUATIONS
• Master of Science (Applied Mathematics and Statistics)
MATH540
PARALLEL SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING
3
• Doctor of Philosophy (Applied Mathematics and Statistics)
or MATH550
NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF PARTIAL
Program Description
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
SYGN502
There are two areas of specialization within the department:
INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH ETHICS *
1
Computational & Applied Mathematics, and Statistics. Since the
*Only required for students receiving NSF support.
requirements for these areas vary somewhat, they are often considered
separately in this bulletin. However, labeling these as distinct areas is not
Specialty in Statistics
meant to discourage any student from pursuing research involving both.
Required Courses
Work in either of these areas can lead to the degree of Master of Science
or Doctor of Philosophy.
MATH436
ADVANCED STATISTICAL MODELING
3
MATH438
STOCHASTIC MODELS
3
The AMS Department also supports the legacy Bachelor of Mathematical
MATH500
LINEAR VECTOR SPACES
3
and Computer Sciences degree with options in Computational and
Applied Mathematics (CAM), Statistics (STAT), and Computer Science
MATH530
STATISTICAL METHODS I
3
(CS). For more information about the Bachelor of Mathematical and
MATH531
STATISTICAL METHODS II
3
Computer Sciences degree please refer to previous years’ bulletins.
MATH534
MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS I
3
Prerequisites
MATH535
MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS II
3
SYGN502
Applicants to the graduate program need four items:
INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH ETHICS *
1
1. A statement of purpose (short essay) from the applicant briefly
*Only required for students receiving NSF support.
describing background, interests, goals at CSM, career intentions,
Elective courses may be selected from any other graduate courses
etc.;
offered by the Department, except for specially designated service
2. The general Graduate Record Examination;
courses. In addition, up to 6 credits of elective courses may be taken in
3. B or better average in courses in the major field;
other departments on campus.
4. B or better overall undergraduate grade point average. In addition,
The Master of Science degree (non-thesis option) requires 36 credit
applicants should have knowledge of the following topics at the
hours of coursework. The coursework includes the required core
undergraduate level.
curriculum.
Applied Mathematics
Combined BS/MS Program
• Linear Algebra
The Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics offers a combined
• Vector Calculus
Bachelor of Science/Master of Science program that enables students to
• Ordinary Differential Equations
work on a Bachelor of Science and a Master of Science simultaneously.
Students take an additional 30 credit hours of coursework at the graduate
• Advanced Calculus (Introduction to Real Analysis)
level in addition to the undergraduate requirements, and work on both
Statistics
degrees at the same time. Students may apply for the program once they
have completed five classes with a MATH prefix numbered 225 or higher.
• Linear Algebra
• Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Doctor of Philosophy Program
• Advanced Calculus (Introduction to Real Analysis)
Requirements:
The Doctor of Philosophy requires 72 credit hours beyond the bachelor’s
Master of Science Program Requirements
degree. At least 24 of these hours must be thesis hours. Doctoral
students must pass the comprehensive examination (a qualifying
The Master of Science degree (thesis option) requires 36 credit hours
examination and thesis proposal), complete a satisfactory thesis, and
of acceptable coursework and research, completion of a satisfactory
successfully defend their thesis. The coursework includes the following
thesis, and successful oral defense of this thesis. At least twelve of the 36
core curriculum.
credit hours must be designated for supervised research. The coursework
includes the following core curriculum.
Specialty in Computational & Applied
Specialty in Computational & Applied
Mathematics
Mathematics
Required Course: All students are required to take the course SYGN502
– Introduction to Research Ethics.
Required Courses
MATH500
LINEAR VECTOR SPACES
3
MATH502
REAL AND ABSTRACT ANALYSIS
3

Colorado School of Mines 37
Specialty in Statistics
MATH503. FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS. 3.0 Hours.
(I) Normed linear spaces, linear operators on normed linear spaces,
Required Courses
Banach spaces, inner product and Hilbert spaces, orthonormal bases,
MATH436
ADVANCED STATISTICAL MODELING
3
duality, orthogonality, adjoint of a linear operator, spectral analysis of
MATH438
STOCHASTIC MODELS
3
linear operators. Prerequisite: MATH502. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
hours.
MATH500
LINEAR VECTOR SPACES
3
MATH530
STATISTICAL METHODS I
3
MATH506. COMPLEX ANALYSIS II. 3.0 Hours.
MATH531
STATISTICAL METHODS II
3
(II) Analytic functions. Conformal mapping and applications. Analytic
MATH534
MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS I
3
continuation.
MATH535
MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS II
3
Schlicht functions. Approximation theorems in the complex domain.
Prerequisite: MATH454. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
SYGN502
INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH ETHICS *
1
MATH510. ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS AND
*Only required for students receiving NSF support.
DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
Further information can be found on the Web at ams.mines.edu.
(I) Topics to be covered: basic existence and uniqueness theory, systems
This website provides an overview of the programs, requirements
of equations, stability, differential inequalities, Poincare-Bendixon theory,
and policies of the department.
linearization. Other topics from: Hamiltonian systems, periodic and almost
Fields of Research
periodic systems, integral manifolds, Lyapunov functions, bifurcations,
homoclinic points and chaos theory. Prerequisite: MATH225 or MATH235
Applied Mathematics:
and MATH332 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Study of Wave Phenomena and Inverse Problems
MATH514. APPLIED MATHEMATICS I. 3.0 Hours.
Numerical Methods for PDEs
(I) The major theme in this course is various non-numerical techniques
for dealing with partial differential equations which arise in science and
Study of Differential and Integral Equations
engineering problems. Topics include transform techniques, Green’s
Computational Radiation Transport
functions and partial differential equations. Stress is on applications to
boundary value problems and wave theory. Prerequisite: MATH455 or
Computational Acoustics and Electromagnetics
equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Multi-scale Analysis and Simulation
MATH515. APPLIED MATHEMATICS II. 3.0 Hours.
High Performance Scientific Computing
(II) Topics include integral equations, applied complex variables, an
Statistics:
introduction to asymptotics, linear spaces and the calculus of variations.
Stress is on applications to boundary value problems and wave theory,
Inverse Problems in Statistics
with additional applications to engineering and physical problems.
Multivariate Statistics
Prerequisite: MATH514. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Spatial Statistics
MATH530. STATISTICAL METHODS I. 3.0 Hours.
Stochastic Models for Environmental Science
(I) Introduction to probability, random variables, and discrete
and continuous probability models. Elementary simulation. Data
Survival Analysis
summarization and analysis. Confidence intervals and hypothesis testing
for means and variances. Chi square tests. Distribution-free techniques
and regression analysis. Prerequisite: MATH213 or equivalent. 3 hours
Courses
lecture; 3 semester hours.
MATH500. LINEAR VECTOR SPACES. 3.0 Hours.
MATH531. STATISTICAL METHODS II. 3.0 Hours.
(I) Finite dimensional vector spaces and subspaces: dimension, dual
(II) Continuation of MATH530. Multiple regression and trend surface
bases, annihilators. Linear transformations, matrices, projections, change
analysis. Analysis of variance. Experimental design (Latin squares,
of basis, similarity. Determinants, eigenvalues, multiplicity. Jordan
factorial designs, confounding, fractional replication, etc.) Nonparametric
form. Inner products and inner product spaces with orthogonality and
analysis of variance. Topics selected from multivariate analysis,
completeness. Prerequisite: MATH301. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
sequential analysis or time series analysis. Prerequisite: MATH323 or
hours.
MATH530 or MATH535. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MATH502. REAL AND ABSTRACT ANALYSIS. 3.0 Hours.
MATH532. SPATIAL STATISTICS. 3.0 Hours.
(I) Introduction to metric and topological spaces. Lebesgue measure
(I) Modeling and analysis of data observed on a 2 or 3-dimensional
and measurable functions and sets. Types of convergence, Lebesgue
surface. Random fields, variograms, covariances, stationarity,
integration and its relation to other integrals. Integral convergence
nonstationarity, kriging, simulation, Bayesian hierarchical models, spatial
theorems. Absolute continuity and related concepts. Prerequisite:
regression, SAR, CAR, QAR, and MA models, Geary/Moran indices,
MATH301. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
point processes, K-function, complete spatial randomness, homogeneous
and inhomogeneous processes, marked point processes, spatio-temporal
modeling. MATH424 or MATH531 or consent of instructor.

38 Graduate
MATH534. MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS I. 3.0 Hours.
MATH550. NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL
(I) The basics of probability, discrete and continuous probability
EQUATIONS. 3.0 Hours.
distributions, sampling distributions, order statistics, convergence in
(II) Numerical methods for solving partial differential equations. Explicit
probability and in distribution, and basic limit theorems, including the
and implicit finite difference methods; stability, convergence, and
central limit theorem, are covered. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3
consistency. Alternating direction implicit (ADI) methods. Weighted
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
residual and finite element methods. Prerequisite: MATH225 or
MATH235, and MATH332, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
MATH535. MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS II. 3.0 Hours.
semester hours.
(II) The basics of hypothesis testing using likelihood ratios, point and
interval estimation, consistency, efficiency, sufficient statistics, and
MATH551. COMPUTATIONAL LINEAR ALGEBRA. 3.0 Hours.
some nonparametric methods are presented. Prerequisite: MATH534 or
(II) Numerical analysis of algorithms for solving linear systems of
equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
equations, least squares methods, the symmetric eigenproblem,
singular value decomposition, conjugate gradient iteration. Modification
MATH539. SURVIVAL ANALYSIS. 3.0 Hours.
of algorithms to fit the architecture. Error analysis, existing software
(I) Basic theory and practice of survival analysis. Topics include survival
packages. Prerequisites: MATH332, CSCI407/MATH407, or consent of
and hazard functions, censoring and truncation, parametric and non-
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
parametric inference, the proportional hazards model, model diagnostics.
Prerequisite: MATH335 or MATH535 or consent of instructor.
MATH556. MODELING WITH SYMBOLIC SOFTWARE. 3.0 Hours.
(I) Case studies of various models from mathematics, the sciences
MATH540. PARALLEL SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING. 3.0 Hours.
and engineering through the use of the symbolic software package
(I) This course is designed to facilitate students’ learning of parallel
MATHEMATICA. Based on hands-on projects dealing with contemporary
programming techniques to efficiently simulate various complex
topics such as number theory, discrete mathematics, complex analysis,
processes modeled by mathematical equations using multiple and multi-
special functions, classical and quantum mechanics, relativity, dynamical
core processors. Emphasis will be placed on the implementation of
systems, chaos and fractals, solitons, wavelets, chemical reactions,
various scientific computing algorithms in FORTRAN/C/C++ using MPI
population dynamics, pollution models, electrical circuits, signal
and OpenMP. Prerequisite: MATH407, CSCI407, or consent of instructor.
processing, optimization, control theory, and industrial mathematics. The
3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
course is designed for graduate students and scientists interested in
modeling and using symbolic software as a programming language and a
MATH542. SIMULATION. 3.0 Hours.
research tool. It is taught in a computer laboratory. Prerequisites: Senior
(I) Advanced study of simulation techniques, random number, and variate
undergraduates need consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
generation. Monte Carlo techniques, simulation languages, simulation
hours.
experimental design, variance reduction, and other methods of increasing
efficiency, practice on actual problems. Prerequisite: CSCI262 (or
MATH557. INTEGRAL EQUATIONS. 3.0 Hours.
equivalent), MATH323 (or MATH530 or equivalent), or permission of
(I) This is an introductory course on the theory and applications of integral
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
equations. Abel, Fredholm and Volterra equations. Fredholm theory:
small kernels, separable kernels, iteration, connections with linear
MATH544. ADVANCED COMPUTER GRAPHICS. 3.0 Hours.
algebra and Sturm-Liouville problems. Applications to boundary-value
This is an advanced computer graphics course in which students will
problems for Laplace’s equation and other partial differential equations.
learn a variety of mathematical and algorithmic techniques that can
Prerequisite: MATH332 or MATH342, and MATH455.
be used to solve fundamental problems in computer graphics. Topics
include global illumination, GPU programming, geometry acquisition
MATH574. THEORY OF CRYPTOGRAPHY. 3.0 Hours.
and processing, point based graphics and non-photorealistic rendering.
Students will draw upon current research results to design, implement
Students will learn about modern rendering and geometric modeling
and analyze their own computer security or other related cryptography
techniques by reading and discussing research papers and implementing
projects. The requisite mathematical background, including relevant
one or more of the algorithms described in the literature.
aspects of number theory and mathematical statistics, will be covered
in lecture. Students will be expected to review current literature from
MATH547. SCIENTIFIC VISUALIZATION. 3.0 Hours.
prominent researchers in cryptography and to present their findings
Scientific visualization uses computer graphics to create visual images
to the class. Particular focus will be given to the application of various
which aid in understanding of complex, often massive numerical
techniques to real-life situations. The course will also cover the following
representation of scientific concepts or results. The main focus of this
aspects of cryptography: symmetric and asymmetric encryption,
course is on techniques applicable to spatial data such as scalar, vector
computational number theory, quantum encryption, RSA and discrete
and tensor fields. Topics include volume rendering, texture based
log systems, SHA, steganography, chaotic and pseudo-random
methods for vector and tensor field visualization, and scalar and vector
sequences, message authentication, digital signatures, key distribution
field topology. Students will learn about modern visualization techniques
and key management, and block ciphers. Prerequisites: CSCI262 plus
by reading and discussing research papers and implementing one of the
undergraduate-level knowledge of statistics and discrete mathematics. 3
algorithms described in the literature.
hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
MATH598. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.

Colorado School of Mines 39
MATH599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
MATH693. WAVE PHENOMENA SEMINAR. 1.0 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
(I, II) Students will probe a range of current methodologies and issues
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
in seismic data processing, with emphasis on under lying assumptions,
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
implications of these assumptions, and implications that would follow from
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
use of alternative assumptions. Such analysis should provide seed topics
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
for ongoing and subsequent research. Topic areas include: Statistics
estimation and compensation, deconvolution, multiple suppression,
MATH610. ADVANCED TOPICS IN DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. 3.0
suppression of other noises, wavelet estimation, imaging and inversion,
Hours.
extraction of stratigraphic and lithologic information, and correlation
(II) Topics from current research in ordinary and/or partial differential
of surface and borehole seismic data with well log data. Prerequisite:
equations; for example, dynamical systems, advanced asymptotic
Consent of instructor. 1 hour seminar; 1 semester hour.
analysis, nonlinear wave propagation, solitons. Prerequisite: Consent of
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MATH699. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
MATH614. ADVANCED TOPICS IN APPLIED MATHEMATICS. 3.0
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
Hours.
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
(I) Topics from current literature in applied mathematics; for example,
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
wavelets and their applications, calculus of variations, advanced applied
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
functional analysis, control theory. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MATH707. GRADUATE THESIS/DISSERTATION RESEARCH CREDIT.
1-12 Hour.
MATH616. INTRODUCTION TO MULTI-DIMENSIONAL SEISMIC
(I, II, S) Research credit hours required for completion of a Masters-level
INVERSION. 3.0 Hours.
thesis or Doctoral dissertation. Research must be carried out under the
(II) Introduction to high frequency inversion techniques. Emphasis on the
direct supervision of the student’s faculty advisor. Variable class and
application of this theory to produce a reflector map of the earth’s interior
semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
and
estimates of changes in earth parameters across those reflectors from
data gathered in response to sources at the surface or in the interior of
the earth. Extensions to elastic media are discussed, as well. Includes
high frequency modeling of the propagation of acoustic and elastic
waves. Prerequisites: partial differential equations, wave equation in the
time or frequency domain, complex function theory, contour integration.
Some knowledge of wave propagation: reflection, refraction, diffraction. 3
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MATH650. ADVANCED TOPICS IN NUMERICAL ANALYSIS. 3.0
Hours.
(II) Topics from the current literature in numerical analysis and/or
computational mathematics; for example, advanced finite element
method, sparse matrix algorithms, applications of approximation theory,
software for initial value ODE’s, numerical methods for integral equations.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MATH691. GRADUATE SEMINAR. 1.0 Hour.
(I) Presentation of latest research results by guest lecturers, staff, and
advanced students. Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1 hour seminar;
1 semester hour. Repeatable for credit to a maximum of 12 hours.
MATH692. GRADUATE SEMINAR. 1.0 Hour.
(II) Presentation of latest research results by guest lecturers, staff, and
advanced students. Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1 hour seminar;
1 semester hour. Repeatable for credit to a maximum of 12 hours.

40 Graduate
Civil and Environmental
Engineering Science. The written dissertation must be defended in an
public oral presentation before the advisor and dissertation committee.
Engineering
The Ph.D. program may build upon one of the CEE or EES M.S.
programs or a comparable M.S. program at another university. Full-time
http://cee.mines.edu
enrollment is expected and leads to the greatest success, although part-
Degrees Offered
time enrollment may be allowed under special circumstances.
• Master of Science (Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Faculty Expertise and General Emphasis Areas:
• Doctor of Philosopy (Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Civil and Environmental Engineering faculty have expertise in engineering
• Master of Science (Environmental Engineering Science)
mechanics, environmental engineering, environmental-engineering
• Doctor of Philosophy (Environmental Engineering Science)
science, geotechnical engineering, hydrology and water-resources
engineering, and structural engineering. These areas also serve as topic
Program Description
areas for coursework and for M.S. thesis or PhD dissertation research,
and are the basis for degree requirements.
The Civil and Environmental Engineering Department offers two M.S. and
Ph.D. graduate degrees - Civil & Environmental Engineering(CEE) and
Engineering Mechanics: Engineering Mechanics is an interdisciplinary
Environmental Engineering Science EES). The Civil and Environmental
emphasis area offered with the Department of Mechanical Engineering.
Engineering (CEE) degree is designed for students who wish to earn
Engineering mechanics is concerned with the development and
a degree with a rigorous engineering curriculum. Students entering
implementation of numerical and analytical procedures to simulate
this degree program should have a B.S. degree in engineering, or
materials’ expected behaviors. This emphasis area draws upon
will generally need to take about one semester of undergraduate
synergistic teaching and research strengths in the Departments of
engineering pre-requisite courses. Within the CEE degree, students
Civil and Environmental Engineering and Mechanical Engineering and
complete specified requirements in four different emphasis areas:
offers options to take courses in Materials Science, Mathematics, and
Engineering Mechanics (EM), Environmental and Water Engineering
Computer Science. The skills developed in this emphasis area may
(EWE), Geotechnical Engineering (GT), and Structural Engineering
be used for a wide range of applications in multiple engineering and
(SE). The Environmental Engineering Science (EES) degree does
science disciplines, including (but not limited to) structural mechanics,
not require engineering credentials and has a flexible curriculum that
geomechanics, fluid mechanics, solid mechanics, hydrology, and physics.
enables students with a baccalaureate degree in biology, chemistry,
Students who pursue this discipline typically complete the requirements
math, physics, geology, engineering, and other technical fields, to tailor
of the Engineering Mechanics (EM) emphasis area in the CEE degree,
a course-work program that best fits their career goals. The specific
given below, or the Engineering Systems degree, described in a separate
requirements for the EES & CEE degrees, as well as for the four
section of this bulletin.
emphasis areas within the CEE degree, are described in detail under the
Environmental and Water Engineering: Environmental engineering
Major tab.
is the application of environmental processes in engineered systems.
The Department also supports graduate degrees in Environmental
CEE faculty have expertise in biosystems engineering, wastewater
Science & Engineering and Engineering (civil specialty), but these
treatment, water-treatment, bioremediation, soil clean up, mining
degrees are being retired. For details on these programs, please
treatment processes and systems, remediation processes, biochemical
see the 2011-2012 CSM Graduate Bulletin. Students admitted to the
reactions in soils, membrane processes, and energy recovery from fluids.
Environmental Science & Engineering (ESE) or Engineering (civil
Students who pursue this discipline complete the requirements of the
specialty) graduate programs for the 2012-2013 academic year may
Environmental and Water Engineering (EW) emphasis area, in the CEE
opt to change their program of study to EES or CEE as appropriate with
degree, given below.
their background and complete the degree requirements for the selected
Environmental Engineering Science: Environmental Engineering
degree.
science is the study of fundamental biological, chemical, and physical
The M.S. and Ph.D. degree in EES has been admitted to the Western
processes that relate to the field of environmental and water resources
Regional Graduate Program (WRGP/WICHE), a recognition that
engineering. Students in this emphasis area usually have interests in
designates this curriculum as unique within the Western United States.
environmental microbiology, aqueous chemistry, environmental organic
An important benefit of this designation is that students who are residents
chemistry, biogeochemistry, or fundamental processes associated
from Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New
with engineered water systems (see description for Water-resources
Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and
engineering below). Students interested in this area complete the
Wyoming are given the tuition status of Colorado residents.
requirements for the EES degree given below.
To achieve the Master of Science (M.S.) degree, students may elect
Geotechnical Engineering: Geotechnical Engineering is concerned
the Non-Thesis option, based exclusively upon coursework and project
with the engineering properties and behavior of natural and engineered
activities, or the Thesis option, which requires coursework and rigorous
geomaterials (soils and rocks), as well as the design and construction
laboratory, modeling and/or field research conducted under the guidance
of foundations, earth dams and levees, retaining walls, embankments,
of a faculty advisor and M.S. thesis committee, that is described in a final
underground structures and tunnels. Almost all constructed projects
written thesis that is defended in an oral presentation.
require input from geotechnical engineers as most structures are
built on, in or of geomaterials. Additionally, mitigation of the impact of
The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree requires students to complete a
natural hazards such as earthquakes and landslides, sustainable use
combination of coursework and original research, under the guidance of
of energy and resources, and reduction of the environmental impacts
a faculty advisor and doctoral committee, that culminates in a significant
of human activities require geotechnical engineers who have in-depth
scholarly contribution (e.g., in the form of published journal articles) to a
understanding of how geomaterials respond to loads, and environmental
specialized field in Civil and Environmental Engineering or Environmental
changes. Students who pursue the geotechnical engineering discipline

Colorado School of Mines 41
complete the requirements of the Geotechncial Engineering emphasis
• The CEE degree also requires either a B.S. degree in civil or
area in the CEE degree, given below, or the Engineering Systems
environmental engineering and completion of specified engineering
degree, described in a separate section of this Bulletin.
pre-requisite courses, which vary by emphasis area as described
below.
Hydrology: Students interested in this area have two options. Students
interested in natural-systems hydrology, ground-water resources, and
Required Curriculum for Environmental Engineering Science (EES)
contaminant-transport processes often choose to earn a degree in
Degree:
“Hydrology” in the interdisciplinary Hydrologic Science and Engineering
The EES curriculum consists of common core and elective courses that
(HSE) program (see HSE section of this graduate bulletin, and the web
may be focused toward specialized areas of emphasis. The common core
site www.hydrology.mines.edu. Students interested in engineered water
includes:
systems, such as water infrastructure, water reclamation and reuse,
ground-water remediation, urban hydrology, and fluid mechanics typically
• ESGN500: Environmental Water Chemistry
choose the CEE degree - Environmental and Water Engineering (EWE)
• ESGN502: Environmental Law
Emphasis area, or the EES degree (for students who do not wish to
• ESGN503: Environmental Fate and Transport
complete an engineering curriculum), both described below.
• 3-credit course in environmental microbiology/biotechnology, to be
Structural Engineering (SE): Structural engineering is a multidisciplinary
determined by the student and advisor
subject spanning the disciplines of civil engineering, aerospace
• 3-credit Independent Study (ESGN 599) or a 3 credit hour design
engineering, mechanical engineering, and marine engineering. In all
course
these disciplines, structural engineers use engineered materials and
conduct analyses using general principles of structural mechanics,
Students earning an EES degree work with their academic advisor
to design structures for civil systems. Designed systems may include
to establish plans of study that best fit their individual interests and
bridges, dams, buildings, tunnels, sustainable infrastructure, highways,
goals. Each student will develop and submit a plan of study during
biomechanical apparatus, and numerous other structures and devices.
the first semester of enrollment; this plan must be submitted with the
Students who pursue this discipline complete the requirements of the
admission to candidacy form. Electives may be chosen freely from
Structural Engineering (SE) emphasis area.
courses offered at CSM and other local universities. Please visit the CEE
website for a complete outline of curriculum requirements and options
Combined Degree Program Option
(www.cee.mines.edu).
CSM undergraduate students have the opportunity to begin work on
Required Curriculum for Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE)
a M.S. degree in Civil & Environmental Engineering or Environmental
Degree:
Engineering Science while completing their Bachelor’s degree. The
CSM Combined Degree Program provides the vehicle for students
The CEE degree is implemented through four emphasis areas:
to use undergraduate coursework as part of their Graduate Degree
Environmental and Water Engineering (EWE) Engineering, Engineering
curriculum. For more information please contact the CEE Office or visit
Mechanics (EM), Geotechnical Engineering (GT), and Structural
cee.mines.edu
Engineering (SE). Requirements for each area are described below.
Core Courses: For each emphasis area, 4 core courses (at least 12
Program Requirements
credits) are required, some of which may be chosen from a list of several
options. Some courses are designated to be design courses, which are
General Degree Requirements for CEE and EES degrees:
annotated by asterisk and at least one must be taken for the non-thesis
M.S. Non-Thesis Option: 30 total credit hours, consisting of coursework
MS.
(27 h), an Independent Study or Design Course (3 h) and seminar.
Electives: CEE degree emphasis areas require additional engineering-
M.S. Thesis Option: 30 total credit hours, consisting of coursework (24 h),
course electives: 12 credits for M.S. thesis option, 15 credits for M.S.
seminar, and research (6 h). Students must also write and orally defend a
non-thesis option and 18 credits for Ph.D. A variety of engineering
research thesis.
courses may be taken for electives in the CEE emphasis areas,
including additional EGGN and ESGN courses, as well as courses from
Ph.D.: 72 total credit hours, consisting of area of emphasis coursework
various departments on campus. The student’s advisor and committee
(at least 18 h), seminar, and research (at least 24 h). Students must also
must approve elective courses. For an up-to-date list of appropriate
successfully complete written and oral qualifying examinations, prepare
elective courses in each emphasis area, see the department website:
and present a dissertation proposal, and write and defend a doctoral
www.cee.mines.edu.
dissertation. For details on the PhD exams, see the department web
page: www.cee.mines.edu. Ph.D. students are also expected to submit
Pre-requisite courses: All CEE degree emphasis areas require completion
the dissertation work for publication in scholarly journals.
of the general science pre-requisites listed above, and also require statics,
dynamics, and differential equations. In addition, each of the four CEE
Prerequisites for CEE and EES degrees:
degree emphasis areas requires specific additional pre-requisites as listed
• Baccalaureate degree: required, preferably in a science or engineering
below.
discipline
CEE Degree Emphasis Areas
• College calculus I & II: two semesters required
ENGINEERING MECHANICS (EM)
• College physics: one semester required, two semesters highly
recommended
Additional Pre-requisites Courses: Mechanics of materials, fluid mechanics
• College chemistry I & II: two semesters required
EM Core Courses: Four core courses (12 credits), each one selected from
• College statistics: one semester required
each one of the following four topical areas), plus EGGN504 seminar:

42 Graduate
1. Mechanics of Solid Materials
Additional Pre-requisites Courses: fluid mechanics, thermodynamics.
2. Mechanics of Fluid or Multiphase Materials
EWE Core Courses: Four core courses (12 credits) from the three topical
3. Numerical and Computational Methods
areas listed below, with at least one course from each topical area, plus
4. Analytical Applied Mathematical Methods
ESGN590 seminar. One of the four core courses (at least 3 credits) must
be a design course.
Topical Area: Mechanics of Solid Materials
1. Environmental Water Chemistry and Biotechnology
MLGN501
STRUCTURE OF MATERIALS
3
2. Contaminant Transport and Water Resources Engineering
MLGN505
MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS
3
3. Treatment Processes and Remediation
EGGN532
FATIGUE AND FRACTURE
3
Topical Area: Environmental Water Chemistry and Biotechnology
EGGN534
SOIL BEHAVIOR
3
EGGN541
ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (*)
3
ESGN541
MICROBIAL PROCESSES,ANALYSIS AND
3
EGGN543
SOLID MECHANICS OF MATERIALS (*)
3
MODELING (*)
EGGN546
ADVANCED ENGINEERING VIBRATION
3
ESGN555
ENVIRONMENTAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
3
EGGN547
TIMBER AND MASONRY DESIGN (*)
3
ESGN586
MOLECULAR MICROBIAL ECOLOGY AND THE
3
ENVIRONMENT
EGGN549
ADVANCED DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES
3
(*)
ESGN596
GEOMICROBIAL SYSTEMS
3
EGGN556
DESIGN OF REINFORCED CONCRETE
3
Topical Area: Contaminant Transport and Water Resources Engineering
STRUCTURES (*)
ESGN459
HYDROLOGIC AND WATER RESOURCES
3
EGGN558
CONCRETE BRIDGE DESIGN BASED ON THE
3
ENGINEERING (*)
AASHTO LRFD SPECIFICATIONS (*)
ESGN520
SURFACE WATER QUALITY MODELING
3
Topical Area: Mechanics of Fluids and Multiphase Materials
ESGN522
SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT (*)
3
ESGN459
HYDROLOGIC AND WATER RESOURCES
3
ESGN528
MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF
3
ENGINEERING
ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS (*)
ESGN522
SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT
3
ESGN622
MULTIPHASE CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT
3
EGGN531
SOIL DYNAMICS (*)
3
EGGN533
UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS
3
EGGN533
UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS
3
EGGN536
HILLSLOPE HYDROLOGY AND STABILITY
3
EGGN536
HILLSLOPE HYDROLOGY AND STABILITY (*)
3
GEGN583
MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF
3
EGGN548
ADVANCED SOIL MECHANICS (*)
3
GROUNDWATER SYSTEMS
EGGN552
VISCOUS FLOWAND BOUNDARY LAYERS
3
Topical Area: Treatment Processes and Remediation
EGGN573
INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTATIONAL
3
ESGN453
WASTEWATER ENGINEERING (*)
3
TECHNIQUES FOR FLUID DYNAMICS AND
TRANSPORT PHENOMENA
ESGN504
WATER AND WASTEWATER TREATMENT
3
ESGN622
MULTIPHASE CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT
3
ESGN506
ADVANCED WATER TREATMENT
3
ENGINEERING AND WATER REUSE (*)
Topical Area: Numerical and Computational Methods
ESGN530
ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING PILOT
4
ESGN528
MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF
3
PLANT LABORATORY (*)
ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS
ESGN575
HAZARDOUS WASTE SITE REMEDIATION (*)
3
EGGN535
INTRODUCTION TO DISCRETE ELEMENT
3
*Design Course
METHODS (DEMS)
GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING (GT)
EGGN542
FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR ENGINEERS
3
EGGN545
BOUNDARY ELEMENT METHODS
3
Additional Pre-requisites Courses: soil mechanics, structural theory
EGGN560
NUMERICAL METHODS FOR ENGINEERS
3
GT CORE COURSES:
EGGN593
ENGINEERING DESIGN OPTIMIZATION (*)
3
EGGN531
SOIL DYNAMICS
3
Topical Area: Analytical Applied Mathematical Methods
EGGN533
UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS
3
EGGN502
ADVANCED ENGINEERING ANALYSIS
4
EGGN534
SOIL BEHAVIOR (*)
3
EGGN503
ADVANCED ENGINEERING DESIGN METHODS
3
EGGN548
ADVANCED SOIL MECHANICS (*)
3
(*)
Plus EGGN504 Seminar.
EGGN515
MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR SIGNALS
3
GT PROGRAM AREA COURSES: 12 credits for MS thesis option, 15
AND SYSTEMS
credits for MS non-thesis option and 18 credits for PhD.
MATH514
APPLIED MATHEMATICS I
3
MATH515
APPLIED MATHEMATICS II
3
EGGN501
ADVANCED ENGINEERING MEASUREMENTS
4
EGGN502
ADVANCED ENGINEERING ANALYSIS
4
ENVIRONMENTAL AND WATER ENGINEERING (EWE)
EGGN535
INTRODUCTION TO DISCRETE ELEMENT
3
METHODS (DEMS)

Colorado School of Mines 43
EGGN536
HILLSLOPE HYDROLOGY AND STABILITY
3
EGGN558
CONCRETE BRIDGE DESIGN BASED ON THE
3
EGGN541
ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS
3
AASHTO LRFD SPECIFICATIONS (*)
EGGN542
FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR ENGINEERS
3
EGGN560
NUMERICAL METHODS FOR ENGINEERS
3
EGGN545
BOUNDARY ELEMENT METHODS
3
* Design Course
EGGN549
ADVANCED DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES
3
(*)
EGGN556
DESIGN OF REINFORCED CONCRETE
3
Courses
STRUCTURES
EGGN531. SOIL DYNAMICS. 3.0 Hours.
EGGN558
CONCRETE BRIDGE DESIGN BASED ON THE
3
(II) Dynamic phenomena in geotechnical engineering, e.g., earthquakes,
AASHTO LRFD SPECIFICATIONS
pile and foundation vibrations, traffic, construction vibrations; behavior
EGGN560
NUMERICAL METHODS FOR ENGINEERS
3
of soils under dynamic loading, e.g., small, medium and large strain
ESGN503
ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION: SOURCES,
3
behavior, soil liquefaction; wave propagation through soil and rock;
CHARACTERISTICS, TRANSPORT AND FATE
laboratory and field techniques to assess dynamic soil properties;
ESGN522
SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT
3
analysis and design of shallow and deep foundations subjected to
ESGN575
HAZARDOUS WASTE SITE REMEDIATION
3
dynamic loading; analysis of construction vibrations. Prerequisites:
GEGN468
ENGINEERING GEOLOGY AND GEOTECHNICS
4
EGGN361, EGGN315, EGGN464 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
lecture; 3 semester hours.
GEGN571
ADVANCED ENGINEERING GEOLOGY
3
GEGN573
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING SITE
3
EGGN533. UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.
INVESTIGATION
The focus of this course is on soil mechanics for unsaturated soils. It
GEGN671
LANDSLIDES: INVESTIGATION, ANALYSIS &
3
provides an introduction to thermodynamic potentials in partially saturated
MITIGATION
soils, chemical potentials of adsorbed water in partially saturated soils,
SYGN550
INTELLIGENT GEOSYSTEMS
3
phase properties and relations, stress state variables, measurements of
soil water suction, unsaturated flow laws, measurement of unsaturated
* Design Courses
permeability, volume change theory, effective stress principle, and
STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING (SE)
measurement of volume changes in partially saturated soils. The course
is designed for seniors and graduate students in various branches of
Additional Pre-requisites Courses: mechanics of materials, fluid
engineering and geology that are concerned with unsaturated soil’s
mechanics, soil mechanics, structural theory, foundations
hydrologic and mechanics behavior. Prerequisites: EGGN461 or consent
SE CORE COURSES: 12 credits including at least 3 credits of design
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Spring even years.
course, plus EGGN504 seminar.
EGGN534. SOIL BEHAVIOR. 3.0 Hours.
EGGN541
ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS
3
(I) The focus of this course is on interrelationships among the
EGGN542
FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR ENGINEERS
3
composition, fabric, and geotechnical and hydrologic properties of soils
EGGN549
ADVANCED DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES
3
that consist partly or wholly of clay. The course will be divided into two
(*)
parts. The first part provides an introduction to the composition and
fabric of natural soils, their surface and pore-fluid chemistry, and the
EGGN556
DESIGN OF REINFORCED CONCRETE
3
physico-chemical factors that govern soil behavior. The second part
STRUCTURES (*)
examines what is known about how these fundamental characteristics
EGGN557
STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS
3
and factors affect geotechnical properties, including the hydrologic
SE PROGRAM AREA COURSES: 12 credits for MS thesis option, 15
properties that govern the conduction of pore fluid and pore fluid
credits for MS non-thesis option and 18 credits for PhD.
constituents, and the geomechanical properties that govern volume
change, shear deformation, and shear strength. The course is designed
EGGN494
INTRODUCTION TO THE SEISMIC DESIGN OF
3
for graduate students in various branches of engineering and geology
STRUCTURES
that are concerned with the engineering and hydrologic behavior of earth
EGGN501
ADVANCED ENGINEERING MEASUREMENTS
4
systems, including geotechnical engineering, geological engineering,
EGGN502
ADVANCED ENGINEERING ANALYSIS
4
environmental engineering, mining engineering, and petroleum
EGGN531
SOIL DYNAMICS
3
engineering. Prerequisites: EGGN461 Soil Mechanics or consent of
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN532
FATIGUE AND FRACTURE
3
EGGN533
UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS
3
EGGN536. HILLSLOPE HYDROLOGY AND STABILITY. 3.0 Hours.
EGGN534
SOIL BEHAVIOR
3
(I) Introduction of shallow landslide occurrence and socio-economic
EGGN536
HILLSLOPE HYDROLOGY AND STABILITY
3
dynamics. Roles of unsaturated flow and stress in shallow landslides.
EGGN545
BOUNDARY ELEMENT METHODS
3
Slope stability analysis based on unsaturated effective stress
conceptualization. Computer modeling of unsaturated flow and stress
EGGN547
TIMBER AND MASONRY DESIGN (*)
3
distributions in hillslope. Prediction of precipitation induced shallow
EGGN549
ADVANCED DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES
3
landslides. Prerequisite: EGGN461. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(*)
EGGN556
DESIGN OF REINFORCED CONCRETE
3
STRUCTURES (*)

44 Graduate
EGGN542. FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR ENGINEERS. 3.0 Hours.
EGGN558. CONCRETE BRIDGE DESIGN BASED ON THE AASHTO
(II) A course combining finite element theory with practical programming
LRFD SPECIFICATIONS. 3.0 Hours.
experience in which the multidisciplinary nature of the finite element
EGGN 550 Concrete Bridge Design. This course presents the
method as a numerical technique for solving differential equations
fundamentals of concrete bridge analysis and design including
is emphasized. Topics covered include simple “structural” elements,
conceptual design, superstructure analysis, AASHTO-LRFD bridge
beams on elastic foundations, solid elasticity, steady state analysis and
specifications, flat slab bridge design, and pre-stressed concrete bridge
transient analysis. Some of the applications will lie in the general area
design. The course is presented through the complete design of the
of geomechanics, reflecting the research interests of the instructor.
superstructure of an example bridges. At the conclusion of the course,
Students get a copy of all the source code published in the course
students will be able to analyze and design simple, but complete concrete
textbook. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
bridge superstructures. Prerequisites: EGGN445. Design of Reinforced
semester hours.
Concrete Structure.
EGGN547. TIMBER AND MASONRY DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.
EGGN560. NUMERICAL METHODS FOR ENGINEERS. 3.0 Hours.
The course develops the theory and design methods required for the
(S) Introduction to the use of numerical methods in the solution of
use of timber and masonry as structural materials. The design of walls,
commonly encountered problems of engineering analysis. Structural/solid
beams, columns, beam-columns, shear walls, and structural systems
analysis of elastic materials (linear simultaneous equations); vibrations
are covered for each material. Gravity, wind, snow, and seismic loads
(roots of nonlinear equations, initial value problems); natural frequency
are calculated and utilized for design. Connection design and advanced
and beam buckling (eigenvalue problems); interpretation of experimental
seismic analysis principles are introduced. Prerequisite: EGGN342 or
data (curve fitting and differentiation); summation of pressure distributions
equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Spring odd years.
(integration); beam deflections (boundary value problems). All course
participants will receive source code of all the numerical methods
EGGN548. ADVANCED SOIL MECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.
programs published in the course textbook which is coauthored by the
Advanced soil mechanics theories and concepts as applied to analysis
instructor. Prerequisite: MATH225 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
and design in geotechnical engineering. Topics covered will include
lecture; 3 semester hours.
seepage, consolidation, shear strength, failure criteria and constitutive
models for soil. The course will have an emphasis on numerical solution
EGGN598C. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGINEERING. 6.0 Hours.
techniques to geotechnical problems by finite elements and finite
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
differences. Prerequisites: A first course in soil mechanics or consent of
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
instructor. 3 Lecture Hours, 3 semester hours. Fall even years.
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
EGGN549. ADVANCED DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES. 3.0 Hours.
The course extends the coverage of steel design to include the topics:
EGGN599C. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
slender columns, beam-columns, frame behavior, bracing systems and
connections, stability, moment resisting connections, composite design,
EGGN699C. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
bolted and welded
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
connections under eccentric loads and tension, and semi-rigid
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
connections. Prerequisite: EGGN444 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
semester hours. Spring even years.
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
hours. Repeatable for credit to a maximum of 6 hours.
EGGN556. DESIGN OF REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES. 3.0
Hours.
ESGN500. ENVIRONMENTAL WATER CHEMISTRY. 3.0 Hours.
Advanced problems in the analysis and design of concrete structures,
This course provides an introduction to chemical equilibria in natural
design of slender columns; biaxial bending; two-way slabs; strut and
waters and engineered systems. Topics covered include chemical
tie models; lateral and vertical load analysis of multistory buildings;
thermodynamics and kinetics, acid/base chemistry, open and closed
introduction to design for seismic forces; use of structural computer
carbonate systems, precipitation reactions, coordination chemistry,
programs. Prerequisite: EGGN445. 3 hour lectures, 3 semester hours.
adsorption and redox reactions. Prerequisites: none. 3 hours lecture; 3
Delivered in the spring of even numbered years.
semester hours.
EGGN557. STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS. 3.0 Hours.
ESGN501. RISK ASSESSMENT. 3.0 Hours.
An introduction to the dynamics and earthquake engineering of structures
This course evaluates the basic principles, methods, uses, and limitations
is provided. Subjects include the analysis of linear and nonlinear single-
of risk
degree and multi-degree of freedom structural dynamics. The link
assessment in public and private sector decision making. Emphasis
between structural dynamics and code-based analysis and designs of
is on how risk assessments are made and how they are used in
structures under earthquake loads is presented. he focus applicaitons of
policy formation, including discussion of how risk assessments can be
the course include single story and multi-story buildings, and other types
objectively and effectively communicated to decision makers and the
of sructures that under major earthquake may respond in the inelastic
public. Prerequisite: ESGN502 and one semester of statistics or consent
range. Prerequisites: EGGN342 Structural Theory or consent of the
of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
instructor. 3 semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 45
ESGN502. ENVIRONMENTAL LAW. 3.0 Hours.
ESGN511. ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP OF NUCLEAR
This is a comprehensive introduction to U.S. Environmental Law, Policy,
RESOURCES. 3.0 Hours.
and Practice, especially designed for the professional engineer, scientist,
The stewardship of nuclear resources spans the entire nuclear fuel
planner, manager, consultant, government regulator, and citizen. It will
cycle, which includes mining and milling through chemical processing on
prepare the student to deal with the complex system of laws, regulations,
the front end of the materials life cycle. On the back end, stewardship
court rulings, policies, and programs governing the environment in the
continues from materials removal from the power plant during re-
USA. Course coverage includes how our legal system works, sources
fueling or facility decommissioning, through storage, recycling and
of environmental law, the major USEPA enforcement programs, state/
disposal, as well as the management of activated or contaminated
local matching programs, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA),
materials generated during facility decommissioning. Each stage in
air and water pollution (CAA, CWA), EPA risk assessment training,
the fuel cycle has a different risk of public exposure through different
toxic/hazardous substances laws (RCRA, CERCLA, EPCRA, TSCA,
pathways and the presence of different isotopes. These risks are an
LUST, etc.), and a brief introduction to international environmental law.
integral part in considering the long-term efficacy of nuclear as an energy
Prerequisites: none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
alternative. Furthermore, nuclear energy has long been vilified in public
opinion forums via emotional responses. Stewardship extends beyond
ESGN503. ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION: SOURCES,
quantification of risks to the incorporation and communication of these
CHARACTERISTICS, TRANSPORT AND FATE. 3.0 Hours.
risks and the associated facts regarding
This course describes the environmental behavior of inorganic and
nuclear power to the public at large. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or
organic chemicals in multimedia environments, including water, air,
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
sediment and biota. Sources and characteristics of contaminants in
the environment are discussed as broad categories, with some specific
ESGN513. LIMNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
examples from various industries. Attention is focused on the persistence,
This course covers the natural chemistry, physics, and biology of lakes
reactivity, and partitioning behavior of contaminants in environmental
as well as some basic principles concerning contamination of such water
media. Both steady and unsteady state multimedia environmental models
bodies. Topics include heat budgets, water circulation and dispersal,
are developed and applied to contaminated sites. The principles of
sedimentation processes, organic compounds and their transformations,
contaminant transport in surface water, groundwater, and air are also
radionuclide limnochronology, redox reactions, metals and other major
introduced. The course provides students with the conceptual basis and
ions, the carbon dioxide system, oxygen, nutrients; planktonic, benthic
mathematical tools for predicting the behavior of contaminants in the
and other communities, light in water and lake modeling. Prerequisite:
environment. Prerequisite: none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ESGN504. WATER AND WASTEWATER TREATMENT. 3.0 Hours.
ESGN520. SURFACE WATER QUALITY MODELING. 3.0 Hours.
Unit operations and processes in environmental engineering are
This course will cover modeling of water flow and quality in rivers, lakes,
discussed in this course, including physical, chemical, and biological
and reservoirs. Topics will include introduction to common analytical and
treatment processes for water and wastewater. Treatment objectives,
numerical methods used in modeling surface water flow, water quality,
process theory, and practice are considered in detail. Prerequisites:
modeling of kinetics, discharge of waste water into surface systems,
Consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
sedimentation, growth kinetics, dispersion, and biological changes in
lakes and rivers. Prerequisites: ESGN440 or ESGN503 recommended, or
ESGN506. ADVANCED WATER TREATMENT ENGINEERING AND
consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
WATER REUSE. 3.0 Hours.
This course presents issues relating to theory, design, and operation
ESGN522. SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT. 3.0 Hours.
of advanced water and wastewater treatment unit processes and
This course will investigate physical, chemical, and biological processes
water reuse systems. Topics include granular activated carbon (GAC),
governing the transport and fate of contaminants in the saturated and
advanced oxidation processes (O3/H2O2), UV disinfection, pressure-
unsaturated zones of the subsurface. Basic concepts in fluid flow,
driven, current-driven, and osmotic-driven membranes (MF, UF, NF,
groundwater hydraulics, and transport will be introduced and studied. The
RO, electrodialysis, and forward osmosis), and natural systems such as
theory and development of models to describe these phenomena, based
riverbank filtration (RBF) and soil-aquifer treatment (SAT). The course is
on analytical and simple numerical methods, will also be discussed.
augmented by ESGN506L offering hands-on experience using bench-
Applications will include prediction of extents of contaminant migration
and pilot-scale unit operations. Prerequisite: ESGN453/ESGN454/
and assessment and design of remediation schemes. Prerequisites:
ESGN504/ESGN530 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
ESGN503 or consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
hours.
ESGN525. CHEMISTRY OF THE SOIL/WATER INTERFACE. 3.0
ESGN510. ENVIRONMENTAL RADIOCHEMISTRY. 3.0 Hours.
Hours.
This course covers the phenomena of radioactivity (e.g., modes of
The fate of many elements in the soil/water environment is regulated by
decay, methods of detection and biological effects) and the use of
sorption reactions. The content of this course focuses on the physical
naturally occurring and artificial radionuclides as tracers for environmental
chemistry of reactions occurring at the soil-particle/water interface. The
processes. Discussions of tracer applications will range from oceanic
emphasis is on the use of surface complexation models to interpret
trace element scavenging to contaminant transport through groundwater
solute sorption at the particle/water interface. Prerequisites: ESGN500 or
aquifers. Prerequisites: ESGN500 or consent of the instructor. 3 hours
consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
lecture; 3 semester hours.

46 Graduate
ESGN527. WATERSHED SYSTEMS ANALYSIS. 3.0 Hours.
ESGN544. AQUATIC TOXICOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
Basic principles of watershed systems analysis required for water
This course provides an introduction to assessment of the effects of
resources evaluation, watershed-scale water quality issues, and
toxic substances on aquatic organisms, communities, and ecosystems.
watershed-scale pollutant transport problems. The dynamics of
Topics include general toxicological principles, water quality standards,
watershed-scale processes and the human impact on natural systems,
sediment quality guidelines, quantitative structure-activity relationships,
and for developing remediation strategies are studied, including terrain
single species and community-level toxicity measures, regulatory issues,
analysis and surface and subsurface characterization procedures and
and career opportunities. The course includes hands-on experience with
analysis. Prerequisite: none. 3 hours lecture per week; 3 semester hours.
toxicity testing and subsequent data reduction. Prerequisite: none. 2.5
hours lecture; 1 hour laboratory; 3 semester
ESGN528. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF ENVIRONMENTAL
hours.
SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
This is an advanced graduate- level course designed to provide students
ESGN545. ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
with hands-on experience in developing, implementing, testing, and using
This course provides an introduction to general concepts of ecology,
mathematical models of environmental systems. The course will examine
biochemistry, and toxicology. The introductory material will provide
why models are needed and how they are developed, tested, and used
a foundation for understanding why, and to what extent, a variety of
as decision-making or policy-making tools. Typical problems associated
products and by-products of advanced industrialized societies are toxic.
with environmental systems, such as spatial and temporal scale effects,
Classes of substances to be examined include metals, coal, petroleum
dimensionality, variability, uncertainty, and data insufficiency, will be
products, organic compounds, pesticides, radioactive materials, and
addressed. The development and application of mathematical models
others. Prerequisite: none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
will be illustrated using a theme topic such as Global Climate Change,
In Situ Bioremediation, or Hydrologic Systems Analysis. Prerequisites:
ESGN552. RECLAMATION OF DISTURBED LANDS. 3.0 Hours.
ESGN503 and knowledge of basic statistics and computer programming.
Basic principles and practices in reclaiming disturbed lands are
3 hours
considered in this course, which includes an overview of present legal
lecture; 3 semester hours.
requirements for reclamation and basic elements of the reclamation
planning process. Reclamation methods, including recontouring, erosion
ESGN530. ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING PILOT PLANT
control, soil preparation, plant establishment, seed mixtures, nursery
LABORATORY. 4.0 Hours.
stock, and wildlife habitat rehabilitation, will be examined. Practitioners in
This course provides an introduction to bench and pilot-scale
the field will discuss their experiences. Prerequisite: consent of
experimental methods used in environmental engineering. Unit
the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
operations associated with water and wastewater treatment for real-
world treatment problems are emphasized, including multi-media
ESGN555. ENVIRONMENTAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 3.0 Hours.
filtration, oxidation processes, membrane treatment, and disinfection
A study of the chemical and physical interactions which determine
processes. Investigations typically include: process assessment, design
the fate, transport and interactions of organic chemicals in aquatic
and completion of bench- and pilot-scale experiments, establishment of
systems, with emphasis on chemical transformations of anthropogenic
analytical methods for process control, data assessment, upscaling and
organic contaminants. Prerequisites: A course in organic chemistry and
cost estimation, and project report writing. Projects are conducted both at
CHGN503, Advanced Physical Chemistry or its equivalent, or consent of
CSM and at the City of Golden Water Treatment Pilot Plant Laboratory.
instructor. Offered in alternate years. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisites: ESGN500 and ESGN504 or consent of the instructor. 6
ESGN556. MINING AND THE ENVIRONMENT. 3.0 Hours.
hours laboratory; 4 semester hours.
The course will cover many of the environmental problems and solutions
ESGN541. MICROBIAL PROCESSES,ANALYSIS AND MODELING. 3.0
associated with each aspect of mining and ore dressing processes.
Hours.
Mining is a complicated process that differs according to the type of
Microorganisms facilitate the transformation of many organic and
mineral sought. The mining process can be divided into four categories:
inorganic constituents. Tools for the quantitative analysis of microbial
Site Development; Extraction; Processing; Site Closure. Procedures for
processes in natural and engineered systems will be presented.
hard rock metals mining; coal mining; underground and surface mining;
Stoichiometries, energetics, mass balances and kinetic descriptions of
and in situ mining will be covered in relation to
relevant microbial processes allow the development of models for specific
environmental impacts. Beneficiation, or purification of metals will be
microbial systems. Simple analytical models and complex models that
discussed, with cyanide and gold topics emphasized. Site closure
require computational solutions will be presented. Systems analyzed
will be focused on; stabilization of slopes; process area cleanup; and
include suspended growth and attached growth reactors for municipal
protection of surface and ground water. After discussions of the mining
and industrial wastewater treatment as well as in-stu bioremediation and
and beneficiation processes themselves, we will look at conventional and
bioenergy systems. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
innovative measures to mitigate or reduce environmental impact.
ESGN562. SOLID WASTE MINIMIZATION AND RECYCLING. 3.0
Hours.
This course will examine, using case studies, ways in which industry
applies engineering principles to minimize waste formation and to meet
solid waste recycling challenges. Both proven and emerging solutions
to solid waste environmental problems, especially those associated with
metals, will be discussed. Prerequisite: ESGN500. 3 hours lecture; 3
semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 47
ESGN563. POLLUTION PREVENTION: FUNDAMENTALS AND
ESGN586. MOLECULAR MICROBIAL ECOLOGY AND THE
PRACTICE. 3.0 Hours.
ENVIRONMENT. 3.0 Hours.
The objective of this course is to introduce the principles of pollution
This course explores the diversity of microbiota in a few of the countless
prevention, environmentally benign products and processes, and
environments of our planet. Topics include microbial ecology (from
manufacturing systems. The course provides a thorough foundation in
a molecular perspective), microbial metabolism, pathogens, extreme
pollution prevention concepts and methods. Engineers and scientists are
environments, engineered systems, oxidation / reduction of metals,
given the tools to incorporate environmental consequences into decision-
bioremediation of both organics and inorganics, microbial diversity,
making. Sources of pollution and its consequences are detailed. Focus
phylogenetics, analytical tools and bioinformatics. The course has an
includes sources and minimization of industrial pollution; methodology for
integrated laboratory component for applied molecular microbial ecology
life-cycle assessments and developing successful pollution prevention
to learn microscopy, DNA extraction, PCR, gel electrophoresis, cloning,
plans; technological means for minimizing the use of water, energy, and
sequencing, data analysis and bioinformatic applications. Prerequisite:
reagents in manufacturing; and tools for achieving a sustainable society.
College Biology and/or CHGC 562, CHGC 563 or equivalent and
Materials selection, process and product design, and packaging are also
enrollment in the ESE graduate program. 3 hours lecture, some field trips;
addressed. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
3 semester hours.
ESGN571. ENVIRONMENTAL PROJECT MANAGEMENT. 3.0 Hours.
ESGN590. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
This course investigates environmental project management and
SEMINAR. 0.0 Hours.
decision making from government, industry, and contractor perspectives.
Research presentations covering current research in a variety of
Emphasis is on (1) economics of project evaluation; (2) cost estimation
environmental topics.
methods; (3) project planning and performance monitoring; (4) and
creation of project teams and organizational/communications structures.
ESGN591. ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT. 3.0 Hours.
Extensive use of case studies. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 3
Techniques for assessing the impact of mining and other activities
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
on various components of the ecosystem. Training in the procedures
of preparing Environmental Impact Statements. Course will include
ESGN575. HAZARDOUS WASTE SITE REMEDIATION. 3.0 Hours.
a review of pertinent laws and acts (i.e. Endangered Species Act,
This course covers remediation technologies for hazardous waste
Coordination Act, Clean Air Act, etc.) that deal with environmental
contaminated sites, including site characteristics and conceptual model
impacts. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture, some
development, remedial action screening processes, and technology
field trips; 3 semester hours.
principles and conceptual design. Institutional control, source isolation
and containment, subsurface manipulation, and in situ and ex situ
ESGN593. ENVIRONMENTAL PERMITTING AND REGULATORY
treatment processes will be covered, including unit operations, coupled
COMPLIANCE. 3.0 Hours.
processes, and complete systems. Case studies will be used and
The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the permit writing
computerized tools for process selection and design will be employed.
process, developing information requirements for permit applications,
Prerequisite: ESGN500 and ESGN503, or consent of the instructor. 3
working with ambiguous regulations, negotiating with permit writers,
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and dealing with public comment. In addition, students will develop an
understanding of the process of developing an economic and legally
ESGN582. INTEGR SURFACE WATER HYDROLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
defensible regulatory compliance program. Prerequisite: ESGN502 or
(I) This course provides a quantitative, integrated view of the hydrologic
consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
cycle. The movement and behavior of water in the atmosphere
(including boundary layer dynamics and precipitation mechanisms),
ESGN596. GEOMICROBIAL SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
fluxes of water between the atmosphere and land surface (including
This course explores the functional activities and biological significance
evaporation, transpiration, precipitation, interception and through fall)
of microorganisms in geological and engineered systems. Topics will
and connections between the water and energy balances (including
include microorganisms as geochemical agents of change, mechanisms
radiation and temperature) are discussed at a range of spatial and
and thermodynamics of microbial respiration, applications of analytical
temporal scales. Additionally, movement of water along the land surface
and molecular tools, and the impact of microbes on the fate and transport
(overland flow and snow dynamics) and in the subsurface (saturated
of problematic water pollutants. Emphasis will be placed on critical
and unsaturated flow) as well as surface-subsurface exchanges and
analysis and communication of peer-reviewed literature on these topics.
runoff generation are also covered. Finally, integration and connections
Prerequisites: ESGN500 and ESGN586 or consent of the instructor. 3
within the hydrologic cycle and scaling of river systems are discussed.
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisites: Groundwater Engineering (GEGN466/GEGN467), Fluid
ESGN597. SPECIAL SUMMER COURSE. 6.0 Hours.
Mechanics (GEGN351/EGGN351), math up to differential equations, or
equivalent classes as determined by the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
ESGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE. 1-6
semester hours.
Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.

48 Graduate
ESGN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
ESGN599A. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
ESGN602. INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LAW. 3.0 Hours.
The course covers an introductory survey of International Environmental
Law, including multi-nation treaties, regulations, policies, practices, and
politics governing the global environment. It surveys the key issues of
sustainable development, natural resources projects, transboundary
pollution, international trade, hazardous waste, climate change, and
protection of ecosystems, wildlife, and human life. New international
laws are changing the rules for engineers, project managers, scientists,
teachers, businesspersons, and others both in the US and abroad, and
this course is especially designed to keep professionals fully, globally
informed and add to their credentials for international work. Prerequisites:
ESGN502 or consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ESGN622. MULTIPHASE CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT. 3.0 Hours.
Principles of multiphase and multicomponent flow and transport are
applied to contaminant transport in the unsaturated and saturated
zones. Focus is on immiscible phase, dissolved phase, and vapor phase
transport of low solubility organic contaminants in soils and aquifer
materials. Topics discussed include: capillarity, interphase mass transfer,
modeling, and remediation technologies. Prerequisites: ESGN500 or
equivalent, ESGN503 or ESGN522 or equivalent, or consent of the
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ESGN699. ADVANCED INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
ESGN707. GRADUATE THESIS/DISSERTATION RESEARCH CREDIT.
1-12 Hour.
(I, II, S) Research credit hours required for completion of a Masters-level
thesis or Doctoral dissertation. Research must be carried out under the
direct supervision of the student’s faculty advisor. Variable class and
semester hours. Repeatable for credit.

Colorado School of Mines 49
Electrical Engineering &
software tools for computational science applications to achieve both
high performance and high reliability on a wide range of computational
Computer Science
platforms.
Information and Systems Sciences is an interdisciplinary research
http://eecs.mines.edu
area that encompasses the fields of control systems, communications,
Degrees Offered
signal and image processing, compressive sensing, robotics, and
mechatronics. Focus areas include intelligent and learning control
• Master of Science (Computer Science)
systems, fault detection and system identification, computer vision and
• Master of Science (Electrical Engineering)
pattern recognition, sensor development, mobile manipulation and
• Doctor of Philosophy (Computer Science)
autonomous systems. Applications can be found in renewable energy
• Doctor of Philosophy (Electrical Engineering)
and power systems, materials processing, sensor and control networks,
bio-engineering, intelligent structures, and geosystems.
Program Overview
Wireless Networks includes research in mobile ad hoc networking,
The Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department (EECS)
mobile and pervasive computing, and sensor networks. Focus
offers the degrees Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in
areas include credible network simulation, cyber-physical systems,
Computer Science and the degrees Master of Science and Doctor of
middleware, mobile social applications, and dynamic data management.
Philosophy in Electrical Engineering. These degree programs demand
Interdisciplinary research also exists, mainly in the use of wireless sensor
academic rigor and depth yet also address real-world problems.
networks for environmental monitoring and development of energy
The Department also supports graduate degrees in Mathematical and
efficient buildings.
Computer Sciences (computer science option) and Engineering (electrical
Education research includes areas such as educational technologies
specialty), but these degrees are being retired. For details on these
(e.g., instructional software-simulations and games), educational
programs, please see the 2011-2012 CSM Graduate Bulletin. Students
software, on-line education (e-learning), students’ cognition and
admitted to the Mathematical and Computer Sciences (computer science
learning styles, human computer interaction, STEM education, and K-12
option) or Engineering (electrical specialty) graduate programs for the
education.
2012-2013 academic year may opt to change their program of study to
Embedded Systems and Robotics is an emerging area at CSM that
EE or CS as appropriate with their background and complete the degree
merges research in mechanical design, control systems, sensing, and
requirements for the selected degree.
mechatronics to develop automated and autonomous systems that can
The EECS department has seven areas of research activity that stem
be used to carry out tasks that are dirty, dangerous, dull, or difficult.
from the core fields of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science:
(1) Applied Algorithms and Data Structures, (2) Computer Graphics
and Image Processing, (3) Energy Systems and Power Electronics, (4)
Program Details
High Performance and Parallel Computing, (5) Information and Systems
Sciences, (6) Wireless Networks, and (7) Education. Additionally,
The EECS Department offers the degrees Master of Science and Doctor
students may study areas such as Embedded Systems and/or Robotics,
of Philosophy in Computer Science and the degrees Master of Science
which includes elements from both Computer Science and Electrical
and Doctor of Philosophy in Electrical Engineering. The master’s program
Engineering disciplines. Note that in many cases, individual research
is designed to prepare candidates for careers in industry or government
projects encompass more than one research area.
or for further study at the Ph.D. level; both thesis and non-thesis options
are available. The Ph.D. degree program is sufficiently flexible to prepare
Applied Algorithms and Data Structures is an interdisciplinary
candidates for careers in industry, government, or academia. See the
research area that is applied to areas such as VLSI design automation,
information that follows for full details on these four degrees.
cheminformatics, computational materials, computer-aided design, and
cyber-physical systems.
Combined Program: The EECS Department also offers combined BS/MS
degree programs. These programs offer an expedited graduate school
Computer Graphics and Image Processing interests span scientific
application process and allow students to begin graduate coursework
visualization, computer graphics, computational geometry and topology,
while still finishing their undergraduate degree requirements. This
data compression, and medical image analysis.
program is described in the undergraduate catalog and is in place for
Energy Systems and Power Electronics is focused on both
both Computer Science and Electrical Engineering students. The Physics
fundamental and applied research in the interrelated fields of
combined program also offers tracks in Electrical Engineering and
conventional electric power systems and electric machinery, renewable
Mechanical Engineering. Details on these programs can be found in the
energy and distributed generation, energy economics and policy
CSM Undergraduate Bulletin. Course schedules for these programs can
issues, power quality, power electronics and drives. The overall scope
be obtained in the EECS, Physics, and Chemistry and Geochemistry
of research encompasses a broad spectrum of electrical energy
Departmental Offices.
applications including investor-owned utilities, rural electric associations,
Requirements for Admission to CS: Applicants must have a Bachelor’s
manufacturing facilities, regulatory agencies, and consulting engineering
degree, or equivalent, from an accredited institution. Students are
firms.
expected to have completed two semesters of calculus, along with
High Performance Computing is an area that spans parallel processing,
courses in object-oriented programming and data structures, and
fault tolerance and checkpointing, real number error/erasure correcting
upper level courses in at least three of the following areas: software
codes, random matrices, numerical linear algebra algorithms and
engineering, numerical analysis, computer architecture, principles of
software, and computational science and engineering. The goal of this
programming languages, analysis of algorithms, and operating systems.
research area is to develop techniques, design algorithms, and build

50 Graduate
For the Ph.D. program, prior research experience is desired but not
and form a thesis committee by the end of the first year. The non-thesis
required.
option consists of two tracks: a Project Track and a Coursework Track.
Requirements for the Project Track are 30 hours of coursework plus
Requirements for Admission to EE: The minimum requirements for
6 hours of project credit; requirements for the Coursework Track are
admission to the M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering are
36 hours of coursework. The following four core courses are required
a baccalaureate degree in engineering, computer science, a physical
of all students. Students may choose elective courses from any CSCI
science, or math with a grade-point average of 3.0 or better on a 4.0
graduate course offered by the Department, as long as at least two
scale; Graduate Record Examination score of 650 (quantitative) or
chosen courses are project-oriented courses (see the following list).
151 (quantitative) on the new scale and a TOEFL score of 550 or
In addition, up to 6 credits of elective courses may be taken outside of
higher (paper based), 213 (computer based), or 79 (internet based) for
CSCI. Lastly, a maximum of 6 Independent Study course units can be
applicants whose native language is not English. Applicants from an
used to fulfill degree requirements.
engineering program at CSM are not required to submit GRE scores. For
the Ph.D. program, prior research experience is desired but not required.
CSCI406
ALGORITHMS
3
Admitted Students: The EECS Department Graduate Committee may
CSCI442
OPERATING SYSTEMS
3
require that an admitted student take undergraduate remedial coursework
CSCI561
THEORY OF COMPUTATION
3
to overcome technical deficiencies, which does not count toward the
CSCI564
ADVANCED COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE
3
graduate program. The committee will decide whether to recommend
to the Dean of Graduate Studies and Research regular or provisional
And two project-oriented courses:
admission, and may ask the applicant to visit CSM for an interview.
CSCI562
APPLIED ALGORITHMS AND DATA
3
Transfer Courses: Graduate level courses taken at other universities
STRUCTURES
for which a grade equivalent to a "B" or better was received will be
CSCI563
PARALLEL COMPUTING FOR SCIENTISTS
3
considered for transfer credit with approval of the academic advisor,
AND ENGINEERS
EECS department head, and thesis committee, as appropriate. We note
CSCI565
DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING SYSTEMS
3
that these courses must not have been used to satisfy the requirements
CSCI568
DATA MINING
3
for an undergraduate degree. We also note, for the M.S. degree, a
CSCI572
COMPUTER NETWORKS II
3
maximum of 9 credits can be transferred in from another institution.
CSCI576
WIRELESS SENSOR SYSTEMS
3
400-level Courses: As stipulated by the CSM Graduate School, no
CSCI580
ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMACE COMPUTING
3
more than 9 400-level credits of course work may be counted towards
CSCI586
FAULT TOLERANT COMPUTING
3
any graduate degree. This requirement must be taken into account as
students choose courses for each of the following degree programs
M.S. Project Track: Students are required to take 6 credits of CSCI 704
detailed.
to fulfill the MS project requirement. (It is recommended that the 6 credits
Advisor and Thesis Committee: Students must have an advisor from
consist of two consecutive semesters of 3 credits each.) At most 6 hours
the EECS Graduate Faculty to direct and monitor their academic plan,
of CSCI 704 will be counted toward the Masters non-thesis degree.
research, and independent studies. Master of Science (thesis option)
Deliverables include a report and a presentation to a committee of two
students must have at least three members on their graduate committee,
EECS faculty including the advisor (at least one committee member must
two of whom must be permanent faculty in the EECS Department.
be a CS faculty member). Deliverables must be successfully completed in
CS Ph.D. graduate committees must have at least four members, two
the last semester in which the student registers for CSCI 704. A student
members besides the advisor/co-advisor must be permanent faculty in
must receive two "pass" votes (i.e., a unanimous vote) to satisfy the
the EECS Department, and one member must be outside the department
project option.
and chair of the committee. EE Ph.D. graduate committees must have at
M.S. Thesis Defense: At the conclusion of the M.S. (Thesis Option), the
least five members; at least three members must be permanent faculty
student will be required to make a formal presentation and defense of
in the EECS Department, and one member must be outside of the
her/his thesis research. A student must “pass” this defense to earn an
departmental and chair of the committee.
M.S. degree
Faculty Advisor for CS Students
Faculty Advisor for EE Students
Doctor of Philosophy - Computer Science
Tracy Camp
William A. Hoff
The Ph.D. degree in Computer Science requires 72 credit hours of course
Zizhong (Jeffrey) Chen
Kathryn Johnson
work and research credits. Required course work provides a strong
Qi Han
Salman Mohagheghi
background in computer science. A course of study leading to the Ph.D.
Dinesh Mehta
Marcelo Godoy Simoes
degree can be designed either for the student who has completed the
master’s degree or for the student who has completed the bachelor’s
Andrzej Szymczak
Pankaj K. (PK) Sen
degree. The following five courses are required of all students. Students
Hua Wang
Tyrone Vincent
who have taken equivalent courses at another institution may satisfy
Michael Wakin
these requirements by transfer.
Program Requirements
CSCI406
ALGORITHMS
3
Master of Science - Computer Science
CSCI442
OPERATING SYSTEMS
3
CSCI561
THEORY OF COMPUTATION
3
The M.S. degree in Computer Science (Thesis or Non-Thesis option)
requires 36 credit hours. Requirements for the thesis M.S. are 24 hours
CSCI564
ADVANCED COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE
3
of coursework plus 12 hours of thesis credit leading to an acceptable
SYGN502
INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH ETHICS
1
Master’s thesis; thesis students are encouraged to find a thesis advisor

Colorado School of Mines 51
Ph.D. Qualifying Examination: Students desiring to take the Ph.D.
Upon completion of these requirements, students must complete an
Qualifying Exam must have:
Admission to Candidacy form. This form must be signed by the student’s
Thesis Committee and the EECS Department Head and filed with the
• (if required by your advisor) taken SYGN 501 The Art of Science
Graduate Office.
(previously or concurrently),
• taken at least four CSCI 500-level courses at CSM (only one CSCI599
Ph.D. Thesis Defense: At the conclusion of the student’s Ph.D. program,
is allowed), and
the student will be required to make a formal presentation and defense
of her/his thesis research. A student must “pass” this defense to earn a
• maintained a GPA of 3.5 or higher in all CSCI 500-level courses taken.
Ph.D. degree.
The Ph.D. Qualifying Exam is offered once a semester. Each Ph.D.
Master of Science – Electrical Engineering
Qualifying Exam comprises TWO research areas, chosen by the student.
The exam consists of the following steps:
The M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering (Thesis or Non-Thesis Option)
requires 30 credit hours. Requirements for the thesis M.S. are 24 hours
Step 1. A student indicates intention to take the CS Ph.D. Qualifying
of coursework and 6 hours of thesis research. The non-thesis option
Exam by choosing two research interest areas from the following list:
requires 30 hours of coursework. A maximum of 6 Independent Study
algorithms, education, graphics, high-performance computing, and
course units can be used to fulfill degree requirements. There are two
networks. This list is subject to change, depending on the current faculty
emphasis areas in Electrical Engineering: (1) Information and Systems
research profile. Students must inform the EECS Graduate Director of
Sciences, and (2) Energy Systems and Power Electronics. Students
their intention to take the exam no later than the first class day of the
are encouraged to decide between emphasis areas before pursuing an
semester.
advanced degree. Students are also encouraged to speak to members
Step 2. The Graduate Director creates an exam committee of (at least)
of the EE graduate faculty before registering for classes and to select an
four appropriate faculty. The exam committee assigns the student
academic advisor as soon as possible. The following set of courses is
deliverables for both research areas chosen. The deliverables will be
required of all students.
some combination from the following list:
M.S. Thesis -Electrical Engineering
• read a set of technical papers, make a presentation, and answer
EGGN504
ENGINEERING SYSTEMS SEMINAR -
1
questions;
ELECTICAL
• complete a hands-on activity (e.g., develop research software) and
EE CORE
12.0
write a report;
Electrical Engineering Core Courses Courses within
one track - see below.
• complete a set of take-home problems;
• write a literature survey (i.e., track down references, separate relevant
EE TECH
Technical Electives Must be approved by Thesis Committee.11.0
from irrelevant papers); and
EGGN707
GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT Select department-1-12
• read a set of papers on research skills (e.g., ethics, reviewing) and
specific course offering (section E)
answer questions.
Total Hours
25-36
*
Note: The student does not need to be outstanding in all
M.S. Thesis Defense: At the conclusion of the M.S. (Thesis Option), the
components of the exam to pass.
student will be required to make a formal presentation and defense of
Step 3. The student must complete all deliverables no later than the
her/his thesis research.
Monday of Dead Week.
M.S. Non-Thesis - Electrical Engineering
Step 4. Each member of the exam committee makes a recommendation
EE CORE
12.0
on the deliverables from the following list: strongly support, support, and
Electrical Engineering Core Courses Courses from
do not support.
one track - see below.
To pass the Ph.D. Qualifying Exam, the student must have at least TWO
EGGN504
ENGINEERING SYSTEMS SEMINAR -
1
"strongly supports" and at most ONE "do not support". The student is
ELECTICAL
informed of the decision no later than the Monday after finals week. A
EE TECH
EE Technical Electives Must be approved by advisor.
11.0
student can only fail the exam one time. If a second failure occurs, the
EE ELECT
6.0
student has unsatisfactory academic performance that results in an
Electrical Engineering Electives Must be taught by an
immediate, mandatory dismissal of the graduate student from the Ph.D.
approved professor in one of the EE specialty tracks.
program.
Total Hours
30.0
Ph.D. Thesis Proposal: After passing the Qualifying Examination, the
Doctor of Philosophy – Electrical Engineering
Ph.D. student is allowed up to 18 months to prepare a written Thesis
Proposal and present it formally to the student’s graduate committee and
The Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering requires 72 credit hours of
other interested faculty.
course work and research credits. There are two emphasis areas in
Electrical Engineering: (1) Information and Systems Sciences, and (2)
Admission to Candidacy: Full-time students must complete the following
Energy Systems and Power Electronics. Students are encouraged to
requirements within two calendar years of enrolling in the Ph.D. program.
decide between emphasis areas before pursuing an advanced degree.
• Have a Thesis Committee appointment form on file in the Graduate
Students are also encouraged to speak to members of the EE graduate
Office:
faculty before registering for classes and to select an academic advisor
• Have passed the Ph.D. Qualifying Exam demonstrating adequate
as soon as possible. The following set of courses is required of all
preparation for, and satisfactory ability to conduct doctoral research.
students.

52 Graduate
EGGN504
ENGINEERING SYSTEMS SEMINAR -
1
Ph.D. Thesis Defense: At the conclusion of the student’s Ph.D. program,
ELECTICAL
the student will be required to make a formal presentation and defense of
EE CORE
her/his thesis research.
Electrical Engineering Core Courses Courses within 12.0
one track - see below.
Electrical Engineering Courses
EE TECH
EE Technical Electives Must be approved by thesis
35.0
Required Core: Energy Systems and Power Electronics Track
committee.
Choose at least 4 of the following:
EGGN707
GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT Select department-24.0
EGGN580
ELECTRIC POWER QUALITY
3
specific course offering (section E).
EGGN581
MODERN ADJUSTABLE SPEED ELECTRIC
3
Total Hours
72.0
DRIVES
EGGN582
RENEWABLE ENERGY AND DISTRIBUTED
3
Ph.D. Qualifying Examination: Students wishing to enroll in the Electrical
GENERATION
Engineering Ph.D. program will be required to pass a Qualifying Exam.
EGGN583
ADVANCED ELECTRICAL MACHINE
3
Normally, full-time Ph.D. candidates will take the Qualifying Exam in
DYNAMICS
their first year, but it must be taken within three semesters of entering
the program. Part-time candidates will normally be expected to take
EGGN584
POWER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS
3
the Qualifying Exam within no more than six semesters of entering the
ENGINEERING
program.
EGGN585
ADVANCED HIGH POWER ELECTRONICS
3
EGGN586
HIGH VOLTAGE AC AND DC POWER
3
The purpose of the Qualifying Exam is to assess some of the attributes
TRANSMISSION
expected of a successful Ph.D. student, including:
EGGN587
POWER SYSTEM OPERATION AND
3
• To determine the student’s ability to review, synthesize and apply
MANAGEMENT
fundamental concepts.
• To determine the creative and technical potential of the student to
Required Core: Information and Systems Sciences
solve open-ended and challenging problems.
All students must take:
• To determine the student’s technical communication skills.
EGGN515
MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR SIGNALS
3
The Qualifying Examination includes both written and oral sections.
AND SYSTEMS
The written section is based on material from the EECS Department’s
and choose at least 3 of the following:
undergraduate Electrical Engineering degree. The oral part of the exam
covers either two of the graduate-level track courses (of the student’s
EGGN509
SPARSE SIGNAL PROCESSING
3
choice), or a paper from the literature chosen by the student and the
EGGN510
IMAGE AND MULTIDIMENSIONAL SIGNAL
3
student’s advisor. The student’s advisor and two additional Electrical
PROCESSING
Specialty faculty members (typically from the student’s thesis committee
EGGN517
THEORY AND DESIGN OF ADVANCED
3
representing their track) administer the oral exam.
CONTROL SYSTEMS
Ph.D. Qualifying exams will typically be held in each regular semester to
EGGN518
ROBOT MECHANICS: KINEMATICS,
3
accommodate graduate students admitted in either the Fall or Spring. In
DYNAMICS, AND CONTROL
the event of a student failing the Qualifying exam, she/he will be given
EGGN519
ESTIMATION THEORY AND KALMAN
3
one further opportunity to pass the exam in the following semester.
FILTERING
If a second failure occurs, the student has unsatisfactory academic
MATH534
MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS I
3
performance that results in an immediate, mandatory dismissal of the
graduate student from the Ph.D. program.
Other EE Courses:
Ph.D. Thesis Proposal: After passing the Qualifying Examination, the
EGGN512
COMPUTER VISION
3
Ph.D. student is allowed up to 18 months to prepare a written Thesis
EGGN513
WIRELESS COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS
3
Proposal and present it formally to the student’s graduate committee and
EGGN514
ADVANCED ROBOT CONTROL
3
other interested faculty.
EGGN516
RF AND MICROWAVE ENGINEERING
3
Admission to Candidacy: Full-time students must complete the following
EGGN521
MECHATRONICS
3
requirements within two calendar years of enrolling in the Ph.D. program.
EGGN589
DESIGN AND CONTROL OF WIND ENERGY
3
• Have a Thesis Committee appointment form on file in the Graduate
SYSTEMS
Office:
EGGN617
INTELLIGENT CONTROL SYSTEMS
3
• Have passed the Ph.D. Qualifying Exam demonstrating adequate
EGGN618
NONLINEAR AND ADAPTIVE CONTROL
3
preparation for, and satisfactory ability to conduct doctoral research.
EGGN683
COMPUTER METHODS IN ELECTRIC POWER
3
Upon completion of these requirements, students must complete an
SYSTEMS
Admission to Candidacy form. This form must be signed by the student’s
Thesis Committee and the EECS Department Head and filed with the
Graduate Office.

Colorado School of Mines 53
Courses
CSCI547. SCIENTIFIC VISUALIZATION. 3.0 Hours.
Scientific visualization uses computer graphics to create visual images
CSCI522. INTRODUCTION TO USABILITY RESEARCH. 3.0 Hours.
which aid
(I) An introduction to the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI).
in understanding of complex, often massive numerical representation of
Students will review current literature from prominent researchers in
scientific
HCI and will discuss how the researchers’ results may be applied to the
concepts or results. The main focus of this course is on techniques
students’ own software design efforts. Topics include usability testing,
applicable to
ubiquitous computing user experience design, cognitive walkthrough and
spatial data such as scalar, vector and tensor fields. Topics include
talk-aloud testing methodologies. Students will work in small teams to
volume
develop and evaluate an innovative product or to conduct an extensive
rendering, texture based methods for vector and tensor field visualization,
usability analysis of an existing product. Project results will be reported
and
in a paper formatted for submission to an appropriate conference
scalar and vector field topology. Students will learn about modern
(UbiComp, SIGCSE, CHI, etc.). Prerequisite: CSCI261 or equivalent. 3
visualization
hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
techniques by reading and discussing research papers and implementing
one of
CSCI542. SIMULATION. 3.0 Hours.
the algorithms described in the literature.
(I) Advanced study of computational and mathematical techniques
for modeling, simulating, and analyzing the performance of various
CSCI561. THEORY OF COMPUTATION. 3.0 Hours.
systems. Simulation permits the evaluation of performance prior to
(I) An introduction to abstract models of computation and computability
the implementation of a system; it permits the comparison of various
theory; including finite automata (finite state machines), pushdown
operational alternatives without perturbing the real system. Topics to
automata, and Turing machines. Language models, including formal
be covered include simulation techniques, random number generation,
languages, regular expressions, and grammars. Decidability and
Monte Carlo simulations, discrete and continuous stochastic models, and
undecidability of computational problems. Prerequisite: CSCI358/
point/interval estimation. Offered every other year. Prerequisite: CSCI262
MATH358. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(or equivalent), MATH323 (or MATH530 or equivalent), or permission of
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CSCI562. APPLIED ALGORITHMS AND DATA STRUCTURES. 3.0
Hours.
CSCI544. ADVANCED COMPUTER GRAPHICS. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Industry competitiveness in certain areas is often based on the use
This is an advanced computer graphics course in which students will
of better algorithms and data structures. The objective of this class is
learn a
to survey some interesting application areas and to understand the
variety of mathematical and algorithmic techniques that can be used to
core algorithms and data structures that support these applications.
solve
Application areas could change with each offering of the class, but would
fundamental problems in computer graphics. Topics include global
include some of the following: VLSI design automation, computational
illumination,
biology, mobile computing, computer security, data compression,
GPU programming, geometry acquisition and processing, point based
web search engines, geographical information systems. Prerequisite:
graphics
MATH406/CSCI406, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
and non-photorealistic rendering. Students will learn about modern
hours.
rendering and
geometric modeling techniques by reading and discussing research
CSCI563. PARALLEL COMPUTING FOR SCIENTISTS AND
papers and
ENGINEERS. 3.0 Hours.
implementing one or more of the algorithms described in the literature.
(I) Students are taught how to use parallel computing to solve complex
scientific problems. They learn how to develop parallel programs, how to
CSCI546. WEB PROGRAMMING II. 3.0 Hours.
analyze their performance, and how to optimize program performance.
(I) This course covers methods for creating effective and dynamic web
The course covers the classification of parallel computers, shared
pages, and
memory versus distributed memory machines, software issues, and
using those sites as part of a research agenda related to Humanitarian
hardware issues in parallel computing. Students write programs for state
Engineering. Students will review current literature from the International
of the art high performance supercomputers, which are accessed over
Symposium on Technology and Society (ISTAS), American Society for
the network. Prerequisite: Programming experience in C, consent of
Engineering Education (ASEE), and other sources to develop a research
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
agenda for the semester. Following a brief survey of web programming
languages, including HTML, CSS, JavaScript and Flash, students will
CSCI564. ADVANCED COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE. 3.0 Hours.
design and implement a website to meet their research agenda. The final
The objective of this class is to gain a detailed understanding about the
product will be a research paper which documents the students’ efforts
options available to a computer architect when designing a computer
and research results. Prerequisite: CSCI 262. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester
system along with quantitative justifications for the options. All aspects
hours.
of modern computer architectures including instruction sets, processor
design, memory system design, storage system design, multiprocessors,
and software approaches will be discussed. Prerequisite: CSCI341, or
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

54 Graduate
CSCI565. DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
CSCI575. MACHINE LEARNING. 3.0 Hours.
(II) This course discusses concepts, techniques, and issues in developing
(II) The goal of machine learning research is to build computer systems
distributed systems in large scale networked environment. Topics include
that learn from experience and that adapt to their environments.
theory and systems level issues in the design and implementation of
Machine learning systems do not have to be programmed by humans
distributed systems. Prerequisites: CSCI442 or equivalent or permission
to solve a problem; instead, they essentially program themselves
of instructor. 3 hours of lecture; 3 semester hours.
based on examples of how they should behave, or based on trial and
error experience trying to solve the problem. This course will focus
CSCI568. DATA MINING. 3.0 Hours.
on the methods that have proven valuable and successful in practical
(II) This course is an introductory course in data mining. It covers
applications. The course will also contrast the various methods, with
fundamentals of data mining theories and techniques. We will discuss
the aim of explaining the situations in which each is most appropriate.
association rule mining and its applications, overview of classification
Prerequisites: CSCI262 and MATH323, or consent of instructor. 3 hours
and clustering, data preprocessing, and several applicationspecific data
lecture; 3 semester hours.
mining tasks. We will also discuss practical data mining using a data
mining software. Project assignments include implementation of existing
CSCI576. WIRELESS SENSOR SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
data mining algorithms, data mining with or without data mining software,
With the advances in computational, communication, and sensing
and study of data mining related research issues. Prerequisite: CSCI262
capabilities, large scale sensor-based distributed environments are
or permission of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
becoming a reality. Sensor enriched communication and information
infrastructures have the potential to revolutionize almost every aspect
CSCI571. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE. 3.0 Hours.
of human life benefitting application domains such as transportation,
(I) Artificial Intelligence (AI) is the subfield of computer science that
medicine, surveillance, security, defense, science and engineering.
studies how to automate tasks for which people currently exhibit superior
Such a distributed infrastructure must integrate networking, embedded
performance over computers. Historically, AI has studied problems such
systems, distributed computing and data management technologies to
as machine learning, language understanding, game playing, planning,
ensure seamless access to data dispersed across a hierarchy of storage,
robotics, and machine vision. AI techniques include those for uncertainty
communication, and processing units, from sensor devices where data
management, automated theorem proving, heuristic search, neural
originates to large databases where the data generated is stored and/
networks, and simulation of expert performance in specialized domains
or analyzed. Prerequisite: CSCI406, CSCI446, CSCI471, or consent of
like medical diagnosis. This course provides an overview of the field of
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Artificial Intelligence. Particular attention will be paid to learning the LISP
language for AI programming. Prerequisite: CSCI262. 3 hours lecture; 3
CSCI580. ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMACE COMPUTING. 3.0 Hours.
semester hours.
This course provides students with knowledge of the fundamental
concepts of high performance computing as well as hands-on experience
CSCI572. COMPUTER NETWORKS II. 3.0 Hours.
with the core technology in the field. The objective of this class is
(II) This course covers the network layer, data link layer, and physical
to understand how to achieve high performance on a wide range of
layer of communication protocols in depth. Detailed topics include
computational platforms. Topics will include sequential computers
routing (unicast, multicast, and broadcast), one hop error detection and
including memory hierarchies, shared memory computers and multicore,
correction, and physical topologies. Other topics include state-of-the-art
distributed memory computers, graphical processing units (GPUs), cloud
communications protocols for emerging networks (e.g., ad hoc networks
and grid computing, threads, OpenMP, message passing (MPI), CUDA
and sensor networks). Prerequisite: CSCI471 or equivalent or permission
(for GPUs), parallel file systems, and scientific applications. 3 hours
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
CSCI574. THEORY OF CRYPTOGRAPHY. 3.0 Hours.
CSCI586. FAULT TOLERANT COMPUTING. 3.0 Hours.
Students will draw upon current research results to design, implement
This course provides a comprehensive overview of fault tolerant
and analyze their own computer security or other related cryptography
computing including uniprocessor fault tolerance, distributed fault
projects. The requisite mathematical background, including relevant
tolerance, failure model, fault detection, checkpoint, message log,
aspects of number theory and mathematical statistics, will be covered
algorithm-based fault tolerance, error correction codes, and fault
in lecture. Students will be expected to review current literature from
tolerance in large storage systems. 3 hours lecture;
prominent researchers in cryptography and to present their findings
3 semester hours.
to the class. Particular focus will be given to the application of various
techniques to real-life situations. The course will also cover the following
CSCI597. SUMMER PROGRAMS. 6.0 Hours.
aspects of cryptography: symmetric and asymmetric encryption,
computational number theory, quantum encryption, RSA and discrete
CSCI598. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
log systems, SHA, steganography, chaotic and pseudo-random
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
sequences, message authentication, digital signatures, key distribution
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
and key management, and block ciphers. Prerequisites: CSCI262 plus
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
undergraduate-level knowledge of statistics and discrete mathematics. 3
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
CSCI599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

Colorado School of Mines 55
CSCI691. GRADUATE SEMINAR. 1.0 Hour.
EGGN512. COMPUTER VISION. 3.0 Hours.
Presentation of latest research results by guest lecturers, staff, and
(II) Computer vision is the process of using computers to acquire images,
advanced students. Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1 hour seminar;
transform images, and extract symbolic descriptions from images. This
1 semester hour. Repeatable for credit to a maximum of 12 hours.
course concentrates on how to recover the structure and properties of
a possibly dynamic three-dimensional world from its two-dimensional
CSCI692. GRADUATE SEMINAR. 1.0 Hour.
images. We start with an overview of image formation and low level
Presentation of latest research results by guest lecturers, staff, and
image processing, including feature extraction techniques. We then go
advanced students. Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1 hour seminar;
into detail on the theory and techniques for estimating shape, location,
1 semester hour. Repeatable for credit to a maximum of 12 hours.
motion, and recognizing objects. Applications and case studies will be
discussed from areas such as scientific image analysis, robotics, machine
CSCI693. WAVE PHENOMENA SEMINAR. 1.0 Hour.
vision inspection systems, photogrammetry, multimedia, and human
Students will probe a range of current methodologies and issues in
interfaces (such as face and gesture recognition). Design ability and
seismic data processing, with emphasis on underlying assumptions,
hands-on projects will be emphasized, using image processing software
implications of these assumptions, and implications that would follow from
and hardware systems. Prerequisite: Linear algebra, Fourier transforms,
use of alternative assumptions. Such analysis should provide seed topics
knowledge of C programming language. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
for ongoing and subsequent research. Topic areas include: Statistics
hours.
estimation and compensation, deconvolution, multiple suppression,
suppression of other noises, wavelet estimation, imaging and inversion,
EGGN513. WIRELESS COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
extraction of stratigraphic and lithologic information, and correlation
This course explores aspects of electromagnetics, stochastic modeling,
of surface and borehole seismic data with well log data. Prerequisite:
signal processing, and RF/microwave components as applied to the
Consent of department. 1 hour seminar; 1 semester hour.
design of wireless systems. In particular, topics on (a) physical and
statistical models to represent the wireless channel, (b) advanced
CSCI700. MASTERS PROJECT CREDITS. 1-6 Hour.
digital modulation techniques, (c) temporal, spectral, code-division and
(I, II, S) Project credit hours required for completion of the non-thesis
spatial multiple access techniques, (d) space diversity techniques and
Master of Science degree in Computer Science (Project Option). Project
(d) the effects of RF/microwave components on wireless systems will
under the direct supervision of a faculty advisor. Credit is not transferable
be discussed. Pre-requisite: EGGN386, EGGN483, and consent of
to any 400, 500, or 600 level courses. Repeatable for credit.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Taught on demand.
CSCI707. GRADUATE THESIS/DISSERTATION RESEARCH CREDIT.
EGGN515. MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR SIGNALS AND
1-12 Hour.
SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
(I, II, S) Research credit hours required for completion of a Masters-level
(I) An introduction to mathematical methods for modern signal processing
thesis or Doctoral dissertation. Research must be carried out under the
using vector space methods. Topics include signal representation in
direct supervision of the student’s faculty advisor. Variable class and
Hilbert and Banach spaces; linear operators and the geometry of linear
semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
equations; LU, Cholesky, QR, eigen- and singular value decompositions.
Applications to signal processing and linear systems are included
EGGN509. SPARSE SIGNAL PROCESSING. 3.0 Hours.
throughout, such as Fourier analysis, wavelets, adaptive filtering, signal
(II) This course presents a mathematical tour of sparse signal
detection, and feedback control.
representations and their applications in modern signal processing.
The classical Fourier transform and traditional digital signal processing
EGGN516. RF AND MICROWAVE ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
techniques are extended to enable various types of computational
This course teaches the basics of RF/microwave design including circuit
harmonic analysis. Topics covered include time-frequency and wavelet
concepts, modeling techniques, and test and measurement techniques,
analysis, filter banks, nonlinear approximation of functions, compression,
as applied to wireless communication systems. RF/microwave concepts
signal restoration, and compressive sensing. Prerequisites: EGGN481
that will be discussed are: scattering parameters, impedance matching,
and EGGN515, or consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
microstrip and coplanar transmission lines, power dividers and couplers,
hours.
filters, amplifiers, oscillators, and diode mixers and detectors. Students
will learn how to design and model RF/microwave components such
EGGN510. IMAGE AND MULTIDIMENSIONAL SIGNAL PROCESSING.
as impedance matching networks, amplifiers and oscillators on Ansoft
3.0 Hours.
Designer software, and will build and measure these circuits in the
(I) This course provides the student with the theoretical background to
laboratory. Prerequisites: EGGN385, EGGN386, EGGN483, and consent
allow them to apply state of the art image and multi-dimensional signal
of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours. Taught on demand.
processing techniques. The course teaches students to solve practical
problems involving the processing of multidimensional data such as
EGGN517. THEORY AND DESIGN OF ADVANCED CONTROL
imagery, video sequences, and volumetric data. The types of problems
SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
students are expected to solve are automated mensuration from multi
(II) This course will introduce and study the theory and design of
- dimensional data, and the restoration, reconstruction, or compression
multivariable and nonlinear control systems. Students will learn to design
of multidimensional data. The tools used in solving these problems
multivariable controllers that are both optimal and robust, using tools such
include a variety of feature extraction methods, filtering techniques,
as state space and transfer matrix models, nonlinear analysis, optimal
segmentation techniques, and transform methods. Students will use the
estimator and controller design, and multi-loop controller synthesis
techniques covered in this course to solve practical problems in projects.
Prerequisite: EGGN417 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
Prerequisite: EGGN388 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
semester hours. Spring semester.

56 Graduate
EGGN519. ESTIMATION THEORY AND KALMAN FILTERING. 3.0
EGGN581. MODERN ADJUSTABLE SPEED ELECTRIC DRIVES. 3.0
Hours.
Hours.
Estimation theory considers the extraction of useful information from
An introduction to electric drive systems for advanced applications.
raw sensor measurements in the presence of signal uncertainty.
The course introduces the treatment of vector control of induction and
Common applications include navigation, localization and mapping, but
synchronous motor drives using the concepts of general flux orientation
applications can be found in all fields where measurements are used.
and the feedforward (indirect) and feedback (direct) voltage and current
Mathematic descriptions of random signals and the response of linear
vector control. AC models in space vector complex algebra are also
systems are presented. The discrete-time Kalman Filter is introduced,
developed. Other types of drives are also covered, such as reluctance,
and conditions for optimality are described. Implementation issues,
stepper-motor and switched-reluctance drives. Digital computer
performance prediction, and filter divergence are discussed. Adaptive
simulations are used to evaluate such implementations. Pre-requisite:
estimation and nonlinear estimation are also covered. Contemporary
Familiarity with power electronics and power systems, such as covered in
applications will be utilized throughout the course. Pre-requisite: EGGN
EGGN484
515 and MATH 534 or equivalent. Spring semester of odd years. 3
and EGGN485. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours. Spring semester of
Lecture Hours; 3 Semester Hours.
even years.
EGGN579. ADVANCES IN RENEWABLE ENERGY INTEGRATION
EGGN582. RENEWABLE ENERGY AND DISTRIBUTED
TECHNIQUES. 3.0 Hours.
GENERATION. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Renewable energy resources are widely distributed geographically
A comprehensive electrical engineering approach on the integration of
and are intermittent in nature, so they cannot be directly controlled and
alternative sources of energy. One of the main objectives of this course is
dispatched like the more traditional sources of generation. Large scale
to focus on the
electrical power networks, collectively referred to as the power grid, have
inter-disciplinary aspects of integration of the alternative sources of
been historically designed using centralized large power generating
energy which will include most common and also promising types of
stations supplying customer loads over a vastly interconnected
alternative primary energy: hydropower, wind power, photovoltaic, fuel
transmission and distribution network. Increasing the penetration level
cells and energy storage with the integration to the electric grid. Pre-
of distributed renewable energy sources requires adjustments to the
requisite: It is assumed that students will have some basic and broad
existing operating procedure and design philosophy of large scale
knowledge of the principles of electrical machines, thermodynamics,
power systems. This course, utilizing a foundation in power systems
power electronics, direct energy conversion, and fundamentals of
analysis, focuses on helping students and practicing professionals
electric power systems such as covered in basic engineering courses
understand the impacts and challenges associated with the renewable
plus EGGN484 and EGGN485. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours. Fall
energy integration. Alternate solutions of integrating variable and
semester of odd years.
uncertain renewable energy sources into the large scale electric power
grid will be discussed. Transmission system integration topics include
EGGN583. ADVANCED ELECTRICAL MACHINE DYNAMICS. 3.0
system dynamic power flows, voltage stability, generation scheduling,
Hours.
and balancing areas of operation and congestion. Integration into the
This course deals primarily with the two rotating AC machines currently
distribution system will feature operating strategies, system overloading,
utilized in the electric power industry, namely induction and synchronous
safety, and system protection topics. The course will engage prominent
machines. The course is divided in two halves: the first half is dedicated
researchers as guest speakers and feature PowerWorld Simulator,
to induction and synchronous machines are taught in the second half.
a commercial power flow analysis software package. Prerequisites:
The details include the development of the theory of operation, equivalent
EGGN484 (Power System Analysis) and consent of instructors 3
circuit models for both steady-state and transient operations, all aspects
Semester Hours.
of performance evaluation, IEEE
methods of testing, and guidelines for industry applications including
EGGN580. ELECTRIC POWER QUALITY. 3.0 Hours.
design and procurement. Prerequisites: EGGN484 or equivalent, and/or
(II) Electric power quality (PQ) deals with problems exhibited by voltage,
consent of instructor. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours. Spring semester
current and frequency that typically impact end-users (customers) of an
of even years.
electric power system. This course is designed to familiarize the concepts
of voltage sags, harmonics, momentary disruptions, and waveform
EGGN584. POWER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS ENGINEERING. 3.0
distortions arising from various sources in the system. A theoretical and
Hours.
mathematical basis for various indices, standards, models, analyses
This course deals with the theory and applications of problems and
techniques, and good design procedures will be presented. Additionally,
solutions as related to electric power distribution systems engineering
sources of power quality problems and some remedies for improvement
from both ends: end-users like large industrial plants and electric utility
will be discussed. The course bridges topics between power systems and
companies. The primary focus of this course in on the medium voltage
power electronics. Prerequisite: EGGN484 and EGGN485 or instructor
(4.16 kV – 69 kV) power systems. Some references will be made to the
approval.
LV power system. The course includes: per-unit methods of calculations;
3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours.
voltage drop and voltage regulation; power factor improvement and shunt
compensation; shortcircuit calculations; theory and fundamentals of
symmetrical components; unsymmetrical faults; overhead distribution
lines and power cables; basics and fundamentals of distribution
protection. Prerequisites: EGGN484 or equivalent, and/or consent of
instructor. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours. Fall semester of odd years.

Colorado School of Mines 57
EGGN585. ADVANCED HIGH POWER ELECTRONICS. 3.0 Hours.
EGGN617. INTELLIGENT CONTROL SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
(I) Basic principles of analysis and design of circuits utilizing high power
Fundamental issues related to the design on intelligent control systems
electronics. AC/DC, DC/AC, AC/AC, and DC/DC conversion techniques.
are described. Neural networks analysis for engi neering systems are
Laboratory project comprising simulation and construction of a power
presented. Neural-based learning, estimation, and identification of
electronics circuit. Prerequisites: EGGN385; EGGN389 or equivalent. 3
dynamical systems are described. Qualitative control system analysis
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Fall semester even years.
using fuzzy logic is presented. Fuzzy mathematics design of rule-based
control, and integrated human-machine intelligent control systems are
EGGN586. HIGH VOLTAGE AC AND DC POWER TRANSMISSION. 3.0
covered. Real-life problems from different engineering systems are
Hours.
analyzed. Prerequisite: EGGN517 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
This course deals with the theory, modeling and applications of HV and
lecture; 3 semester hours. Taught on demand.
EHV power transmission systems engineering. The primary focus is on
overhead AC transmission line and voltage ranges between 115 kV –
EGGN618. NONLINEAR AND ADAPTIVE CONTROL. 3.0 Hours.
500 kV. HVDC and underground transmission will also be discussed.
This course presents a comprehensive exposition of the theory of
The details include the calculations of line parameters (RLC); steady-
nonlinear dynamical systems and the applications of this theory to
state performance evaluation (voltage drop and regulation, losses and
adaptive control. It will focus on (1) methods of characterizing and
efficiency) of short, medium and long lines; reactive power compensation;
understanding the behavior of systems that can be described by
FACTS devices; insulation coordination; corona; insulators; sag-tension
nonlinear ordinary differential equations, (2) methods for designing
calculations; EMTP, traveling wave and transients; fundamentals of
controllers for such systems, (3) an introduction to the topic of system
transmission line design; HV and EHV power cables: solid dielectric, oil-
identification, and (4) study of the primary techniques in adaptive control,
filled and gas-filled; Fundamentals of DC transmission systems including
including model-reference adaptive control and model predictive control.
converter and filter. Prerequisites: EGGN484 or equivalent, and/or
Prerequisite: EGGN517 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
consent of instructor. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours. Fall semester of
semester hours. Spring, even numbered years.
even years.
EGGN683. COMPUTER METHODS IN ELECTRIC POWER SYSTEMS.
EGGN587. POWER SYSTEM OPERATION AND MANAGEMENT. 3.0
3.0 Hours.
Hours.
This course deals with the computer methods and numerical solution
(I) This course presents a comprehensive exposition of the theory,
techniques applied to large scale power systems. Primary focus includes
methods, and algorithms for Energy Management Systems (EMS)
load flow, short circuit, voltage stability and transient stability studies and
in the power grid. It will focus on (1) modeling of power systems and
contingency analysis. The details include the modeling of various devices
generation units, (2) methods for dispatching generating resources, (3)
like transformer, transmission lines, FACTS devices, and synchronous
methods for accurately estimating the state of the system, (4) methods
machines. Numerical techniques include solving a large set of linear
for assessing the security of the power system, and (5) an overview of the
or non-linear algebraic equations, and solving a large set of differential
market operations in the grid. Prerequisite: EGGN484. 3 lecture hours; 3
equations. A number of simple case studies (as per IEEE standard
semester hours.
models) will be performed. Prerequisites: EGGN583, EGGN584 and
EGGN586 or equivalent, and/or consent of instructor; a strong knowledge
EGGN589. DESIGN AND CONTROL OF WIND ENERGY SYSTEMS.
of digital simulation techniques. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours.
3.0 Hours.
Taught on demand.
(II) Wind energy provides a clean, renewable source for electricity
generation. Wind turbines provide electricity at or near the cost of
SYGN555. SMARTGEO SEMINAR. 1.0 Hour.
traditional fossil-fuel fired power plants at suitable locations, and the wind
Geosystems are natural or engineered earth structures, e.g. earth
industry is growing rapidly as a result. Engineering R&D can still help
dams or levees, groundwater systems, underground construction
to reduce the cost of energy from wind, improve the reliability of wind
sites, and contaminated aquifers. An intelligent geosystem is one
turbines and wind farms, and help to improve acceptance of wind energy
that can sense its environment, diagnose its condition/state, and
in the public and political arenas. This course provides an overview of the
provide decision support to improve the management, operation, or
design and control of wind energy systems. Prerequisite: EGGN307. 3
objective of the geosystem. The goal of this course is to introduce
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
students to topics that are needed for them to be successful
working in a multi-disciplinary field. The course will include
EGGN597E. SPECIAL SUMMER COURSE. 6.0 Hours.
training in leadership, multidisciplinary teams, policy and ethical
issues, and a monthly technical seminar. Prerequisite/Corequisite:
EGGN599E. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 0.5-6 Hour.
SYGN550. 1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour credit.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

58 Graduate
Engineering Systems
The purpose of the Qualifying Exam is to assess some of the attributes
expected of a successful PhD student. The objectives are to assess the
http://engineering.mines.edu
students in the following three categories.
Degrees Offered
• To determine the student’s ability to review, synthesize and apply
fundamental concepts.
• Master of Science in Engineering Systems
• To determine the creative and technical potential of the student to
• Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering Systems
solve challenging open-ended problems.
Program Overview
• To evaluate the student’s technical written and oral communication
skills.
The College of Engineering and Computational Sciences (CECS) offers
the degrees: Master of Science in Engineering Systems and Doctor
Ph.D. Qualifying exams will typically be held in each regular semester to
of Philosophy in Engineering Systems. Because in many problems
accommodate graduate students admitted in either the Fall or Spring. In
individual research projects encompass more than one research area
the event of a student failing the Qualifying exam, she/he will be given
or sit in a niche resulting from the intersection of multiple disciplines,
one further opportunity to pass the exam in the following semester. A
the degrees in Engineering Systems allow a student to develop a
second failure of the Qualifying Exam in a given specialty would lead
personalized plan of study that explores systems-based concepts in
to removal of the student from the Ph.D. program. After passing the
problems that span disciplines or to study specialized topics not typically
Qualifying Examination, the Ph.D. student is allowed up to 18 months to
found in a single disciplinary field of study.
prepare a written Thesis Proposal and present it formally to the graduate
committee and other interested faculty.
Admission to Candidacy.
Full-time students must complete the following requirements within two
Program Details
calendar years of enrolling in the Ph.D. program.
The M.S. in Engineering Systems degree (Thesis or Non-Thesis Option)
• Have a Thesis Committee appointment form on file in the Graduate
requires 30 credit hours. Requirements for the thesis M.S. are 24 hours
Office:
of coursework and 6 hours of thesis research. The non-thesis option
• Have passed the Ph.D. Qualifying Exam demonstrating adequate
requires 30 hours of coursework. For the M.S. degree, a maximum
preparation for, and satisfactory ability to conduct doctoral research.
of 9 credits can be transferred in from another institution (note that
• Upon completion of these requirements, students must complete an
these courses must not have been used to satisfy the requirements
Admission to Candidacy form. This form must be signed by the Thesis
for an undergraduate degree). Graduate level courses taken at other
Committee and the Dean and filed with the Graduate Office.
universities for which a grade equivalent to a "B" or better was received
will be considered for transfer credit via a petition to the Dean.
Prerequisites
The Ph.D. in Engineering Systems degree requires 72 credit hours of
The minimum requirements for admission for the M.S., and Ph.D.
course work and research credits. Graduate level courses taken at other
degrees in Engineering are a baccalaureate degree in engineering,
universities for which a grade equivalent to a "B" or better was received
computer science, a physical science, or math with a grade-point average
will be considered for transfer credit via a petition to the Dean (note that
of 3.0 or better on a 4.0 scale; Graduate Record Examination score of
these courses must not have been used to satisfy the requirements for an
650 (math) and a TOEFL score of 550 or higher (paper based), 213
undergraduate degree).
(computer based), or 79 (internet based) for applicants whose native
Students must have an advisor from the College Graduate Faculty
language is not English. Applicants from an engineering program at CSM
to direct and monitor their academic plan, research and independent
are not required to submit GRE scores.
studies. Master of Science (thesis option) students must have at least
The Engineering Graduate committee evaluating an applicant may
three members on their graduate committee, two of whom must be
require that the student take undergraduate remedial coursework to
permanent faculty in the College. Ph.D. graduate committees must have
overcome technical deficiencies, which does not count toward the
at least five members; at least three members must be permanent faculty
graduate program. The committee will decide whether to recommend
in the College, and at least one member must be from the department in
to the Dean of Graduate Studies and Research regular or provisional
which the student is pursuing a minor program, if applicable. The faculty
admission, and may ask the applicant to come for an interview.
indicated above are officially affiliated with the degrees in Engineering
Systems. However, all graduate faculty in the College may advise
Degree Requirements
students in these degree programs.
Graduate students who choose an interdisciplinary education in
Ph.D. Qualifying Exam.
Engineering may do so using the curriculum below.
Students wishing to enroll in the Engineering PhD program will be
M.S. Degree (EGGN) - Thesis Option:
required to pass a Qualifying Exam. Normally, full-time PhD candidates
EGGN501
ADVANCED ENGINEERING MEASUREMENTS
4
will take the Qualifying Exam in their first year, but it must be taken
within three semesters of entering the program. Part-time candidates will
EGGN502
ADVANCED ENGINEERING ANALYSIS
4
normally be expected to take the Qualifying Exam within no more than six
or EGGN515
MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR SIGNALS AND
semesters of entering the program.
SYSTEMS
EGGN503
ADVANCED ENGINEERING DESIGN METHODS
3
EGGN504
Grad Colloquium Select department-specific course listing.
1.0

Colorado School of Mines 59
TECH ELECT
Technical Elective Courses must be approved by the 12.0-13.0
graduate thesis committee.
EGGN707
Graduate Research Credit Select department-specific
6.0
course listing.
Total Hours
30-31
M.S. Degree (EGGN) - Non-Thesis Option
EGGN501
ADVANCED ENGINEERING MEASUREMENTS
4
EGGN502
ADVANCED ENGINEERING ANALYSIS
4
or EGGN515
MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR SIGNALS AND
SYSTEMS
EGGN503
ADVANCED ENGINEERING DESIGN METHODS
3
EGGN504
Grad Colloquium Select department-specific course listing.
1.0
TECH ELECT
TECHNICAL ELECTIVE Courses must be approved by the
18.0-19.0
faculty advisor.
Total Hours
30-31
Ph.D. Degree (EGGN)
EGGN501
ADVANCED ENGINEERING MEASUREMENTS
4
EGGN502
ADVANCED ENGINEERING ANALYSIS
4
or EGGN515
MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR SIGNALS AND
SYSTEMS
EGGN503
ADVANCED ENGINEERING DESIGN METHODS
3
EGGN504
Grad Colloquium Select department-specific course listing.
1.0
EGGN707
Graduate Research Credit Select department-specific
24.0
course listing.
TECH ELECT
Technical Electives Must be approved by thesis committee. 36.0
Total Hours
72.0

60 Graduate
Mechanical Engineering
background. The Physics five-year program offers tracks in Mechanical
Engineering. Details on these five-year programs can be found in the
http://mechanical.mines.edu
CSM Undergraduate Bulletin. Course schedules for these five-year
programs can be obtained in the Mechanical Engineering, Physics and
Degrees Offered
Chemistry Departmental Offices.
• Master of Science (Mechanical Engineering)
The Ph.D. Mechanical Engineering degree requires 72 credit hours of
• Doctor of Philosophy (Mechancial Engineering)
course work and research credits. Graduate level courses taken at other
universities for which a grade equivalent to a "B" or better was received
Program Overview
will be considered for transfer credit via a petition to the Mechanical
The Mechanical Engineering Department offers the Master of Science
Engineering Department Head (note that these courses must not have
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Mechanical Engineering. The
been used to satisfy the requirements for an undergraduate degree).
program demands academic rigor and depth yet also addresses real-
Students must have an advisor from the Mechanical Engineering
world engineering problems. The department has four areas of research
Department Graduate Faculty to direct and monitor their academic
activity that stem from the core fields of Mechanical Engineering:
plan, research, and independent studies. Master of Science (thesis
(1) Biomechanics, (2) Thermal Science and Engineering, (3) Solid
option) students must have at least three members on their graduate
Mechanics and Materials, and (4) Robotics, Automation, and Design
committee, two of whom must be permanent faculty in the Mechanical
(which includes elements from Computer Science, Electrical, and
Engineering Department. Ph.D. graduate committees must have at least
Mechanical Engineering disciplines). Note that in many cases, individual
five members; at least three members must be permanent faculty in the
research projects encompass more than one research area.
Mechanical Engineering Department, and at least one member must be
Biomechanics focuses on the application of engineering principles to the
from the department in which the student is pursuing a minor program, if
musculoskeletal system and other connective tissues. Research activities
applicable.
include experimental, computational, and theoretical approaches
Ph.D. Qualifying Exam. Students wishing to enroll in the Mechanical
with applications in the areas of rehabilitation engineering, computer
Engineering PhD program will be required to pass a Qualifying Exam.
assisted surgery and medical robotics, patient specific biomechanical
Normally, full-time PhD candidates will take the Qualifying Exam in
modeling, intelligent prosthetics and implants, and bioinstrumentation.
their first year, but it must be taken within three semesters of entering
The Biomechanics group has strong research ties with other campus
the program. Part-time candidates will normally be expected to take
departments, the local medical community, and industry partners.
the Qualifying Exam within no more than six semesters of entering the
Robotics, Automation, and Design is an area at CSM that merges
program.
research in mechanical design, control systems, sensing, and
The purpose of the Qualifying Exam is to assess some of the attributes
mechatronics to develop automated and autonomous systems that can
expected of a successful PhD student, including
be used to carry out tasks that are dirty, dangerous, dull, or difficult.
• To determine the student’s ability to review, synthesize and apply
Solid Mechanics and Materials investigations consider solid-
fundamental concepts.
state material behavior as it relates to microstructural evolution and
• To determine the creative and technical potential of the student to
control, nano-mechanics, functionally graded materials, biomaterial
solve open-ended and challenging problems.
analysis and characterization, artificial biomaterial design, and fracture
• To determine the student’s technical communication skills.
mechanics. Research in this area tends to have a strong computational
component covering a broad range of length and time scales that
The qualifying examination is based on one of four concentration areas
include molecular dynamics, Finite element methods, discrete element
(Biomechanics, Robotics, Automation, and Design, Solid Mechanics
methods, and boundary element methods. These tools are used to study
and Materials, and Thermal Science and Engineering) and includes
a variety of material systems. Strong ties exist between this group and
both a written and oral examination. This examination is comprehensive
activities within the campus communities of physics, materials science,
in nature and is designed to address material from both the student’s
mathematics and chemical engineering.
undergraduate and initial graduate course work. The student is expected
Thermal Science and Engineering is a research area with a wide array
to demonstrate adequate breadth and depth of knowledge as well as an
of multidisciplinary applications including clean energy systems, materials
ability to analyze and address new problems related to the concentration
processing, combustion, biofuels and renewable energy. Graduate
area.
students in this area typically specialize in Mechanical Engineering but
Ph.D. Qualifying exams will typically be held in each regular semester to
also have the opportunity to specialize in interdisciplinary programs such
accommodate graduate students admitted in either the Fall or Spring. In
as Materials Science.
the event of a student failing the Qualifying exam, she/he will be given
one further opportunity to pass the exam in the following semester.
Program Details
A second failure of the Qualifying Exam in a given specialty would lead to
removal of the student from the Ph.D. program.
The Mechanical Engineering department also offers five-year combined
BS/MS degree programs. These programs offer an expedited
After passing the Qualifying Examination, the Ph.D. student is allowed up
graduate school application process and allow students to begin
to 18 months to prepare a written Thesis Proposal and present it formally
graduate coursework while still finishing their undergraduate degree
to the graduate committee and other interested faculty.
requirements. This program is described in the undergraduate catalog.
Students should consult the Mechanical Engineering Graduate Handbook
In addition, the five year program is offered in collaboration with the
for additional details.
Departments of Physics and Chemistry and allows students to obtain
specific engineering skills that complement their physics or chemistry

Colorado School of Mines 61
Admission to Candidacy. Full-time students must complete the
CORE
Course Core from the ME Course List Courses must 15.0
following requirements within two calendar years of enrolling in the Ph.D.
be approved by the faculty advisor.
program.
Total Hours
30.0
• Have a Thesis Committee appointment form on file in the Graduate
Office:
Ph.D. Degree (EGGN-ME)
• Have passed the Ph.D. Qualifying Exam demonstrating adequate
EGGN501
ADVANCED ENGINEERING MEASUREMENTS
4
preparation for, and satisfactory ability to conduct doctoral research.
Required core
Upon completion of these requirements, students must complete an
EGGN502
ADVANCED ENGINEERING ANALYSIS Required
4
Admission to Candidacy form. This form must be signed by the Thesis
core
Committee and the Mechanical Engineering Department Head and filed
with the Graduate Office.
EGGN504
Grad Colloquium Select department-specific course offering 1.0
(section M).
Prerequisites
CORE
Course Core fro mthe ME Course List See below for 18.0
The minimum requirements for admission for the M.S., and Ph.D.
specific course list.
degrees in Mechanical Engineering are a baccalaureate degree in
engineering, computer science, a physical science, or math with a
EGGN707
GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT Select department-24.0
grade-point average of 3.0 or better on a 4.0 scale; Graduate Record
specific course offering (section M).
Examination score of 650 (math) and a TOEFL score of 550 or higher
(paper based), 213 (computer based), or 79 (internet based) for
ME TECH
Technical Electives Must be approved by the thesis
21.0
applicants whose native language is not English. Applicants from an
committee.
engineering program at CSM are not required to submit GRE scores.
Total Hours
72.0
The Mechanical Engineering Graduate committee evaluating an applicant
may require that the student take undergraduate remedial coursework
Course List
to overcome technical deficiencies. Such coursework does not count
EGGN503
ADVANCED ENGINEERING DESIGN METHODS
3
toward the graduate program. The committee will decide whether to
EGGN514
ADVANCED ROBOT CONTROL
3
recommend to the Dean of Graduate Studies and Research regular or
EGGN515
MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR SIGNALS
3
provisional admission, and may ask the applicant to come to campus for
AND SYSTEMS
an interview.
EGGN517
THEORY AND DESIGN OF ADVANCED
3
Degree Requirements
CONTROL SYSTEMS
M.S. Thesis Degree (EGGN-ME)
EGGN518
ROBOT MECHANICS: KINEMATICS,
3
DYNAMICS, AND CONTROL
EGGN501
ADVANCED ENGINEERING MEASUREMENTS
4
EGGN521
MECHATRONICS
3
required core
EGGN525
MUSCULOSKELETAL BIOMECHANICS
3
EGGN502
ADVANCED ENGINEERING ANALYSIS required
4
EGGN527
PROSTHETIC AND IMPLANT ENGINEERING
3
core
EGGN528
COMPUTATIONAL BIOMECHANICS
3
EGGN504
Grad Colloquium Select department-specific course offering 1.0
EGGN530
BIOMEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION
3
(section M).
EGGN532
FATIGUE AND FRACTURE
3
CORE
EGGN535
INTRODUCTION TO DISCRETE ELEMENT
3
Course Core from the ME Course List Courses must
9.0
METHODS (DEMS)
be approved by the thesis committee.
EGGN542
FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR ENGINEERS
3
EGGN707
GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT Select department- 6.0
EGGN545
BOUNDARY ELEMENT METHODS
3
specific course offering (section M).
EGGN546
ADVANCED ENGINEERING VIBRATION
3
ME TECH
Technical Electives Courses approved by thesis committee. 6.0
EGGN552
VISCOUS FLOWAND BOUNDARY LAYERS
3
Total Hours
30.0
EGGN560
NUMERICAL METHODS FOR ENGINEERS
3
EGGN566
COMBUSTION
3
M.S. Non-Thesis Degree (EGGN-ME)
EGGN569
FUEL CELL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
3
EGGN501
ADVANCED ENGINEERING MEASUREMENTS
4
EGGN573
INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTATIONAL
3
Required core
TECHNIQUES FOR FLUID DYNAMICS AND
EGGN502
TRANSPORT PHENOMENA
ADVANCED ENGINEERING ANALYSIS Required
4
core
EGGN593
ENGINEERING DESIGN OPTIMIZATION
3
EGGN617
INTELLIGENT CONTROL SYSTEMS
3
EGGN504
Grad Colloquium Select department-specific course offering 1.0
(section M).
*
Any graduate level course taught by a member of the CSM
Mechanical Engineering faculty is also a member of the list of
ME TECH
Technical Electives Courses must be approved by faculty
6.0
acceptable Mechanical Engineering Courses.
advisor.

62 Graduate
EGGN521. MECHATRONICS. 3.0 Hours.
Courses
Fundamental design of electromechanical systems with embedded
microcomputers and intelligence. Design of microprocessor based
EGGN501. ADVANCED ENGINEERING MEASUREMENTS. 4.0 Hours.
systems and their interfaces. Fundamental design of machines with
(I) Introduction to the fundamentals of measurements within the context
active sensing and adaptive response. Microcontrollers and integration
of engineering systems. Topics that are covered include: errors and error
of micro-sensors and micro-actuators in the design of electromechanical
analysis,
systems. Introduction to algorithms for information processing appropriate
modeling of measurement systems, basic electronics, noise and noise
for embedded systems. Smart materials and their use as actuators.
reduction, and data acquisition systems. Prerequisite: EGGN250,
Students will do projects involving the design and implementation of
DCGN381 or equivalent, and MATH323 or equivalent; graduate student
smart-systems. Prerequisite: DCGN381 and EGGN482 recommended. 3
status or consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab; 4 semester
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Spring semester of even years.
hours.
EGGN525. MUSCULOSKELETAL BIOMECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.
EGGN502. ADVANCED ENGINEERING ANALYSIS. 4.0 Hours.
(II) This course is intended to provide graduate engineering students
(I) Introduce advanced mathematical and numerical methods used to
with an introduction to musculoskeletal biomechanics. At the end
solve engineering problems. Analytic methods include series solutions,
of the semester, students should have a working knowledge of the
special functions, Sturm-Liouville theory, separation of variables,
special considerations necessary to apply engineering principles to the
and integral transforms. Numerical methods for initial and boundary
human body. The course will focus on the biomechanics of injury since
value problems include boundary, domain, and mixed methods, finite
understanding injury will require developing an understanding of normal
difference approaches for elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic equations,
biomechanics. Prerequisites: DCGN421 Statics, EGGN320 Mechanics of
Crank-Nicolson methods, and strategies for nonlinear problems.
Materials, EGGN325/BELS325 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering (or
The approaches are applied to solve typical engineering problems.
instructor permission). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisite: This is an introductory graduate class. The student
must have a solid understanding of linear algebra, calculus, ordinary
EGGN526. MODELING AND SIMULATION OF HUMAN MOVEMENT.
differential equations, and Fourier theory. 3 hours lecture; 1 hour lab.
3.0 Hours.
(II) Introduction to modeling and simulation in biomechanics. The course
EGGN503. ADVANCED ENGINEERING DESIGN METHODS. 3.0
includes a synthesis of musculoskeletal properties and interactions with
Hours.
the environment to construct detailed computer models and simulations.
(I) Introduction to contemporary and advanced methods used in
The course will culminate in individual class projects related to each
engineering design. Includes, need and problem identification, methods
student’s individual interests. Prerequisites: EGGN315 and EGGN325/
to understand the customer, the market and the competition. Techniques
BELS 325, or consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
to decompose design problems to identify functions. Ideation methods to
hours.
produce form from function. Design for X topics. Methods for prototyping,
modeling, testing and evaluation of designs. Embodiment and detailed
EGGN527. PROSTHETIC AND IMPLANT ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
design processes. Prerequisites: EGGN491 and
Prosthetics and implants for the musculoskeletal and other systems
EGGN492, equivalent senior design project experience or industrial
of the human body are becoming increasingly sophisticated. From
design experience, graduate standing or consent of the Instructor. 3
simple joint replacements to myoelectric limb replacements and
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Taught on demand.
functional electrical stimulation, the engineering opportunities continue
to expand. This course builds on musculoskeletal biomechanics and
EGGN514. ADVANCED ROBOT CONTROL. 3.0 Hours.
other BELS courses to provide engineering students with an introduction
The focus is on mobile robotic vehicles. Topics covered are: navigation,
to prosthetics and implants for the musculoskeletal system. At the end
mining applications, sensors, including vision, problems of sensing
of the semester, students should have a working knowledge of the
variations in rock properties, problems of representing human knowledge
challenges and special considerations necessary to apply engineering
in control systems, machine condition diagnostics, kinematics, and
principles to augmentation or replacement in the musculoskeletal system.
path planning real time obstacle avoidance. Prerequisite: EGGN307 or
Prerequisites: Musculoskeletal Biomechanics (EGGN/BELS425 or
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
EGGN/BELS525), 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Fall even years.
Spring semester of odd years.
EGGN528. COMPUTATIONAL BIOMECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.
EGGN518. ROBOT MECHANICS: KINEMATICS, DYNAMICS, AND
Computational Biomechanics provides and introduction to the application
CONTROL. 3.0 Hours.
of computer simulation to solve some fundamental problems in
(I) Mathematical representation of robot structures. Mechanical analysis
biomechanics and bioengineering. Musculoskeletal mechanics, medical
including kinematics, dynamics, and design of robot manipulators.
image reconstruction, hard and soft tissue modeling, joint mechanics, and
Representations for trajectories and path planning for robots.
inter-subject variability will be considered. An emphasis will be placed on
Fundamentals of robot control including, linear, nonlinear and force
understanding the limitations of the computer model as a predictive tool
control methods. Introduction to off-line programming techniques and
and the need for rigorous verification
simulation. Prerequisite: EGGN307, EGGN400 or consent of instructor. 3
and validation of computational techniques. Clinical application of
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
biomechanical modeling tools is highlighted and impact on patient quality
of life is demonstrated. Prerequisite: EGGN413, EGGN325 or consent of
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Fall odd years.

Colorado School of Mines 63
EGGN529. PROBABILISTIC BIOMECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.
EGGN545. BOUNDARY ELEMENT METHODS. 3.0 Hours.
(II) EGGN529/BELS529. PROBABILISTIC BIOMECHANICS The
(II) Development of the fundamental theory of the boundary element
course introduces the application of probabilistic analysis methods in
method with applications in elasticity, heat transfer, diffusion, and
biomechanical systems. All real engineering systems, and especially
wave propagation. Derivation of indirect and direct boundary integral
human systems, contain inherent uncertainty due to normal variations
equations. Introduction to other Green’s function based methods of
in dimensional parameters, material properties, motion profiles, and
analysis. Computational experiments in primarily two dimensions.
loading conditions. The purpose of this course is to examine methods
Prerequisite: EGGN502, EGGN540 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
for including these sources of variation in biomechanical computations.
lecture; 3 semester hours Spring Semester, odd numbered years.
Concepts of basic probability will be reviewed and applied in the context
of engineering reliability analysis. Probabilistic analysis methods will
EGGN546. ADVANCED ENGINEERING VIBRATION. 3.0 Hours.
be introduced and examples specifically pertaining to musculoskeletal
Vibration theory as applied to single- and multi-degree-offreedom
biomechanics will be studied. Prerequisites: EGGN/BELS428 or EGGN/
systems. Free and forced vibrations to different types of loading-
BELS528. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours. Spring even years.
harmonic, impulse, periodic and general. Natural frequencies. Role
of Damping. Importance of resonance. Modal superposition method.
EGGN530. BIOMEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION. 3.0 Hours.
Prerequisite: EGGN315, 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
The acquisition, processing, and interpretation of biological signals
presents many unique challenges to the Biomedical Engineer.
EGGN552. VISCOUS FLOWAND BOUNDARY LAYERS. 3.0 Hours.
This course is intended to provide students with the knowledge to
(I) This course establishes the theoretical underpinnings of fluid
understand, appreciate, and address these challenges. At the end of
mechanics, including fluid kinematics, stress-strain relationships, and
the semester, students should have a working knowledge of the special
derivation of the fluid-mechanical conservation equations. These include
considerations necessary to gathering and analyzing biological signal
the mass-continuity and
data. Prerequisites: EGGN250 MEL I, DCGN381 Introduction to Electrical
Navier-Stokes equations as well as the multi-component energy and
Circuits, Electronics, and Power, EGGN325/BELS325 Introduction to
species-conservation equations. Fluid-mechanical boundary-layer theory
Biomedical Engineering (or permission of instructor). 3 hours lecture; 3
is developed and applied to situations arising in chemically reacting flow
semester hours. Fall odd years.
applications including combustion, chemical processing, and thin-film
materials processing. Prerequisite: EGGN473, or CHEN430 or consent of
EGGN532. FATIGUE AND FRACTURE. 3.0 Hours.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(I) Basic fracture mechanics as applied to engineering materials, S-N
curves, the Goodman diagram, stress concentrations, residual stress
EGGN555. KINETIC PHENOMENA IN MATERIALS. 3.0 Hours.
effects, effect of material properties on mechanisms of crack propagation.
(I) Linear irreversible thermodynamics, dorce-flux couplings, diffusion,
Prerequisite: Consent of department. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
crystalline materials, amorphous materials, defect kinetics in crystalline
Fall semesters, odd numbered years.
materials, interface kinetics, morphological evolution of interfaces,
nucleation theory, crystal growth, coarsening phenomena and grain
EGGN535. INTRODUCTION TO DISCRETE ELEMENT METHODS
growth, solidification, spinodal decomposition. Prerequisites: MATH225:
(DEMS). 3.0 Hours.
Differential equations (or equivalent), MLGN504/MTGN555/CHEN509:
(I) Review of particle/rigid body dynamics, numerical DEM solution of
Thermodynamics (or its equivalent).
equations of motion for a system of particles/rigid bodies, linear and
nonlinear contact and impact laws dynamics, applications of DEM in
EGGN566. COMBUSTION. 3.0 Hours.
mechanical engineering, materials processing and geo-mechanics.
(I) An introduction to combustion. Course subjects include: the
Prerequisites: EGGN320, EGGN315 and some scientific programming
development of the Chapman-Jouget solutions for deflagration
experience in C/C++ or Fortran or the consent of the instructor. 3 hours
and detonation, a brief review of the fundamentals of kinetics and
lecture; 3 semester hours Spring semester of even numbered years.
thermochemistry, development of solutions for diffusion flames and
premixed flames, discussion of flame structure, pollutant formation, and
EGGN541. ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS. 3.0 Hours.
combustion in practical systems. Prerequisite: EGGN473, or
(I) Introduction to advanced structural analysis concepts. Nonprismatic
ChEN430 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
structures. Arches, Suspension and cable-stayed bridges. Structural
optimization. Computer Methods. Structures with nonlinear materials.
EGGN569. FUEL CELL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
Internal force redistribution for statically indeterminate structures.
(I) Investigate fundamentals of fuel-cell operation and electrochemistry
Graduate credit requires additional homework and projects. Prerequisite:
from a chemical-thermodynamics and materials- science perspective.
EGGN342. 3 hour lectures, 3 semester hours.
Review types of fuel cells, fuel-processing requirements and approaches,
and fuel-cell system integration. Examine current topics in fuel-cell
EGGN543. SOLID MECHANICS OF MATERIALS. 3.0 Hours.
science and technology. Fabricate and test operational fuel cells in the
(II) Introduction to the algebra of vectors and tensors; coordinate
Colorado Fuel Cell Center. 3 credit hours.
transformations; general theories of stress and strain; principal stresses
and strains; octahedral stresses; Hooke’s Law introduction to the
mathematical theory of elasticity and to energy methods; failure theories
for yield and fracture. Prerequisite: EGGN320 or equivalent, MATH225 or
equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

64 Graduate
EGGN570. DESIGN & SIMULATION OF THERMAL. 3.0 Hours.
EGGN593. ENGINEERING DESIGN OPTIMIZATION. 3.0 Hours.
In this course the principles of design, modeling, analysis, and
The application of gradient, stochastic and heuristic optmization
optimization of
algorithms to linear and nonlinear optimization problems in constrained
processes, devices, and systems are introduced and applied to
and unconstrained design spaces. Students will consider problems in
conventional and
constrained and unconstrained design spaces. Students will consider
advanced energy conversion systems. It is intended to integrate
problems with continuous, integer and mixed-integer variables, problems
conservation principles of thermodynamics (EGGN 371) with the
with single or multiple objectives and the task modeling design spaces
mechanism relations of fluid mechanics (EGGN351) and heat transfer
and constraints. Design optimization methods are becoming of increasing
(EGGN471). The course begins with general system design approaches
importance in engineering design and offer the potential to reduce design
and requirements and proceeds with mathematical modeling, simulation,
cycle times while improving design quality by leveraging simulation
analysis, and optimization methods. The design and simulation of
and historical design data. Prerequisites: Experience wiht computer
energy systems is inherently computational and involves modeling of
programming languages, graduate or senior standing or consent of the
thermal equipment, system simulation using performance characteristics,
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
thermodynamic properties, mechanistic relations, and optimization
(typically with economic-based objective functions). Fundamental
EGGN598M. SPECIAL TOPICS - MECH. 1-6 Hour.
principles for steady-state and dynamic modeling are covered. Methods
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
for system simulation which involves predicting performance with a given
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
design (fixed geometry) are studied. Analysis methods that include Pinch
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Technology, Exergy Analysis, and Thermo-economics are examined
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
and are considered complementary to achieving optimal designs.
EGGN599M. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
Optimization encompasses objective function formulation, systems
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
analytical methods, and programming techniques. System optimization
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
of the design and operating parameters of a configuration using various
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
objective functions are explored through case studies and problem
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
sets. Economics and optimization for analyses and design of advanced
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
energy systems, such as Rankine and Brayton cycle power plants,
combined heat and power, refrigeration and geothermal systems, fuel
cells, turbomachinery, and heat transfer equipment are a focus. 3 lecture
hours; 3 credit hours.
EGGN571. ADVANCED HEAT TRANSFER. 3.0 Hours.
(II) An advanced course in heat transfer that supplements topics
covered in EGGN 471. Derivation and solution of governing heat
transfer equations from conservation laws. Development of analytical
and numerical models for conduction, convection, and radiation heat
transfer, including transient, multidimensional, and multimode problems.
Introduction to turbulence, boiling and condensation, and radiative
transfer in participating media.
EGGN573. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTATIONAL TECHNIQUES
FOR FLUID DYNAMICS AND TRANSPORT PHENOMENA. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for graduate
students with no prior knowledge of this topic. Basic techniques
for the numerical analysis of fluid flows. Acquisition of hands-on
experience in the development of numerical algorithms and codes for the
numerical modeling and simulation of flows and transport phenomena
of practical and fundamental interest. Capabilities and limitations of
CFD. Prerequisite: EGGN473 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 65
Economics and Business
Combined Degree Program Option
Mines undergraduate students have the opportunity to begin work on
Degrees Offered
a M.S. degree in Mineral and Energy Economics or Engineering &
• Master of Science (Mineral and Energy Economics)
Technology Management while completing their Bachelor’s degree at
Mines. The Mineral and Energy Economics Combined Degree Program
• Doctor of Philosophy (Mineral and Energy Economics)
provides the vehicle for students to use undergraduate coursework as
• Master of Science (Engineering and Technology Management)
part of their Graduate Degree curriculum. For more information please
Mineral and Energy Economics Program
contact the EB Office or visit econbus.mines.edu.
Description
Mineral and Energy Economics Program
In an increasingly global and technical world, government and industry
leaders in the mineral and energy areas require a strong foundation in
Requirements
economic and business skills. The Division offers such skills in unique
M.S. Degree Students choose from either the thesis or non-thesis
programs leading to M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Mineral and Energy
option in the Master of Science (M.S.) Program and are required to
Economics. Course work and research emphasizes the use of models to
complete a minimum total of 36 credits (a typical course has 3 credits).
aid in decision making.
Initial admission is only to the non-thesis program. Admission to the
Students in the Mineral and Energy Economics Program may select
thesis option requires subsequent application after at least one full-time
from one of three areas of specialization: Applied Economics (ECON),
equivalent semester in the program.
Finance (FIN), and Operations Research/Operations Management (OR/
Non-thesis option
OM). ECON courses combine theory and empirical methods to analyze
Core courses
18.0
social and industry decision making. FIN courses emphasize investment
decision making and sources and uses of funds to invest in mineral
Credits from one or more specializations
12.0
and energy markets. The OR/OM courses emphasize the application of
Approved electives or a minor from another department
6.0
models of various types and thier uses in decision making (optimization,
Total Hours
36.0
simulation, decision analysis, for example).
Thesis option
Engineering and Technology
Core courses
18.0
Management Program Description
Research credits
12.0
The Division also offers an M.S. degree in Engineering and Technology
Credits from one or more specializations
6.0
Management (ETM). The ETM degree program is designed to integrate
Total Hours
36.0
the technical elements of engineering practice with the managerial
Ph.D. Degree Doctoral students develop a customized curriculum to fit
perspective of modern engineering and technology management. A
their needs. The degree requires a minimum of 72 graduate credit hours
major focus is on the business and management principles related
that includes course work and a thesis.
to this integration. The ETM Program provides the analytical tools
and managerial perspective needed to effectively function in a highly
Course work (requires advisor and committee approval)
competitive and technologically complex business economy.
Core courses
24.0
Students in the ETM Program may select from one of two areas
Credits from one or both specializations
12.0
of degree specialization: Operations/Engineering Management or
Credits in a minor or elective credits
12.0
Strategy and Innovation. The Operations/Engineering Management
Total Hours
48.0
courses emphasize valuable techniques for managing large engineering
and technical projects effectively and efficiently. In addition, special
Research credits
emphasis is given to advanced operations research, optimization, and
Research credits
24.0
decision making techniques applicable to a wide array of business and
engineering problems. The Strategy and Innovation courses teach
The student’s faculty advisor and the doctoral thesis committee must
the correct match between organizational strategies and structures to
approve the student’s program of study and the topic for the thesis.
maximize the competitive power of technology. This specialization has a
Qualifying Examination Process
particular emphasis on management issues associated with the modern
business enterprise.
Upon completion of the core course work, students must pass qualifying
written examinations to become a candidate for the Ph.D. degree. The
Fields of Research
qualifying exam is given in two parts in summers of the first and second
Faculty members carry out applied research in a variety of areas
years. In addition, at the discretion of a student’s doctoral committee, a
including international trade, resource economics, environmental
student may be required to complete assignments or examinations (or
economics, industrial organization, metal market analysis, energy
both) that are more directly related to the thesis topic.
economics, applied microeconomics, applied econometrics, management
Following a successful thesis-proposal defense and prior to the final
theory and practice, finance and investment analysis, exploration
thesis defense, a student is required to present a completed research
economics, decision analysis, utility theory, and corporate risk policy.
paper (or dissertation chapter) in a research seminar at CSM. The
research presentation must be considered satisfactory by at least three
CSM faculty members in attendance.

66 Graduate
Minor from Another Department
Important: Applications for admission to the joint degree program should
be submitted for consideration by March 1st to begin the program the
Non-thesis M.S. students may apply six elective credits towards a nine
following fall semester in August. A limited number of students are
hour minor in another department. A minor is ideal for those students
selected for the program each year.
who want to enhance or gain knowledge in another field while gaining
the economic and business skills to help them move up the career
Prerequisites for the Mineral and Energy
ladder. For example, a petroleum, chemical, or mining engineer might
Economics Programs
want to learn more about environmental engineering, a geophysicist or
geologist might want to learn the latest techniques in their profession,
Students must have completed the following undergraduate prerequisite
or an economic policy analyst might want to learn about political risk.
courses prior to beginning the program with a grade of B or better:
Students should check with the minor department for the opportunities
1. Principles of Microeconomics;
and requirements.
2. One semester of college-level Calculus;
Transfer Credits
3. Probability and Statistics
Non-thesis M.S. students may transfer up to 6 credits (9 credits for a
Students will only be allowed to enter in the spring semester if they
thesis M.S.). The student must have achieved a grade of B or better in
have completed all three prerequisites courses previously, as well as
all graduate transfer courses and the transfer credit must be approved by
undergraduate courses in mathematical economics and natural resource
the student’s advisor and the Division Director. Students who enter the
economics.
Ph.D. program may transfer up to 24 hours of graduate-level course work
from other institutions toward the Ph.D. degree subject to the restriction
Required Course Curriculum in Mineral
that those courses must not have been used as credit toward a Bachelor
and Energy Economics
degree. The student must have achieved a grade of B or better in all
graduate transfer courses and the transfer must be approved by the
All M.S. and Ph.D. students in Mineral and Energy Economics are
student’s Doctoral Thesis Committee and the Division Director.
required to take a set of core courses that provide basic tools for the
more advanced and specialized courses in the program.
Unsatisfactory Progress
1. M.S. Curriculum
In addition to the institutional guidelines for unsatisfactory progress as
described elsewhere in this bulletin: Unsatisfactory progress will be
a. Core Courses
assigned to any full-time student who does not pass the core courses
EBGN509
MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS
3.0
EBGN509 and EBGN510 in first fall semester of study and EBGN511 and
EBGN590 in the first spring semester of study. Unsatisfactory progress
EBGN510
NATURAL RESOURCE ECONOMICS
3.0
will also be assigned to any students who do not complete requirements
EBGN511
MICROECONOMICS
3.0
as specified in their admission letter. Part-time students develop an
EBGN512
MACROECONOMICS
3.0
approved course plan with their advisor.
EBGN525
OPERATIONS RESEARCH METHODS
3.0
Combined BS/MS Program
EBGN590
ECONOMETRICS AND FORECASTING
3.0
Students enrolled in CSM’s Combined Undergraduate/ Graduate
Total Hours
18.0
Program may double count 6 hours from their undergraduate course-work
b. Area of Specialization Courses (12 credits for M.S. non-thesis
towards the non-thesis graduate program provided the courses satisfy
option or 6 credits for M.S. thesis option)
the M.S. requirements.
Economics - Applied Theory, Empirics, & Policy Analysis
Dual Degree
EBGN495
ECONOMIC FORECASTING
3.0
The M.S. degree may be combined with a second degree from the
EBGN523
MINERAL AND ENERGY POLICY
3.0
IFP School (Paris, France) in Petroleum Economics and Management
EBGN530
ECONOMICS OF INTERNATIONAL ENERGY
3.0
(see http://www.ifp.fr). This dual-degree program is geared to meet the
MARKETS
needs of industry and government. Our unique program trains the next
generation of technical, analytical and managerial professionals vital to
EBGN535
ECONOMICS OF METAL INDUSTRIES AND
3.0
the future of the petroleum and energy industries
MARKETS
EBGN536
MINERAL POLICIES AND INTERNATIONAL
3.0
These two world-class institutions offer a rigorous and challenging
INVESTMENT
program in an international setting. The program gives a small elite group
EBGN541
INTERNATIONAL TRADE
3.0
of students a solid economics foundation combined with quantitative
business skills, the historical and institutional background, and the
EBGN542
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
3.0
interpersonal and intercultural abilities to in the fast paced, global world of
EBGN570
ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS
3.0
oil and gas.
EBGN580
EXPLORATION ECONOMICS
3.0
Degrees: After studying in English for only 16 months (8 months at CSM
EBGN610
ADVANCED NATURAL RESOURCE
3.0
and 8 months at IFP) the successful student of Petroleum Economics and
ECONOMICS
Management (PEM) receives not 1 but 2 degrees:
EBGN611
ADVANCED MICROECONOMICS
3.0
• Masters of Science in Mineral and Energy Economics from CSM and
EBGN690
ADVANCED ECONOMETRICS
3.0
• Diplôme D’Ingénieur or Mastère Spécialisé from IFP
Finance
EBGN504
ECONOMIC EVALUATION AND INVESTMENT
3.0
DECISION METHODS

Colorado School of Mines 67
EBGN505
INDUSTRIAL ACCOUNTING
3.0
Finance
EBGN545
CORPORATE FINANCE
3.0
EBGN504
ECONOMIC EVALUATION AND INVESTMENT
3.0
EBGN546
INVESTMENT AND PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT 3.0
DECISION METHODS
EBGN547
FINANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT
3.0
EBGN505
INDUSTRIAL ACCOUNTING
3.0
EBGN575
ADVANCED MINING AND ENERGY VALUATION 3.0
EBGN545
CORPORATE FINANCE
3.0
Quantitative Business Methods/Operations Research
EBGN546
INVESTMENT AND PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT 3.0
EBGN528
INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS SIMULATION
3.0
EBGN547
FINANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT
3.0
EBGN552
NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING
3.0
EBGN575
ADVANCED MINING AND ENERGY VALUATION 3.0
EBGN555
LINEAR PROGRAMMING
3.0
Operations Research/Operations Management
EBGN556
NETWORK MODELS
3.0
EBGN525
OPERATIONS RESEARCH METHODS
3.0
EBGN557
INTEGER PROGRAMMING
3.0
EBGN528
INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS SIMULATION
3.0
EBGN559
SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT
3.0
EBGN552
NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING
3.0
EBGN560
DECISION ANALYSIS
3.0
EBGN555
LINEAR PROGRAMMING
3.0
EBGN561
STOCHASTIC MODELS IN MANAGEMENT
3.0
EBGN556
NETWORK MODELS
3.0
SCIENCE
EBGN557
INTEGER PROGRAMMING
3.0
EBGN655
ADVANCED LINEAR PROGRAMMING
3.0
EBGN559
SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT
3.0
EBGN657
ADVANCED INTEGER PROGRAMMING
3.0
EBGN560
DECISION ANALYSIS
3.0
EBGN690
ADVANCED ECONOMETRICS
3.0
EBGN561
STOCHASTIC MODELS IN MANAGEMENT
3.0
SCIENCE
2. Ph.D. Curriculum
EBGN655
ADVANCED LINEAR PROGRAMMING
3.0
a. Common Core Courses
EBGN657
ADVANCED INTEGER PROGRAMMING
3.0
EBGN509
MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS
3.0
Engineering and Technology
EBGN510
NATURAL RESOURCE ECONOMICS
3.0
Management Program (ETM)
EBGN511
MICROECONOMICS
3.0
EBGN590
ECONOMETRICS AND FORECASTING
3.0
Requirements
EBGN695
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
3.0
Students choose either the thesis or non-thesis option and complete a
Total Hours
15.0
minimum of 30 credit hours. Initial admission is only to the non-thesis
program. Admission to the thesis option requires subsequent application
b. Extended Core Courses - Economics
after at least one full-time equivalent semester in the program.
EBGN611
ADVANCED MICROECONOMICS
3.0
Non-thesis option
EBGN600-level course *
3.0
Core courses
15.0
EBGN600-level course *
3.0
Credits from one or both specializations
15.0
Total Hours
9.0
Total Hours
30.0
*
EBGN695 not eligible.
Thesis option
Core courses
15.0
Students who have not taken and passed a course in macro-economics
Research credits
6.0
at any level are also required to take EBGN512 Macroeconomics or
equivalent.
Credits from one or both specializations
9.0
Total Hours
30.0
d. Area of Specialization Courses
Students must receive approval from their advisor in order to apply
Applied Economics
non-EB Division courses towards their ETM degree. Thesis students
EBGN495
ECONOMIC FORECASTING
3.0
are required to complete 6 credit hours of thesis credit and complete a
EBGN530
ECONOMICS OF INTERNATIONAL ENERGY
3.0
Master’s level thesis under the direct supervision of the student’s faculty
MARKETS
advisor.
EBGN535
ECONOMICS OF METAL INDUSTRIES AND
3.0
Further Degree Requirements
MARKETS
EBGN536
MINERAL POLICIES AND INTERNATIONAL
3.0
All thesis and non-thesis ETM Program students have three additional
INVESTMENT
degree requirements:
EBGN541
INTERNATIONAL TRADE
3.0
1. the “Executive-in-Residence” seminar series;
EBGN542
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
3.0
2. the ETM Communications Seminar;
EBGN570
ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS
3.0
3. the Leadership and Team Building Exercise.
EBGN580
EXPLORATION ECONOMICS
3.0
All students are required to attend the ETM Program “Executive-
EBGN610
ADVANCED NATURAL RESOURCE
3.0
in-Residence” seminar series during at least one semester of their
ECONOMICS
attendance at CSM. The “Executive-in-Residence” series features

68 Graduate
executives from industry who pass on insight and knowledge to graduate
EBGN585
ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY
3.0
students preparing for positions in industry. This series facilitates
MANAGEMENT CAPSTONE (to be taken during
active involvement in the ETM program by industry executives through
the final semester of coursework)
teaching, student advising activities and more. Every spring semester
Total Hours
15.0
the “Executive-in-Residence will present 5-7 one hour seminars on a
variety of topics related to leadership and strategy in the engineering
b. Areas of Specialization (15 credits required for non-thesis option
and technology sectors. In addition, all students are required to attend a
or 9 credits required for thesis option)
two-day Communications Seminar in their first fall semester of study in
Operations/Engineering Management
the ETM Program. The seminar will provide students a comprehensive
EBGN528
INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS SIMULATION
3.0
approach to good quality communication skills, including presentation
proficiency, organizational skills, professional writing skills, meeting
EBGN552
NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING
3.0
management, as well as other professional communication abilities. The
EBGN553
PROJECT MANAGEMENT
3.0
Communications Seminar is designed to better prepare students for the
EBGN555
LINEAR PROGRAMMING
3.0
ETM learning experience, as well as their careers in industry. Finally, all
EBGN556
NETWORK MODELS
3.0
students are required to attend a one-day Leadership and Team Building
EBGN557
INTEGER PROGRAMMING
3.0
Exercise in their first fall semester of study in the ETM Program. This
course will consist of non-competitive games, trust exercises and problem
EBGN559
SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT
3.0
solving challenges. This exercise will introduce students to one another
EBGN560
DECISION ANALYSIS
3.0
and provide some opportunity to learn and practice leadership and team
EBGN561
STOCHASTIC MODELS IN MANAGEMENT
3.0
skills.
SCIENCE
Transfer Credits
EBGN568
ADVANCED PROJECT ANALYSIS
3.0
EBGN655
ADVANCED LINEAR PROGRAMMING
3.0
Students who enter the M.S. in Engineering and Technology
Management program may transfer up to 6 graduate course credits into
EBGN657
ADVANCED INTEGER PROGRAMMING
3.0
the degree program. The student must have achieved a grade of B or
Strategy and Innovation
better in all graduate transfer courses and the transfer credit must be
EBGN515
ECONOMICS AND DECISION MAKING
3
approved by the student’s advisor and the Chair of the ETM Program.
EBGN564
MANAGING NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT
3.0
Prerequisites for ETM Program
EBGN565
MARKETING FOR TECHNOLOGY-BASED
3.0
COMPANIES
MATH323
PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS FOR
3.0
EBGN566
TECHNOLOGY ENTREPRENEURSHIP
3.0
ENGINEERS
EBGN567
BUSINESS LAW AND TECHNOLOGY
3.0
or MATH530
STATISTICAL METHODS I
EBGN569
BUSINESS ETHICS
3.0
EBGN321
ENGINEERING ECONOMICS
3.0
EBGN571
MARKETING RESEARCH
3.0
or EBGN504
ECONOMIC EVALUATION AND INVESTMENT
EBGN572
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS STRATEGY
3.0
DECISION METHODS
EBGN573
ENTREPRENEURIAL FINANCE
3.0
Total Hours
6.0
EBGN574
INVENTING, PATENTING, AND LISCENSING
3.0
Students not demonstrating satisfactory standing in these areas may
be accepted; however, they will need to complete the deficiency prior
to enrolling in courses that require these subjects as prerequisites. A
grade of a B or better is required in all prerequisite courses. It is strongly
Courses
suggested that students complete any deficiencies prior to enrolling in
EBGN504. ECONOMIC EVALUATION AND INVESTMENT DECISION
graduate degree course work, however ETM students are allowed to
METHODS. 3.0 Hours.
complete prerequisite coursework during the first semester the course is
Time value of money concepts of present worth, future worth, annual
offered.
worth, rate of return and break-even analysis are applied to after-tax
Required Curriculum M.S. Degree
economic analysis of mineral, petroleum and general investments.
Related topics emphasize proper handling of (1) inflation and escalation,
Engineering and Technology
(2) leverage (borrowed money), (3) risk adjustment of analysis using
Management
expected value concepts, and (4) mutually exclusive alternative analysis
and service producing alternatives. Case study analysis of a mineral
Thesis and non-thesis students are required to complete the following 15
or petroleum investment situation is required. Students may not take
hours of core courses:
EBGN504 for credit if they have completed EBGN321.
a. Core Courses
EBGN505. INDUSTRIAL ACCOUNTING. 3.0 Hours.
EBGN505
INDUSTRIAL ACCOUNTING
3.0
Concepts from both financial and managerial accounting. Preparation
EBGN525
OPERATIONS RESEARCH METHODS
3.0
and interpretation of financial statements and the use of this financial
EBGN545
CORPORATE FINANCE
3.0
information in evaluation and control of the organization. Managerial
EBGN563
MANAGEMENT OF TECHNOLOGY
3.0
concepts include the use of accounting information in the development
and implementation of a successful global corporate strategy, and how
control systems enhance the planning process.

Colorado School of Mines 69
EBGN509. MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS. 3.0 Hours.
EBGN525. OPERATIONS RESEARCH METHODS. 3.0 Hours.
This course reviews and re-enforces the mathematical and computer
The core of this course is a scientific approach to planning and decision-
tools that are necessary to earn a graduate degree in Mineral Economics.
making problems that arise in business. The course covers deterministic
It includes topics from differential and integral calculus; probability and
optimization models (linear programming, integer programming and
statistics; algebra and matrix algebra; difference equations; and linear,
network modeling) and a brief introduction to stochastic (probabilistic)
mathematical and dynamic programming. It shows how these tools are
models with Monte-Carlo simulation. Applications of the models are
applied in an economic and business context with applications taken
covered using spreadsheets. The intent of the course is to enhance
from the mineral and energy industries. It requires both analytical as
logical modeling ability and to develop quantitative managerial and
well as computer solutions. At the end of the course you will be able to
spreadsheet skills. The models cover applications in the areas of energy
appreciate and apply mathematics for better personal, economic and
and mining, marketing, finance, production, transportation, logistics
business decision making. Prerequisites: Principles of Microeconomics,
and work-force scheduling. Prerequisite: MATH111 or permission of
MATH111; or permission of instructor.
instructor.
EBGN510. NATURAL RESOURCE ECONOMICS. 3.0 Hours.
EBGN528. INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS SIMULATION. 3.0 Hours.
The threat and theory of resource exhaustion; commodity analysis
The course focuses on creating computerized models of real or proposed
and the problem of mineral market instability; cartels and the nature
complex systems for performance evaluation. Simulation provides a cost
of mineral pricing; the environment; government involvement; mineral
effective way of pre-testing proposed systems and answering “what-if”
policy issues; and international mineral trade. This course is designed
questions before incurring the expense of actual implementations. The
for entering students in mineral economics. Prerequisite: Principles of
course is instructed in the state-of-the-art computer lab (CTLM), where
Microeconomics or permission of instructor.
each student is equipped with a personal computer and interacts with
the instructor during the lecture. Professional version of a widely used
EBGN511. MICROECONOMICS. 3.0 Hours.
commercial software package, “Arena”, is used to build models, analyze
The first of two courses dealing with applied economic theory. This part
and interpret the results. Other business analysis and productivity
concentrates on the behavior of individual segments of the economy, the
tools that enhance the analysis capabilities of the simulation software
theory of consumer behavior and demand, the theory of production and
are introduced to show how to search for optimal solutions within the
costs, duality, welfare measures, price and output level determination
simulation models. Both discrete-event and continuous simulation
by business firms, and the structure of product and input markets.
models are covered through extensive use of applications including call
Prerequisites: Principles of Microeconomics, MATH111, EBGN509,
centers, various manufacturing operations, production/inventory systems,
EBGN510; or permission of instructor.
bulk-material handling and mining, port operations, high-way traffic
systems and computer networks. Prerequisites: MATH111, MATH530; or
EBGN512. MACROECONOMICS. 3.0 Hours.
permission of instructor.
This course will provide an introduction to contemporary macroeconomic
concepts and analysis. Macroeconomics is the study of the behavior of
EBGN530. ECONOMICS OF INTERNATIONAL ENERGY MARKETS.
the economy as an aggregate. Topics include the equilibrium level of
3.0 Hours.
inflation, interest rates, unemployment and the growth in national income.
Application of models to understand markets for oil, gas, coal, electricity,
The impact of government fiscal and monetary policy on these variables
and renewable energy resources. Models, modeling techniques, and
and the business cycle, with particular attention to the effects on the
issues included are supply and demand, market structure, transportation
mineral industry. Prerequisites: Principles of Microeconomics, MATH111;
models, game theory, futures markets, environmental issues, energy
or permission of instructor.
policy, energy regulation, input/output models, energy conservation, and
dynamic optimization. The emphasis in the course is on the development
EBGN515. ECONOMICS AND DECISION MAKING. 3.0 Hours.
of appropriate models and their application to current issues in energy
The application of microeconomic theory to business strategy.
markets. Prerequisites: Principles of Microeconomics, MATH111,
Understanding the horizontal, vertical, and product boundaries of
EBGN509, EBGN510, EBGN511; or permission of instructor.
the modern firm. A framework for analyzing the nature and extent of
competition in a firm’s dynamic business environment. Developing
EBGN535. ECONOMICS OF METAL INDUSTRIES AND MARKETS. 3.0
strategies for creating and sustaining competitive advantage.
Hours.
Metal supply from main product, byproduct, and secondary production.
EBGN523. MINERAL AND ENERGY POLICY. 3.0 Hours.
Metal demand and intensity of use analysis. Market organization and
(II) An analysis of current topics in the news in mineral and energy
price formation. Public policy, comparative advantage, and international
issues through the lens of economics. Since many of the topics involve
metal trade. Metals and economic development in the developing
government policy, the course provides instruction related to the
countries and former centrally planned economies. Environmental policy
economic foundations of mineral and energy policy analysis. 3 credit
and mining and mineral processing. Students prepare and present a
hours.
major research paper. Prerequisites: Principles of Microeconomics,
MATH111, EBGN509, EBGN510, EBGN511; or permission of instructor.

70 Graduate
EBGN536. MINERAL POLICIES AND INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENT.
EBGN547. FINANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT. 3.0 Hours.
3.0 Hours.
Analysis of the sources, causes and effects of risks associated with
Identification and evaluation of international mineral investment policies
holding, operating and managing assets by individuals and organizations;
and company responses using economic, business and legal concepts.
evaluation of the need and importance of managing these risks; and
Assessment of policy issues in light of stakeholder interests and needs.
discussion of the methods employed and the instruments utilized to
Theoretical issues are introduced and then applied to case studies,
achieve risk shifting objectives. The course concentrates on the use of
policy drafting, and negotiation exercises to assure both conceptual and
derivative assets in the risk management process. These derivatives
practical understanding of the issues. Special attention is given to the
include futures, options, swaps, swaptions, caps, collars and floors.
formation of national policies and corporate decision making concerning
Exposure to market and credit risks will be explored and ways of handling
fiscal regimes, project financing, environmental protection, land use and
them will be reviewed and critiqued through analysis of case studies
local community concerns and the content of exploration and extraction
from the mineral and energy industries. Prerequisites: Principles of
agreements. Prerequisites: Principles of Microeconomics, MATH111,
Microeconomics, MATH111, MATH5301, EBGN5052; EBGN545 or
EBGN509, EBGN510, EBGN511; permission of instructor.
EBGN546; or permission of instructor. Recommended: EBGN509,
EBGN511.
EBGN541. INTERNATIONAL TRADE. 3.0 Hours.
Theories and evidence on international trade and development.
EBGN552. NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING. 3.0 Hours.
Determinants of static and dynamic comparative advantage. The
As an advanced course in optimization, this course will address both
arguments for and against free trade. Economic development in
unconstrained and constrained nonlinear model formulation and
nonindustrialized countries. Sectoral development policies and
corresponding algorithms (e.g., Gradient Search and Newton’s Method,
industrialization. The special problems and opportunities created by
and Lagrange Multiplier Methods and Reduced Gradient Algorithms,
extensive mineral resource endowments. The impact of value-added
respectively). Applications of state-of-the-art hardware and software will
processing and export diversification on development. Prerequisites:
emphasize solving real-world problems in areas such as mining, energy,
Principles of Microeconomics, MATH111, EBGN509, EBGN511; or
transportation, and the military. Prerequisite: MATH111; EBGN525 or
permission of instructor.
EBGN555; or permission of instructor.
EBGN542. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Hours.
EBGN553. PROJECT MANAGEMENT. 3.0 Hours.
Role of energy and minerals in the development process. Sectoral
An introductory course focusing on analytical techniques for managing
policies and their links with macroeconomic policies. Special
projects
attention to issues of revenue stabilization, resource largesse effects,
and on developing skills for effective project leadership and management
downstream processing, and diversification. Prerequisites: Principles
through analysis of case studies. Topics include project portfolio
of Microeconomics, MATH111, EBGN509, EBGN511, EBGN512; or
management, decomposition of project work, estimating resource
permission of instructor.
requirements, planning and budgeting, scheduling, analysis of
uncertainty, resource loading and leveling, project monitoring and control,
EBGN545. CORPORATE FINANCE. 3.0 Hours.
earned value analysis and strategic project leadership. Guest speakers
The fundamentals of corporate finance as they pertain to the valuation
from industry discuss and amplify the relevance of course topics to
of investments, firms, and the securities they issue. Included are the
their specific areas of application (construction, product development,
relevant theories associated with capital budgeting, financing decisions,
engineering design, R&D, process development, etc.). Students learn
and dividend policy. This course provides an in-depth study of the theory
Microsoft Project and complete a course project using this software,
and practice of corporate financial management including a study of the
demonstrating proficiency analyzing project progress and communicating
firm’s objectives, investment decisions, long-term financing decisions,
project information to stakeholders. Prerequisite: EBGN504 or permission
and working capital management. Prerequisite: EBGN5052 or permission
of instructor.
of instructor.
EBGN555. LINEAR PROGRAMMING. 3.0 Hours.
EBGN546. INVESTMENT AND PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT. 3.0
This course addresses the formulation of linear programming models,
Hours.
examines
This course covers institutional information, valuation theory and
linear programs in two dimensions, covers standard form and other
empirical analysis of alternative financial investments, including stocks,
basics essential to understanding the Simplex method, the Simplex
bonds, mutual funds, ETS, and (to a limited extent) derivative securities.
method itself, duality theory, complementary slackness conditions,
Special attention is paid to the role of commodities (esp. metals and
and sensitivity analysis. As time permits, multi-objective programming
energy products) as an alternative investment class. After an overview of
and stochastic programming are introduced. Applications of linear
time value of money and arbitrage and their application to the valuation of
programming models discussed in this course include, but are not limited
stocks and bonds, there is extensive treatment
to, the areas of manufacturing, finance, energy, mining, transportation
of optimal portfolio selection for risk averse investors, mean-variance
and logistics, and the military. Prerequisite: MATH111; MATH332 or
efficient portfolio theory, index models, and equilibrium theories of
EBGN509; or permission of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
asset pricing including the capital asset pricing model (CAPM) and
arbitrage pricing theory (APT). Market efficiency is discussed, as
are its implications for passive and active approaches to investment
management. Investment management functions and policies, and
portfolio performance evaluation are also considered. Prerequisites:
Principles of Microeconomics, MATH111, MATH530; or permission of
instructor.

Colorado School of Mines 71
EBGN556. NETWORK MODELS. 3.0 Hours.
EBGN561. STOCHASTIC MODELS IN MANAGEMENT SCIENCE. 3.0
Network models are linear programming problems that possess special
Hours.
mathematical structures. This course examines a variety of network
The course introduces tools of “probabilistic analysis” that are frequently
models, specifically, spanning tree problems, shortest path problems,
used in the formal studies of management. We see methodologies that
maximum flow problems, minimum cost flow problems, and transportation
help to quantify the dynamic relationships of sequences of “random”
and assignment problems. For each class of problem, we present
events that evolve over time. Topics include static and dynamic
applications in areas such as manufacturing, finance, energy, mining,
Monte-Carlo simulation, discrete and continuous time Markov Chains,
transportation and logistics, and the military. We also discuss an
probabilistic dynamic programming, Markov decision processes, queuing
algorithm or two applicable to each problem class. As time permits, we
processes and networks, Brownian motion and stochastic control.
explore combinatorial problems that can be depicted on graphs, e.g.,
Applications from a wide range of fields will be introduced including
the traveling salesman problem and the Chinese postman problem,
marketing, finance, production, logistics and distribution, energy and
and discuss the tractability issues associated with these problems in
service systems. In addition to an intuitive understanding of analytical
contrast to “pure” network models. Prerequisites: MATH111; EBGN525 or
techniques to model stochastic processes, the course emphasizes
EBGN555; or permission of the instructor.
how to use related software packages for managerial decision-making.
Prerequisites: MATH111, MATH530; or permission of instructor.
EBGN557. INTEGER PROGRAMMING. 3.0 Hours.
This course addresses the formulation of linear integer programming
EBGN563. MANAGEMENT OF TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
models, examines the standard brand-and-bound algorithm for solving
Case studies and reading assignments explore strategies for profiting
such models, and covers advanced topics related to increasing the
from technology assets and technological innovation. The roles of
tractability of such models. These advanced topics include the application
strategy, core competencies, product and process development,
of cutting planes and strong formulations, as well as decomposition
manufacturing, R&D, marketing, strategic partnerships, alliances,
and reformulation techniques, e.g., Lagrangian relaxation, Benders
intellectual property, organizational architectures, leadership and politics
decomposition, column generation. Prerequisites: MATH111;
are explored in the context of technological innovation. The critical role
EBGN525 or EBGN555; or permission of instructor.
of organizational knowledge and learning in a firm’s ability to leverage
technological innovation to gain competitive advantage is explored.
EBGN559. SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT. 3.0 Hours.
The relationships between an innovation, the competencies of the
The focus of the course is to show how a firm can achieve better
innovating firm, the ease of duplication of the innovation by outsiders, the
“supply-demand matching” through the implementation of rigorous
nature of complementary assets needed to successfully commercialize
mathematical models and various operational/tactical strategies. We
an innovation and the appropriate strategy for commercializing the
look at organizations as entities that must match the supply of what they
innovation are developed. Students explore the role of network effects in
produce with the demand for their products. A considerable portion of the
commercialization strategies, particularly with respect to standards wars
course is devoted to mathematical models that treat uncertainty in the
aimed at establishing new dominant designs. Prerequisite: EBGN5043
supply-chain. Topics include managing economies of scale for functional
recommended.
products, managing market-mediation costs for innovative products,
make-to order versus make-to-stock systems, quick response strategies,
EBGN564. MANAGING NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Hours.
risk pooling strategies, supply-chain contracts and revenue management.
Develops interdisciplinary skills required for successful product
Additional “special topics” may be introduced, such as reverse logistics
development in today’s competitive marketplace. Small product
issues in the supply-chain or contemporary operational and financial
development teams step through the new product development process
hedging strategies, as time permits Prerequisites: MATH111, MATH530;
in detail, learning about available tools and techniques to execute each
or permission of instructor.
process step along the way. Each student brings his or her individual
disciplinary perspective to the team effort, and must learn to synthesize
EBGN560. DECISION ANALYSIS. 3.0 Hours.
that perspective with those of the other students in the group to develop a
Introduction to the science of decision making and risk theory. Application
sound, marketable product. Prerequisite: EBGN563 recommended.
of decision analysis and utility theory to the analysis of strategic decision
problems. Focuses on the application of quantitative methods to business
EBGN565. MARKETING FOR TECHNOLOGY-BASED COMPANIES.
problems characterized by risk and uncertainty. Choice problems such as
3.0 Hours.
decisions concerning major capital investments, corporate acquisitions,
This class explores concepts and practices related to marketing in this
new product
unique, fast-paced environment, including the defining characteristics of
introductions, and choices among alternative technologies are
high-technology industries; different types and patterns of innovations
conceptualized and structured using the concepts introduced in this
and their marketing implications; the need for (and difficulties in) adopting
course. Prerequisite: EBGN504 or permission of instructor.
a customer-orientation; tools used to gather marketing research/
intelligence in technology-driven industries; use of strategic alliances and
partnerships in marketing technology;
adaptations to the “4 P’s”; regulatory and ethical considerations in
technological arenas. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
EBGN566. TECHNOLOGY ENTREPRENEURSHIP. 3.0 Hours.
Introduces concepts related to starting and expanding a technological-
based corporation. Presents ideas such as developing a business and
financing plan, role of intellectual property, and the importance of a good
R&D program. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.

72 Graduate
EBGN567. BUSINESS LAW AND TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
EBGN572. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS STRATEGY. 3.0 Hours.
Computer software and hardware are the most complex and rapidly
The purpose of this course is to gain understanding of the complexities
developing intellectual creations of modern man. Computers provide
presented by managing businesses in an international environment.
unprecedented power in accessing and manipulating data. Computers
International business has grown rapidly in recent decades due to
work in complex systems that require standardization and compatibility
technological expansion, liberalization of government policies on trade
to function. Each of these special features has engendered one or more
and resource movements, development of institutions needed to support
bodies of law. Complex intellectual creation demands comprehensive
and facilitate international transactions, and increased global competition.
intellectually property protection. Computer technology, however, differs
Due to these factors, foreign countries increasingly
fundamentally from previous objects of intellectual property protection,
are a source of both production and sales for domestic companies.
and thus does not fit easily into traditional copyright and patent law. This
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
course covers
topics that relate to these complex special features of computer and
EBGN573. ENTREPRENEURIAL FINANCE. 3.0 Hours.
technology. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Entrepreneurial activity has been a potent source of innovation and
job generation in the global economy. In the U.S., the majority of new
EBGN568. ADVANCED PROJECT ANALYSIS. 3.0 Hours.
jobs are generated by new entrepreneurial firms. The financial issues
An advanced course in economic analysis that will look at more
confronting entrepreneurial firms are
complex issues associated with valuing investments and projects.
drastically different from those of established companies. The focus
Discussion will focus on development and application of concepts in
in this course will be on analyzing the unique financial issues which
after-tax environments and look at other criteria and their impact in the
face entrepreneurial firms and to develop a set of skills that has wide
decision-making and valuation process. Applications to engineering and
applications for such situations. Prerequisite: EBGN505 or permission of
technology aspects will be discussed. Effective presentation of results
instructor. Corequisite: EBGN545 or permission of instructor.
will be an important component of the course. Prerequisite: EBGN504 or
permission of instructor.
EBGN574. INVENTING, PATENTING, AND LISCENSING. 3.0 Hours.
The various forms of intellectual property, including patents, trademarks,
EBGN569. BUSINESS ETHICS. 3.0 Hours.
copyrights, trade secrets and unfair competition are discussed; the
This business and leadership ethics course is designed to immerse you in
terminology of inventing, patenting and licensing is reviewed, and an
organizational ethical decision-making processes, issues, organizational
overview of the complete process is given; the statutes most frequently
control mechanisms, and benefits of developing comprehensive and due
encountered in dealing with patents (35 USC §101, §102, §103 and
diligence ethics programs. As a business practitioner, most activities both
§112) are introduced and explained; the basics of searching the prior
inside and outside the organization have ethical dimensions. Particularly,
art are presented; participants ’walk through’ case histories illustrating
many business functions represent boundary spanning roles between the
inventing, patenting, licensing, as well as patent infringement and
organization and outside constituents and as such present challenges
litigation; the importance of proper documentation at all stages of the
in the areas of: honesty and fairness, deceptive advertising, price fixing
process is explained; the "do’s" and "don’t" of disclosing inventions are
and anti-trust, product misrepresentation and liability, billing issues.
presented; various types of agreements are discussed including license
This course explores organizational successes and failures to better
agreements; methods for evaluating the market potential of new products
understand how to manage this area. 3 lecture hours; 3 semester hours.
are presented; the resources available for inventors are reviewed;
inventing and patenting in the corporate environment are discussed; the
EBGN570. ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS. 3.0 Hours.
economic impacts of patents are addressed. Prerequisite: Permission of
The role of markets and other economic considerations in controlling
instructor. Offered in Field session and Summer session only.
pollution; the effect of environmental policy on resource allocation
incentives; the use of benefit/cost analysis in environmental policy
EBGN575. ADVANCED MINING AND ENERGY VALUATION. 3.0
decisions and the associated problems with measuring benefits and
Hours.
costs. Prerequisites: Principles of Microeconomics, MATH111, EBGN509,
The use of stochastic and option pricing techniques in mineral
EBGN510; or permission of instructor.
and energy asset valuation. The Hotelling Valuation Principle. The
measurement of political risk and its impact on project value. Extensive
EBGN571. MARKETING RESEARCH. 3.0 Hours.
use of real cases. Prerequisites: Principles of Microeconomics,
The purpose of this course is to gain a deep understanding of the
MATH111, EBGN504, EBGN505, EBGN509, EBGN510, EBGN511; or
marketing research decisions facing product managers in technology
permission of instructor.
based companies. While the specific responsibilities of a product
manager vary across industries and firms, three main activities common
EBGN580. EXPLORATION ECONOMICS. 3.0 Hours.
to the position are: (1) analysis of market information, (2) marketing
Exploration planning and decision making for oil and gas, and metallic
strategy development, and (3) implementing strategy through marketing
minerals. Risk analysis. Historical trends in exploration activity and
mix decisions. In this course students will develop an understanding
productivity. Prerequisites: Principles of Microeconomics, EBGN510; or
of available marketing research methods and the ability to use
permission of instructor. Offered when student demand is sufficient.
marketing research information to make strategic and tactical decisions.
Prerequisite: MATH530.

Colorado School of Mines 73
EBGN585. ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT
EBGN655. ADVANCED LINEAR PROGRAMMING. 3.0 Hours.
CAPSTONE. 3.0 Hours.
As an advanced course in optimization, this course will expand
This course represents the culmination of the ETM Program. This
upon topics in linear programming. Specific topics to be covered
course is about the strategic management process – how strategies
include advanced formulation, column generation, interior point
are developed and imple mented in organizations. It examines senior
method, stochastic optimization, and numerical stability in linear
management’s role in formulating strategy and the role that all an
programming. Applications of state-of-the-art hardware and software will
organization’s managers play in implementing a well thought out
emphasize solving real-world problems in areas such as mining, energy,
strategy. Among the topics discussed in this course are (1) how
transportation and the military. Prerequisites: EBGN555 or consent of
different industry conditions support different types of strategies; (2)
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
how industry conditions change and the implication of those changes
for strategic management; and (3) how organizations develop and
EBGN657. ADVANCED INTEGER PROGRAMMING. 3.0 Hours.
maintain capabilities that lead to sustained competitive advantage.
As an advanced course in optimization, this course will expand upon
This course consists of learning fundamental concepts associated
topics in integer programming. Specific topics to be covered include
with strategic management process and competing in a web-based
advanced formulation, strong integer programming formulations,
strategic management simulation to support the knowledge that you
Benders Decomposition, mixed integer programming cuts, constraint
have developed. Prerequisites: MATH530, EBGN504; or permission of
programming, rounding heuristics, and persistence. Applications of
instructor.
state-of-the-art hardware and software will emphasize solving real-world
problems in areas such as mining, energy, transportation and the military.
EBGN590. ECONOMETRICS AND FORECASTING. 3.0 Hours.
Prerequisites: EBGN557 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
Using statistical techniques to fit economic models to data. Topics include
semester hours.
ordinary least squares and single equation regression models; two stage
least squares and multiple equation econometric models; specification
EBGN690. ADVANCED ECONOMETRICS. 3.0 Hours.
error, serial correlation, heteroskedasticity; distributive lag; applications
A second course in econometrics. Compared to EBGN590, this
to mineral commodity markets; hypothesis testing; forecasting with
course provides a more theoretical and mathematical understanding
econometric models, time series analysis, and simulation. Prerequisites:
of econometrics. Matrix algebra is used and model construction and
MATH111, MATH5301, EBGN509; or permission of instructor.
hypothesis testing are emphasized rather than forecasting. Prerequisites:
Principles of Microeconomics, MATH111, MATH5301, EBGN509,
EBGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS. 1-6
EBGN590; or permission of instructor. Recommended: EBGN511.
Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
EBGN695. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
Lectures provide an overview of methods used in economic research
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
relating to EPP and QBA/OR dissertations in Mineral Economics and
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
information on how to carry out research and present research results.
Students will be required to write and present a research paper that
EBGN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
will be submitted for publication. It is expected that this paper will lead
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
to a Ph.D. dissertation proposal. It is a good idea for students to start
faculty member when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter,
thinking about potential dissertation topic areas as they study for their
content, and credit hours. Contact the Economics and Business Division
qualifier. This course is also recommended for students writing Master’s
office for credit limits toward the degree.
thesis or who want guidance in doing independent research relating to
the economics and business aspects of energy, minerals and related
EBGN610. ADVANCED NATURAL RESOURCE ECONOMICS. 3.0
environmental and technological topics. Prerequisites: MATH5301,
Hours.
EBGN509, EBGN510, EBGN511, EBGN590 or permission of instructor.
Optimal resource use in a dynamic context using mathematical
programming, optimal control theory and game theory. Constrained
EBGN698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS. 1-6
optimization techniques are used to evaluate the impact of capital
Hour.
constraints, exploration activity and environmental regulations.
Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
Offered when student demand is sufficient. Prerequisites: Principles
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
of Microeconomics, MATH111, MATH5301, EBGN509, EBGN510,
once. Repeatable for credit under different titles.
EBGN511; or permission of instructor.
EBGN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
EBGN611. ADVANCED MICROECONOMICS. 3.0 Hours.
Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty
A second graduate course in microeconomics, emphasizing state-of-
member when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter,
the-art theoretical and mathematical developments. Topics include
content, and credit hours. Contact the Economics and Business Division
consumer theory, production theory and the use of game theoretic and
office for credit limits toward the degree.
dynamic optimization tools. Prerequisites: Principles of Microeconomics,
MATH111, MATH530, EBGN509, EBGN511; or permission of instructor.
EBGN707. GRADUATE THESIS/DISSERTATION RESEARCH CREDIT.
1-12 Hour.
(I, II, S) Research credit hours required for completion of a Masters-level
thesis or Doctoral dissertation. Research must be carried out under the
direct supervision of the student’s faculty advisor. Variable class and
semester hours. Repeatable for credit.

74 Graduate
Geology and Geological
The requirement for Doctor of Philosophy (Geology) program will
be established individually by a student’s Doctoral Thesis Advisory
Engineering
Committee, but must meet the minimum requirements presented below.
The Doctor of Philosophy (Geology) academic program will require a
Degrees Offered
minimum of 72 hours of course and research credit hours (a maximum
of 9 credit hours may be 400-level course work). All students must
• Professional Master Degree (Petroleum Reservoir Systems) (Non-
complete:
Thesis)
• Professional Master Degree (Mineral Exploration) (Non-Thesis)
Course work
48.0
• Professional Master Degree (Geochemistry) (Non-Thesis)
Research
24.0
• Master of Engineering (Geological Engineer) (Non-Thesis)
Total Hours
72.0
• Master of Science (Geology)
Up to 24 relevant course credit hours may be awarded by the student’s
• Master of Science (Geological Engineering)
Doctoral Thesis Advisory Committee for completion of a Master
• Master of Science (Geochemistry)
of Science degree (at CSM or elsewhere). To ensure breadth of
• Master of Science (Hydrology), Thesis option
background, the course of study to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy
(Geology) must include at least one graduate course in each of the
• Master of Science (Hydrology), Non-thesis option
fields of stratigraphy/sedimentology, structural geology/tectonics, and
• Doctor of Philosophy (Geology)
petrology (this breadth requirement may be satisfied by courses already
• Doctor of Philosophy (Geochemistry)
taken as part of a Master of Science degree). At the discretion of the
• Doctor of Philosophy (Geological Engineering)
student’s Doctoral Thesis Advisory Committee, an appropriate course
• Doctor of Philosophy (Hydrology)
may be substituted for one (and only one) of the fields above. In addition,
students must complete GEOL608 (History of Geological Concepts) or
Program Description
an appropriate equivalent approved by the Doctoral Thesis Advisory
Committee. All Doctor of Philosophy (Geology) students must pass a
The Department of Geology and Geological Engineering offers
qualifying examination and must complete an appropriate thesis based
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Geology, and
upon original research they have conducted. A thesis proposal and
Geochemistry; and Master of Engineering, Master of Science and
course of study must be approved by the student’s Doctoral Thesis
Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Geological Engineering. Professional
Advisory Committee before the student begins substantial work on the
Master Degrees are offered in Petroleum Reservoir Systems, Mineral
thesis research.
Exploration, and Geochemistry. Geological Engineering degrees require
possession or acquisition of an undergraduate engineering degree or its
Prospective students should submit the results of the Graduate Record
equivalent.
Examination with their application for admission to graduate study. In the
event that it is not possible, because of geographic and other restrictions,
Graduate students desiring to study ground water, engineering geology/
to take the Graduate Record Examination prior to enrolling at Colorado
geotechnics, mining engineering geology and some environmental
School of Mines, enrollment may be granted on a provisional basis
applications are generally expected to pursue the Geological Engineering
subject to satisfactory completion of the examination within the first year
degree. Students desiring to study petroleum or minerals exploration or
of residence.
development sciences, geochemistry and/or geology generally pursue
Geology or Geochemistry degrees. Students are initially admitted to
Prerequisites
either geoscience or geological engineering degree programs and must
receive approval of the GE department Graduate Advisory Committee to
Geology Program
switch degree category.
The candidate for the degree of Master of Science (Geology) or Doctor
of Philosophy (Geology) must have completed the following or equivalent
Program Requirements
subjects, for which credit toward an advanced degree will not be granted.
• General Geology
Geology Degrees
• Structural Geology
The Master of Science (Geology) program will require 36 semester
• Field Geology (6 weeks)
hours of course and research credit hours (a maximum of 9 credit hours
• Mineralogy
may be 400-level course work). Twelve of the 36 credit hours must be
research credits. To ensure breadth of background, the course of study
• Petrology
for the Master of Science (Geology) degree must include at least one
• Stratigraphy
graduate course in each of the fields of stratigraphy/ sedimentology,
• Chemistry (3 semesters, including at least 1 semester of physical or
structural geology/tectonics, and petrology. At the discretion of the
organic)
student’s Thesis Advisory Committee, an appropriate course may be
• Mathematics (2 semesters of calculus)
substituted for one (and only one) of the fields above. Students must
• An additional science course (other than geology) or advanced
also complete GEOL507 (Graduate Seminar), as part of their course
mathematics
programs. All Master of Science (Geology) candidates must also
complete an appropriate thesis, based upon original research they have
• Physics (2 semesters)
conducted. A thesis proposal and course of study must be approved by
Professional Master Degree Programs:
the student’s Thesis Advisory Committee before the candidate begins
substantial work on the thesis research.
Candidates for the Professional Master Degree must possess an
appropriate geosciences undergraduate degree or its equivalent.

Colorado School of Mines 75
Prerequisites are the same as those required for the Master of Science
• Other engineering design courses as approved by the program
(Geology) Degree.
committee
Engineering Programs
Professional Master in Mineral Exploration
The candidate for the degree of Master of Engineering (Geological
This non-thesis, master degree program is designed for working
Engineer), Master of Science (Geological Engineering) or Doctor of
professionals who want to increase their knowledge and skills, while
Philosophy (Geological Engineering) must have completed the following
gaining a thorough up-date of advances across the spectrum of economic
or equivalent subjects. Graduate credit may be granted for courses at or
geology, mineral exploration techniques, and mining geosciences.
above the 400 level, if approved by the student’s advisory committee.
Admission to the program is competitive. Preference will be given
Mathematics
to applicants with a minimum of two years of industrial or equivalent
experience.
Four semesters including: Calculus (2 semesters) and one semester of
The program requires a minimum of 30 credit hours. A minimum of 15
any two of: calculus III, differential equations, probability and statistics,
credit hours must be accumulated in five of the following core areas:
numerical analysis, linear algebra, operations research, optimization.
Basic Science
• mineral deposits,
• mineral exploration,
• Chemistry (2 semesters)
• applied geophysics,
• Mineralogy and Petrology
• applied geochemistry,
• Physics (2 semesters)
• applied structural geology,
• Stratigraphy or Sedimentation
• petrology,
• Physical Geology
• field geology, and
• Computer Programming or GIS
• economic evaluation.
Engineering Science
An additional 15 credit hours may be selected from the course offerings
• Structural Geology and one semester in four of the following subjects:
of the Department of Geology and Geological Engineering and allied
• Physical Chemistry or Thermodynamics
departments including Mining Engineering, Economics and Business,
• Statics
Geophysics, Chemistry and Geochemistry, Metallurgy and Materials
Science, and Environmental Sciences.
• Mechanics of Materials
• Fluid Mechanics
Selection of courses will be undertaken in consultation with the academic
advisor. Up to 9 credit hours may be at the 400-level. All other credits
• Dynamics
towards the degree must be 500-level or above. A maximum of 9 credit
• Soil Mechanics
hours may be independent study focusing on a topic relevant to the
• Rock Mechanics
mineral exploration and mining industries.
Prerequisites: Admission to the program is generally restricted to
Engineering Design
individuals holding a four-year undergraduate degree in earth sciences.
• Field Geology
Candidates for the degree of Professional Master in Mineral Exploration
must have completed the following or equivalent subjects, for which
As part of the graduate program each student must take one semester in
credit toward the advanced degree will not be granted. These are
two of the following subjects if such courses were not taken for a previous
general geology, structural geology, field geology, mineralogy, petrology,
degree:
chemistry (2 semesters), mathematics (2 semesters of calculus), physics
• Mineral Deposits/Economic Geology
(1 semester), and an additional science course other than geology.
• Hydrogeology
Professional Master in Petroleum Reservoir
• Engineering Geology
Systems
and also as part of the graduate program one semester in three of the
This is a non-thesis, interdisciplinary master degree program jointly
following subjects if such courses were not taken for a previous degree:
administered by the departments of Geology and Geological Engineering,
Geophysics, and Petroleum Engineering. This program consists only of
• Foundation Engineering
coursework in petroleum geoscience and engineering. No research is
• Engineering Hydrology
required.
• Geomorphology
• Airphoto Interpretation, Photogeology, or Remote Sensing
General Administration
• Petroleum Geology
The three participating departments share oversight for this program
• Introduction to Mining
through a committee consisting of one faculty member from each of
the three departments. Students gain admission to the program by
• Introductory Geophysics
application to any of the three sponsoring departments. Students are
• Engineering Geology Design
administered by that department into which they first matriculate.
• Mineral Exploration Design
• Groundwater Engineering Design

76 Graduate
Requirements
GEGN599 requires a project and report that demonstrate competence in
the application of geological engineering principles that merits a grade of
The program requires a minimum of 36 credit hours. Up to 9 credit hours
B or better. The project topic and content of the report is determined by
may be at the 400 level. All other credits toward the degree must be 500
the student’s advisor, in consultation with the student, and is approved by
level or above.
the Geological Engineering Graduate Program Committee. The format of
9 hours must consist of:
the report will follow the guidelines for a professional journal paper.
GPGN/
WELL LOG ANALYSIS AND FORMATION
3.0
The student, in consultation with the advisor, must prepare a formal
PEGN419
EVALUATION
program of courses and independent study topic for approval by the
or GPGN/
ADVANCED FORMATION EVALUATION
Geological Engineering Graduate Program Committee. The program
PEGN519
must be submitted to the committee on or before the end of the first week
of classes of the first semester.
Select two of the following:
6.0
GEGN/
MULTIDISCIPLINARY PETROLEUM DESIGN
The most common difficulty in scheduling completion of the degree
GPGN/
involves satisfaction of prerequisites. Common deficiency courses
PEGN439
are Statics, Mechanics of Materials, and Fluid Mechanics. These are
essential to the engineering underpinnings of the degree. An intense
GEGN/
INTEGRATED EXPLORATION AND
program at CSM involving 18 credit hours each semester including
GPGN/
DEVELOPMENT
Statics in the fall and Fluid Mechanics in the spring and 9 credits in the
PEGN503
summer including Mechanics of Materials, allows these classes to be
GEGN/
INTEGRATED EXPLORATION AND
taken along with the standard program. Some students may choose to
GPGN/
DEVELOPMENT
take these prerequisites elsewhere before arriving on the CSM campus.
PEGN504
Total Hours
9.0
Engineering Geology/Geotechnics Specialty
(Non-Thesis)
9 additional hours must consist of one course each from the 3
participating departments.
Students working towards a Masters of Engineering (non-thesis) with
specialization in Engineering Geology/ Geotechnics must meet the
The remaining 18 hours may consist of graduate courses from any of the
prerequisite course requirements listed later in this section. Required
3 participating departments, or other courses approved by the committee.
courses for the degree are:
Up to 6 hours may consist of independent study, including an industry
project.
GEGN467
GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING
4.0
Geological Engineering Degrees
GEGN468
ENGINEERING GEOLOGY AND GEOTECHNICS 4.0
GEGN532
GEOLOGICAL DATA ANALYSIS
3.0
The Master of Engineering (Non-Thesis) Program in Geological
GEGN570
CASE HISTORIES IN GEOLOGICAL
3.0
Engineering outlined below may be completed by individuals already
ENGINEERING AND HYDROGEOLOGY
holding undergraduate or advanced degrees or as a combined degree
program (see Graduate Degrees and Requirements (p. 7) section of this
or GEGN571
ADVANCED ENGINEERING GEOLOGY
bulletin) by individuals already matriculated as undergraduate students at
GEGN573
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING SITE
3.0
The Colorado School of Mines. The program is comprised of:
INVESTIGATION
GEGN599
INDEPENDENT STUDY
6.0
CORE
Course Work
30.0
GEGN671
LANDSLIDES: INVESTIGATION, ANALYSIS &
3.0
GEGN599
INDEPENDENT STUDY
6.0
MITIGATION
Total Hours
36.0
or GEGN672
ADVANCED GEOTECHNICS
Up to nine credit hours can be at the 400 level and the remainder
GE ELECT
Electives *
10.0
will be 500 or 600 level. For the combined degree program, courses
Total Hours
36.0
recommended as appropriate for double counting may be chosen from:
*
GEGN403
MINERAL EXPLORATION DESIGN
3.0
Electives and course substitutions are approved by the Geological
Engineering Graduate Program Committee and must be consistent
GEGN439
MULTIDISCIPLINARY PETROLEUM DESIGN
3.0
with the program specialization. As part of their elective courses,
GEGN469
ENGINEERING GEOLOGY DESIGN
3.0
students are required to have an advanced course in both soil and
GEGN470
GROUND-WATER ENGINEERING DESIGN
3.0
rock engineering. Possibilities for other electives include graduate-
level rock mechanics and rock engineering, soil mechanics and
The typical program plan includes 15 course credit hours in both the
foundations, ground water, site characterization, geographical
fall and the spring terms followed by 6 independent study credit hours
information systems (GIS), project management and geophysics, for
during the summer term. The non-thesis degree includes three areas
example.
of specialization (engineering geology/geotechnics, ground-water
engineering, and mining geological engineering).
Ground Water Engineering/Hydrogeology
All Master of Engineering (Non-Thesis) program will include the following
Specialty (Non-Thesis)
core requirements:
Students working towards a Masters of Engineering (non-thesis) with
GEGN532
GEOLOGICAL DATA ANALYSIS
3.0
specialization in Ground Water Engineering and Hydrogeology must meet
GEGN599
INDEPENDENT STUDY
6.0

Colorado School of Mines 77
the prerequisite course requirements listed later in this section. Required
*
Electives and course substitutions are approved by the Geological
courses for the degree (36 hours) are:
Engineering Graduate Program Committee and must be consistent
with the program specialization. Typically, the elective courses are
GEGN466
GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING
3
selected from the following topical areas: mineral deposits geology,
GEGN532
GEOLOGICAL DATA ANALYSIS (Fall)
3.0
ore microscopy, applied geophysics, applied geochemistry, remote
GEGN681
VADOSE ZONE HYDROLOGY (Fall )
3.0
sensing, engineering geology, environmental geology, engineering
or GEGN581
ADVANCED GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING
economics / management, mineral processing, geostatistics,
GEGN509
INTRODUCTION TO AQUEOUS
3.0
geographic information systems, environmental or exploration and
GEOCHEMISTRY (Fall or Spring)
mining law, and computers sciences.
or ESGN500
ENVIRONMENTAL WATER CHEMISTRY
The Master of Science Degree Program in Geological Engineering
GEGN583
MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF
3.0
requires a minimum of 36 semester hours of course and project/
GROUNDWATER SYSTEMS (Spring)
research credit hours (a maximum of 9 credit hours may be 400-
GEGN470
GROUND-WATER ENGINEERING DESIGN
3.0
level course work), plus a Graduate Thesis. The degree includes
(Spring)
three areas of specialization (engineering geology/geotechnics,
groundwater engineering, and mining geological engineering) with
or ESGN575
HAZARDOUS WASTE SITE REMEDIATION
common requirements as follows:
GEGN575
APPLICATIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC
3.0
INFORMATION SYSTEMS (Fall/Spring)
GEGN532
GEOLOGICAL DATA ANALYSIS
3.0
GEGN599
INDEPENDENT STUDY Summer
6.0
GEGN707
GRADUATE THESIS/DISSERTATION
12.
RESEARCH CREDIT (minimum)
GE ELECT
Electives *
9.0
GEGN
Course work, approved by the thesis committee 24.0
Total Hours
36.0
Total Hours
39.0
*
Electives and course substitutions are approved by the Geological
The content of the thesis is to be determined by the student’s advisory
Engineering Graduate Program Committee and must be consistent
committee in consultation with the student. The Masters thesis must
with the program specialization. As part of their elective courses,
demonstrate creative and comprehensive ability in the development or
students are required to have at least one additional advanced
application of geological engineering principles. The format of the thesis
course in hydrogeochemistry. Possibilities for other electives
will follow the guidelines described under the Thesis Writer’s Guide.
include courses in site characterization, environmental science and
engineering, geographical information systems (GIS), geochemistry,
In addition to the common course requirements, the Master of Science
and geophysics, for example.
degree with specialization in Engineering Geology/Geotechnics
requires:
Mining Geological Engineering Specialty
GEGN467
GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING
4.0
(Non-Thesis)
GEGN468
ENGINEERING GEOLOGY AND GEOTECHNICS 4.0
Students working towards a Masters of Engineering (non-thesis) with
GEGN570
CASE HISTORIES IN GEOLOGICAL
3.0
specialization in Mining Geology must meet the prerequisite course
ENGINEERING AND HYDROGEOLOGY
requirements listed later in this section. Required courses for the degree
Select at least two of the following:
6.0
are:
GEGN571
ADVANCED ENGINEERING GEOLOGY
GEGN468
ENGINEERING GEOLOGY AND GEOTECHNICS 4.0
GEGN573
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING SITE
or GEGN467
GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING
INVESTIGATION
GEGN532
GEOLOGICAL DATA ANALYSIS
3.0
GEGN671
LANDSLIDES: INVESTIGATION, ANALYSIS &
GEOL515
ADVANCED MINERAL DEPOSITS
3.0
MITIGATION
Selected Topics
2-4
GEGN672
ADVANCED GEOTECHNICS
MNGN523
SELECTED TOPICS (Surface Mine Design OR)
Total Hours
17.0
MNGN523
SELECTED TOPICS (Underground Mine Design)
Typically, the additional courses are selected from the following topical
GE ELECT
Elective *
3.0
areas: engineering geology, groundwater engineering, groundwater
GEOL505
ADVANCED STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY
3.0
modeling, soil mechanics and foundations, rock mechanics, underground
construction, seismic hazards, geomorphology, geographic information
GEOL520
NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN THE GEOLOGY AND 2.0
systems, construction management, finite element modeling, waste
EXPLORATION OF ORE DEPOSITS
management, environmental engineering, environmental law, engineering
GE ELECT
Elective *
6.0
management, and computer programming.
GEGN599
INDEPENDENT STUDY
6.0
In addition to the common course requirements, the Master of Science
Total Hours
32-34
degree with specialization in Ground Water also requires the following
courses:
GEGN467
GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING
4.0
GEGN468
ENGINEERING GEOLOGY AND GEOTECHNICS 4.0
GEGN583
MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF
3.0
GROUNDWATER SYSTEMS

78 Graduate
2 Courses Selected as Follows:
6.0
and additional course work tailored to the student’s specific interests,
ESGN500
ENVIRONMENTAL WATER CHEMISTRY
which are likely to include chemistry, engineering, environmental
science, geophysics, math (particularly Partial Differential Equations),
GEGN509
INTRODUCTION TO AQUEOUS
microbiology, organic chemistry, contaminant transport, soil physics,
GEOCHEMISTRY
optimization, shallow resistivity or seismic methods. The student’s
ESGN503
ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION: SOURCES,
advisory committee has the authority to approve elective courses and any
CHARACTERISTICS, TRANSPORT AND FATE
substitutions for required courses.
GEGN581
ADVANCED GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING
In addition to the common course requirements, a PhD specializing in
Total Hours
17.0
Mining Geology also requires:
As nearly all ground water software is written in Fortran, if the student
GEGN468
ENGINEERING GEOLOGY AND GEOTECHNICS 4.0
does not know Fortran, a Fortran course must be taken before
or GEGN467
GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING
graduation, knowledge of other computer languages is encouraged.
GEOL505
ADVANCED STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY
3.0
In addition to the common course requirements, the Master of Science
GEOL515
ADVANCED MINERAL DEPOSITS
3.0
degree with specialization in Mining Geology also requires:
GEOL520
NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN THE GEOLOGY AND 2.0
Specialty Areas (minimum)
17.0
EXPLORATION OF ORE DEPOSITS
Total Hours
17.0
MNGN523
SELECTED TOPICS (Surface Mine Design or
2
Underground Mine Design)
This will include about 5–6 courses (predominantly at 500 and 600
level) selected by the student in conjunction with the Masters program
Total Hours
14.0
advisory committee. Specialty areas might include: mineral deposits
Additional course work suited to the student’s specific interests and
geology, mineral exploration, mining geology, mineral processing, applied
approved by the doctoral program committee. (Typically, the additional
geophysics, applied geochemistry, engineering geology, environmental
courses are selected from the following topical areas: mineral deposits
geology, geostatistics, geographic information systems, environmental or
geology, mineral exploration, mining geology, mineral processing, applied
exploration and mining law, engineering economics/ management, and
geophysics, applied geochemistry, engineering geology, environmental
computer sciences.
geology, geostatistics, geographic information systems, environmental
The Doctor of Philosophy (Geological Engineering) degree requires a
or exploration and mining law, engineering economics/management, and
minimum of 72 hours course work and research combined. Requirements
computer sciences).
include the same courses as for the Master of Science (Geological
Geochemistry
Engineering) with the additions noted below. After completing all
coursework and an admission to candidacy application, the Dissertation
The Geochemistry Program is an interdisciplinary graduate program
is completed under GEGN707 Graduate Research. The content of the
administered by the departments of Geology and Geological Engineering
dissertation is to be determined by the student’s advisory committee
and Chemistry and Geochemistry. The geochemistry faculty from each
in consultation with the student. The dissertation must make a new
department are responsible for the operations of the program. Student
contribution to the geological engineering profession. The format of the
reside in either Department. Please see the Geochemistry section of the
dissertation will follow the guidelines described under the Thesis Writer’s
Bulletin for detailed information on this degree program.
Guide. A minimum of 24 research credits must be taken. Up to 24 course
Hydrologic Science and Engineering
credit hours may be awarded by the candidate’s Doctoral Thesis Advisory
Committee for completion of a Master of Science degree (at CSM or
The Hydrologic Science and Engineering (HSE) Program is an
elsewhere).
interdisciplinary graduate program comprised of faculty from several
different CSM departments. Please see the Hydrologic Science and
In addition to the common course requirements, a PhD specializing
Engineering section of the Bulletin for detailed information on this degree
in Engineering Geology/Geotechnics requires additional course
program.
work tailored to the student’s specific interests and approved by
the doctoral program committee. (Typically, the additional courses
Qualifying Examination
are selected from the following topical areas: engineering geology,
Ph.D. students in Geology, Geological Engineering, Geochemistry, and
groundwater engineering, groundwater modeling, soil mechanics
Hydrologic Science and Engineering must pass a qualifying examination
and foundations, rock mechanics, underground construction,
by the end of the second year of their programs. This timing may be
seismic hazards, geomorphology, geographic information systems,
adjusted for part-time students. This examination will be administered by
construction management, finite element modeling, waste management,
the student’s Doctoral committee and will consist of an oral and a written
environmental engineering, environmental law, engineering management,
examination, administered in a format to be determined by the Doctoral
and computer programming.)
Committee. Two negative votes in the Doctoral Committee constitute
In addition to the common course requirements listed previously, a PhD
failure of the examination. In case of failure of the qualifying examination,
specializing in Ground Water also requires:
a re-examination may be given upon the recommendation of the Doctoral
Committee and approval of the Graduate Dean. Only one re-examination
GEGN581
ADVANCED GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING
3.0
may be given.
GEGN669
ADVANCED TOPICS IN ENGINEERING
1-2
HYDROGEOLOGY
GEGN681
VADOSE ZONE HYDROLOGY
3.0
GEGN683
ADVANCED GROUND WATER MODELING
3.0

Colorado School of Mines 79
Courses
GEGN532. GEOLOGICAL DATA ANALYSIS. 3.0 Hours.
(I or II) Techniques and strategy of data analysis in geology and
GEGN503. INTEGRATED EXPLORATION AND DEVELOPMENT. 3.0
geological engineering: basic statistics review, analysis of data
Hours.
sequences, mapping, sampling and sample representativity, univariate
(I) Students work alone and in teams to study reservoirs from fluvial-
and multivariate statistics, geostatistics, and geographic information
deltaic and valley fill depositional environments. This is a multidisciplinary
systems (GIS). Practical experience with geological applications via
course that shows students how to characterize and model subsurface
supplied software and data sets from case histories. Prerequisites:
reservoir performance by integrating data, methods and concepts from
Introductory statistics course (MATH323 or MATH530 equivalent) or
geology, geophysics and petroleum engineering. Activities include field
permission of instructor. 2 hours lecture/discussion; 3 hours lab; 3
trips, computer modeling, written exercises and oral team presentations.
semester hours.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3
semester hours. Offered fall semester, odd years.
GEGN570. CASE HISTORIES IN GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING AND
HYDROGEOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
GEGN504. INTEGRATED EXPLORATION AND DEVELOPMENT. 3.0
(I) Case histories in geological and geotechnical engineering, ground
Hours.
water, and waste management problems. Students are assigned
(I) Students work in multidisciplinary teams to study practical problems
problems and must recommend solutions and/or prepare defendable
and case studies in integrated subsurface exploration and development.
work plans. Discussions center on the role of the geological engineer
The course addresses emerging technologies and timely topics with
in working with government regulators, private-sector clients, other
a general focus on carbonate reservoirs. Activities include field trips,
consultants, and other special interest groups. Prerequisite: GEGN467,
3D computer modeling, written exercises and oral team presentation.
GEGN468, GEGN469, GEGN470 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture and seminar; 3
lecture; 3 semester hours.
semester hours. Offered fall semester, even years.
GEGN571. ADVANCED ENGINEERING GEOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
GEGN509. INTRODUCTION TO AQUEOUS GEOCHEMISTRY. 3.0
(I) Emphasis will be on engineering geology mapping methods,
Hours.
and geologic hazards assessment applied to site selection and site
(I) Analytical, graphical and interpretive methods applied to aqueous
assessment for a variety of human activities. Prerequisite: GEGN468
systems. Thermodynamic properties of water and aqueous solutions.
or equivalent. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours. Offered
Calculations and graphical expression of acid-base, redox and solution-
alternate years.
mineral equilibria. Effect of temperature and kinetics on natural aqueous
systems. Adsorption and ion exchange equilibria between clays and
GEGN573. GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING SITE INVESTIGATION. 3.0
oxide phases. Behavior of trace elements and complexation in aqueous
Hours.
systems. Application of organic geochemistry to natural aqueous
(II) Methods of field investigation, testing, and monitoring for geotechnical
systems. Light stable and unstable isotopic studies applied to aqueous
and hazardous waste sites, including: drilling and sampling methods,
systems. Prerequisite: DCGN209 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. 3
sample logging, field testing methods, instrumentation, trench logging,
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
foundation inspection, engineering stratigraphic column and engineering
soils map construction. Projects will include technical writing for
GEGN527. ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY OF FOSSIL FUELS AND ORE
investigations (reports, memos, proposals, workplans). Class will
DEPOSITS. 3.0 Hours.
culminate in practice conducting simulated investigations (using a
(II) A study of organic carbonaceous materials in relation to the genesis
computer simulator). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and modification of fossil fuel and ore deposits. The biological origin of
the organic matter will be discussed with emphasis on contributions of
GEGN575. APPLICATIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION
microorganisms to the nature of these deposits. Biochemical and thermal
SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
changes which convert the organic compounds into petroleum, oil shale,
(II) An introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and their
tar sand, coal, and other carbonaceous matter will be studied. Principal
applications to all areas of geology and geological engineering. Lecture
analytical techniques used for the characterization of organic matter in
topics include: principles of GIS, data structures, digital elevation models,
the geosphere and for evaluation of oil and gas source potential will be
data input and verification, data analysis and spatial modeling, data
discussed. Laboratory exercises will emphasize source rock evaluation,
quality and error propagation, methods of GIS evaluation and selection.
and oil-source rock and oil-oil correlation methods. Prerequisite:
Laboratories will use Macintosh and DOS-based personal computer
CHGN221, GEGN438, or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours
systems for GIS projects, as well as video-presentations. Visits to local
lab; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
GIS laboratories, and field studies will be required. 2 hours lecture, 3
hours lab; 3 semester hours.
GEGN530. CLAY CHARACTERIZATION. 1.0 Hour.
(I) Clay mineral structure, chemistry and classification, physical properties
(flocculation and swelling, cation exchange capacity, surface area and
charge), geological occurrence, controls on their stabilities. Principles of
X-ray diffraction, including sample preparation techniques, data collection
and interpretation, and clay separation and treatment methods. The
use of scanning electron microscopy to investigate clay distribution
and morphology. Methods of measuring cation exchange capacity
and surface area. Prerequisite: GEGN206 or equivalent, or consent of
instructor. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab; 1 semester hour.

80 Graduate
GEGN578. GIS PROJECT DESIGN. 1-3 Hour.
GEGN598. SEMINAR IN GEOLOGY OR GEOLOGICAL
(I, II) Project implementation of GIS analysis. Projects may be undertaken
ENGINEERING. 1-3 Hour.
by individual students, or small student teams. Documentation of all
(I, II) Special topics classes, taught on a one-time basis. May include
project design stages, including user needs assessment, implementation
lecture, laboratory and field trip activities. Prerequisite: Approval of
procedures, hardware and software selection, data sources and
instructor and department head. Variable credit; 1 to 3 semester hours.
acquisition, and project success assessment. Various GIS software may
Repeatable for credit under different topics.
be used; projects may involve
2-dimensional GIS, 3-dimensional subsurface models, or multi-
GEGN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING GEOLOGY OR
dimensional time-series analysis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY. 1-6 Hour.
Variable credit, 1-3 semester hours, depending on project. Offered on
(I, II) Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems in
demand.
geological engineering or engineering hydrogeology. Prerequisite:
Approval of instructor and department head. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit
GEGN581. ADVANCED GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
hours. Repeatable for credit.
(I) Lectures, assigned readings, and discussions concerning the theory,
measurement, and estimation of ground water param eters, fractured-
GEGN669. ADVANCED TOPICS IN ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY.
rock flow, new or specialized methods of well hydraulics and pump tests,
1-2 Hour.
tracer methods. Prerequisite: GEGN467 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
(I, II) Review of current literature and research regarding selected
lecture; 3 semester hours.
topics in hydrogeology. Group discussion and individual participation.
Guest speakers and field trips may be incorporated into the course.
GEGN582. INTEGRATED SURFACE WATER HYDROLOGY. 3.0
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to 2 semester hours; may be
Hours.
repeated for credit with consent of instructor.
(I) This course provides a quantitative, integrated view of the hydrologic
cycle. The movement and behavior of water in the atmosphere (including
GEGN670. ADVANCED TOPICS IN GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING. 3.0
boundary layer dynamics and precipitation mechanisms), fluxes of
Hours.
water between the atmosphere and land surface (including evaporation,
(I, II) Review of current literature and research regarding selected topics
transpiration, precipitation, interception and through fall) and connections
in engineering geology. Group discussion and individual participation.
between the water and energy balances (including radiation and
Guest speakers and field trips may be incorporated into the course.
temperature) are discussed at a range of spatial and temporal scales.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Additionally, movement of water along the land surface (overland flow
Repeatable for credit under different topics.
and snow dynamics) and in the subsurface (saturated and unsaturated
GEGN671. LANDSLIDES: INVESTIGATION, ANALYSIS &
flow) as well as surface-subsurface exchanges and runoff generation are
MITIGATION. 3.0 Hours.
also covered. Finally, integration and connections within the hydrologic
(I) Geological investigation, analysis, and design of natural rock
cycle and scaling of river systems are discussed. Prerequisites:
and soil slopes and mitigation of unstable slopes. Topics include
Groundwater Engineering (GEGN466/GEGN467), Fluid Mechanics
landslide types and processes, triggering mechanisms, mechanics of
(GEGN351/EGGN351), math up to differential equations, or equivalent
movements, landslide investigation and characterization, monitoring
classes as determined by the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
and instrumentation, soil slope stability analysis, rock slope stability
hours.
analysis, rock fall analysis, stabilization and risk reduction measures.
GEGN583. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF GROUNDWATER
Prerequisites: GEGN468, EGGN361, MNGN321, (or equivalents) or
SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(II) Lectures, assigned readings, and direct computer experience
GEGN672. ADVANCED GEOTECHNICS. 3.0 Hours.
concerning the fundamentals and applications of finite-difference and
(II) Geological analysis, design, and stabilization of natural soil and
finite-element numerical methods and analytical solutions to ground
rock slopes and rock foundations; computer modeling of slopes; use
water flow and mass transport problems. Prerequisite: A knowledge of
of specialized methods in earth construction. Prerequisite: GEGN468,
FORTRAN programming, mathematics through differential and integral
EGGN361/EGGN363 and MNGN321. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
calculus, and GEGN467 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
semester hours.
GEGN673. ADVANCED GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN. 3.0
Hours.
GEGN584. FIELD METHODS IN HYDROLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Application of geological principles and analytical techniques to solve
(I) Design and implementation of tests that characterize surface and
complex engineering problems related to geology, such as mitigation
subsurface hydrologic systems, including data logger programming,
of natural hazards, stabilization of earth materials, and optimization of
sensor calibration, pumping tests, slug tests, infiltration tests, stream
construction options. Design tools to be covered will include problem
gauging and dilution measurements, and geophysical (EM, resistivity,
solving techniques, optimization, reliability, maintainability, and economic
and/or SP) surveys. Prerequisites: Groundwater Engineering (GEGN466/
analysis. Students will complete independent and group design projects,
GEGN467, Surface Water Hydrology (ESGN582) or equivalent classes
as well as a case analysis of a design failure. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
as determined by the instructor. 2 hours lecture; 5 hours lab and field
hours. Offered alternate years.
exercises one day of the week. Days TBD by instructor; 3 semester
hours.

Colorado School of Mines 81
GEGN681. VADOSE ZONE HYDROLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
GEOL502. STRUCTURAL METHODS FOR SEISMIC
(II) Study of the physics of unsaturated groundwater flow and
INTERPRETATION. 3.0 Hours.
contaminant transport. Fundamental processes and data collection
(I) A practical course that covers the wide variety of structural methods
methods will be presented. The emphasis will be on analytic solutions
and techniques that are essential to produce a valid and coherent
to the unsaturated flow equations and analysis of field data. Application
interpretation of 2D and 3D seismic reflection data in structurally complex
to non-miscible fluids, such as gasoline, will be made. The fate of leaks
areas. Topics covered include: Extensional tectonics, fold and thrust
from underground tanks will be analyzed. Prerequisites: GEGN467 or
belts, salt tectonics, inversion tectonics and strike-slip fault systems.
equivalent; Math through Differential Equations; or consent of instructor.
Laboratory exercises are based on seismic datasets from a wide variety
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
of structural regimes from across the globe. The course includes a 4 day
field trip to SE Utah. Prerequisite: GEOL309 and GEOL314 or GEOL315,
GEGN682. FLOW AND TRANSPORT IN FRACTURED ROCK. 3.0
or equivalents, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture/lab; 3 semester
Hours.
hours.
(I) Explores the application of hydrologic and engineering principles to
flow and transport in fractured rock. Emphasis is on analysis of field
GEOL505. ADVANCED STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
data and the differences between flow and transport in porous media
(I) Advanced Structural Geology builds on basic undergraduate Structural
and fractured rock. Teams work together throughout the semester
Geology. Structures such as folds, faults, foliations, lineations and shear
to solve problems using field data, collect and analyze field data,
zones will be considered in detail. The course
and do independent research in flow and transport in fractured rock.
focuses on microstructures, complex geometries and multiple generations
Prerequisites: GEGN581 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 credit
of deformation. The laboratory consists of microscopy, in-class problems,
hours. Offered alternate years.
and some field-based problems. Prerequisites: GEGN307, GEOL309,
GEGN316, GEGN321, or equivalents. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab, and
GEGN683. ADVANCED GROUND WATER MODELING. 3.0 Hours.
field exercise; 3 semester hours.
(II) Flow and solute transport modeling including: 1) advanced analytical
modeling methods; 2) finite elements, random-walk, and method of
GEOL507. GRADUATE SEMINAR. 1.0 Hour.
characteristics numerical methods; 3) discussion of alternative computer
(II) Recent geologic ideas and literature reviewed. Preparation and oral
codes for modeling and presentation of the essential features of a
presentation of short papers. 1 hour seminar; 1 semester hour. Required
number of codes; 4) study of selection of appropriate computer codes
of all geology candidates for advanced degrees during their enrollment on
for specific modeling problems; 5) application of models to ground water
campus.
problems; and 6) study of completed modeling projects through literature
review, reading and discussion. Prerequisite: GEGN509/CHGC509
GEOL512. MINERALOGY AND CRYSTAL CHEMISTRY. 3.0 Hours.
or GEGN583, or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3
(I) Relationships among mineral chemistry, structure, crystallography, and
semester hours.
physical properties. Systematic treatments of structural representation,
defects, mineral stability and phase transitions, solid solutions,
GEGN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING GEOLOGY OR
substitution mechanisms, and advanced methods of mineral identification
ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY. 1-6 Hour.
and characterization. Applications of principles using petrological
(I, II) Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems in
and environmental examples. Prerequisites: GEOL321, DCGN209 or
geological engineering or engineering hydrogeology. Pre-requisite:
equivalent or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours
Approval of instructor and department head. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit
lab; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
hours. Repeatable for credit.
GEOL513. HYDROTHERMAL GEOCHEMISTRY. 3.0 Hours.
GEGN707. GRADUATE THESIS/DISSERTATION RESEARCH CREDIT.
(II) Geochemistry of high-temperature aqueous systems. Examines
1-12 Hour.
fundamental phase relationships in model systems at elevated
(I, II, S) Research credit hours required for completion of a Masters-level
temperatures and pressures. Major and trace element behavior during
thesis or Doctoral dissertation. Research must be carried out under the
fluid-rock interaction. Theory and application of stable isotopes as applied
direct supervision of the student’s faculty advisor. Variable class and
to hydrothermal mineral deposits. Review of the origin of hydrothermal
semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
fluids and mechanisms of transport and deposition of ore minerals.
Includes the study of the geochemistry of magmatic aqueous systems,
GEGX571. GEOCHEMICAL EXPLORATION. 3.0 Hours.
geothermal systems, and submarine hydrothermal vents. Prerequisites:
(I) Dispersion of trace metals from mineral deposits and their discovery.
GEGN401 or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3
Laboratory consists of analysis and statistical interpretation of data of
semester hours.
soils, stream sediments, vegetation, and rock in connection with field
problems. Term report required. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 2
GEOL515. ADVANCED MINERAL DEPOSITS. 3.0 Hours.
hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
(I) Geology of mineral systems at a deposit, district, and regional
scale formed by magmatic-hydrothermal, sedimentary/basinal, and
GEOL501. APPLIED STRATIGRAPHY. 4.0 Hours.
metamorphic processes. Emphasis will be placed on a systems approach
(I) Review of basic concepts in siliciclastic and carbonate sedimentology
to evaluating metal and sulfur sources, transportation paths, and
and stratigraphy. Introduction to advanced concepts and their application
traps. Systems examined will vary by year and interest of the class.
to exploration and development of fossil fuels and stratiform mineral
Involves a team-oriented research project that includes review of current
deposits. Modern facies models and sequence-stratigraphic concepts
literature and laboratory research. Prerequisites: GEGN401 or consent of
applied to solving stratigraphic problems in field and subsurface settings.
instructor. 1 hour lecture, 5 hours lab; 3 semester hours. Repeatable for
Prerequisites: GEOL314 or equivalent or consent of instructor. 3 hours
credit.
lecture, 4 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

82 Graduate
GEOL517. FIELD METHODS FOR ECONOMIC GEOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
GEOL522. TECTONICS AND SEDIMENTATION. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Methods of field practices related to mineral exploration and mining.
(II) Application and integration of advanced sedimentologic and
Lithology, structural geology, alteration, and mineralization vein-type
stratigraphic concepts to understand crustal deformation at a wide range
precious metal deposits. Mapping is conducted both underground at the
of spatial- and time-scales. Key concepts include: growth-strata analysis,
Edgar Test Mine and above ground in the Idaho Springs area. Drill core
interpretation of detrital composition (conglomerate unroofing sequences
and rock chips from different deposit types are utilized. Technical reports
and sandstone provenance trends), paleocurrent deflection and thinning
are prepared for each of four projects. Class is run on Saturday (9 am-4
trends, tectonic control on facies distribution and basic detrital zircon and
pm) throughout the semester. Prerequisites: GEGN401 or consent of
fission track analysis. Students will read a
instructor. 6 hours lab and seminar; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate
wide range of literature to explore the utility and limitation of traditional
years when student demand is sufficient.
"tectonic signatures" in stratigraphy, and will work on outcrop and
subsurface datasets to master these concepts. Special attention is paid
GEOL518. MINERAL EXPLORATION. 3.0 Hours.
to fold-thrust belt, extensional and salt-related deformation. The course
(II) Mineral industry overview, deposit economics, target selection,
has important applications in Petroleum Geology, Geologic Hazards, and
deposit modeling, exploration technology, international exploration,
Hydrogeology. Required: 2-3 fieldtrips, class presentations, and a final
environmental issues, program planning, proposal development. Team
paper that is written in a peer-reviewed journal format. Prerequisites:
development and presentation of an exploration proposal. Prerequisite:
GEOL314 or equivalent, and GEOL309 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture and
GEOL515, GEOL520, or equivalent. 2 hours lecture/seminar, 3 hours lab;
seminar; 3 semester hours. Offered even years.
3 semester hours. Offered when student demand is sufficient.
GEOL525. TECTONOTHERMAL EVOLUTION OF THE CONTINENTS.
GEOL519. ABITIBI GEOLOGY AND EXPLORATION FIELD SCHOOL.
3.0 Hours.
3.0 Hours.
(I) Evolution of the continental crust with a specific focus on processes
(II, S) Methods of field practices related to mineral exploration and
occurring at collisional margins. Emphasis will be on the application of
mining. Regional and deposit-scale geology of Archean mineral deposits,
metamorphic processes and concepts., including integration of major,
including lode gold deposits and volcanic-hosted massive sulfide
trace, and isotopic geochemistry of rocks and minerals to interpreting
deposits. Includes mineral prospect evaluation, structural geology,
and understanding the tectonic and thermal evolution of the crust
physical volcanology, deposit definition, alteration mapping, mining
through space and time. Laboratory emphasizes the interpretation
methods, ore processing, and metallurgy. Core logging, underground
of metamorphic textures and assemblages within the context of
stope mapping, open pit mapping, lithogeochemical sampling, and field-
geochemistry and deformation, and the application of thermodynamic
analytical techniques. Course involves a seminar in the spring semester
principles to the understanding of the thermal history of rocks and
that focuses on the geology and deposit types in the area to be visited.
terrains. Prerequiste: Appropriate undergraduate optical mineralogy
An intense 14-day field trip is run in the summer semester. Each day
and petrology coursework (GEOL321 and GEGN307, or equivalent)
includes up to 4 hours of instruction in the field and 4 hours of team-
or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture and seminar, 3 hours lab: 3
oriented field exercises. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. 6 hours lab
semester hours. Offered alternate years.
and seminar; 2 semester hours in spring, 1 semester hour in summer.
Offered alternate years when student demand is sufficient.
GEOL530. CLAY CHARACTERIZATION. 1.0 Hour.
(I) Clay mineral structure, chemistry and classification, physical properties
GEOL520. NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN THE GEOLOGY AND
(flocculation and swelling, cation exchange capacity, surface area and
EXPLORATION OF ORE DEPOSITS. 2.0 Hours.
charge), geological occurrence, controls on their stabilities. Principles of
(I, II) Each topic unique and focused on a specific mineral deposit type
X-ray diffraction, including sample preparation techniques, data collection
or timely aspects of economic geology. Review of the geological and
and interpretation, and clay separation and treatment methods. The
geographic setting of a specific magmatic, hydrothermal, or sedimentary
use of scanning electron microscopy to investigate clay distribution
mineral deposit type. Detailed study of the physical and chemical
and morphology. Methods of measuring cation exchange capacity
characteristics of selected deposits and mining districts. Theory and
and surface area. Prerequisite: GEGN206 or equivalent, or consent of
application of geological field methods and geochemical investigations.
instructor. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
Includes a discussion of genetic models, exploration strategies, and
mining methods. Prerequistes: GEGN401 or consent of instructor. 2
GEOL550. INTEGRATED BASIN MODELING. 3.0 Hours.
hours lecture; 2 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
(I) This course introduces students to principal methods in computer-
based basin modeling: structural modeling and tectonic restoration;
GEOL521. FIELD AND ORE DEPOSIT GEOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
thermal modeling and hydrocarbon generation; and stratigraphic
(I, S) Field study of major mineral deposit districts inside and outside of
modeling. Students apply techniques to real data set that includes
the USA. Examines regional and deposit-scale geology. Underground
seismic and well data and learn to integrate results from multiple
and open pit mine visits and regional traverses. Topics addressed
approaches in interpreting a basin’s history. The course is primarily a
include deposit definition, structural geology, alteration mapping, mining
lab course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. A course background in
methods, and ore processing. Course involves a seminar in the spring
structural geology, sedimentology/stratigraphy or organic geochemistry
semester that focuses on the geology and deposit types in the area to
will be helpful. 1 hour lecture, 5 hours labs; 3 semester hours.
be visited. An intense 10-14 day field trip is run in the summer semester.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. 6 hours lab and seminar; 2 semester
hours in spring, 1 semester hour in summer. Offered alternate years
when student demand is sufficient. Repeatable for credit.

Colorado School of Mines 83
GEOL551. APPLIED PETROLEUM GEOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
GEOL598. SEMINAR IN GEOLOGY OR GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING.
(II) Subjects to be covered include computer subsurface mapping
1-3 Hour.
and cross sections, petrophysical analysis of well data, digitizing well
(I, II) Special topics classes, taught on a one-time basis. May include
logs, analyzing production decline curves, creating hydrocarbon-
lecture, laboratory and field trip activities. Prerequisite: Approval of
porosity-thickness maps, volumetric calculations, seismic structural and
instructor and department head. Variable credit; 1 to 3 semester hours.
stratigraphic mapping techniques, and basin modeling of hydrocarbon
Repeatable for credit under different topics.
generation. Students are exposed to three software packages used
extensively by the oil and gas industry. Prerequisite: GEGN438 or
GEOL599. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GEOLOGY. 1-6 Hour.
GEOL609 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(I, II) Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems in
geological engineering or engineering hydrogeology. Prerequisite:
GEOL552. UNCONVENTIONAL PETROLEUM SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
Approval of instructor and department head. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit
(II) Unconventional petroleum systems have emerged as a critical and
hours. Repeatable for credit.
indispensable part of current US production and potential future reserves.
Each of the 5 unconventional oil and 4 unconventional gas systems will
GEOL608. HISTORY OF GEOLOGICAL CONCEPTS. 3.0 Hours.
be discussed: what are they, world wide examples, required technology
(II) Lectures and seminars concerning the history and philosophy of the
to evaluate and produce, environmental issues, and production/resource
science of geology; emphasis on the historical development of basic
numbers. The oil part of the course will be followed by looking at cores
geologic concepts. 3 hours lecture and seminar; 3 semester hours.
from these systems. The gas part of the course will include a field
Required of all doctoral candidates in department. Offered alternate
trip to the Denver, Eagle, and Piceance Basins in Colorado to see
years.
outstanding outcrops of actual producing units. Prerequisites: GEGN438
GEOL609. ADVANCED PETROLEUM GEOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
or GEOL609, GEGN527 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
(II) Subjects to be covered involve consideration of basic chemical,
semester hours. Offered alternate years.
physical, biological and geological processes and their relation to modern
GEOL553. GEOLOGY AND SEISMIC SIGNATURES OF RESERVOIR
concepts of oil/gas generation (including source rock deposition and
SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
maturation), and migration/accumulation (including that occurring under
(II) This course is a comprehensive look at the depositional models,
hydrodynamic conditions). Concepts will be applied to the historic and
log signatures, characteristics, and seismic signatures for all the main
predictive occurrence of oil/gas to specific Rocky Mountain areas. In
reservoirs we explore for and produce from in the subsurface. The first
addition to lecture attendance, course work involves review of topical
half is devoted to the clastic reservoirs (12 in all); the second part to
papers and solution of typical problems. Prerequisite: GEGN438 or
the carbonate reservoirs (7 total). The course will utilize many hands-
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
on exercises using actual seismic lines for the various reservoir types.
GEOL610. ADVANCED SEDIMENTOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
Prerequisites: GEOL501 or GEOL314. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(I) Keynote lectures and a seminar series on the physical depositional
Offered alternate years.
processes, as the basic processes and key restrictions for building
GEOL570. APPLICATIONS OF SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING. 3.0
stratigraphy. Linkage of physical processes with depositional
Hours.
environments and stratigraphy. Learning the key observations for
(II) An introduction to geoscience applications of satellite remote sensing
recognizing depositional environments in outcrops and cores. Linkage to
of the Earth and planets. The lectures provide background on satellites,
well logs. Seminars, field trips, field labs and report required. Prerequisite:
sensors, methodology, and diverse applications. Topics include visible,
GEOL501 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture and seminar; 3 semester hours.
near infrared, and thermal infrared passive sensing, active microwave
Offered alternate years.
and radio sensing, and geodetic remote sensing. Lectures and labs
GEOL611. SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHY IN SEISMIC, WELL LOGS,
involve use of data from a variety of instruments, as several applications
AND OUTCROP. 3.0 Hours.
to problems in the Earth and planetary sciences are presented. Students
(I) Keynote lectures and a seminar series on the sequence stratigraphy
will complete independent term projects that are presented both written
of depositional systems, including both siliciclastics and carbonates
and orally at the end of the term. Prerequisites: PHGN200 and MATH225
and how they behave in changing sea-level, tectonic subsidence,
or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
and sediment supply conditions. Application of sequence stratigraphy
GEOL580. INDUCED SEISMICITY. 3.0 Hours.
concepts to reflection seismic, well-log, and outcrop datasets. Field trip
(II) Earthquakes are sometimes caused by the activities of man. These
and report required. Prerequisite: GEOL501 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture
activities include mining and quarrying, petroleum and geothermal energy
and seminar; 3 semester hours.
production, building water reservoirs and dams, and underground nuclear
GEOL613. GEOLOGIC RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION. 3.0 Hours.
testing. This course will help students understand the characteristics and
(I, II) Principles and practice of characterizing petro leum reservoirs using
physical causes of man-made earthquakes and seismicity induced in
geologic and engineering data, including well logs, sample descriptions,
various situations. Students will read published reports and objectively
routine and special core analysis and well tests. Emphasis is placed on
analyze the seismological and ancillary data therein to decide if
practical analysis of such data sets from a variety of clastic petroleum
the causative agent was man or natural processes. Prerequisites:
reservoirs worldwide. These data sets are integrated into detailed
Undergraduate geology and physics. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
characterizations, which then are used to solve practical oil and gas field
Offered spring semester, odd years.
problems. Prerequisites: GEGN438, GEOL501, GEOL505 or equivalents.
GEOL597. SPECIAL SUMMER COURSE. 15.0 Hours.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

84 Graduate
GEOL617. THERMODYNAMICS AND MINERAL PHASE EQUILIBRIA.
GEOL645. VOLCANOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
3.0 Hours.
(II) Assigned readings and seminar discussions on volcanic processes
(I) Basic thermodynamics applied to natural geologic systems. Evaluation
and products. Principal topics include pyroclastic rocks, craters and
of mineral-vapor mineral solution, mineral-melt, and solid solution
calderas, caldron subsidence, diatremes, volcanic domes, origin and
equilibria with special emphasis on oxide, sulfide, and silicate systems.
evolution of volcanic magmas, and relation of volcanism to alteration
Experimental and theoretical derivation, use, and application of phase
and mineralization. Petrographic study of selected suites of lava and
diagrams relevant to natural rock systems. An emphasis will be placed
pyroclastic rocks in the laboratory. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1
on problem solving rather than basic theory. Prerequisite: DCGN209 or
hour seminar, 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
equivalent or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Offered alternate years.
GEOL653. CARBONATE DIAGENESIS AND GEOCHEMISTRY. 3.0
Hours.
GEOL621. PETROLOGY OF DETRITAL ROCKS. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Petrologic, geochemical, and isotopic approaches to the study of
(II) Compositions and textures of sandstones, siltstones, and mudrocks.
diagenetic changes in carbonate sediments and rocks. Topics covered
Relationship of compositions and textures of provenance, environment of
include major near-surface diagenetic environments, subaerial exposure,
deposition, and burial history. Development of porosity and permeability.
dolomitization, burial diagenesis, carbonate aqueous equilibria, and
Laboratory exercises emphasize use of petrographic thin sections, x-
the carbonate geochemistry of trace elements and stable isotopes.
ray diffraction analysis, and scanning electron microscopy to examine
Laboratory stresses thin section recognition of diagenetic textures and
detrital rocks. A term project is required, involving petrographic analysis
fabrics, x-ray diffraction, and geochemical/isotopic
of samples selected by student. Pre-requisites: GEGN206 , GEOL321 or
approaches to diagenetic problems. Prerequisite: GEOL624 or equivalent
equivalent or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture and seminar, 3 hours
or consent of instructor. 4 to 6 hours lecture/ seminar/lab; 3 semester
lab; 3 semester hours. Offered on demand.
hours.
GEOL624. CARBONATE SEDIMENTOLOGY AND PETROLOGY. 3.0
GEOL699. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GEOLOGY. 1-3 Hour.
Hours.
(I, II). Individual special studies, laboratory and/or field problems in
(II) Processes involved in the deposition of carbonate sediments
geology. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and department. Variable
with an emphasis on Recent environments as analogs for ancient
credit; 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
carbonate sequences. Carbonate facies recognition through bio-
and lithofacies analysis, three-dimensional geometries, sedimentary
GEOL707. GRADUATE THESIS/DISSERTATION RESEARCH CREDIT.
dynamics, sedimentary structures, and facies associations. Laboratory
1-12 Hour.
stresses identification of Recent carbonate sediments and thin section
(I, II, S) Research credit hours required for completion of a Masters-level
analysis of carbonate classification, textures, non-skeletal and biogenic
thesis or Doctoral dissertation. Research must be carried out under the
constituents, diagenesis, and porosity evolution. Prerequisite: GEOL321
direct supervision of the student’s faculty advisor. Variable class and
and GEOL314 or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture/seminar, 2 hours
semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
lab; 3 semester hours.
GEOL628. ADVANCED IGNEOUS PETROLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
(I) Igneous processes and concepts, emphasizing the genesis, evolution,
and emplacement of tectonically and geochemically diverse volcanic
and plutonic occurrences. Tectonic controls on igneous activity and
petrochemistry. Petrographic study of igneous suites, mineralized and
non-mineralized, from diverse tectonic settings. Prerequisites: GEOL321,
GEGN206. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours. Offered
alternate years.
GEOL642. FIELD GEOLOGY. 1-3 Hour.
(S) Field program operated concurrently with GEGN316 field camp to
familiarize the
student with basic field technique, geologic principles, and regional
geology of Rocky Mountains. Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree in
geology and GEGN316 or equivalent. During summer field session; 1 to 3
semester hours.
GEOL643. GRADUATE FIELD SEMINARS. 1-3 Hour.
(I, II, S) Special advanced field programs emphasizing detailed study of
some aspects of geology. Normally conducted away from the Golden
campus. Prerequisite: Restricted to Ph.D. or advanced M.S. candidates.
Usually taken after at least one year of graduate residence. Background
requirements vary according to nature of field study. Consent of instructor
and department head is required. Fees are assessed for field and living
expenses and transportation. 1 to 3 semester hours; may be repeated for
credit with consent of instructor.

Colorado School of Mines 85
Geophysics
and physical theory, in addition to exploring the theoretical and practical
aspects of the various geophysical methodologies.
Degrees Offered
Research Emphasis
• Professional Masters in Petroleum Reservoir Systems
The Department conducts research in a wide variety of areas mostly
• Master of Science (Geophysics)
related, but not restricted, to applied geophysics. Candidates interested
• Master of Science (Geophysical Engineering)
in the research activities of a specific faculty member are encouraged to
• Doctor of Philosophy (Geophysics)
visit the Department’s website and to contact that faculty member directly.
To give prospective candidates an idea of the types of research activities
• Doctor of Philosophy (Geophysical Engineering)
available in geophysics at CSM, a list of the recognized research groups
Program Description
operating within the Department of Geophysics is given below.
Founded in 1926, the Department of Geophysics at Colorado School of
The Center for Wave Phenomena (CWP) is a research group with
Mines is recognized and respected around the world for its programs in
a total of four faculty members from the Department of Geophysics.
applied geophysical research and education.
With research sponsored by some 31 companies worldwide in the
petroleum-exploration industry, plus U.S. government agencies, CWP
Geophysics is an interdisciplinary field - a rich blend of disciplines such
emphasizes the development of theoretical and computational methods
as geology, physics, mathematics, computer science, and electrical
for imaging of the Earth’s subsurface, primarily through use of the
engineering. Professionals working in the field of geophysics come from
reflection seismic method. Researchers have been involved in forward
programs in these allied disciplines as well as from formal programs in
and inverse problems of wave propagation as well as data processing for
geophysics.
data obtained where the subsurface is complex, specifically where it is
Geophysicists study and explore the Earth’s interior through physical
both heterogeneous and anisotropic. Further information about CWP can
measurements collected at the earth’s surface, in boreholes, from
be obtained at http://www.cwp.mines.edu.
aircraft, and from satellites. Using a combination of mathematics, physics,
The Reservoir Characterization Project (RCP) integrates the
geology, chemistry, hydrology, and computer science, a geophysicist
acquisition and interpretation of multicomponent, three-dimensional
analyzes these measurements to infer properties and processes within
seismic reflection and downhole data, with the geology and petroleum
the Earth’s complex interior. Non-invasive imaging beneath the surface
engineering of existing oil fields, in an attempt to understand the
of Earth and other planets by geophysicists is analogous to non-invasive
complex properties of petroleum reservoirs. RCP is a multidisciplinary
imaging of the interior of the human body by medical specialists.
group with faculty members from Geophysics, Petroleum Engineering,
The Earth supplies all materials needed by our society, serves as the
and Geology. More information about RCP can be obtained at http://
repository of used products, and provides a home to all its inhabitants.
geophysics.mines.edu/rcp/.
Therefore, geophysics and geophysical engineering have important roles
The Center for Gravity, Electrical & Magnetic Studies (CGEM) in
to play in the solution of challenging problems facing the inhabitants of
the Department of Geophysics is an academic research center that
this planet, such as providing fresh water, food, and energy for Earth’s
focuses on the quantitative interpretation of gravity, magnetic, electrical
growing population, evaluating sites for underground construction and
and electromagnetic, and surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)
containment of hazardous waste, monitoring non-invasively the aging
data in applied geophysics. The center brings together the diverse
infrastructures (natural gas pipelines, water supplies, telecommunication
expertise of faculty and students in these different geophysical methods
conduits, transportation networks) of developed nations, mitigating the
and works towards advancing the state of art in geophysical data
threat of geohazards (earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, avalanches)
interpretation for real-world problems. The emphases of CGEM research
to populated areas, contributing to homeland security (including detection
are processing and inversion of applied geophysical data. The primary
and removal of unexploded ordnance and land mines), evaluating
areas of application include petroleum exploration and production,
changes in climate and managing humankind’s response to them, and
mineral exploration, geothermal, and geotechnical and engineering
exploring other planets.
problems. In addition, environmental problems, infrastructure mapping,
Energy companies and mining firms employ geophysicists to explore for
archaeology, hydrogeophysics, and crustal studies are also research
hidden resources around the world. Engineering firms hire geophysical
areas within the Center. There are currently five major focus areas of
engineers to assess the Earth’s near-surface properties when sites
research within CGEM: Gravity and Magnetics Research Consortium
are chosen for large construction projects and waste-management
(GMRC), mineral exploration, geothermal exploration, surface NMR, and
operations. Environmental organizations use geophysics to conduct
hydrogeophysics. Research funding is provided by petroleum and mining
groundwater surveys and to track the flow of contaminants. On the global
industries, ERDC, SERDP, and other agencies. More information about
scale, geophysicists employed by universities and government agencies
CGEM is available on the web at: http://geophysics.mines.edu/cgem/.
(such as the United States Geological Survey, NASA, and the National
The Center for Rock Abuse is a rock-physics laboratory focusing
Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration) try to understand such
on research in rock and fluid properties for exploration and reservoir
Earth processes as heat flow, gravitational, magnetic, electric, thermal,
monitoring. The primary goal of exploration and production geophysics
and stress fields within the Earth’s interior. For the past decade, 100%
is to identify fluids, specifically hydrocarbons, in rocks. Current projects
of CSM’s geophysics graduates have found employment in their chosen
center on fluid distributions in rocks and how these distributions affect
field.
characteristics such as wave attenuation, velocity dispersion and seismic
With 20 active faculty members and small class sizes, students
signature. http://crusher.mines.edu
receive individualized attention in a close-knit environment. Given the
The Group for Hydrogeophysics and Porous Media focuses on
interdisciplinary nature of geophysics, the graduate curriculum requires
combining geoelectrical (DC resistivity, complex conductivity, self-
students to become thoroughly familiar with geological, mathematical,
potential, and EM) and gravity methods with rock physics models

86 Graduate
at various scales and for various applications including the study of
credits toward the degree must be 500 level or above. At least 9 hours
contaminant plumes, geothermal systems, leakage in earth dams
must consist of:
and embankments, and active volcanoes. Website: http://www.andre-
One course selected from the following:
revil.com/research.html
GPGN/
WELL LOG ANALYSIS AND FORMATION
3
The Planetary Geophysics Group investigates the geophysical
PEGN419
EVALUATION
evolution of the terrestrial planets and moons of our solar system
Two courses selected from the following:
using a combination of numerical modeling and geophysical data
GEGN/GPGN/
MULTIDISCIPLINARY PETROLEUM DESIGN
3
analysis. Research areas include planetary geodynamics, tectonics,
PEGN439
and hydrology. More information is available at http://inside.mines.edu/
~jcahanna/.
GEGN/GPGN/
INTEGRATED EXPLORATION AND
3
PEGN503
DEVELOPMENT
GEGN/GPGN/
INTEGRATED EXPLORATION AND
3
Program Requirements
PEGN504
DEVELOPMENT
The Department offers both traditional, research-oriented graduate
Also, 9 additional hours must consist of one course each from the 3
programs and a non-thesis professional education program designed
participating departments. The remaining 18 hours may consist of
to meet specific career objectives. The program of study is selected by
graduate courses from any of the 3 participating departments, or other
the student, in consultation with an advisor, and with thesis committee
courses approved by the committee. Up to 6 hours may consist of
approval, according to the student’s career needs and interests. Specific
independent study, including an industry project.
degrees have specific requirements as detailed below.
Master of Science Degrees: Geophysics and
Geophysical Engineering Program Objectives
Geophysical Engineering
The principal objective for students pursuing the PhD in Geophysics or
the PhD in Geophysical Engineering is: Geophysics PhD graduates will
Students may obtain a Master of Science Degree in either Geophysics
be regarded by their employers as effective teachers and/or innovative
or Geophysical Engineering. Both degrees have the same coursework
researchers in their early-career peer group. In support of this objective,
and thesis requirements, as described below. Students are normally
the PhD programs in the Department of Geophysics are aimed at
admitted into the Master of Science in Geophysics program. If, however,
achieving these student outcomes:
a student would like to obtain the Master of Science in Geophysical
Engineering, the student must submit a request to the Department to
• Graduates will command superior knowledge of Geophysics and
change to the Master of Science in Geophysical Engineering. The course
fundamental related disciplines.
work and thesis topic must meet the following requirements. Note that
• Graduates will independently be able to conduct research leading to
these requirements are in addition to those associated with the Master of
significant new knowledge and Geophysical techniques.
Science in Geophysics.
• Graduates will be able to report their findings orally and in writing.
• Students must complete, either prior to their arrival at CSM or while
The chief objective for students pursuing the MS degree in Geophysics or
at CSM, no fewer than 16 credits of engineering coursework. What
Geophysical Engineering is: Geophysics MS graduates will be regarded
constitutes coursework considered as engineering is determined by
by their employers as effective practitioners addressing earth, energy
the Geophysics faculty.
and environmental problems with geophysical techniques. In support of
• In the opinion of the Geophysics faculty, the student’s dissertation
this objective, the MS programs in the Department of Geophysics aim to
topic must be appropriate for inclusion as part of an Engineering
achieve these student outcomes:
degree.
• Graduates will command superior knowledge of Geophysics and
For either Master of Science degree, a minimum of:
fundamental related disciplines.
Course credits
26.0
• Graduates will be able to conduct original research that results in new
Graduate research
12.0
knowledge and Geophysical techniques.
• Graduates will be able to report their findings orally and in writing.
Total Hours
38.0
While individual courses constituting the degree are determined by the
Professional Masters in Petroleum Reservoir
student, and approved by the advisor and thesis committee, courses
Systems
applied to all MS degrees must satisfy the following criteria:
This is a multi-disciplinary, non-thesis master’s degree for students
• All course, research, transfer, residence, and thesis requirements are
interested in working as geoscience professionals in the petroleum
as described in Registration and Tuition Classification and Graduate
industry. The Departments of Geophysics, Petroleum Engineering, and
Degrees and Requirements sections of the Bulletin.
Geology and Geological Engineering share oversight for the Professional
• All credits applied to the degree must be at the 400 (senior) level or
Masters in Petroleum Reservoir Systems program through a committee
above.
consisting of one faculty member from each department. Students gain
• Students must include the following courses in their Master degree
admission to the program by application to any of the three sponsoring
program:
departments. Students are administered by that department into which
they first matriculate. A minimum of 36 hours of course credit is required
LICM501
PROFESSIONAL ORAL COMMUNICATION
1
to complete the Professional Masters in Petroleum Reservoir Systems
GPGN581
GRADUATE SEMINAR
1
program. Up to 9 credits may be earned by 400 level courses. All other

Colorado School of Mines 87
GPGN707
GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT beyond the
12.0
SYGN501
THE ART OF SCIENCE
required 26.0 course credits
SYGN600
COLLEGE TEACHING
LAIS601
ACADEMIC PUBLISHING
• Additional courses may also be required by the student’s advisor and
committee to fulfill background requirements as described below.
• Additional courses may also be required by the student’s advisor and
committee to fulfill background requirements described below.
As described in the Master of Science, Thesis and Thesis Defense
section of this bulletin, all MS candidates must successfully defend their
Students in the Doctoral program are also required to participate in
MS thesis in an open oral Thesis Defense. The guidelines for the Thesis
a practical teaching experience. This must take place within a single
Defense enforced by the Department of Geophysics generally follow
semester and include:
those outlined in in the Graduate Departments and Programs section of
• Planning and delivery of a minimum of 6 lecture hours, or 4 lecture
the Bulletin, with one exception. The Department of Geophysics requires
hours and 2 labs;
students submit the final draft of their written thesis to their Thesis
• Creating and evaluating students’ homework and laboratory reports, if
Committee no less than three weeks prior to the thesis defense date.
appropriate; and
Doctor of Philosophy Degrees: Geophysics
• Holding office hours if necessary.
and Geophysical Engineering
In the Doctoral program, students must demonstrate the potential
We invite applications to our PhD program not only from those individuals
for successful completion of independent research and enhance the
with a background in geophysics, but also from those whose background
breadth of their expertise by completing a Doctoral Research Qualifying
is in allied disciplines such as geology, physics, mathematics, computer
Examination no later than two years from the date of enrollment in
science, and electrical engineering.
the program. An extension of one additional year may be petitioned
by students through their Thesis Committees.In the Department of
Students may obtain a Doctor of Philosophy Degree in either Geophysics
Geophysics, the Doctoral Research Qualifying Examination consists of
or Geophysical Engineering. Both degrees have the same coursework
the preparation, presentation, and defense of one research project and
and thesis requirements, as described below. Students are normally
a thesis proposal. The research project and thesis proposal used in this
admitted into the PhD in Geophysics program. If, however, a student
process must conform to the standards posted on the Department of
would like to obtain the PhD in Geophysical Engineering, the student
Geophysics web site. As described in the Doctor of Philosophy, Thesis
must submit a request to the Department to change to the Doctor of
Defense section of this bulletin, all PhD candidates must successfully
Philosophy in Geophysical Engineering. The course work and thesis topic
defend their PhD thesis in an open oral Thesis Defense. The guidelines
must meet the following requirements. Note that these requirements are
for the Thesis Defense enforced by the Department of Geophysics follow
in addition to those associated with the PhD in Geophysics.
those outlined in the Graduate Departments and Programs section of
• Students must complete, either prior to their arrival at CSM or while
the Bulletin, with one exception. The Department of Geophysics requires
at CSM, no fewer than 16 credits of engineering coursework. What
students submit the final draft of their written thesis to their Thesis
constitutes coursework considered as engineering is determined by
Committee no less than three weeks prior to the thesis defense date.
the Geophysics faculty.
Acceptable Thesis Formats
• In the opinion of the Geophysics faculty, the student’s dissertation
topic must be appropriate for inclusion as part of an Engineering
In addition to traditional dissertations, the Department of Geophysics
degree.
also accepts dissertations that are compendia of papers published or
submitted to peer-reviewed journals. The following guidelines are applied
For the Doctor of Philosophy Degree (PhD), at least 72 credits beyond
by the Department in determining the suitability of a thesis submitted as a
the Bachelors degree are required. No fewer than 24 research credits are
series of written papers.
required. At least 12 credit hours must be completed in a minor program
approved by the candidate’s PhD Thesis Committee. Up to 36 course
• All papers included in the dissertation must have a common theme, as
credits may be awarded by the candidate’s committee for completion of a
approved by a student’s thesis committee.
thesis-based Master’s Degree.
• Papers should be submitted for inclusion in a dissertation in a common
format and typeset.
While individual courses constituting the degree are determined by the
student and approved by the student’s advisor and committee, courses
• In addition to the individual papers, students must prepare abstract,
applied to all PhD degrees must satisfy the following criteria:
introduction, discussion, and conclusions sections of the thesis that tie
together the individual papers into a unified dissertation.
• All course, research, minor degree programs, transfer, residence,
• A student’s thesis committee might also require the preparation and
and thesis requirements are as described in Registration and Tuition
inclusion of various appendices with the dissertation in support of the
Classification and Graduate Degrees and Requirements sections of
papers prepared explicitly for publication.
the Bulletin.
• All credits applied to the degree must be at the 400 (senior) level or
Graduate Program Background
above.
Requirements
• Students must include the following courses in their PhD program:
All graduate programs in Geophysics require that applicants have a
LICM501
PROFESSIONAL ORAL COMMUNICATION
1
background that includes the equivalent of adequate undergraduate
preparation in the following areas:
GPGN681
GRADUATE SEMINAR – PHD
1
GPGN707
GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT
24.0
• Mathematics – Linear Algebra or Linear Systems, Differential
Choose two of the following:
Equations, and Computer Programming

88 Graduate
• Physics – Classical Physics
GPGN511. ADVANCED GRAVITY AND MAGNETIC EXPLORATION.
• Geology – Structural Geology and Stratigraphy
4.0 Hours.
(II) Field or laboratory projects of interest to class members; topics
• Geophysics – Geophysical Field Methods and courses that include
for lecture and laboratory selected from the following: new methods
theory and application in three of the following areas: gravity/
for acquiring, processing, and interpreting gravity and magnetic data,
magnetics, seismic, electrical/ electromagnetics, borehole geophysics,
methods for the solution of two- and three-dimensional potential field
remote sensing, and physics of the earth
problems, Fourier transforms as applied to gravity and magnetics, the
• Field experience in the hands-on application of several geophysical
geologic implications of filtering gravity and magnetic data, equivalent
methods
distributions, harmonic functions, inversions. Prerequisite: GPGN411 or
• In addition, candidates in the Doctoral program are required to have
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab and field; 4 semester
no less than one year of college-level or two years of high-school-
hours. Offered fall semester, even years.
level courses in a single foreign language, or be able to demonstrate
proficiency in at least one language other than English.
GPGN519. ADVANCED FORMATION EVALUATION. 3.0 Hours.
(II) A detailed review of well logging and other formation evaluation
methods will be presented, with the emphasis on the imaging and
characterization of hydrocarbon reservoirs. Advanced logging tools such
Courses
as array induction, dipole sonic, and imaging tools will be discussed. The
GPGN503. INTEGRATED EXPLORATION AND DEVELOPMENT. 3.0
second half of the course will offer in parallel sessions: for geologists
Hours.
and petroleum engineers on subjects such as pulsed neutron logging,
(I) Students work alone and in teams to study reservoirs from fluvial-
nuclear magnetic resonance, production logging, and formation testing;
deltaic and valley fill depositional environments. This is a multidisciplinary
for geophysicists on vertical seismic profiling, cross well acoustics and
course that shows students how to characterize and model subsurface
electro-magnetic surveys. Prerequisite: GPGN419/PEGN419 or consent
reservoir performance by integrating data, methods and concepts from
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
geology, geophysics and petroleum engineering. Activities include field
trips, computer modeling, written exercises and oral team presentations.
GPGN520. ELECTRICAL AND ELECTROMAGNETIC EXPLORATION.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3
4.0 Hours.
semester hours. Offered fall semester, odd years.
(I) Electromagnetic theory. Instrumentation. Survey planning.
Processing of data. Geologic interpretations. Methods and limitations
GPGN504. INTEGRATED EXPLORATION AND DEVELOPMENT. 3.0
of interpretation. Prerequisite: GPGN302 and GPGN303, or consent of
Hours.
instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours. Offered fall
(I) Students work in multidisciplinary teams to study practical problems
semester, odd years.
and case studies in integrated subsurface exploration and development.
The course addresses emerging technologies and timely topics with
GPGN521. ADVANCED ELECTRICAL AND ELECTROMAGNETIC
a general focus on carbonate reservoirs. Activities include field trips,
EXPLORATION. 4.0 Hours.
3D computer modeling, written exercises and oral team presentation.
(II) Field or laboratory projects of interest to class members; topics for
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture and seminar; 3
lecture and laboratory selected from the following: new methods for
semester hours. Offered fall semester, even years.
acquiring, processing and interpreting electrical and electromagnetic
data, methods for the solution of two- and three-dimensional EM
GPGN507. NEAR-SURFACE FIELD METHODS. 3.0 Hours.
problems, physical modeling, integrated inversions. Prerequisite:
(I) Students design and implement data acquisition programs for all
GPGN420 or GPGN520, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours
forms of near-surface geophysical surveys. The result of each survey
lab; 4 semester hours. Offered spring semester, even years.
is then modeled and discussed in the context of field design methods.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3
GPGN530. APPLIED GEOPHYSICS. 3.0 Hours.
semester hours. Offered fall semester, even years.
(II) Introduction to geophysical techniques used in a variety of industries
(mining, petroleum, environmental and engineering) in exploring for new
GPGN509. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES AND
deposits, site design, etc. The methods studied include gravity, magnetic,
PROCESSES IN ROCK, SOILS, AND FLUIDS. 3.0 Hours.
electrical, seismic, radiometric and borehole techniques. Emphasis
(I) Physical and chemical properties and processes that are measurable
on techniques and their applications are tailored to student interests.
with geophysical instruments are studied, including methods of
The course, intended for non-geophysics students, will emphasize
measurement, interrelationships between properties, coupled processes,
the theoretical basis for each technique, the instrumentation used and
and processes which modify properties in pure phase minerals and fluids,
data collection, processing and interpretation procedures specific to
and in mineral mixtures (rocks and soils). Investigation of implications for
each technique so that non-specialists can more effectively evaluate
petroleum development, minerals extraction, groundwater exploration,
the results of geophysical investigations. Prerequisites: PHGN100,
and environmental remediation. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3
PHGN200, MATH111, GEGN401 or consent of the instructor. 3 hours
hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
lecture; 3 semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 89
GPGN540. MINING GEOPHYSICS. 3.0 Hours.
GPGN558. SEISMIC DATA INTERPRETATION. 3.0 Hours.
(I) Introduction to gravity, magnetic, electric, radiometric and borehole
(II) Practical interpretation of seismic data used in exploration for hydro
techniques used primarily by the mining industry in exploring for new
carbons. Integration with other sources of geological and geophysical
deposits but also applied extensively to petroleum, environmental and
information. Prerequisite: GPGN461, GEOL501 or equivalent or consent
engineering problems. The course, intended for graduate geophysics
of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
students, will emphasize the theoretical basis for each technique, the
instrumentation used and data collection, processing and interpretation
GPGN561. SEISMIC DATA PROCESSING I. 3.0 Hours.
procedures specific to each technique. Prerequisites: GPGN221,
(I) Introduction to basic principles underlying the processing of seismic
GPGN322, MATH111, MATH112, MATH213. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
data for suppression of various types of noise. Includes the rationale
hours.
for and methods for implementing different forms of gain to data, and
the use of various forms of stacking for noise suppression, such as
GPGN551. WAVE PHENOMENA SEMINAR. 1.0 Hour.
diversity stacking of Vibroseis data, normal-moveout correction and
(I, II) Students will probe a range of current methodologies and issues in
common-midpoint stacking, optimum-weight stacking, beam steering
seismic data processing, and discuss their ongoing and planned research
and the stack array. Also discussed are continuous and discrete oneand
projects. Topic areas include: Statics estimation and compensation,
two-dimensional data filtering, including Vibroseis correlation, spectral
deconvolution, multiple suppression, wavelet estimation, imaging
whitening, moveout filtering, data interpolation, slant stacking, and
and inversion, anisotropic velocity and amplitude analysis, seismic
the continuous and discrete Radon transform for enhancing data
interferometry, attenuation and dispersion, extraction of stratigraphic
resolution and suppression of multiples and other forms of coherent
and lithologic information, and correlation of surface and borehole
noise. Prerequisite: GPGN461 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
seismic data with well log data. Every student registers for GPGN551 in
semester hours.
only the first semester in residence and receives a grade of PRG. The
grade is changed to a letter grade after the student’s presentation of
GPGN562. SEISMIC DATA PROCESSING II. 3.0 Hours.
thesis research. Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1 hour seminar; 1
(II) The student will gain understanding of applications of deterministic
semester hour.
and statistical deconvolution for wavelet shaping, wavelet compression,
and multiple suppression. Both reflection-based and refraction-based
GPGN552. INTRODUCTION TO SEISMOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
statistics estimation and correction for 2-D and 3-D seismic data will be
(I) Introduction to basic principles of elasticity including Hooke’s
covered, with some attention to problems where subsurface structure is
law, equation of motion, representation theorems, and reciprocity.
complex. Also for areas of complex subsurface structure, students will
Representation of seismic sources, seismic moment tensor, radiation
be intro duced to analytic and interactive methods of velocity estimation.
from point sources in homogeneous isotropic media. Boundary
Where the near-surface is complex, poststack and prestack imaging
conditions, reflection/transmission coefficients of plane waves, plane-
methods, such as layer replacement are introduced to derive dynamic
wave propagation in stratified media. Basics of wave propagation in
corrections to reflection data. Also discussed are special problems related
attenuative media, brief description of seismic modeling methods.
to the processing of multi-component seismic data for enhancement of
Prerequisite: GPGN461 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
shearwave
semester hours.
information, and those related to processing of vertical seismic profile
data for separation of upgoing and downgoing P- and S- wave arrivals.
GPGN553. INTRODUCTION TO SEISMOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
Prerequisite: GPGN461 and GPGN561 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
(II) This course is focused on the physics of wave phenomena and
lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered spring semester, odd years.
the importance of wave-theory results in exploration and earthquake
seismology. Includes reflection and transmission problems for spherical
GPGN570. APPLICATIONS OF SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING. 3.0
waves, methods of steepest descent and stationary phase, point-
Hours.
source radiation in layered isotropic media, surface and non-geometrical
(II) An introduction to geoscience applications of satellite remote sensing
waves. Discussion of seismic modeling methods, fundamentals of
of the Earth and planets. The lectures provide background on satellites,
wave propagation in anisotropic and attenuative media. Prerequisite:
sensors, methodology, and diverse applications. Topics include visible,
GPGN552 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
near infrared, and thermal infrared passive sensing, active microwave
Offered spring semester, even years.
and radio sensing, and geodetic remote sensing. Lectures and labs
involve use of data from a variety of instruments, as several applications
GPGN555. INTRODUCTION TO EARTHQUAKE SEISMOLOGY. 3.0
to problems in the Earth and planetary sciences are presented. Students
Hours.
will complete independent term projects that are presented both written
(II) Introductory course in observational, engineering, and theoretical
and orally at the end of the term. Prerequisites: PHGN200 and MATH225
earthquake seismology. Topics include: seismogram interpretation,
or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
elastic plane waves and surface waves, source kinematics and
constraints from seismograms, seismicity and earthquake location,
GPGN574. GROUNDWATER GEOPHYSICS. 4.0 Hours.
magnitude and intensity estimates, seismic hazard analysis, and
(II) Description of world groundwater aquifers. Effects of water saturation
earthquake induced ground motions. Students interpret digital data from
on the physical properties of rocks. Use of geophysical methods in
globally distributed seismic stations. Prerequisite: GPGN461. 3 hours
the exploration, development and production of groundwater. Field
lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered spring semester, odd years.
demonstrations of the application of the geophysical methods in the
solution of some groundwater problems. Prerequisite: Consent of
instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

90 Graduate
GPGN575. PLANETARY GEOPHYSICS. 3.0 Hours.
GPGN605. INVERSION THEORY. 3.0 Hours.
(I) Of the solid planets and moons in our Solar System, no two bodies
(II) Introductory course in inverting geophysical observations for inferring
are exactly alike. This class will provide an overview of the observed
earth structure and processes. Techniques discussed include: Monte-
properties of the planets and moons, cover the basic physical processes
Carlo procedures, Marquardt-Levenburg optimization, and generalized
that govern their evolution, and then investigate how the planets
linear inversion. In addition, aspects of probability theory, data and model
differ and why. The overarching goals are to develop a quantitative
resolution, uniqueness considerations, and the use of a priori constraints
understanding of the processes that drive the evolution of planetary
are presented. Students are required to apply the inversion methods
surfaces and interiors, and to develop a deeper understanding of
described to a problem of their choice and present the results as an oral
the Earth by placing it in the broader context of the Solar System.
and written report. Prerequisite: MATH225 and knowledge of a scientific
Prerequisites: Graduate standing. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
programming language. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
GPGN576. SPECIAL TOPICES IN THE PLANETARY SCIENCES. 1.0
GPGN606. SIMULATION OF GEOPHYSICAL DATA. 3.0 Hours.
Hour.
(II) Efficiency of writing and running computer programs. Review of
(I, II) Students will read and discuss papers on a particular topic in the
basic matrix manipulation. Utilization of existing CSM and department
planetary sciences. The choice of topic will change each semester. The
computer program libraries. Some basic and specialized numerical
emphasis is on key topics related to the current state and evolution of the
integration techniques used in geophysics. Geophysical applications
solid planets and moons in our solar system. Readings will include both
of finite elements, finite differences, integral equation modeling, and
seminal papers and current research on the topic. Students will take turns
summary representation. Project resulting in a term paper on the use of
presenting summaries of the papers and leading the ensuing discussion.
numerical methods in geophysical interpretation. Prerequisite: Consent
Prerequisites: Graduate standing, or senior standing and permission of
of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered spring semester,
the instructor. 1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
odd years.
GPGN580. INDUCED SEISMICITY. 3.0 Hours.
GPGN651. ADVANCED SEISMOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Earthquakes are sometimes caused by the activities of man. These
(I) In-depth discussion of wave propagation and seismic processing for
activities include mining and quarrying, petroleum and geothermal energy
anisotropic, heterogeneous media. Topics include influence of anisotropy
production, building water reservoirs and dams, and underground nuclear
on plane-wave velocities and polarizations, traveltime analysis for
testing. This course will help students understand the characteristics and
transversely isotropic models, anisotropic velocity-analysis and imaging
physical causes of man-made earthquakes and seismicity induced in
methods, point-source radiation and Green’s function in anisotropic
various situations. Students will read published reports and objectively
media, inversion and processing of multicomponent seismic data,
analyze the seismological and ancillary data therein to decide if the
shear-wave splitting, and basics of seismic fracture characterization.
causative agent was man or natural processes. Prerequisite: basic
Prerequisites: GPGN552 and GPGN553 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
undergraduate geology and physics. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
GPGN581. GRADUATE SEMINAR. 1.0 Hour.
GPGN658. SEISMIC WAVEFIELD IMAGING. 3.0 Hours.
(I, II) Presentation describing results of MS thesis research. All theses
(I) Seismic imaging is the process that converts seismograms, each
must be presented in seminar before corresponding degree is granted.
recorded as a function of time, to an image of the earth’s subsurface,
Every MS student registers for GPGN581 only in his/her first semester
which is a function of depth below the surface. The course emphasizes
in residence and receives a grade of PRG. Thereafter, students must
imaging applications developed from first principles (elastodynamics
attend the weekly Heiland Distinguished Lecture every semester in
relations) to practical methods applicable to seismic wavefield data.
residence. The grade of PRG is changed to a letter grade after the
Techniques discussed include reverse-time migration and migration
student’s presentation of MS thesis research. 1 hour seminar, 1 semester
by wavefield extrapolation, angle-domain imaging, migration velocity
hour.
analysis and analysis of angle-dependent reflectivity. Students do
independent term projects presented at the end of the term, under the
GPGN597. SUMMER PROGRAMS. 12.0 Hours.
supervision of a faculty member or guest lecturer. Prerequisite: Consent
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
GPGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN GEOPHYSICS. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) New topics in geophysics. Each member of the academic faculty
GPGN660. MATHEMATICS OF SEISMIC IMAGING AND MIGRATION.
is invited to submit a prospectus of the course to the department head
3.0 Hours.
for evaluation as a special topics course. If selected, the course can be
(II) During the past 40 years geophysicists have developed many
taught only once under the 598 title before becoming a part of the regular
techniques (known collectively as “migration”) for imaging geologic
curriculum under a new course number and title. Prerequisite: Consent
structures deep within the Earth’s subsurface. Beyond merely
of department. Credit-variable, 1 to 6 hours. Repeatable for credit under
imaging strata, migration can provide information about important
different titles.
physical properties of rocks, necessary for the subsequent drilling and
development of oil- and gas-bearing formations within the Earth. In
GPGN599. GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATIONS MS. 1-6 Hour.
this course the student will be introduced to the mathematical theory
(I, II) Individual project; instrument design, data interpretation, problem
underlying seismic migration, in the context of “inverse scattering imaging
analysis, or field survey. Prerequisite: Consent of department and
theory.” The course is heavily oriented toward problem solving. 3 hours
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered spring semester, odd years.
Registrar. Credit dependent upon nature and extent of project. Variable 1
to 6 hours. Repeatable for credit.

Colorado School of Mines 91
GPGN681. GRADUATE SEMINAR – PHD. 1.0 Hour.
(I, II) Presentation describing results of Ph.D. thesis research. All theses
must be presented in seminar before corresponding degree is granted.
Every PhD student registers for GPGN681 only in his/her first semester in
residence and receives a grade of PRG. Thereafter, students must attend
the weekly Heiland Distinguished Lecture every semester in residence.
The grade of PRG is changed to a letter grade after the student’s
presentation of PhD thesis research. 1 hour seminar; 1 semester hour.
GPGN699. GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION-PHD. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Individual project; instrument design, data interpretation, problem
analysis, or field survey. Prerequisite: Consent of department and
“Independent Study” form must be completed and submitted to the
Registrar. Credit dependent upon nature and extent of project, not to
exceed 6 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
GPGN707. GRADUATE THESIS/DISSERTATION RESEARCH CREDIT.
1-12 Hour.
(I, II, S) Research credit hours required for completion of a Masters-level
thesis or Doctoral dissertation. Research must be carried out under the
direct supervision of the student’s faculty advisor. Variable class and
semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
SYGN501. THE ART OF SCIENCE. 1.0 Hour.
This course consists of class sessions and practical exercises. The
content of the course is aimed at helping students acquire the skills
needed for a career in research. The class sessions cover topics such
as the choice of a research topic, making a work plan and executing
that plan effectively, what to do when you are stuck, how to write a
publication and choose a journal for publication, how to write proposals,
the ethics of research, the academic career versus a career in industry,
time-management, and a variety of other topics. The course is open to
students with very different backgrounds; this ensures a rich and diverse
intellectual environment. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 hour
lecture; 1 semester hour.

92 Graduate
Liberal Arts and International
See "Combined Undergraduate/Graduate Degree Programs
(bulletin.mines.edu/graduate/graduatedepartmentsandprograms)"
Studies
elsewhere in this bulletin for further details.
http://lais.mines.edu/
Admission Requirements
Degree Offered
The requirements for admission into LAIS Graduate Programs are as
follows:
• Master of International Political Economy of Resources
1. An undergraduate degree with a cumulative grade point average
Certificates Offered
(GPA) at or above 3.0 (4.0 scale) or be a CSM undergraduate with
a minimum GPA of 3.0 in LAIS course work.
• Graduate Certificate in International Political Economy
2. The GRE is required. Under certain circumstances, the GRE
• Graduate Certificate in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Policy
requirements can be waived. GMAT scores may be used in lieu of
the GRE.
Minors Offered
3. A TOEFL score of 580 (paper test), 237 (computer test), or 92-93
• International Political Economy of Resources
(Internet test) or higher is required for students who are non-native
• Science, Technology, Engineering, and Policy
English speakers.
Program Description
Degree Offered
As the 21st century unfolds, individuals, communities, and nations face
major challenges in energy, natural resources, and the environment.
• Master of International Political Economy of Resources
While these challenges demand practical ingenuity from engineers
Requirements for a Master of International
and applied scientists, solutions must also take into account social,
political, economic, cultural, ethical, and global contexts. CSM students,
Political Economy of Resources (MIPER)
as citizens and future professionals, confront a rapidly changing society
The interdisciplinary Master of International Political Economy of
that demands core technical skills complemented by flexible intelligence,
Resources (MIPER) aims to train the next generation of social scientists,
original thought, and cultural sensitivity.
physical scientists, and engineers so that they possess the critical skills
Courses in Liberal Arts and International Studies (LAIS) expand
to respond to the global challenges of natural resource management
students’ professional capacities by providing opportunities to explore
and energy policies in the 21st century. It trains them in quantitative and
the humanities, social sciences, and fine arts. Our curricula encourage
qualitative methodologies as well as enhancing their skills to understand,
the development of critical thinking skills that will help students make
analyze, and implement complex solutions in diverse social and political
more informed choices as national and world citizens - promoting
settings around the world. The program is writing- and research-intensive,
more complex understandings of justice, equality, culture, history,
with a strong focus on verbal and written communication skills in critical
development, and sustainability. Students study ethical reasoning,
issues facing the extractive industries, natural resource management,
compare and contrast different economies and cultures, and develop
and national and global energy policies in the broader context of politics,
arguments from data and analyze globalization. LAIS courses also foster
economics, culture and religion.
creativity by offering opportunities for self-discovery. Students conduct
The Master of International Political Economy of Resources (MIPER)
literary analyses, improve communication skills, play music, learn media
provides students with either a thesis-based or non-thesis professional
theory, and write poetry. These experiences foster intellectual agility,
degree that requires 36 semester hours. Students in the MIPER program
personal maturity, and respect for the complexity of our world.
may choose to earn one or more minors in other departments. Please
The Division of Liberal Arts & International Studies offers a graduate
see the website https://miper.mines.edu/ for more information on specific
degree, the Master of International Political Economy of Resources
courses associated with the degree.
(MIPER); two graduate certificates in International Political Economy
Non-Thesis Option
(IPE); a graduate certificate in Science, Technology, Engineering, and
Core Courses
15.0
Policy (STEP); and a graduate individual minor.
Elective Courses
21.0
Combined Undergraduate/Graduate Degree
Total Hours
36.0
Programs
Thesis Option
Some students may earn the master’s degree as part of CSM’s
Core Courses
15.0
Combined Undergraduate/Graduate programs. Students participating in
the combined degree program may double count up to 6 semester hours
Elective Courses
15.0
of 400-level course work from their undergraduate course work.
Research
6.0
Total Hours
36.0
Please note that CSM students interested in pursuing a Combined
Undergraduate/Graduate program are encouraged to make an initial
contact with the MIPER Director after completion of the first semester of
Minors Offered
their sophomore year for counseling on degree application procedures,
admissions standards, and degree completion requirements.
• International Political Economy of Resources
• Science, Technology, Engineering and Policy

Colorado School of Mines 93
International Political Economy of Resources
LAIS523. ADVANCED SCIENCE COMMUNICATION. 3.0 Hours.
(IPER) Graduate Minor
This course will examine historical and contemporary case studies in
which science
The IPER minor requires a minimum of nine (9) semester hours for
communication (or miscommunication) played key roles in shaping policy
Master students and twelve (12) semester hour for PhD students.
outcomes
Students work with a full-time LAIS faculty member to create a minor
and/or public perceptions. Examples of cases might include the recent
that focuses on an area of interest to the student. Courses must be at
controversies over hacked climate science emails, nuclear power plant
the 500- or 600-level and may include independent studies and speacial
siting controversies, or discussions of ethics in classic environmental
topics. The minor must be approved by the student’s graduate committee
cases, such as the Dioxin pollution case. Students will study, analyze,
and by the LAIS Division.
and write about science communication and policy theories related to
Science, Technology, Engineering, and
scientific uncertainty; the role of the scientist as communicator; and
media ethics. Students will also be exposed to a number of strategies for
Policy (STEP) Graduate Minor
managing their encounters with the media, as well as tools for assessing
The STEP graduate minor for the MS degree requires a minimum 9
their communication responsibilities and capacities. 3 hours seminar; 3
semester hours of course work. The STEP graduate minor for the
semester hours.
PhD degree requires a minimum 12 semester hours of course work.
In all cases, the required course work must include LAIS586 Science
LAIS525. MEDIA AND THE ENVIRONMENT. 3.0 Hours.
and Technology Policy. Other courses may be selected from a list
This course explores the ways that messages about the environment and
of recommended courses posted and regularly updated on the LAIS
environmentalism are communicated in the mass media, fine arts, and
Science and Technology Policy Studies web site, a list which includes
popular culture. The course will introduce students to key readings
some courses from other academic units. Among non-LAIS courses, the
in communications, media studies, and cultural studies in order to
MS minor is limited to one such course and the PhD minor and graduate
understand the many ways in which the images, messages, and politics
certificate are limited to two such courses. With the approval of the LAIS
of “nature” are constructed. Students will analyze their role as science
STEP adviser, it is also possible to utilize a limited number of other
or technology communicators and will participate in the creation of
courses from the CSM Bulletin as well as transfer courses from other
communications projects related to environmental research on campus. 3
institutions. For more information. please contact Dr. Jason Delborne.
hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
LAIS531. RELIGION AND SECURITY. 3.0 Hours.
Certificates Offered
An introduction to the central topics in religion and society. Develops
an analysis of civil society in 21st century contexts and connects this
• Graduate Certificate in International Political Economy
analysis with leading debates about the relationship of religion and
• Graduate Certificate in Science, Technology, Engineering and Policy
security. Creates an understanding of diverse religious traditions from the
Graduate Certificates
perspective of how they view security. 3 hours lecture and descission; 3
semester hours.
The IPE Graduate Certificate program is 15 credit hour certificate
and may focus on either IPE theories, methods, and models; or on
LAIS535. LATIN AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Hours.
specialization, such as regional development (Asia-Pacific, Latin
Explores the political economy of current and recent past development
America, Africa, Russia, Eurasia, and the Middle East), international or
strategies, models, efforts, and issues in Latin America, one of the most
comparative political economy issues, and specific themes like trade,
dynamic regions of the world today. Development is understood to be a
finance, the environment, gender and ethnicity. It must be approved by
nonlinear, complex set of processes involving political, economic, social,
the MIPER Director.
cultural, and environmental factors whose ultimate goal is to improve the
quality of life for individuals. The role of both the state and the market
The STEP graduate certificate requires a minimum 15 semester hours of
in development processes will be examined. Topics to be covered will
course work and must include LAIS586 Science and Technology Policy.
vary as changing realities dictate but will be drawn from such subjects
It must be approved by the STEP advisor.
as inequality of income distribution; the role of education and health
Admissions requirements are the same as for the degree program.
care; region-markets; the impact of globalization; institution-building;
Please see the MIPER Director for more information.
corporatecommunity-state interfaces; neoliberalism; privatization;
democracy; and public policy formulation as it relates to development
goals. 3 hours lecture and discussion; 3 semester hours.
Courses
LAIS537. ASIAN DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Hours.
LAIS521. ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY AND POLICY. 3.0 Hours.
Explores the historical development of Asia Pacific from agrarian to post-
Analyzes environmental ethics and philosophy including the relation of
industrial
philosophical perspectives to policy decision making. Critically examines
eras; its economic, political, and cultural transformation since World War
often unstated ethical and/or philosophical assumptions about the
II, contemporary security issues that both divide and unite the region;
environment and how
and globalization processes that encourage Asia Pacific to forge a single
these may complicate and occasionally undermine productive policies.
trading bloc. 3 hours lecture and discussion; 3 semester hours.
Policies that may be considered include environmental protection,
economic development, and energy production and use. 3 hours
seminar; 3 semester hours.

94 Graduate
LAIS539. MIDDLE EAST DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Hours.
LAIS548. GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY. 3.0
This course invokes economic, political, social and historical dynamics to
Hours.
help
Examines the increasing importance of environmental policy and politics
understand the development trajectories that the Middle East has been
in international political economy and global international relations.
on in recent
Using historical analysis and interdisciplinary environmental studies
decades. This research-intensive graduate seminar discusses the
perspectives, this course explores global environmental problems that
development of
have prompted an array of international and global regimes and other
Middle Eastern societies from their tribal and agrarian roots to post-
approaches to deal with them. It looks at the impact of environmental
industrial ones, and reflects on the pursuant contemporary security
policy and politics on development, and the role that state and nonstate
issues that both divide and unite the region, and analyzes the effects of
actors play, especially in North-South relations and in the pursuit of
globalization on econo.
sustainability. Prerequisites: any two IPE courses at the 300-level; or one
IPE course at the 400 level; or one IPE course at the 300 level and one
LAIS541. AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Hours.
environmental policy/issues course at the 400 level. 3 hours lecture and
Provides a broad overview of the political economy of Africa. Its goal is to
discussion; 3 semester hours.
give students an understanding of the possibilities of African development
and the impediments that currently block its economic growth. Despite
LAIS550. POLITICAL RISK ASSESSMENT. 3.0 Hours.
substantial natural resources, mineral reserves, and human capital,
Uses social science analytical tools and readings as well as indices
most African countries remain mired in poverty. The struggles that
prepared by organizations, such as the World Bank and the International
have arisen on the continent have fostered thinking about the curse of
Monetary Fund, to create assessments of the political, social, economic,
natural resources where countries with oil or diamonds are beset with
environmental and security risks that multinational corporations may
political instability and warfare. Readings give first an introduction to the
face as they expand operations around the world. Students will develop
continent followed by a focus on the specific issues that confront African
detailed political risk reports for specific countries that teams collectively
development today. 3 hours lecture and discussion; 3 semester hours.
select. Prerequisite: LAIS545, IPE Minor, or instructor’s
permission. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
LAIS542. NATURAL RESOURCES AND WAR IN AFRICA. 3.0 Hours.
Examines the relationship between natural resources and wars in Africa.
LAIS551. POL RISK ASSESS RESEARCH SEM. 1.0 Hour.
It begins by discussing the complexity of Africa with its several many
When offered, this international political economy seminar must be
languages, peoples, and geographic distinctions. Among the most vexing
taken concurrently with LAIS450/LAIS550, Political Risk Assessment.
challenges for Africa is the fact that the continent possesses such wealth
Its purpose is to acquaint the student with empirical research methods
and yet still struggles with endemic warfare, which is hypothetically
and sources appropriate to conducting a political risk assessment study,
caused by greed and competition over resource rents. Readings are
and to hone the students analytical abilities. Prerequisite: LAIS100.
multidisciplinary and draw from policy studies, economics, and political
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. Concurrent enrollment in LAIS450/
science. Students will acquire an understanding of different theoretical
LAIS550. 1 hour seminar; 1 semester hour.
approaches from the social sciences to explain the relationship between
abundant natural resources and war in Africa. The course helps students
LAIS552. CORRUPTION AND DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Hours.
apply the different theories to specific cases and productive sectors. 3
Addresses the problem of corruption and its impact on development.
hours lecture and discussion; 3 semester hours.
Readings are multidisciplinary and include policy studies, economics,
and political science. Students will acquire an understanding of what
LAIS545. INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY. 3.0 Hours.
constitutes corruption, how it negatively affects development, and what
Introduces students to the field of International Political Economy
they, as engineers in a variety of professional circumstances, might do
(IPE) . IPE scholars examine the intersection between economics and
in circumstances in which bribe paying or taking might occur. 3 hours
politics, with a focus on interactions between states, organizations,
lecture and discussion; 3 semester hours.
and individuals around the world. Students will become familiar with
the three main schools of thought on IPE: Realism (mercantilism),
LAIS553. ETHNIC CONFLICT IN THE GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE. 3.0
Liberalism, and Historical Structuralism (including Marxism and feminism)
Hours.
and will evaluate substantive issues such as the role of international
Studies core economic, cultural, political, and psychological variables
organizations (the World Trade Organization, the World Bank, and
that pertain to ethnic identity and ethnic contention, and analyzes their
the International Monetary Fund), the monetary and trading systems,
operation in a wide spectrum of conflict situations around the globe.
regional development, international development, foreign aid, debt
Considers ethnic contention in institutionalized contexts, such as the
crises, multinational corporations, and globalization. 3 hours seminar; 3
politics of affirmative action, as well as in non-institutionalized situations,
semester hours.
such as ethnic riots and genocide. Concludes by asking what can be
done to mitigate ethnic conflict and what might be the future of ethnic
LAIS546. GLOBALIZATION. 3.0 Hours.
group identification. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
Assesses the historical development of international political economy
as a discipline. Originally studied as the harbinger of today’s political
LAIS555. INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS. 3.0 Hours.
science, economics, sociology, anthropology, and history, International
Familiarizes students with the study of international organizations:
Political Economy is the multidisciplinary study of the relationship
how they are created, how they are organized and what they try to
between states and markets. A fuller understanding will be achieved
accomplish. By the end of the semester, students will be familiar with
through research and data analysis as well as interpretation of case
the role of international organization in the world system as well as the
studies. Prerequisites: LAIS345 and any 400-level IPE course, or two
analytical tools used to analyze them. 3 hours lecture and discussion; 3
equivalent courses. 3 hours lecture and discussion; 3 semester hours.
semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 95
LAIS557. INTRODUCTION TO CONFLICT MANAGEMENT. 3.0 Hours.
LAIS564. QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR THE SOCIAL SCIENCES.
Introduces graduate students to the issue of international conflict
3.0 Hours.
management with an emphasis on conflict in resource abundant
Teaches basic methods of quantitative empirical research in the social
countries. Its goal is to develop analytic tools to acquire a systematic
sciences. Places social science in the broader context of scientific inquiry
means to think about conflict management in the international political
by addressing the role of observation and hypothesis testing in the social
economy and to assess and react to such events. The course addresses
sciences. The focus is on linear regression and group comparisions, with
the causes of contemporary conflicts with an initial focus on weak states,
attention to questions of research design, internal validity, and reliability.
armed insurgencies, and ethnic conflict. It then turns to intra-state war
3 hours lecture and discussion; 3 semester hours.
as a failure of conflict management before discussing state failure,
intractable conflicts, and efforts to build peace and reconstruct failed,
LAIS565. SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND SOCIETY. 3.0 Hours.
post-conflict states. 3 hours lecture and discussion; 3 semester hours.
Provides an introduction to foundational concepts, themes, and questions
developed within the interdisciplinary field of science and technology
LAIS558. NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Hours.
studies (STS). Readings address anthropological understandings of
Examines the relationship between natural resources and development.
laboratory practice, sociological perspectives on the settling of techno-
It begins by discussing theories of development and how those theories
scientific controversies,
account for specific choices among resource abundant countries. From
historical insights on the development of scientific institutions,
the theoretical readings, students examine sector specific topics in
philosophical stances on the interactions between technology and
particular cases. These subjects include oil and natural gas in African
humans, and relationships between science and democracy. Students
and Central Asian countries; hard rock mining in West Africa and East
complete several writing assignments,
Asia; gemstone mining in Southern and West Africa; contracting in the
present material from readings and research, and help to facilitate
extractive industries; and corporate social responsibility. Readings are
discussion. 3 hours lecture and discussion; 3 semester hours.
multidisciplinary and draw from policy studies, economics, and political
science to provide students an understanding of different theoretical
LAIS570. HISTORY OF SCIENTIFIC THOUGHT. 3.0 Hours.
approaches from the social sciences to explain the relationship between
This course offers a critical examination of the history of scientific
abundant natural resources and development. 3 hours lecture and
thought, investigation, discovery, and controversy in a range of historical
discussion; 3 semester hours.
contexts. This course, which examines the transition from descriptive
and speculative science to quantitative and predictive science, will help
LAIS559. INTERNATIONAL INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
students understand the broad context of science, technology, and social
This course has, as its primary aim, the equipping of a future consultant
relations, a key component of the MEPS program framework. 3 hours
to deal with the cultural, socioeconomic, behavioral, psychological,
lecture and discussion; 3 semester hours.
ethical, and political problems in the international workplace. Specific
materials covered are: Early experimentation with small group dynamics
LAIS577. ENGINEERING AND SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY
relative to economic incentive; Hawthorne experiments; experiments
DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Hours.
of Asch on perception, Analysis of case studies of work productivity in
Analyzes the relationship between engineering and sustainable
service and technological industries. Review of work of F.W. Taylor,
community development (SCD) from historical, political, ethical, cultural,
Douglas McGregor, Blake & Mouton, and others in terms of optimum
and practical perspectives. Students will study and analyze different
working conditions relative to wage and fringe benefits. Review ofNiccolò
dimensions of sustainability, development, and "helping", and the role
Machiavelli’s The Prince and the Discourses, and The Art of War by
that engineering might play in each. Will include critical explorations of
Sun Tzu with application to present times and international cultural
strengths and limitations of dominant methods in engineering problem
norms. The intent of this course is to teach the survival, report writing,
solving, design and research for
and presentation skills, and cultural awareness needed for success
working in SCD. Through case-studies, students will analyze and
in the real international business world. The students are organized
evaluate projects in SCD and develop criteria for their evaluation. 3 hours
into small groups and do a case each week requiring a presentation
lecture and discussion; 3 semester hours.
of their case study results, and a written report of the results as well.
LAIS578. ENGINEERING AND SOCIAL JUSTICE. 3.0 Hours.
(Textbooks: Human Side of Enterprise by Douglas McGregor, Principles
(II) Explores the meaning of social justice in different areas of social life
of Scientific Management by F.W. Taylor, The Art of War by Sun Tzu, Up
and the role that engineers and engineering can play in promoting or
The Organization by Robert Townsend, The Prince and the Discourses
defending social justice. Begins with students’ exploration of their own
of Niccolò Machiavelli, and The Managerial Grid by Blake & Mouton.) 3
social locations, alliances, and resistances to social justice through critical
hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
engagement of interdisciplinary readings that challenge engineering
LAIS560. GLOBAL GEOPOLITICS. 3.0 Hours.
mindsets. Offers understandings of why and how engineering has on
Examines geopolitical theories and how they help us explain and
occasion been aligned with or divergent from specific social justice issues
understand contemporary developments in the world. Empirical evidence
and causes. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
from case studies help students develop a deeper understanding of the
LAIS586. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY. 3.0 Hours.
interconnections between the political, economic, social, cultural and
Examines current issues relating to science and technology policy in the
geographic dimensions of governmental policies and corporate decisions.
United States and, as appropriate, in other countries. 3 hours lecture and
Prerequisites: any two IPE courses at the 300-level, or one IPE course at
discussion; 3 semester hours.
the 400 level. 3 hours lecture and discussion; 3 semester hours.

96 Graduate
LAIS587. ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY. 3.0 Hours.
LAIS699. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
Explores environmental policies and the political and governmental
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
processes that produce them. Group discussion and independent
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
research on specific environmental issues. Primary but not exclusive
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
focus on the U.S. 3 hours lecture
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
and discussion; 3 semester hours.
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
LAIS588. WATER POLITICS AND POLICY. 3.0 Hours.
LAIS707. GRADUATE THESIS/DISSERTATION RESEARCH CREDIT.
Examines water policies and the political and governmental processes
1-12 Hour.
that produce them, as an example of natural resource politics and policy
(I, II, S) Research credit hours required for completion of a Masters-level
in general. Group discussion and independent research on specific
thesis or Doctoral dissertation. Research must be carried out under the
politics and policy issues. Primary but not exclusive focus on the U.S. 3
direct supervision of the student’s faculty advisor. Variable class and
hours lecture and discussion; 3 semester hours.
semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
LAIS589. NUCLEAR POWER AND PUBLIC POLICY. 3.0 Hours.
LICM501. PROFESSIONAL ORAL COMMUNICATION. 1.0 Hour.
A general introduction to research and practice concerning policies
A five-week course which teaches the fundamentals of effectively
and practices relevant to the development and management of nuclear
preparing and presenting messages. "Hands-on" course emphasizing
power. Corequisite: PHGN590 Nuclear Reactor Physics or instructor
short (5- and 10-minute) weekly presentations made in small groups
consent. 3 hours lecture and seminar; 3 semester hours.
to simulate professional and corporate communications. Students
are encouraged to make formal presentations which relate to their
LAIS590. ENERGY AND SOCIETY. 3.0 Hours.
academic or professional fields. Extensive instruction in the use of
(II) The course begins with a brief introduction to global energy
visuals. Presentations are rehearsed in class two days prior to the formal
production and conservation, focusing on particular case studies that
presentations, all of which are video-taped and carefully evaluated. 1
highlight the relationship among energy, society, and community in
hour lecture/lab; 1 semester hour.
different contexts. The course examines energy successes and failures
wherein communities, governments, and/or energy companies come
SYGN502. INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH ETHICS. 1.0 Hour.
together to promote socially just and economically viable forms of energy
A five-week course that introduces students to the various components
production/conservation. The course also explores conflicts driven by
of responsible and research practices. Topics covered move from issues
energy development. These case studies are supplemented by the
related to the planning of research through the conducting of research
expertise of guest speakers from industry, government, NGOs, and
to the dissemination of research results. The course culminates with
elsewhere. Areas of focus include questioning the forward momentum of
students writing and defending their ethics statements. 1 hour lecture/lab;
energy production, its social and environmental impact, including how it
1 semester hour.
distributes power, resources and risks across different social groups and
communities. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
LAIS598. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
LAIS599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 6.0 Hours.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
LAIS601. ACADEMIC PUBLISHING. NaN Hours.
Students will finish this course with increased knowledge of general and
discipline-
specific writing conversations as well as the ability to use that knowledge
in publishing portions of theses or dissertations. Beyond the research
article, students will also have the opportunity to learn more about genres
such as conference abstracts, conference presentations, literature
reviews, and research funding proposals. Prerequisite: Must have
completed one full year (or equivalent) of graduate school course work.
Variable credit: 2 or 3 semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 97
Mining Engineering
Course work (maximum)
48.0
Research (minimum)
24.0
Degrees Offered
Total Hours
72.0
• Master of Engineering (Engineer of Mines)
Those with an MSc in an appropriate field may transfer a maximum of
• Master of Science (Mining and Earth Systems Engineering)
30 credit hours of course work towards the 48 credit hour requirement
• Doctor of Philosophy (Mining and Earth Systems Engineering)
upon the approval of the advisor and thesis committee. The thesis must
be successfully defended before a doctoral committee.
Program Description
Prerequisites
The program has two distinctive, but inherently interwoven specialties.
Students entering a graduate program for the master’s or doctor’s
The Mining Engineering area or specialty is predominantly for mining
degree are expected to have had much the same undergraduate training
engineers and it is directed towards the traditional mining engineering
as that required at Colorado School of Mines in mining, if they are
fields. Graduate work is normally centered around subject areas such
interested in the traditional mining specialty. Students interested in the
as mine planning and development, computer aided mine design,
Earth Systems engineering specialty with different engineering sub-
rock mechanics, operations research applied to the mineral industry,
disciplinary background may also require special mining engineering
environment and sustainability considerations, mine mechanization, mine
subjects depending upon their graduate program. Deficiencies if any, will
evaluation, finance and management and similar mining engineering
be determined by the Department of Mining Engineering on the basis of
topics.
students’ education, experience, and graduate study.
The Earth Systems Engineering area or specialty is designed to
For specific information on prerequisites, students are encouraged to
be distinctly interdisciplinary by merging the mining engineering
refer to a copy of the Mining Engineering Department’s Departmental
fundamentals with civil, geotechnical, environmental or other engineering
Guidelines and Regulations (bulletin.mines.edu/graduate/
into advanced study tracks in earth systems, rock mechanics and earth
graduatedepartmentsandprograms) for Graduate Students, available
structural systems, underground excavation, and construction systems.
from the Mining Engineering Department.
This specialty is open for engineers with different sub-disciplinary
backgrounds, but interested in working and/or considering performing
Required Curriculum
research in mining, tunneling, excavation and underground construction
Graduate students, depending upon their specialty and background may
areas.
be required to complete two of the three core courses listed below during
Graduate work is normally centered around subject areas such as site
their program of study at CSM. These courses are:
characterization, environmental aspects, underground construction and
MNGN508
ADVANCED ROCK MECHANICS
3.0
tunneling (including microtunneling), excavation methods and equipment,
MNGN512
SURFACE MINE DESIGN
3.0
mechanization of mines and underground construction, environmental
and management aspects, modeling and design in geoengineering.
MNGN516
UNDERGROUND MINE DESIGN
3.0
In addition, all full-time graduate students are required to register for
Program Requirements
and attend MNGN625 - Graduate Mining Seminar each semester while
in residence, except in the case of extreme circumstances. For these
The Master of Science degree in Mining and Earth Systems Engineering
circumstances, consideration will be given on a case-by-case basis
has two options available. Master of Science - Thesis and Master of
by the coordinator or the Department Head. It is expected that part
Science - Non-Thesis.
time students participate in MNGN625 as determined by the course
Thesis Option
coordinator or the Department Head. Although it is mandatory to enroll in
MNGN625 each semester, this course will only count as one credit hour
Course work (minimum)
21.0
for the total program.
Research, approved by the graduate committee
9.0
Master’s Thesis
Fields of Research
Total Hours
30.0
The Mining Engineering Department focuses on the following
fundamental areas:
Non-Thesis Option
• Geomechanics, Rock Mechanics and Stability of Underground and
Course work (minimum) *
30.0
Surface Excavations
*
Six (6) credit hours may be applied towards the analytical report
• Computerized Mine Design and Related Applications (including
writing, if required.
Geostatistical Modeling)
• Advanced Integrated Mining Systems Incorporating Mine
The Master of Engineering degree (Engineer of Mines) in Mining
Mechanization and Mechanical Mining Systems
Engineering includes all the requirements for the M.S. degree, with the
sole exception that an “engineering report” is required rather than a
• Underground Excavation (Tunneling) and Construction
Master’s Thesis.
• Site Characterization and Geotechnical Investigations, Modeling and
Design in Geoengineering.
The Doctor of Philosophy degree in Mining and Earth Systems
• Rock Fragmentation
Engineering requires a total of 72 credit hours, beyond the bachelor’s
degree.
• Mineral Processing, Communition, Separation Technology
• Bulk Material Handling

98 Graduate
GOGN506. EXCAVATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT. 2.0 Hours.
Normal project initiation, design procedures, project financing, permitting
Courses
and environmental impacts, preparation of plans and specifications,
contract award, notice to proceed and legal requirements. Construction
GOGN501. SITE INVESTIGATION AND CHARACTERIZATION. 3.0
alternatives, contract types, standard contract language, bidding and
Hours.
estimating and contract awarding procedures. Construction inspection
An applications oriented course covering: geological data collection,
and control methods and completion procedures. Conflict resolution,
geophysical methods for site investigation; hydrological data collection;
administrative redress, arbitration and litigation. Time and tonnage based
materials properties determination; and various engineering classification
incentive programs. The role of experts. Prerequisite: College-level in
systems. Presentation of data in a format suitable for subsequent
Microeconomics or Engineering Economy. Degree in Engineering. 2
engineering design will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Introductory
hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
courses in geology, rock mechanics, and soil mechanics. 3 hours lecture;
3 semester hours.
GOGN625. GEO-ENGINEERING SEMINAR. 1.0 Hour.
Discussions presented by graduate students, staff, and visiting lectures
GOGN502. SOLID MECHANICS APPLIED TO ROCKS. 3.0 Hours.
on research and development topics of general interest. Required of all
An introduction to the deformation and failure of rocks and rock masses
graduate students in Geo-Engineering every semester, during residence.
and to the flow of groundwater. Principles of displacement, strain and
Prerequisite: Enrollment in Geo-Engineering Program. 1 semester hour
stress, together with the equations of equilibrium are discussed. Elastic
upon completion of thesis or residence.
and plastic constitutive laws, with and without time dependence, are
introduced. Concepts of strain hardening and softening are summarized.
MNGN501. REGULATORY MINING LAWS AND CONTRACTS. 3.0
Energy principles, energy changes caused by underground excavations,
Hours.
stable and unstable equilibria are defined. Failure criteria for intact rock
(I) Basic fundamentals of engineering law, regulations of federal and
and rock masses are explained. Principles of numerical techniques are
state laws pertaining to the mineral industry and environment control.
discussed and illustrated. Basic laws and modeling of groundwater flows
Basic concepts of mining contracts. Offered in even numbered years.
are introduced. Prerequisite: Introductory Rock Mechanics. 3 hours
Prerequisite: Senior or graduate status. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
lecture; 3 semester hours.
hours. Offered in even years.
GOGN503. CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING LABORATORY.
MNGN503. MINING TECHNOLOGY FOR SUSTAINABLE
3.0 Hours.
DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Hours.
An applications oriented course covering: Advanced rock testing
(I, II) The primary focus of this course is to provide students an
procedures; dynamic rock properties determination; on-site
understanding of the fundamental principles of sustainability and how
measurements; and various rock mass modeling approaches.
they influence the technical components of a mine’s life cycle, beginning
Presentation of data in a format suitable for subsequent engineering
during project feasibility and extending through operations to closure
design will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Introductory courses in geology,
and site reclamation. Course discussions will address a wide range of
rock mechanics, and soil mechanics. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
traditional engineering topics that have specific
relevance and impact to local and regional communities, such as mining
GOGN504. SURFACE STRUCTURES IN EARTH MATERIALS. 3.0
methods and systems, mine plant design and layout, mine operations
Hours.
and supervision, resource utilization and cutoff grades, and labor. The
Principles involved in the design and construction of surface structures
course will emphasize the
involving earth materials. Slopes and cuts. Retaining walls. Tailing dams.
importance of integrating social, political, and economic considerations
Leach dumps. Foundations. Piles and piers. Extensive use of case
into technical decision-making and problem solving. 3 hours lecture; 3
examples. Prerequisites: GOGN501, GOGN502, GOGN503. 3 hours
semester hours.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
MNGN505. ROCK MECHANICS IN MINING. 3.0 Hours.
GOGN505. UNDERGROUND EXCAVATION IN ROCK. 3.0 Hours.
(I) The course deals with the rock mechanics aspect of design of
Components of stress, stress distributions, underground excavation
mine layouts developed in both underground and surface. Underground
failure mechanisms, optimum orientation and shape of excavations,
mining sections include design of coal and hard rock pillars, mine
excavation stability, excavation support design, ground treatment
layout design for tabular and massive ore bodies, assessment of caving
and rock pre-reinforcement, drill and blast excavations, mechanical
characteristics or ore bodies,
excavation, material haulage, ventilation and power supply, labor
performance and application of backfill, and phenomenon of rock
requirements and training, scheduling and costing of underground
burst and its alleviation. Surface mining portion covers rock mass
excavations, and case histories. Prerequisites: GOGN501, GOGN502,
characterization, failure modes of slopes excavated in rock masses,
GOGN503. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
probabilistic and deterministic approaches to design of slopes, and
remedial measures for slope stability
problems. Prerequisite: MN321 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
hours.

Colorado School of Mines 99
MNGN506. DESIGN AND SUPPORT OF UNDERGROUND
MNGN514. MINING ROBOTICS. 3.0 Hours.
EXCAVATIONS. 3.0 Hours.
(I) Fundamentals of robotics as applied to the mining industry. The focus
Design of underground excavations and support. Analysis of stress
is on mobile robotic vehicles. Topics covered are mining applications,
and rock mass deformations around excavations using analytical and
introduction and history of mobile robotics, sensors, including vision,
numerical methods. Collections, preparation, and evaluation of insitu and
problems of sensing variations in rock properties, problems of
laboratory data for excavation design. Use of rock mass rating systems
representing human knowledge in control systems, machine condition
for site characterization and excavation design. Study of support types
diagnostics, kinematics, and path finding. Prerequisite: CSCI404 or
and selection of support for underground excavations. Use of numerical
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in odd
models for design of shafts, tunnels and large chambers. Prerequisite:
years.
Instructor’s consent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in odd
years.
MNGN515. MINE MECHANIZATION AND AUTOMATION. 3.0 Hours.
This course will provide an in-depth study of the current state of the art
MNGN507. ADVANCED DRILLING AND BLASTING. 3.0 Hours.
and future trends in mine mechanization and mine automation systems
(I) An advanced study of the theories of rock penetration including
for both surface and underground mining, review the infrastructure
percussion, rotary, and rotary percussion drilling. Rock fragmentation
required to support mine automation, and analyze the potential economic
including explosives and the theories of blasting rock. Application of
and health and safety benefits. Prerequisite: MNGN312, MNGN314,
theory to drilling and blasting practice at mines, pits, and quarries.
MNGN316, or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3
Prerequisite: MNGN407. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in
semester hours. Fall of odd years.
odd years.
MNGN516. UNDERGROUND MINE DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.
MNGN508. ADVANCED ROCK MECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.
Selection, design, and development of most suitable underground
Analytical and numerical modeling analysis of stresses and
mining methods based upon the physical and the geological properties
displacements induced around engineering excavations in rock. Insitu
of mineral deposits (metallics and nonmetallics), conservation
stress. Rock failure criteria. Complete load deformation behavior of rocks.
considerations, and associated environmental impacts. Reserve
Measurement and monitoring techniques in rock mechanics. Principles
estimates, development and production planning, engineering drawings
of design of excavation in rocks. Analytical, numerical modeling and
for development and extraction, underground haulage systems, and
empirical design methods. Probabilistic and deterministic approaches
cost estimates. Prerequisite: MNGN210. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3
to rock engineering designs. Excavation design examples for shafts,
semester hours.
tunnels, large chambers and mine pillars. Seismic loading of structures
in rock. Phenomenon of rock burst and its alleviation. Prerequisite:
MNGN517. ADVANCED UNDERGROUND MINING. 3.0 Hours.
MNGN321 or professor’s consent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(II) Review and evaluation of new developments in advanced
underground mining systems to achieve improved productivity and
MNGN510. FUNDAMENTALS OF MINING AND MINERAL RESOURCE
reduced costs. The major topics covered include: mechanical excavation
DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Hours.
techniques for mine development and
Specifically designed for non-majors, the primary focus of this course is
production, new haulage and vertical conveyance systems, advanced
to provide students with a fundamental understanding of how mineral
ground support and roof control methods, mine automation and
resources are found, developed, mined, and ultimately reclaimed.
monitoring, new mining systems and future trends in automated, high
The course will present a wide range of traditional engineering and
productivity mining schemes. Prerequisite: Underground Mine Design
economic topics related to: exploration and resource characterization,
(e.g., MNGN314). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
project feasibility, mining methods and systems, mine plant design
and layout, mine operations and scheduling, labor, and environmental
MNGN518. ADVANCED BULK UNDERGROUND MINING
and safety considerations. The course will emphasize the importance
TECHNIQUES. 3.0 Hours.
of integrating social (human), political, and environmental issues into
This course will provide advanced knowledge and understanding of
technical decision-making and design. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
the current state-of-the-art in design, development, and production in
underground hard rock mining using bulk-mining methods. Design and
MNGN511. MINING INVESTIGATIONS. 2-4 Hour.
layout of sublevel caving, block caving, open stoping and blasthole
(I, II) Investigational problems associated with any important aspect of
stoping systems. Equipment selection, production scheduling, ventilation
mining. Choice of problem is arranged between student and instructor.
design, and mining costs. Prerequisites: MNGN314, MNGN516, or
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Lecture, consultation, lab, and
consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
assigned reading; 2 to 4 semester hours.
Spring of odd years.
MNGN512. SURFACE MINE DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.
MNGN519. ADVANCED SURFACE COAL MINE DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.
Analysis of elements of surface mine operation and design of surface
(II) Review of current manual and computer methods of reserve
mining system components with emphasis on minimization of adverse
estimation, mine design, equipment selection, and mine planning and
environmental impact and maximization of efficient use of mineral
scheduling. Course includes design of a surface coal mine for a given
resources. Ore estimates, unit operations, equipment selection, final
case study and comparison of manual and computer results. Prerequisite:
pit determinations, short- and long-range planning, road layouts, dump
MNGN312, MNGN316, MNGN427. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3
planning, and cost estimation. Prerequisite: MNGN210. 3 hours lecture; 3
semester hours. Offered in odd years.
semester hours.

100 Graduate
MNGN520. ROCK MECHANICS IN UNDERGROUND COAL MINING.
MNGN528. MINING GEOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
3.0 Hours.
(I) Role of geology and the geologist in the development and production
(I) Rock mechanics consideration in the design of room-and-pillar,
stages of a mining operation. Topics addressed: mining operation
longwall, and shortwall coal mining systems. Evaluation of bump and
sequence, mine mapping, drilling, sampling, reserve estimation,
outburst conditions and remedial measures. Methane drainage systems.
economic evaluation, permitting, support functions. Field trips, mine
Surface subsidence evaluation. Prerequisite: MNGN321. 3 hours lecture;
mapping, data evaluation, exercises and term project. Prerequisite:
3 semester hours. Offered in odd years.
GEGN401 or GEGN405 or permission of instructors. 2 hours lecture/
seminar, 3 hours laboratory: 3 semester hours. Offered in even years.
MNGN522. FLOTATION. 3.0 Hours.
Science and engineering governing the practice of mineral concentration
MNGN529. URANIUM MINING. 2.0 Hours.
by flotation. Interfacial phenomena, flotation reagents, mineral-reagent
(I) Overview and introduction to the principles of uranium resource
interactions, and zeta-potential are covered. Flotation circuit design and
extraction and production. All aspects of the uranium fuel cycle are
evaluation as well as tailings handling are also covered. The course also
covered, including the geology of uranium, exploration for uranium
includes laboratory demonstrations of some fundamental concepts. 3
deposits, mining, processing, environmental issues, and health and
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
safety aspects. A lesser emphasis will be placed on nuclear fuel
fabrication, nuclear power and waste disposal.
MNGN523. SELECTED TOPICS. 2-4 Hour.
(I, II) Special topics in mining engineering, incorporating lectures,
MNGN530. INTRODUCTION TO MICRO COMPUTERS IN MINING. 3.0
laboratory work or independent study, depending on needs. This course
Hours.
may be repeated for additional credit only if subject material is different.
(I) General overview of the use of PC based micro computers and
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 2 to 4 semester hours. Repeatable for
software applications in the mining industry. Topics include the use of:
credit under different titles.
database, CAD, spreadsheets, computer graphics, data acquisition, and
remote communications as applied in the mining industry. Prerequisite:
MNGN525. INTRODUCTION TO NUMERICAL TECHNIQUES IN ROCK
Any course in computer programming. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3
MECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.
semester hours.
(I) Principles of stress and infinitesimal strain analysis are summarized,
linear
MNGN536. OPERATIONS RESEARCH TECHNIQUES IN THE
constitutive laws and energy methods are reviewed. Continuous and
MINERAL INDUSTRY. 3.0 Hours.
laminated models of stratified rock masses are introduced. The general
Analysis of exploration, mining, and metallurgy systems using statistical
concepts of the boundary element and finite element methods are
analysis. Monte Carlo methods, simulation, linear programming, and
discussed. Emphasis is placed on the boundary element approach with
computer methods. Prerequisite: MNGN433 or consent of instructor. 2
displacement discontinui ties, because of its relevance to the modeling of
hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours. Offered in even years.
the extraction of tabular mineral bodies and to the mobilization of faults,
joints, etc. Several practical problems, selected from rock mechanics
MNGN538. GEOSTATISTICAL ORE RESERVE ESTIMATION. 3.0
and subsidence engineering practices, are treated to demonstrate
Hours.
applications of the techniques. Prerequi site: MNGN321, EGGN320, or
(I) Introduction to the application and theory of geostatistics in the mining
equivalent courses, MATH455 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
industry. Review of elementary statistics and traditional ore reserve
semester hours. Offered in even years.
calculation techniques. Presentation of fundamental geostatistical
concepts, including: variogram, estimation variance, block variance,
MNGN526. MODELING AND MEASURING IN GEOMECHANICS. 3.0
kriging, geostatistical simulation. Emphasis on the practical aspects of
Hours.
geostatistical modeling in mining. Prerequisite: MATH323 or equivalent
(II) Introduction to instruments and instrumen tation systems used
course in statistics; graduate or senior status.
for making field measurements (stress, convergence, deformation,
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
load, etc.) in geomechanics. Techniques for determining rock mass
strength and deformability. Design of field measurement programs.
MNGN539. ADVANCED MINING GEOSTATISTICS. 3.0 Hours.
Interpretation of field data. Development of predictive models using field
(II) Advanced study of the theory and application of geostatistics in
data. Intro duction to various numerical techniques (boundary element,
mining engineering. Presentation of state-of-the-art geostatistical
finite element, FLAC, etc.) for modeling the behavior of rock structures.
concepts, including: robust estimation, nonlinear geostatistics, disjunctive
Demonstration of concepts using various case studies. Prerequisite:
kriging, geostatistical simulation, computational aspects. This course
Graduate standing or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3
includes presentations by many guest lecturers from the mining industry.
semester hours. Offered in odd years.
Emphasis on the development and application of advanced geostatistical
techniques to difficult problems in the mining industry today. 3 hours
MNGN527. THEORY OF PLATES AND SHELLS. 3.0 Hours.
lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in odd years.
Classical methods for the analysis of stresses in plate type structure
are presented first. The stiffness matrices for plate element will be
MNGN540. CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
developed and used in the finite element method of analysis. Membrane
(I, II) Clean Energy - Gasification of Carbonaceous Materials - including
and bending stresses in shells are derived. Application of the theory to
coal, oil, gas, plastics, rubber, municipal waste and other substances.
tunnels, pipes, pressures vessels, and domes, etc., will be included.
Prerequisites: EGGN320 or instructor’s consent. 3 hours lecture; 3 credit
hours.

Colorado School of Mines 101
MNGN545. ROCK SLOPE ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
MNGN560. INDUSTRIAL MINERALS PRODUCTION. 3.0 Hours.
Introduction to the analysis and design of slopes excavated in rock.
(II) This course describes the engineering principles and practices
Rock mass classification and strength determinations, geological
associated with quarry mining operations related to the cement and
structural parameters, properties of fracture sets, data collection
aggregate industries. The course will cover resource definition, quarry
techniques, hydrological factors, methods of analysis of slope stability,
planning and design, extraction, and processing of minerals for cement
wedge intersections, monitoring and maintenance of final pit slopes,
and aggregate production. Permitting issues and reclamation, particle
classification of slides. Deterministic and probabilistic approaches in
sizing and environmental practices, will be studied in depth.
slope design. Remedial measures. Laboratory and field exercise in slope
design. Collection of data and specimens in the field for deterring
MNGN585. MINING ECONOMICS. 3.0 Hours.
physical properties required for slope design. Application of numerical
(I) Advanced study in mine valuation with emphasis on revenue and cost
modeling and analytical techniques to slope stability determinations for
aspects.
hard rock and soft rock environments. Prerequisite: Instructor’s consent.
Topics include price and contract consideration in coal, metal and other
3 hours lecture. 3 semester hours.
commodities; mine capital and operating cost estimation and indexing;
and other topics of current interest. Prerequisite: MNGN427 or EBGN504
MNGN549. MARINE MINING SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in even years.
(I) Define interdisciplinary marine mining systems and operational
requirements for the exploration survey, sea floor mining, hoisting, and
MNGN590. MECHANICAL EXCAVATION IN MINING. 3.0 Hours.
transport. Describe and design components of deep-ocean, manganese-
(II) This course provides a comprehensive review of the existing and
nodule mining systems and other marine mineral extraction methods.
emerging mechanical excavation technologies for mine development and
Analyze dynamics and remote control of the marine mining systems
production in surface and underground mining. The major topics covered
interactions and system components. Describe the current state-of-the-art
in the course include: history and development of mechanical excavators,
technology, operational practice, trade-offs of the system design and risk.
theory and principles of mechanical rock fragmentation, design and
Prerequisite: EGGN351, EGGN320, GEOC408 or consent of instructor. 3
performance of rock cutting tools, design and operational characteristics
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate even years.
of mechanical excavators (e.g. continuous miners, roadheaders, tunnel
boring machines, raise drills, shaft borers, impact miners, slotters),
MNGN550. NEW TECHNIQUES IN MINING. 3.0 Hours.
applications to mine development and production, performance prediction
(II) Review of various experimental mining procedures, including a critical
and geotechnical investigations, costs versus conventional methods,
evaluation of their potential applications. Mining methods covered include
new mine designs for applying mechanical excavators, case histories,
deep sea nodule mining, in situ gassification of coal, in situ retorting of
future trends and anticipated developments and novel rock fragmentation
oil shale, solution mining of soluble minerals, in situ leaching of metals,
methods including water jets, lasers, microwaves, electron beams,
geothermal power generation, oil mining, nuclear fragmentation, slope
penetrators, electrical discharge and sonic rock breakers. Prerequisite:
caving, electro-thermal rock penetration and fragmentation. Prerequisite:
Senior or graduate status. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in
Graduate standing or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
odd years.
hours. Offered in even years.
MNGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MINING ENGINEERING. 1-6 Hour.
MNGN552. SOLUTION MINING AND PROCESSING OF ORES. 3.0
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
Hours.
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
(II) Theory and application of advanced methods of extracting and
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
processing of minerals, underground or in situ, to recover solutions and
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
concentrates of value-materials, by minimization of the traditional surface
processing and disposal of tailings to minimize environmental impacts.
MNGN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
Prerequisite: Senior or graduate status; Instructor’s consent. 3 hours
(I, II) (WI) Individual research or special problem projects supervised
lecture, 3 semester hours. Offered in spring.
by a faculty member. When a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, method of assessment, and credit hours, it must be
MNGN559. MECHANICS OF PARTICULATE MEDIA. 3.0 Hours.
approved by the Department Head. Prerequisite: "Independent Study"
(1) This course allows students to establish fundamental knowledge
form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1
of quasi-static and dynamic particle behavior that is beneficial to
to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
interdisciplinary material handling processes in the chemical, civil,
materials, metallurgy, geophysics, physics, and mining engineering.
MNGN625. GRADUATE MINING SEMINAR. 1.0 Hour.
Issues of interst are the definition of particl size and size distribution,
(I, II) Discussions presented by graduate students, staff, and visiting
particle shape, nature of packing, quasi-static behavior under different
lecturers on research and development topics of general interest.
external loading, particle collisions, kinetic theoretical modeling of
Required of all graduate students in mining engineering every semester
particulate flows, molecular dynamic simulations, and a brief introduction
during residence. 1 semester hour upon completion of thesis or
of solid-fluid two-phase flows. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
residence.
lecture; 3 semester hours. Fall semesters, every other year.
MNGN698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MINING ENGINEERING. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
interests of instructor(s) and student( s). Usually the course is offered
only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit
hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

102 Graduate
MNGN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) (WI) ) Individual research or special problem projects supervised
by a faculty member. When a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, method of assessment, and credit hours, it must be
approved by the Department Head. Prerequisite: "Independent Study"
form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1
to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
MNGN700. GRADUATE ENGINEERING REPORTMASTER OF
ENGINEERING. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Laboratory, field, and library work for the Master of Engineering
report under supervision of the student’s advisory committee. Required of
candidates for the degree of Master of Engineering. Variable 1 to 6 hours.
Repeatable for credit to a maximum of 6 hours.
MNGN707. GRADUATE THESIS/DISSERTATION RESEARCH
CREDIT. 1-12 Hour.
(I, II, S) GRADUATE THESIS/DISSERTATION RESEARCH CREDIT
Research credit hours required for completion of a Masters-level thesis
or Doctoral dissertation. Research must be carried out under the direct
supervision of the student’s faculty advisor. Variable class and semester
hours. Repeatable for credit.
MTGN707. GRADUATE THESIS/DISSERTATION RESEARCH CREDIT.
1-12 Hour.
(I, II, S) Research credit hours required for completion of a Masters-level
thesis or Doctoral dissertation. Research must be carried out under the
direct supervision of the student’s faculty advisor. Variable class and
semester hours. Repeatable for credit.

Colorado School of Mines 103
Petroleum Engineering
student is expected to pass the required courses and the grades received
in these courses are included in the GPA. Not passing these courses
Degrees Offered
can jeopardize the student’s continuance in the graduate program. It is
desirable for students with deficiencies to complete the deficiencies or
• Professional Masters in Petroleum Reservoir Systems
course work within the first two semesters of arrival to the program or as
• Master of Engineering (Petroleum Engineering)
soon as possible with the approval of their advisor.
• Master of Science (Petroleum Engineering)
All PE graduate students are required to complete 3 credit hours of
• Doctor of Philosophy (Petroleum Engineering)
course work in writing, research, or presentation intensive classes, such
as PEGN681, LICM501, SYGN501, and SYGN600, as agreed to by their
Program Description
graduate advisor.
The Petroleum Engineering Department offers students a choice of a
Fields of Research
Master of Science (MS) degree or a Master of Engineering (ME) degree.
For the MS degree, a thesis is required in addition to course work. For
Current research topics include:
the ME degree, no thesis is required, but the course work requirement
• Rock and fluid properties, phase behavior, and rock mechanics
is greater than that for the MS degree. The Petroleum Engineering
• Analytical and numerical modeling of fluid flow in porous media
Department also offers CSM undergraduate students the option of a
Combined Undergraduate/Graduate Program. This is an accelerated
• Formation evaluation, well test analysis, and reservoir characterization
program that provides the opportunity to CSM students to have a head
• Geomechanics
start on their graduate education.
• Oil recovery processes
Applications from students having a MS in Petroleum Engineering, or
• Unconventional oil and gas
in another complimentary discipline, will be considered for admission to
• Shale gas and shale oil
the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) program. To obtain the Ph.D. degree,
• Natural gas engineering, coalbed methane, and geothermal energy
a student must demonstrate unusual competence, creativity, and
• Completion and stimulation of wells
dedication in the degree field. In addition to extensive course work, a
• Horizontal and multilateral wells
dissertation is required for the Ph.D. degree.
• Drilling management and rig automation
Applying for Admission
• Fluid flow in wellbores and artificial lift
All graduate applicants must have taken core engineering, math and
• External fluid flow on offshore structures
science courses before applying to graduate school. For the Colorado
• Drilling mechanics, directional drilling, extraterrestrial drilling, ice coring
School of Mines this would be 3 units of Calculus, 2 units of Chemistry
and drilling
with Quantitative Lab, 2 units of Physics, Differential Equations, Statics,
• Bit vibration analysis, tubular buckling and stability, wave propagation
Fluid Mechanics, Thermodynamics and Mechanics of Materials. To
in drilling tubulars
apply for admission, follow the procedure outlined in the general section
• Laser technology in penetrating rocks
of this bulletin. Three letters of recommendation must accompany the
application. The Petroleum Engineering Department requires the general
Research projects may involve professors and graduate students
test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) for applicants to all
from other disciplines. Projects often include off-campus laboratories,
degree levels.
institutes, and other resources.
Applicants for the Master of Science, Master of Engineering, and
The Petroleum Engineering Department houses a research institute, two
Professional Masters in Petroleum Reservoir Systems programs
research centers, and one consortia.
should have a minimum score of 700 or better and applicants for the
Ph.D. program are expected to have 750 or better on the quantitative
Research Institute
section of the GRE exam, in addition to acceptable scores in the
• Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Institute (UNGI)
verbal and analytical sections. The GPA of the applicant must be 3.0
or higher. The graduate application review committee determines
Research Centers
minimum requirements accordingly, and these requirements may change
• Marathon Center of Excellence for Reservoir Studies (MCERS)
depending on the application pool for the particular semester. The
• Center for Earth Mechanics, Materials, and Characterization (CEMMC)
applicants whose native language is not English are also expected to
provide satisfactory scores on the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign
Research Consortia
Language) exam as specified in the general section of this bulletin.
• Fracturing, Acidizing, Stimulation Technology (FAST) Consortium.
Required Curriculum
Special Features
A student in the graduate program selects course work by consultation
with the Faculty Advisor and with the approval of the graduate committee.
In the exchange programs with the Petroleum Engineering Departments
Course work is tailored to the needs and interests of the student.
of the Mining University of Leoben, Austria, Technical University in Delft,
Students who do not have a BS degree in petroleum engineering must
Holland, and the University of Adelaide, Australia, a student may spend
take deficiency courses as required by the department as soon as
one semester abroad during graduate studies and receive full transfer
possible in their graduate programs. Depending on the applicant’s
of credit back to CSM with prior approval of the Petroleum Engineering
undergraduate degree, various basic undergraduate petroleum
Department at CSM.
engineering and geology courses will be required. These deficiency
In the fall of 2012, the new Petroleum Engineering building, Marquez
courses are not counted towards the graduate degree; nonetheless, the
Hall, was opened. The new home for the Petroleum Engineering

104 Graduate
Department is a prominent campus landmark, showcasing Mines’
Reservoir Systems program. Up to 9 credits may be earned by 400 level
longstanding strengths in its core focus areas and our commitment to
courses. All other credits toward the degree must be 500 level or above.
staying at the forefront of innovation. The new building is designed using
At least 9 hours must consist of:
aggressive energy saving strategies and will be LEED certified. Marquez
GEGN/GPGN/
MULTIDISCIPLINARY PETROLEUM DESIGN
3.0
Hall is the first building on the Colorado School of Mines Campus that is
PEGN439
funded entirely by donations.
Select one of the following:
3.0
The Petroleum Engineering Department enjoys strong collaboration with
GPGN/
WELL LOG ANALYSIS AND FORMATION
the Geology and Geological Engineering Department and Geophysics
PEGN419
EVALUATION
Department at CSM. Courses that integrate the faculty and interests of
GPGN/
ADVANCED FORMATION EVALUATION
the three departments are taught at the undergraduate and graduate
PEGN519
levels.
Select one of the following:
3.0
The department is close to oil and gas field operations, oil companies and
GEGN/
INTEGRATED EXPLORATION AND
laboratories, and geologic outcrops of producing formations. There are
GPGN/
DEVELOPMENT
many opportunities for summer and part-time employment in the oil and
PEGN503
gas industry.
GEGN/
INTEGRATED EXPLORATION AND
Each summer, several graduate students assist with the field sessions
GPGN/
DEVELOPMENT
designed for undergraduate students. The field sessions in the past
PEGN504
several years have included visits to oil and gas operations in Europe,
Total Hours
9.0
Alaska, Canada, Southern California, the Gulf Coast, the Northeast US,
the Rocky Mountain regions, and western Colorado.
Also 9 additional hours must consist of one course each from the 3
participating departments. The remaining 18 hours may consist of
The Petroleum Engineering Department encourages student involvement
graduate courses from any of the 3 participating departments, or other
with the Society of Petroleum Engineers, the American Association of
courses approved by the committee. Up to 6 hours may consist of
Drilling Engineers and the American Rock Mechanics Association. The
independent study, including an industry project.
department provides some financial support for students attending the
annual technical conferences for these professional societies.
Candidates for the non-thesis Master of Engineering degree must
complete a minimum of 36 hours of graduate course credit. At least 18 of
the credit hours must be from the Petroleum Engineering Department. Up
Program Requirements
to 12 graduate credit hours can be transferred from another institution,
Professional Masters in Petroleum Reservoir
and up to 9 credit hours of senior-level courses may be applied to the
Systems
degree. All courses must be approved by the student’s advisor and the
department head. No graduate committee is required. No more than six
Minimum 36 hours of course credit
credit hours can be earned through independent study.
Master of Engineering
Candidates for the Master of Science degree must complete at least
24 graduate credit hours of course work, approved by the candidate’s
Minimum 36 hours of course credit
graduate committee, and a minimum of 12 hours of research credit.
Master of Science
At least 12 of the course credit hours must be from the Petroleum
Engineering Department. Up to 9 credit hours may be transferred from
Minimum 36 hours, of which no less than 12 credit hours earned by
another institution. Up to 9 credit hours of senior-level courses may be
research and 24 credit hours by course work
applied to the degree. For the MS degree, the student must demonstrate
Combined Undergraduate/Graduate Program
ability to observe, analyze, and report original scientific research. For
other requirements, refer to the general instructions of the Graduate
The same requirements as Master of Engineering or Master of Science
School (p. 7) in this bulletin.
after the student is granted full graduate status. Students in the
Combined Undergraduate/Graduate Program may fulfill part of the
The requirements for the Combined Undergraduate/Graduate Program
requirements of their graduate degree by including up to 6 credit hours of
are defined in the section of this Bulletin titled “Graduate Degrees and
undergraduate course credits upon approval of the department.
Requirements—V. Combined Undergraduate/Graduate Programs.” After
the student is granted full graduate status, the requirements are the
Doctor of Philosophy
same as those for the non-thesis Master of Engineering or thesis-based
Minimum 90 credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree of which no less
Master of Science degree, depending to which program the student
than 30 credit hours earned by research, or minimum 54 credit hours
was accepted. The Combined Undergraduate/Graduate Program allows
beyond the Master’s degree of which no less than 30 credit hours earned
students to fulfill part of the requirements of their graduate degree by
by research.
including up to 6 credit hours of their undergraduate course credits upon
approval of the department. The student must apply for the program by
The Petroleum Engineering, Geology and Geological Engineering, and
submitting an application through the Graduate School before the first
the Geophysics Departments share oversight for the Professional
semester of their Senior year. For other requirements, refer to the general
Masters in Petroleum Reservoir Systems program through a
directions of the Graduate School (p. 7) in this bulletin.
committee consisting of one faculty member from each department.
Students gain admission to the program by application to any of the three
A candidate for the Ph.D. must complete at least 60 hours of course
sponsoring departments. Students are administered by that department
credit and a minimum of 30 credit hours of research beyond the
into which they first matriculate. A minimum of 36 credit hours of course
Bachelor’s degree or at least 24 hours of course credit and a minimum
credit is required to complete the Professional Masters in Petroleum

Colorado School of Mines 105
of 30 credit hours of research beyond the Master’s degree. The credit
PEGN504. INTEGRATED EXPLORATION AND DEVELOPMENT. 3.0
hours to be counted toward a Ph.D. are dependent upon approval of the
Hours.
student’s thesis committee. Students who enter the Ph.D. program with
(I) Students work in multidisciplinary teams to study practical problems
a Bachelor’s degree may transfer up to 33 graduate credit hours from
and case studies in integrated subsurface exploration and development.
another institution with the approval of the graduate advisor. Students
The course addresses emerging technologies and timely topics with
who enter the Ph.D. program with a master’s degree may transfer up
a general focus on carbonate reservoirs. Activities include field trips,
to 45 credit hours of course and research work from another institution
3D computer modeling, written exercises and oral team presentation.
upon approval by the graduate advisor. Ph.D. students must complete
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture and seminar; 3
a minimum of 12 credit hours of their required course credit in a minor
semester hours. Offered fall semester, even years.
program of study. The student’s faculty advisor, thesis committee, and
the department head must approve the course selection. Full-time
PEGN505. HORIZONTAL WELLS: RESERVOIR AND PRODUCTION
Ph.D. students must satisfy the following requirements for admission
ASPECTS. 3.0 Hours.
to candidacy within the first two calendar years after enrolling in the
This course covers the fundamental concepts of horizontal well
program:
reservoir and production engineering with special emphasis on the new
developments. Each topic covered highlights the concepts that are
1. have a thesis committee appointment form on file,
generic to horizontal wells and draws attention to the pitfalls of applying
2. complete all prerequisite courses successfully,
conventional concepts to horizontal wells without critical evaluation.
3. demonstrate adequate preparation for and satisfactory ability to
There is no set prerequisite for the course but basic knowledge on
conduct doctoral research by successfully completing a series of
general reservoir engineering concepts is useful. 3 hours lecture; 3
written and/or oral examinations and fulfilling the other requirements
semester hours.
of their graduate committees as outlined in the department’s
graduate handbook.
PEGN506. ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY METHODS. 3.0 Hours.
Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) methods are reviewed from both the
Failure to fulfill these requirements within the time limits specified
qualitative and quantitative standpoint. Recovery mechanisms and design
above may result in immediate mandatory dismissal from the Ph.D.
procedures for the various EOR processes are discussed. In addition
program according to the procedure outlined in the section of this Bulletin
to lectures, problems on actual field design procedures will be covered.
titled “General Regulations—Unsatisfactory Academic Performance—
Field case histories will be reviewed. Prerequisite: PEGN424 or consent
Unsatisfactory Academic Progress Resulting in Probation or Discretionary
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Dismissal.” For other requirements, refer to the general directions of the
Graduate School (p. 7) in this bulletin and/or the Department’s Graduate
PEGN507. INTEGRATED FIELD PROCESSING. 3.0 Hours.
Student Handbook.
Integrated design of production facilities covering multistage separation
of oil, gas, and water, multiphase flow, oil skimmers, natural gas
dehydration, compression, crude stabilization, petroleum fluid storage,
and vapor recovery. Prerequisite: PEGN411 or consent of instructor. 3
Courses
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PEGN501. APPLICATIONS OF NUMERICAL METHODS TO
PETROLEUM ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
PEGN508. ADVANCED ROCK PROPERTIES. 3.0 Hours.
The course will solve problems of interest in Petroleum Engineering
Application of rock mechanics and rock properties to reservoir
through the use of spreadsheets on personal computers and structured
engineering, well logging, well completion and well stimulation. Topics
FORTRAN programming on PCs or mainframes. Numerical techniques
covered include: capillary pressure, relative permeability, velocity effects
will include methods for numerical quadrature, differentiation,
on Darcy’s Law, elastic/mechanical rock properties, subsidence, reservoir
interpolation, solution of linear and nonlinear ordinary differential
compaction, and sand control. Prerequisites: PEGN423 and PEGN426 or
equations, curve fitting and direct or iterative methods for solving
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
simultaneous equations. Prerequisites: PEGN414 and PEGN424 or
PEGN511. ADVANCED THERMODYNAMICS AND PETROLEUM
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
FLUIDS PHASE BEHAVIOR. 3.0 Hours.
PEGN502. ADVANCED DRILLING FLUIDS. 3.0 Hours.
Essentials of thermodynamics for understanding the phase behavior
The physical properties and purpose of drilling fluids are investigated.
of petroleum fluids such as natural gas and oil. Modeling of phase
Emphasis is placed on drilling fluid design, clay chemistry, testing, and
behavior of single and multi-component systems with equations of states
solids control. Prerequisite: PEGN311 or consent of instructor. 2 hours
with a brief introduction to PVT laboratory studies, commercial PVT
lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
software, asphaltenes, gas hydrates, mineral deposition, and statistical
thermodynamics. Prerequisites: PEGN310 and PEGN305 or equivalent,
PEGN503. INTEGRATED EXPLORATION AND DEVELOPMENT. 3.0
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Hours.
(I) Students work alone and in teams to study reservoirs from fluvial-
PEGN512. ADVANCED GAS ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
deltaic and valley fill depositional environments. This is a multidisciplinary
The physical properties and phase behavior of gas and gas condensates
course that shows students how to characterize and model subsurface
will be discussed. Flow through tubing and pipelines as well as through
reservoir performance by integrating data, methods and concepts from
porous media is covered. Reserve calculations for normally pressured,
geology, geophysics and petroleum engineering. Activities include field
abnormally pressured and water drive reservoirs are presented. Both
trips, computer modeling, written exercises and oral team presentations.
stabilized and isochronal deliverability testing of gas wells will be
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3
illustrated. Prerequisite: PEGN423 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
semester hours. Offered fall semester, odd years.
lecture; 3 semester hours.

106 Graduate
PEGN513. RESERVOIR SIMULATION I. 3.0 Hours.
PEGN519. ADVANCED FORMATION EVALUATION. 3.0 Hours.
The course provides the rudiments of reservoir simulation, which include
A detailed review of wireline well logging and evaluation methods
flow equations, solution methods, and data requirement. Specifically,
stressing the capability of the measurements to determine normal and
the course covers: equations of conservation of mass, conservation of
special reservoir rock parameters related to reservoir and production
momentum, and energy balance; numerical solution of flow in petroleum
problems. Computers for log processing of single and multiple wells.
reservoirs by finite difference (FD) and control volume FD; permeability
Utilization of well logs and geology in evaluating well performance before,
tensor and directional permeability; non-Darcy flow; convective flow
during, and after production of hydrocarbons. The sensitivity of formation
and numerical dispersion; grid orientation problems; introduction to
evaluation parameters in the volumetric determination
finite element and mixed finite-element methods; introduction to hybrid
of petroleum in reservoirs. Prerequisite: PEGN419 or consent of
analytical/numerical solutions; introduction to multi-phase flow models;
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
relative permeability, capillary pressure and wettability issues; linear
equation solvers; streamline simulation; and multi-scale simulation
PEGN522. ADVANCED WELL STIMULATION. 3.0 Hours.
concept. Prerequisite: PEGN424 or equivalent, strong reservoir
Basic applications of rock mechanics to petroleum engineering problems.
engineering background, and basic computer programming knowledge. 3
Hydraulic fracturing; acid fracturing, fracturing simulators; fracturing
credit hours. 3 hours of lecture per week.
diagnostics; sandstone acidizing; sand control, and well bore stability.
Different theories of formation failure, measurement of mechanical
PEGN514. PETROLEUM TESTING TECHNIQUES. 3.0 Hours.
properties. Review of recent advances and research areas. Prerequisite:
Investigation of basic physical properties of petroleum reservoir rocks and
PEGN426 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
fluids. Review of recommended practices for testing drilling fluids and
oil well cements. Emphasis is placed on the accuracy and calibration of
PEGN523. ADVANCED ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF OIL AND GAS
test equipment. Quality report writing is stressed. Prerequisite: Graduate
PROJECTS. 3.0 Hours.
status. 2 hours lecture, 1 hour lab; 3 semester hours. Required for
Determination of present value of oil properties. Determination of
students who do not have a BS in PE.
severance, ad valorem, windfall profit, and federal income taxes.
Analysis of profitability indicators. Application of decision tree theory and
PEGN515. RESERVOIR ENGINEERING PRINCIPLES. 3.0 Hours.
Monte Carlo methods to oil and gas properties. Economic criteria for
Reservoir Engineering overview. Predicting hydrocarbon in place;
equipment selection. Prerequisite: PEGN422 or EBGN504 or ChEN504
volumetric method, deterministic and probabilistic approaches, material
or MNGN427 or ChEN421 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
balance, water influx, graphical techniques. Fluid flow in porous media;
semester hours.
continuity and diffusivity equations. Well performance; productivity index
for vertical, perforated, fractured, restricted, slanted, and horizontal
PEGN524. PETROLEUM ECONOMICS AND MANAGEMENT. 3.0
wells, inflow performance relationship under multiphase flow conditions.
Hours.
Combining material balance and well performance equations. Future
Business applications in the petroleum industry are the central focus.
reservoir performance prediction; Muskat, Tarner, Carter and Tracy
Topics covered are: fundamentals of accounting, oil and gas accounting,
methods. Fetkovich decline curves. Reservoir simulation; fundamentals
strategic planning, oil and gas taxation, oil field deals, negotiations, and
and formulation, streamline simulation, integrated reservoir studies. 3
the formation of secondary units. The concepts are covered by forming
hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
companies that prepare proforma financial statements, make deals, drill
for oil and gas, keep accounting records, and negotiate the participation
PEGN516. PRODUCTION ENGINEERING PRINCIPLES. 3.0 Hours.
formula for a secondary unit. Prerequisite:
Production Engineering Overview. Course provides a broad introduction
PEGN422 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
to the practice of production engineering. Covers petroleum system
analysis, well stimulation (fracturing and acidizing), artificial lift (gas lift,
PEGN530. ENVIRONMENTAL LAW. 3.0 Hours.
sucker rod, ESP, and others), and surface facilities. 3 hours lecture, 3
Designed for engineers, geoscientists, managers, consultants and
semester hours.
citizens, this course covers the basics of environmental, energy
and natural resources law. Topics include: an introduction to U.S.
PEGN517. DRILLING ENGINEERING PRINCIPLES. 3.0 Hours.
Environmental Law, Policy and Practice; the administrative process;
Drilling Engineering overview. Subjects to be covered include overall
enforcement and liability; a survey of U.S. laws and compliance
drilling organization, contracting, and reporting; basic drilling engineering
programs addressing pollution, toxic substances, endangered species,
principles and equipment; drilling fluids, hydraulics, and cuttings
pesticides, minerals, oil & gas, land uses and others including the
transport; drillstring design; drill bits; drilling optimization; fishing
National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA), Resource Conservation
operations; well control; pore pressure and fracture gradients, casing
and Recovery Act (RCRA), Underground Storage Tanks (UST), Clean
points and design; cementing; directional drilling and horizontal drilling. 3
Air Act (CAA), Clean Water Act (CWA), Oil Pollution Act (OPA); Safe
hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
Drinking Water Act (SDWA); Comprehensive Environmental Response,
Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); Toxic Substances Control
Act (TSCA) and others; an introduction to international environmental law;
ethics; and case studies." 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
hours.

Colorado School of Mines 107
PEGN541. APPLIED RESERVOIR SIMULATION. 3.0 Hours.
PEGN592. GEOMECHANICS FOR UNCONVENTIONAL RESOURCES.
Concepts of reservoir simulation within the context of reservoir
3.0 Hours.
management will be discussed. Course participants will learn how to use
A wide spectrum of topics related to the challenges and solutions for the
available flow simulators to achieve reservoir management objectives.
exploration, drilling, completion, production and hydraulic fracturing of
They will apply the concepts to an open-ended engineering design
unconventional resources including gas and oil shale, heavy oil sand
problem. Prerequisites: PEGN424 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
and carbonate reservoirs, their seal formations is explored. The students
lecture; 3 semester hours.
acquire skills in integrating and visualizing multidiscipline data in Petrel
(a short tutorial is offered) as well as assignments regarding case studies
PEGN542. INTEGRATED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION. 3.0
using field and core datasets. The role of integrating geomechanics data
Hours.
in execution of the exploration, drilling, completion, production, hydraulic
The course introduces integrated reservoir characterization from a
fracturing and monitoring of pilots as well as commercial applications in
petroleum engineering perspective. Reservoir characterization helps
unlocking the unconventional resources are pointed out using examples.
quantify properties that
Prerequisite: PEGN590. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
influence flow characteristics. Students will learn to assess and integrate
data sources into a comprehensive reservoir model. Prerequisites:
PEGN593. ADVANCED WELL INTEGRITY. 3.0 Hours.
PEGN424 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Fundamentals of wellbore stability, sand production, how to keep
wellbore intact is
PEGN550. MODERN RESERVOIR SIMULATORS. 3.0 Hours.
covered in this course. The stress alterations in near wellbore region and
Students will learn to run reservoir simulation software using a variety of
associated consequences in the form of well failures will be covered in
reservoir engineering examples. The course will focus on the capabilities
detailed theoretically and with examples from deepwater conventional
and operational features of simulators. Students will learn to use pre-
wells and onshore unconventionalwell operations. Assignments will
and post-processors, fluid property analysis software, black oil and gas
be given to expose the students to the real field data to interpret and
reservoir models, and compositional models. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
evaluate cases to determinepractical solutions to drilling and production
hours.
related challenges. Fluid pressure and composition sensitivity of various
formations will be studied. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PEGN577. WORKOVER DESIGN AND PRACTICE. 3.0 Hours.
Workover Engineering overview. Subjects to be covered include
PEGN594. ADVANCED DIRECTIONAL DRILLING. 3.0 Hours.
Workover Economics, Completion Types, Workover Design
Application of directional control and planning to drilling. Major topics
Considerations, Wellbore Cleanout (Fishing), Workover Well Control,
covered include: Review of procedures for the drilling of directional wells.
Tubing and Workstring Design, SlicklineOperations, Coiled Tubing
Section and horizontal view preparation. Two and three dimensional
Operations, Packer Selection, Remedial Cementing Design and
directional planning. Collision diagrams. Surveying and trajectory
Execution, Completion Fluids, Gravel Packing, and Acidizing. 3 hours
calculations. Surface and down hole equipment. Common rig operating
lecture, 3 semester hours.
procedures, and horizontal drilling techniques. Prerequisite: PEGN311 or
equivalent, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PEGN590. RESERVOIR GEOMECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.
The course provides an introduction to fundamental rock mechanics and
PEGN595. DRILLING OPERATIONS. 3.0 Hours.
aims to
Lectures, seminars, and technical problems with emphasis on well
emphasize their role in exploration, drilling, completion and production
planning, rotary rig supervision, and field practices for execution of
engineering
the plan. This course makes extensive use of the drilling rig simulator.
operations. Deformation as a function of stress, elastic moduli, in situ
Prerequisite: PEGN311, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
stress, stress
semester hours.
magnitude and orientation, pore pressure, strength and fracture gradient,
rock
PEGN596. ADVANCED WELL CONTROL. 3.0 Hours.
characteristic from field data (seismic, logging, drilling, production),
Principles and procedures of pressure control are taught with the aid of a
integrated
full-scale drilling simulator. Specifications and design of blowout control
wellbore stability analysis, depletion and drilling induced fractures,
equipment for onshore and offshore drilling operations, gaining control
compaction and
of kicks, abnormal pressure detection, well planning for wells containing
associated changes in rock properties, hydraulic fracturing and fracture
abnormal pressures, and kick circulation removal methods are taught.
stability are
Students receive hands-on training with the simulator and its peripheral
among the topics to be covered. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
equipment. Prerequisite: PEGN311 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
lecture; 3 semester hours.

108 Graduate
PEGN597. TUBULAR DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.
PEGN606. ADVANCED RESERVOIR ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
Fundamentals of tubulars (casing, tubing, and drill pipe) design applied to
A review of depletion type, gas-cap, and volatile oil reservoirs. Lectures
drilling. Major topics covered include: Dogleg running loads. Directional
and supervised studies on gravity segregation, moving gas-oil front,
hole considerations. Design criteria development. Effects of formation
individual well performance analysis, history matching, performance
pressures. Stability loads after cementing. Effects of temperature,
prediction, and development planning. Prerequisite: PEGN423 or consent
pressure, mud weights, and cement. Helical bending of tubing. Fishing
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
loads. Micro-annulus problem. Strengths of API tubulars. Abrasive wear
while rotating drill pipe. How to design for hydrogen sulfide and fatigue
PEGN607. PARTIAL WATER DRIVE RESERVOIRS. 3.0 Hours.
corrosion. Connection selection. Common rig operating procedures.
The hydrodynamic factors which influence underground water movement,
Prerequisites: PEGN311 and PEGN361 or equivalent, or consent of
particularly with respect to petroleum reservoirs. Evaluation of oil and gas
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
reservoirs in major water containing formations. Prerequisite: PEGN424
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PEGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PETROLEUM ENGINEERING. 1-6
Hour.
PEGN608. MULTIPHASE FLUID FLOW IN POROUS MEDIA. 3.0
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
Hours.
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
The factors involved in multiphase fluid flow in porous and fractured
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
media. Physical processes and mathematical models for micro- and
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
macroscopic movement of multiphase fluids in reservoirs. Performance
evaluation of various displacement processes in the laboratory as well
PEGN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
as in the petroleum field during the secondary and EOR/IOR operations.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
Prerequisite: PEGN424, or consent of instructor, 3 hours lecture; 3
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
semester hours.
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
PEGN614. RESERVOIR SIMULATION II. 3.0 Hours.
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
The course reviews the rudiments of reservoir simulation and flow
equations, solution methods, and data requirement. The course
PEGN601. APPLIED MATHEMATICS OF FLUID FLOW IN POROUS
emphasizes multi-phase flow and solution techniques; teaches the
MEDIA. 3.0 Hours.
difference between conventional reservoir simulation, compositional
This course is intended to expose petroleum-engineering students
modeling and multi-porosity modeling; teaches how to construct
to the special mathematical techniques used to solve transient flow
three-phase relative permeability from water-oil and gas-oil relative
problems in porous media. Bessel’s equation and functions, Laplace
permeability data set; the importance of capillary pressure measurements
and Fourier transformations, the method of sources and sinks, Green’s
and wetability issues; discusses the significance of gas diffusion
functions, and boundary integral techniques are covered. Numerical
and interphase mass transfer. Finally, the course develops solution
evaluation of various reservoir engineering solutions, numerical Laplace
techniques to include time tested implicit-pressure-explicitsaturation,
transformation and inverse transformation are also discussed. 3 hours
sequential and fully implicit methods. Prerequisite: PEGN513 or
lecture; 3 semester hours.
equivalent, strong reservoir engineering background, and basic computer
programming knowledge. 3 credit hours. 3 hours of lecture per week.
PEGN603. DRILLING MODELS. 3.0 Hours.
Analytical models of physical phenomena encountered in drilling. Casing
PEGN615. SHALE RESERVOIR ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
and drilling failure from bending, fatigue, doglegs, temperature, stretch;
Fundamentals of shale-reservoir engineering and special topics of
mud filtration; corrosion; wellhead loads; and buoyancy of tubular goods.
production from
Bit weight and rotary speed optimization. Prerequisites: PEGN311 and
shale reservoirs are covered. The question of what makes shale a
PEGN361, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
producing reservoir is explored. An unconventional understanding
of shale-reservoir characterization is emphasized and the pitfalls
PEGN604. INTEGRATED FLOW MODELING. 3.0 Hours.
of conventional measurements and interpretations are discussed.
Students will study the formulation, development and application of a
Geological, geomechanical, and engineering aspects of shale reservoirs
reservoir flow simulator that includes traditional fluid flow equations and a
are explained. Well completions with emphasis on hydraulic fracturing
petrophysical model. The course will discuss properties of porous media
and fractured horizontal wells are discussed from the view-point of
within the context of reservoir modeling, and present the mathematics
reservoir engineering. Darcy flow, diffusive flow, and desorption in shale
needed to understand and apply the simulator. Simulator applications
matrix are covered. Contributions of hydraulic and natural fractures are
will be interspersed throughout the course. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
discussed and the stimulated reservoir volume concept is introduced.
hours.
Interactions of flow between fractures and matrix are explained within
the context of dual-porosity modeling. Applications of pressure-transient,
PEGN605. WELL TESTING AND EVALUATION. 3.0 Hours.
rate-transient, decline-curve and transient-productivity analyses are
Various well testing procedures and interpretation techniques for
covered. Field examples are studied. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
individual wells or groups of wells. Application of these techniques to
field development, analysis of well problems, secondary recovery, and
reservoir studies. Productivity, gas well testing, pressure buildup and
drawdown, well interference, fractured wells, type curve matching, and
shortterm testing. Prerequisite: PEGN426 or consent of instructor. 3
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 109
PEGN619. GEOMECHANICALLY AND PHYSICOCHEMICALLY
PEGN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
COUPLED FLUID FLOW IN POROUS MEDIA. 3.0 Hours.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
The role of physic-chemisty and geomechanics on fluid flow in porous
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
media will be
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
included in addition to conventional fluid flow modeling and
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
measurmeents in porous media. The conventional as well as
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
unconventional reservoirs will be studied with the coupling of
physicochemical effects and geomechanics stresses. Assignments will
PEGN707. GRADUATE THESIS/DISSERTATION RESEARCH CREDIT.
be given to expose the students to the real field data in interpretation
1-12 Hour.
and evaluation of filed cases to determine practical solutions to drilling
(I, II, S) Research credit hours required for completion of a Masters-level
and production related modeling challenges. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
thesis or Doctoral dissertation. Research must be carried out under the
hours.
direct supervision of the student’s faculty advisor. Variable class and
semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
PEGN620. NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS --
ENGINEERING AND RESERVOIR SIMULATION. 3.0 Hours.
The course covers reservoir engineering, well testing, and simulation
aspects of naturally fractured reservoirs. Specifics include: fracture
description, connectivity and network; fracture properties; physical
principles underlying reservoir engineering and modeling naturally
fractured reservoirs; local and global effects of viscous, capillary, gravity
and molecular diffusion flow; dual-porosity/dual-permeability models;
multi-scale fracture model; dual-mesh model; streamlin model; transient
testing with non-Darcy flow effects; tracer injection and breakthrough
analysis; geomechanics and fractures; compositional model; coal-bed
gas model; oil and gas from fractured shale; improved and enhanced
oil recovery in naturally fracture reservoirs. Prerequisite: PEGN513 or
equivalent, strong reservoir engineering background, and basic computer
programming knowledge. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PEGN624. COMPOSITIONAL MODELING - APPLICATION TO
ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY. 3.0 Hours.
Efficient production of rich and volatile oils as well as enhanced oil
recovery by gas injection (lean and rich natural gas, CO2, N2, air, and
steam) is of great interest in the light of greater demand for hydrocarbons
and the need for CO2 sequestration. This course is intended to provide
technical support for engineers dealing with such issues. The course
begins with a review of the primary and secondary recovery methods,
and will analyze the latest worldwide enhanced oil recovery production
statistics. This will be followed by presenting a simple and practical
solvent flooding model to introduce the student to data preparation and
code writing. Next, fundamentals of phase behavior, ternary phase
diagram, and the Peng-Robinson equation of state will be presented.
Finally, a detailed set of flow and thermodynamic equations for a full-
fledged compositional model, using molar balance, equation of motion
and the afore-mentioned equation of state, will be developed and solution
strategy will be presented. Prerequisite: PEGN513 or equivalent, strong
reservoir engineering background, and basic computer programming
knowledge. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PEGN681. PETROLEUM ENGINEERING SEMINAR. 3.0 Hours.
Comprehensive reviews of current petroleum engineering literature,
ethics, and selected topics as related to research and professionalism. 2
hours seminar; 3 semester hour.
PEGN698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PETROLEUM ENGINEERING. 1-6
Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.

110 Graduate
Chemical and Biological
RESEARCH
Research Credits or Coursework
6.0
Engineering
Total Hours
30.0
Students must take a minimum of 6 research credits, complete, and
Degrees Offered
defend an acceptable Masters dissertation. Upon approval of the
thesis committee, graduate credit may be earned for 400-level courses.
• Master of Science (Chemical Engineering)
Between coursework and research credits a student must earn a
• Doctor of Philosophy (Chemical Engineering)
minimum of 30 total semester hours. Full-time Masters students must
enroll in graduate colloquium (CHEN605) each semester.
Program Description
Master of Science (non-thesis)
The Chemical and Biological Engineering Department of the Colorado
School of Mines is a dynamic, exciting environment for research and
Students entering the Master of Science (non-thesis) program with an
higher education. Mines provides a rigorous educational experience
acceptable undergraduate degree in chemical engineering are required
where faculty and top-notch students work together on meaningful
to take a minimum of 30 semester hours of coursework. All students must
research with far-reaching societal applications. Departmental
complete:
research areas include hydrates, renewable energy, soft materials,
Chemical Engineering core graduate courses
biomedical devices, thin-film materials, simulation and modeling. Visit
CHEN509
ADVANCED CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
3.0
our website for additional information about our graduate program. http://
THERMODYNAMICS
chemeng.mines.edu/
CHEN516
TRANSPORT PHENOMENA
3.0
CHEN518
REACTION KINETICS AND CATALYSIS
3.0
Program Requirements
ELECT
Approved Electives
21.0
See Required Curriculum below.
Total Hours
30.0
Prerequisites
Students may complete an acceptable engineering report for up to
The program outlined here assumes that the candidate for an advanced
6 hours of academic credit. Upon approval of the thesis committee,
degree has a background in chemistry, mathematics, and physics
graduate credit may be earned for selected 400-level courses. Full-time
equivalent to that required for the BS degree in Chemical Engineering at
Masters students must enroll in graduate colloquium (CHEN605) each
the Colorado School of Mines. Undergraduate course deficiencies must
semester.
be removed prior to enrollment in graduate coursework.
CSM undergraduates enrolled in the combined BS/MS degree program
The essential undergraduate courses include:
must meet the requirements described above for the MS portion of
their degree (both thesis and non-thesis). Students accepted into the
CHEN201
MATERIAL AND ENERGY BALANCES
3.0
combined program may take graduate coursework and/or research
CHEN307
FLUID MECHANICS
3.0
credits as an undergraduate and have them applied to their MS degree.
CHEN308
HEAT TRANSFER
3.0
Doctor of Philosophy Program
CHEN357
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS 3.0
The course of study for the PhD degree consists of a minimum of 30
CHEN375
MASS TRANSFER
3.0
semester hours of coursework. All PhD students must complete:
CHEN418
KINETICS AND REACTION ENGINEERING
3.0
Core courses
Total Hours
18.0
CHEN509
ADVANCED CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
3.0
Required Curriculum
THERMODYNAMICS
Master of Science Program
CHEN516
TRANSPORT PHENOMENA
3.0
CHEN518
REACTION KINETICS AND CATALYSIS
3.0
Master of Science (with Thesis)
CHEN568
INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 3.0
Students entering the Master of Science (with thesis) program with an
RESEARCH
acceptable undergraduate degree in chemical engineering are required
CHEN6XX
600-Level Coursework Electives
6.0
to take a minimum of 18 semester hours of coursework. All students must
CHEN707
complete:
Graduate Research Credit (up to 12 hours per semester) 42.0
ELECT
Approved Coursework Electives
12.0
Chemical Engineering core graduate courses
Total Hours
72.0
CHEN509
ADVANCED CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
3.0
THERMODYNAMICS
In addition, students must complete and defend an acceptable Doctoral
CHEN516
TRANSPORT PHENOMENA
3.0
dissertation. Upon approval of the thesis committee, graduate credit may
be earned for 400-level courses. Full-time PhD students must enroll in
CHEN518
REACTION KINETICS AND CATALYSIS
3.0
graduate colloquium (CHEN605) each semester.
CHEN568
INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 3.0
RESEARCH
Students in the PhD program are required to pass both a Qualifying
CHEN707
GRADUATE THESIS/DISSERTATION
6
Exam and the PhD Proposal Defense. After successful completion of
RESEARCH CREDIT
30 semester hours of coursework and completion of the PhD proposal
defense, PhD candidates will be awarded a non-thesis Master of Science
ELECT
Approved Coursework Electives
6.0

Colorado School of Mines 111
Degree. The additional requirements for the PhD program are described
Courses
below.
BELS525. MUSCULOSKELETAL BIOMECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.
PhD Qualifying Examination
(II) This course is intended to provide graduate engineering students
with an introduction to musculoskeletal biomechanics. At the end
The PhD qualifying examination will be offered twice each year, at the
of the semester, students should have a working knowledge of the
start and end of the Spring semester. All students who have entered the
special considerations necessary to apply engineering principles to the
PhD program must take the qualifying examination at the first possible
human body. The course will focus on the biomechanics of injury since
opportunity. However, a student must be in good academic standing
understanding injury will require developing an understanding of normal
(above 3.0 GPA) to take the qualifying exam. A student may retake the
biomechanics. Prerequisites: DCGN241 Statics, EGGN320 Mechanics of
examination once if he/she fails the first time; however, the examination
Materials, EGGN325/BELS325 Intro duction to Biomedical Engineering
must be retaken at the next regularly scheduled examination time. Failure
(or instructor permission). 3 hours lecture; 3 semesterb hours.
of the PhD qualifying examination does not disqualify a student for the
MS degree, although failure may affect the student’s financial aid status.
BELS527. PROSTHETIC AND IMPLANT ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
The qualifying examination will cover the traditional areas of Chemical
(I) Prosthetics and implants for the musculoskeletal and other systems
Engineering, and will consist of two sections: a written section and
of the human body are becoming increasingly sophisticated. From
an oral section. The written section will contain 6 questions, 3 at the
simple joint replacements to myoelectric limb replacements and
undergraduate level (covering fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and mass
functional electrical stimulation, the engineering opportunities continue
transfer/material and energy balances) and 3 at the graduate level
to expand. This course builds on musculoskeletal biomechanics and
(covering applied transport, reaction kinetics, and thermodynamics). The
other BELS courses to provide engineering students with an introduction
qualifying examination is open-book and students are free to use any
to prosthetics and implants for the musculoskeletal system. At the end
reference books or course notes during the written examination. The oral
of the semester, students should have a working knowledge of the
examination will consist of a presentation by the student on a technical
challenges and special considerations necessary to apply engineering
paper from the chemical engineering literature. Students will choose
principles
a paper in one of 4 areas (thermodynamics, kinetics, transport, and
to augmentation or replacement in the musculoskeletal system.
materials) from a list determined by the faculty. The student is required
Prerequisites: Musculoskeletal Biomechanics (EGGN425/BELS425 or
to present an oral critique of the paper of approximately 15- 20 minutes
EGGN525/BELS525) 3 hours lecture;
followed by questions from the faculty. Papers for the oral examination
3 semester hours.
will be distributed well in advance of the oral portion of the exam so
students have sufficient time to prepare their presentations.
BELS528. COMPUTATIONAL BIOMECHANICS. 1-3 Hour.
Computational Biomechanics provides and introduction to the application
PhD Proposal Defense
of computer simulation to solve some fundamental problems in
After passing the Qualifying Exam, all PhD candidates are required
biomechanics and bioengineering. Musculoskeletal mechanics, medical
to prepare a detailed written proposal on the subject of their PhD
image reconstruction, hard and soft tissue modeling, joint mechanics,
research topic. An oral examination consisting of a defense of the thesis
and inter-subject variability will be considered. An emphasis will be
proposal must be completed within approximately one year of passing
placed on understanding the limitations of the computer model as a
the Qualifying Examination. Written proposals must be submitted to the
predictive tool and the need for rigorous verification and validation of
student’s thesis committee no later than one week prior to the scheduled
computational techniques. Clinical application of biomechanical modeling
oral examination.
tools is highlighted and impact on patient quality of life is demonstrated.
Prerequisite: EGGN413, EGGN325 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
Two negative votes from the doctoral committee members are required
lecture; 3 semester hours. Fall odd years.
for failure of the PhD Proposal Defense. In the case of failure, one
re-examination will be allowed upon petition to the Department
BELS530. BIOMEDICAL. 3.0 Hours.
Head. Failure to complete the PhD Proposal Defense within the
(I) The acquisition, processing, and interpretation of biological signals
allotted time without an approved postponement will result in failure.
presents many unique challenges to the Biomedical Engineer.
Under extenuating circumstances a student may postpone the exam
This course is intended to provide students with the knowledge to
with approval of the Graduate Affairs committee, based on the
understand, appreciate, and address these challenges. At the end of
recommendation of the student’s thesis committee. In such cases, a
the semester, students should have a working knowledge of the special
student must submit a written request for postponement that describes
considerations necessary to gathering and analyzing biological signal
the circumstances and proposes a new date. Requests for postponement
data. Prerequisites: EGGN250 MEL I, DCGN381 Introduction to Electrical
must be presented to the thesis committee no later than 2 weeks before
Circuits, Electronics, and Power, EGGN325/BELS325 Introduction to
the end of the semester in which the exam would normally have been
Biomedical Engineering (or permission of instructor). 3 hours lecture; 3
taken.
semester hours.

112 Graduate
BELS541. BIOCHEMICAL TREATMENT PROCESSES. 3.0 Hours.
BELS596. MOLECULAR ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY. 3.0
The analysis and design of biochemical processes used to transform
Hours.
pollutants are investigated in this course. Suspended growth, attached
(l) Applications of recombinant DNA technology to the development of
growth, and porous media systems will be analyzed. Common
enzymes and organisms used for environmentally friendly industrial
biochemical operations used for water, wastewater, and sludge treatment
purposes. Topics include genetic engineering technology, biocatalysis of
will be discussed. Biochemical systems for organic oxidation and
industrial processes by extremozymes, dye synthesis, biodegradation of
fermentation and inorganic oxidation and reduction will be
aromatic compounds and chlorinated solvents, biosynthesis of polymers
presented. Prerequisites: ESGN504 or consent of the instructor. 3 hours
and fuels, and agricultural
lecture; 3 semester hours.
biotechnology. Prerequisite: introductory microbiology and organic
chemistry or consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
BELS544. AQUATIC TOXICOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
(II) An introduction to assessing the effects of toxic substances on
BELS598. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
aquatic organisms, communities, and ecosystems. Topics include
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
general toxicological principles, water quality standards, quantitative
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
structure-activity relationships, single species and community-level
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
toxicity measures, regulatory issues, and
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
career opportunities. The course includes hands-on experience with
toxicity testing and subsequent data reduction. Prerequisite: none. 2.5
BELS599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
hours lecture; 1 hour lab; 3 semester hours.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
BELS545. ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
(II) Introduction to general concepts of ecology, biochemistry, and
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
toxicology. The introductory material will provide a foundation for
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
understanding why, and to what extent, a variety of products and by-
products of advanced industrialized societies are toxic. Classes of
CHEN504. ADVANCED PROCESS ENGINEERING ECONOMICS. 3.0
substances to be examined include metals, coal, petroleum products,
Hours.
organic compounds, pesticides, radioactive materials, and others.
Advanced engineering economic principles applied to original and
Prerequisite: none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
alternate investments. Analysis of chemical and petroleum processes
relative to marketing and return on investments. Prerequisite: Consent of
BELS555. POLYMER AND COMPLEX FLUIDS COLLOQUIUM. 1.0
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Hour.
The Polymer and Complex Fluids Group at the Colorado School
CHEN505. NUMERICAL METHODS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING. 3.0
of Mines combines expertise in the areas of flow and field based
Hours.
transport, intelligent design and synthesis as well as nanomaterials
Engineering applications of numerical methods. Numerical integration,
and nanotechnology. A wide range of research tools employed by the
solution of algebraic equations, matrix 54 Colorado School of Mines
group includes characterization using rheology, scattering, microscopy,
Graduate Bulletin 2011 2012 algebra, ordinary differential equations,
microfluidics and separations, synthesis of novel macromolecules
and special emphasis on partial differential equations. Emphasis on
as well as theory and simulation involving molecular dynamics and
application of numerical methods to chemical engineering problems
Monte Carlo approaches. The course will provide a mechanism for
which cannot be solved by analytical methods. Prerequisite: Consent of
collaboration between faculty and students in this research area by
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
providing presentations on topics including the expertise of the group
CHEN507. APPLIED MATHEMATICS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING.
and unpublished, ongoing campus research. Prerequisites: consent of
3.0 Hours.
instructor. 1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour. Repeatable for credit to a
This course stresses the application of mathematics to problems drawn
maximum of 3 hours.
from chemical engineering fundamentals such as material and energy
BELS570. INTRO TO BIOCOMPATIBILITY. 3.0 Hours.
balances, transport phenomena and kinetics. Formulation and solution
Material biocompatibility is a function of tissue/ implant mechanics,
of ordinary and partial differential equations arising in chemical engi
implant morphology and surface chemistry. The interaction of the
neering or related processes or operations are discussed. Mathematical
physiologic environment
approaches are restricted to analytical solutions or techniques for
with a material is present at each of these levels, with subjects including
producing problems amenable to analytical solutions. Prerequisite:
material mechanical/structural matching to surrounding tissues, tissue
Undergraduate differential equations course; undergraduate chemical
responses to materials (inflammation, immune response), anabolic
engineering courses covering reaction kinetics, and heat, mass and
cellular responses and tissue
momentum transfer. 3 hours lecture-discussion; 3 semester hours.
engineering of new tissues on scaffold materials. This course is intended
CHEN509. ADVANCED CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
for senior level undergraduates and first year graduate students.
THERMODYNAMICS. 3.0 Hours.
Prerequisites: BELS301 or equivalent, or Consent of Instructor. 3 hours
Extension and amplification of under graduate chemical engineering
lecture; 3 semester hours.
thermodynamics. Topics will include the laws of thermodynamics,
thermodynamic properties of pure fluids and fluid mixtures, phase
equilibria, and chemical reaction
equilibria. Prerequisite: ChEN357 or equivalent or consent of instructor. 3
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 113
CHEN513. SELECTED TOPICS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING. 1-3
CHEN555. POLYMER AND COMPLEX FLUIDS COLLOQUIUM. 1.0
Hour.
Hour.
Selected topics chosen from special interests of instructor and students.
The Polymer and Complex Fluids Group at the Colorado School
Course may be repeated for credit on different topics. Prerequisite:
of Mines combines expertise in the areas of flow and field based
Consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours lecture/discussion; 1 to 3
transport, intelligent design and synthesis as well as nanomaterials
semester hours.
and nanotechnology. A wide range of research tools employed by the
group includes characterization using rheology, scattering, microscopy,
CHEN516. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA. 3.0 Hours.
microfluidics and separations, synthesis of novel macromolecules
Principles of momentum, heat, and mass transport with applications
as well as theory and simulation involving molecular dynamics and
to chemical and biological processes. Analytical methods for solving
Monte Carlo approaches. The course will provide a mechanism for
ordinary and partial differential equations in chemical engineering
collaboration between faculty and students in this research area by
with an emphasis on scaling and approximation techniques including
providing presentations on topics including the expertise of the group and
singular and regular perturbation methods. Convective transport in the
unpublished, ongoing campus research.
context of boundary layer theory and development of heat and mass
Prerequisites: consent of instructor. 1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour.
transfer coefficients. Introduction to computational methods for solving
Repeatable for credit to a maximum of 3 hours.
coupled transport problems in irregular geometries. 3 hours lecture and
discussion; 3 semester hours.
CHEN568. INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
RESEARCH. 3.0 Hours.
CHEN518. REACTION KINETICS AND CATALYSIS. 3.0 Hours.
Students will be expected to apply chemical engineering principles
Homogeneous and heterogeneous rate expressions. Fundamental
to critically analyze theoretical and experimental research results in
theories of reaction rates. Analysis of rate data and complex reaction
the chemical engineering literature, placing it in the context of the
networks. Properties of solid catalysts. Mass and heat transfer with
related literature. Skills to be developed and discussed include oral
chemical reaction. Hetero geneous non-catalytic reactions. Prerequisite:
presentations, technical writing, critical reviews, ethics, research
ChEN418 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
documentation (the laboratory notebook), research funding, types of
research, developing research, and problem solving. Students will use
CHEN524. COMPUTER-AIDED PROCESS SIMULATION. 3.0 Hours.
state-ofthe-
Advanced concepts in computer-aided process simulation are covered.
art tools to explore the literature and develop well-documented research
Topics include optimization, heat exchanger networks, data regression
proposals and presentations. Prerequisites: graduate student in Chemical
analysis, and separations systems. Use of industry-standard process
and Biological Engineering in good standing or consent of instructor. 3
simulation software (Aspen Plus) is stressed. Prerequisite: consent of
semester hours.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
hours.
CHEN569. FUEL CELL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
(I) Investigate fundamentals of fuel-cell operation and electrochemistry
CHEN535. INTERDISCIPLINARY MICROELECTRONICS
from a chemical-thermodynamics and materials- science perspective.
PROCESSING LABORATORY. 3.0 Hours.
Review types of fuel cells, fuel-processing requirements and approaches,
Application of science and engineering principles to the design,
and fuel-cell system integration. Examine current topics in fuel-cell
fabrication, and testing of microelectronic devices. Emphasis on specific
science and technology. Fabricate and test operational fuel cells in the
unit operations and the interrelation among processing steps. Consent of
Colorado Fuel Cell Center. 3 credit hours.
instructor 1 hour lecture, 4 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
CHEN570. INTRODUCTION TO MICROFLUIDICS. 3.0 Hours.
CHEN550. MEMBRANE SEPARATION TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
This course introduces the basic principles and applications of
This course is an introduction to the fabrication, characteri zation, and
microfluidics systems. Concepts related to microscale fluid mechanics,
application of synthetic membranes for gas and liquid separations.
transport, physics, and biology are presented. To gain familiarity with
Industrial membrane processes such as reverse osmosis, filtration,
small-scale systems, students are provided with the opportunity to
pervaporation, and gas separations will be covered as well as new
design, fabricate, and test a simple microfluColorado School of Mines
applications from the research literature. The course
Graduate Bulletin 2011–2012 55 idic device. Students will critically
will include lecture, experimental, and computational (molecular
analyze the literature in this emerging field. Prerequisites: ChEN307 or
simulation) laboratory components. Prerequisites: ChEN375, ChEN430 or
equivalent or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CHEN580. NATURAL GAS HYDRATES. 3.0 Hours.
The purpose of this class is to learn about clathrate hydrates, using two
of the instructor’s books, (1) Clathrate Hydrates of Natural Gases, Third
Edition (2008) co authored by C.A.Koh, and (2) Hydrate Engineering,
(2000). Using a basis of these books, and accompanying programs,
we have abundant resources to act as professionals who are always
learning. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

114 Graduate
CHEN584. FUNDAMENTALS OF CATALYSIS. 3.0 Hours.
CHEN625. MOLECULAR SIMULATION. 3.0 Hours.
The basic principles involved in the preparation, charac terization, testing
Principles and practice of modern computer simulation techniques
and theory of heterogeneous and homo geneous catalysts are discussed.
used to understand solids, liquids, and gases. Review of the statistical
Topics include chemisorption, adsorption isotherms, diffusion, surface
foundation of thermodynamics followed by indepth discussion of Monte
kinetics, promoters, poisons, catalyst theory and design, acid base
Carlo and Molecular Dynamics techniques. Discussion of intermolecular
catalysis and soluble transition metal complexes. Examples of important
potentials, extended ensembles, and mathematical algorithms used in
industrial applications are given. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 3
molecular simulations. Prerequisites: ChEN509 or equivalent, ChEN610
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
or equivalent recommended. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CHEN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING. 1-6 Hour.
CHEN690. SUPERVISED TEACHING OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING.
Topical courses in chemical engineering of special interest. Prerequisite:
2.0 Hours.
consent of instructor; 1 to 6 semester hours. Repeatable for credit under
Individual participation in teaching activities. Discussion, problem
different titles.
review and development, guidance of laboratory experiments, course
development, supervised practice teaching. Course may be repeated
CHEN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, appointment as a graduate
Individual research or special problem projects. Topics, content, and
student instructor, or consent of instructor. 6 to 10 hours supervised
credit hours to be agreed upon by student and supervising faculty
teaching; 2 semester hours.
member. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and department head,
submission of “Independent Study” form to CSM Registrar. 1 to 6
CHEN698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING. 1-6 Hour.
semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
Topical courses in chemical engineering of special interest. Prerequisite:
consent of instructor; 1 to 6 semester hours. Repeatable for credit under
CHEN604. TOPICAL RESEARCH SEMINARS. 1.0 Hour.
different titles.
Lectures, reports, and discussions on current research in chemical
engineering, usually related to the student’s thesis topic. Sections are
CHEN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
operated independently and are directed toward different research topics.
Individual research or special problem projects. Topics, content, and
Course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
credit hours to be agreed upon by student and supervising faculty
1 hour lecture-discussion; 1 semester hour. Repeatable for credit to a
member. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and department head,
maximum of 3 hours.
submission of “Independent Study” form to CSM Registrar. 1 to 6
semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
CHEN605. COLLOQUIUM. 1.0 Hour.
Students will attend a series of lectures by speakers from industry,
SYGN600. COLLEGE TEACHING. 2.0 Hours.
academia, and government. Primary emphasis will be on current
This course is designed for graduate students planning careers in
research in chemical engineering and related disciplines, with secondary
academia and focuses on principles of learning and teaching in a college
emphasis on ethical, philosophical, and career-related issues of
setting; methods to foster and assess higher order thinking; and effective
importance to the chemical engineering profession. Prerequisite:
design, delivery and assessment of college courses. Prerequisite:
Graduate status. 1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour. Repeatable for credit to
Permission of the instructor. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
a maximum of 10 hours.
CHEN608. ADVANCED TOPICS IN FLUID MECHANICS. 1-3 Hour.
Indepth analysis of selected topics in fluid mechanics with special
emphasis on chemical engineering applications. Prerequisite: ChEN508
or consent of instructor. 1 to 3 hours lecturediscussion; 1 to 3 semester
hours.
CHEN609. ADVANCED TOPICS IN THERMODYNAMICS. 1-3 Hour.
Advanced study of thermodynamic theory and application of
thermodynamic principles. Possible topics include stability, critical
phenomena, chemical thermodynamics, thermodynamics of polymer
solutions and thermodynamics of aqueous and ionic solutions.
Prerequisite: consent of in structor. 1 to 3 semester
hours.
CHEN610. APPLIED STATISTICAL THERMODYNAMICS. 3.0 Hours.
Principles of relating behavior to microscopic properties. Topics include
element of probability, ensemble theory, appli cation to gases and solids,
distribution theories of fluids, and transport properties. Prerequisite:
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 115
Chemistry and Geochemistry
Students must be enrolled in CHGN560 for each Fall and Spring
semester that they are in residence at CSM. A minimum of 36 semester
http://chemistry.mines.edu
hours, including at least 24 semester hours of course work, are required.
At least 15 of the required 24 semester hours of course work must be
Degrees Offered
taken in the Department of Chemistry & Geochemistry at CSM. The
• Master of Science (Chemistry; thesis and non-thesis options)
student’s thesis committee makes decisions on transfer credit. Up to
9 semester hours of graduate courses may be transferred from other
• Doctor of Philosophy (Applied Chemistry)
institutions, provided that those courses have not been used as credit
• Master of Science (Geochemistry; thesis)
toward a Bachelor degree.
• Professional Masters in Environmental Geochemistry (non-thesis)
Research-Intensive MS Degree: CSM undergraduates who enter the
• Doctor of Philosophy (Geochemistry)
graduate program through the combined BS/MS program may use this
All graduate degree programs in the Department of Chemistry &
option (thesis-based MS) to acquire a research-intensive MS degree
Geochemistry have been admitted to the Western Regional Graduate
by minimizing the time spent on coursework. This option requires a
Program (WICHE). This program allows residents of Alaska, Arizona,
minimum of 12 hours of coursework up to six hours of which may be
California, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota,
double counted from the student’s undergraduate studies at CSM (see
Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming to register at
below).
Colorado resident tuition rates.
M.S. Degree (chemistry, non-thesis option): The non-thesis M.S.
Program Description
degree requires 36 semester hours of course credit:
The Department of Chemistry & Geochemistry offers graduate degrees in
Course work
30.0
chemistry and in geochemistry. This section of the Bulletin only describes
Independent study
6.0
the chemistry degrees. For geochemistry degrees, please consult the
Total Hours
36.0
Geochemistry section of the bulletin.
The program of study includes the following four core courses,
Prerequisites
independent study on a topic determined by the student and the student’s
faculty advisor, and the preparation of a report based on the student’s
A candidate for an advanced degree in the chemistry program should
study topic:
have completed an undergraduate program in chemistry which is
essentially equivalent to that offered by the Department of Chemistry
CHGN502
ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
3.0
& Geochemistry at the Colorado School of Mines. Undergraduate
CHGN503
ADV PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I
4.0
deficiencies will be determined by faculty in the Department of Chemistry
CHGN505
ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
3.0
& Geochemistry through interviews and/or placement examinations at the
beginning of the student’s first semester of graduate work.
CHGN507
ADVANCED ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY
3.0
CHGN560
GRADUATE SEMINAR, M.S. (M.S.-level seminar) 1.0
Required Curriculum
Total Hours
14.0
Students must be enrolled in CHGN560 for each Fall and Spring
Chemistry
semester that they are in residence at CSM. At least 21 of the required
A student in the chemistry program, in consultation with the advisor and
36 semester hours of course work must be taken as a registered master’s
thesis committee, selects the program of study. Initially, before a thesis
degree student at CSM. The student’s committee makes decisions on
advisor and thesis committee have been chosen, the student is advised
courses to be taken, transfer credit, and examines the student’s written
by a temporary advisor and by the Graduate Affairs Committee in the
report. Up to 15 semester hours of graduate courses may be transferred
Department of Chemistry & Geochemistry. The following four graduate
into the degree program, provided that those courses have not been used
courses are designated as core courses in the Department of Chemistry
as credit toward a Bachelor degree.
and Geochemistry:
CSM undergraduates entering a combined B.S./M.S. program in
CHGN502
ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
3.0
chemistry may double-count six hours from their undergraduate studies
CHGN503
ADV PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I
4.0
toward the M.S. degree. The undergraduate courses that are eligible
for dual counting toward the M.S. degree are (with approval of faculty
CHGN505
ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
3.0
advisor and committee):
CHGN507
ADVANCED ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY
3.0
Total Hours
13.0
CHGN401
THEORETICAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
3.0
CHGN410
SURFACE CHEMISTRY
3.0
M.S. Degree (chemistry, thesis option): The program of study includes
CHGN403
INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL
3.0
the following four core courses, research, and the preparation and oral
CHEMISTRY
defense of an MS thesis based on the student’s research:
CHGN422
POLYMER CHEMISTRY LABORATORY
1.0
CHGN502
ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
3.0
CHGN428
BIOCHEMISTRY
3.0
CHGN503
ADV PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I
4.0
CHGN430
INTRODUCTION TO POLYMER SCIENCE
3.0
CHGN505
ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
3.0
CHGN475
COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY
3.0
CHGN507
ADVANCED ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY
3.0
CHGN498
SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (with approval 1-6
CHGN560
GRADUATE SEMINAR, M.S. (M.S.-level
1.0
of faculty advisor and committee)
seminar )

116 Graduate
Any 500 level lecture course taken as an undergraduate may also be
Geochemistry and biogeochemistry. Microbial and chemical processes
counted as part of the six hours from the undergraduate program (with
in global climate change, biomineralization, metal cycling, medical and
approval of faculty advisor and committee).
archeological geochemistry, humic substances.
Ph.D. Degree (Applied Chemistry): The program of study for the Ph.D.
Inorganic Chemistry. Synthesis, characterization, and applications of
degree in Applied Chemistry includes the departmental core courses,
metal and metal oxide nanoparticles.
a comprehensive examination, research, and the preparation and oral
Nanoscale materials. Design, synthesis and characterization of new
defense of a Ph.D. thesis based on the student’s research:
materials for catalysis, energy sciences, spectroscopic applications and
CHGN502
ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
3.0
drug delivery. Environmental fate of nanoparticles.
CHGN503
ADV PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I
4.0
Organic Chemistry. Polymer design, synthesis and characterization.
CHGN505
ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
3.0
Catalysis. Alternative fuels.
CHGN507
ADVANCED ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY
3.0
Physical and Computational Chemistry. Computational chemistry
CHGN560
GRADUATE SEMINAR, M.S. (M.S.-level seminar) 1.0
for polymer design, clathrate hydrates, energy sciences, and materials
CHGN660
GRADUATE SEMINAR, Ph.D. (Ph.D.-level
1.0
research. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.
seminar)
Polymers. New techniques for controlling polymer architecture and
Total Hours
15.0
composition. Theory and simulation. Separation and characterization.
The total hours of course work required for the Ph.D. degree is
determined on an individual basis by the student’s thesis committee. Up
to 24 semester hours of graduate-level course work may be transferred
Courses
from other institutions toward the Ph.D. degree provided that those
CHGC503. INTRODUCTION TO GEOCHEMISTRY. 4.0 Hours.
courses have not been used by the student toward a Bachelor’s
A comprehensive introduction to the basic concepts and principles of
degree. The student’s thesis committee may set additional course
geochemistry, coupled with a thorough overview of the related principles
requirements and will make decisions on requests for transfer credit.
of thermodynamics. Topics covered include: nucleosynthesis, origin of
Ph.D. students may base their CHGN560 seminar on any chemistry-
earth and solar system, chemical bonding, mineral chemistry, elemental
related topic including the proposed thesis research. The CHGN560
distributions and geochemical cycles, chemical equilibrium and kinetics,
seminar requirement must be completed no later than the end of the
isotope systematics, and organic and biogeochemistry. Prerequisite:
student’s second year of graduate studies at CSM. After completion of
Introductory chemistry, mineralogy and petrology, or consent of instructor.
the CHGN560 seminar, students must enroll in CHGN660. Students must
4 hours lecture, 4 semester hours.
be enrolled in either CHGN560 or CHGN660 for each Fall and Spring
semester that they are in residence at CSM. The CHGN660 seminar
CHGC504. METHODS IN GEOCHEMISTRY. 2.0 Hours.
must be based on the student’s Ph.D. research and must include detailed
Sampling of natural earth materials including rocks, soils, sediments, and
research findings and interpretation thereof. This CHGN660 seminar
waters. Preparation of naturally heterogeneous materials, digestions,
must be presented close to, but before, the student’s oral defense of
and partial chemical extractions. Principles of instrumental analysis
the thesis. The comprehensive examination comprises a written non-
including atomic spectroscopy, mass separations, and chromatography.
thesis proposal wherein the student prepares an original proposal on
Quality assurance and quality control. Interpretation and assessment
a chemistry topic distinctly different from the student’s principal area
of geochemical data using statistical methods. Prerequisite: Graduate
of research. The student must orally defend the non-thesis proposal
standing in geochemistry or environmental science and engineering. 2
before the thesis committee. The non-thesis proposal requirement must
hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
be completed prior to the end of the student’s second year of graduate
studies. A student’s thesis committee may, at its discretion, require
CHGC505. INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY. 3.0
additional components to the comprehensive examination process such
Hours.
as inclusion of cumulative or other examinations.
(II) Processes by which natural and anthropogenic chemicals interact,
Geochemistry
react, and are transformed and redistributed in various environmental
compartments. Air, soil, and aqueous (fresh and saline surface and
Please see the Geochemistry section (bulletin.mines.edu/graduate/
groundwaters) environments are covered, along with specialized
graduatedepartmentsandprograms/geochemistry) of the bulletin for
environments such as waste treatment facilities and the upper
information on Geochemistry degree programs.
atmosphere. Meets with CHGN403. CHGN403 and CHGC505 may
Fields of Research
not both be taken for credit. Prerequisites: SYGN101, CHGN122 and
DCGN209 or DCGN210 or permission of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
Analytical and bioanalytical chemistry. Separation and
semester hours.
characterization techniques for polymers, biopolymers, nano-particles
and natural colloids. Biodetection of pathogens. Advanced separations
for nuclear fuel cycle.
Energy sciences. Alternative fuels. New materials for solar energy
conversion. Radiochemistry.
Environmental chemistry. Detection and fate of anthropogenic
contaminants in water, soil, and air. Acid mine drainage. Ecotoxicology.
Environmental photochemistry.

Colorado School of Mines 117
CHGC506. WATER ANALYSIS LABORATORY. 2.0 Hours.
CHGC555. ENVIRONMENTAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 3.0 Hours.
Instrumental analysis of water samples using spectroscopy and
A study of the chemical and physical interactions which determine
chromatography. Methods for field collection of water samples and
the fate, transport and interactions of organic chemicals in aquatic
field measurements. The development of laboratory skills for the use of
systems, with emphasis on chemical transformations of anthropogenic
ICP-AES, HPLC, ion chromatography, and GC. Laboratory techniques
organic contaminants. Prerequisites: A course in organic chemistry and
focus on standard methods for the measurement of inorganic and
CHGN503, Advanced Physical Chemistry or its equivalent, or consent of
organic constituents in water samples. Methods of data analysis are also
instructor. Offered in alternate years. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
presented. Prerequisite: Introductory chemistry, graduate standing or
consent of instructor. 3 hour laboratory, 1 hour lecture, 2 semester hours.
CHGC562. MICROBIOLOGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT. 3.0 Hours.
This course will cover the basic fundamentals of microbiology, such as
CHGC509. INTRODUCTION TO AQUEOUS GEOCHEMISTRY. 3.0
structure and function of procaryotic versus eucaryotic cells; viruses;
Hours.
classification of micro-organisms; microbial metabolism, energetics,
Analytical, graphical and interpretive methods applied to aqueous
genetics, growth and diversity; microbial interactions with plants, animals,
systems. Thermodynamic properties of water and aqueous solutions.
and other microbes. Additional topics covered will include various aspects
Calculations and graphical expression of acid-base, redox and solution-
of environmental microbiology such as global biogeochemical cycles,
mineral equilibria. Effect of temperature and kinetics on natural aqueous
bioleaching, bioremediation, and wastewater treatment. Prerequisite:
systems. Adsorption and ion exchange equilibria between clays and
ESGN301 or consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
oxide phases. Behavior of trace elements and complexation in aqueous
Offered alternate years.
systems. Application of organic geochemistry to natural aqueous
systems. Light stable and unstable isotopic studies applied to aqueous
CHGC563. ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY. 2.0 Hours.
systems. Prerequisite: DCGN209 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. 3
An introduction to the microorganisms of major geochemical importance,
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
as well as those of primary importance in water pollution and waste
treatment. Microbes and sedimentation, microbial leaching of metals from
CHGC511. GEOCHEMISTRY OF IGNEOUS ROCKS. 3.0 Hours.
ores, acid mine water pollution, and the microbial ecology of marine and
A survey of the geochemical characteristics of the various types of
freshwater habitats are covered. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1
igneous rock suites. Application of major element, trace element, and
hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
isotope geochemistry to problems of their origin and modification.
Prerequisite: Undergraduate mineralogy and petrology or consent of
CHGC564. BIOGEOCHEMISTRY AND GEOMICROBIOLOGY. 3.0
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
Hours.
Designed to give the student an understanding of the role of living
CHGC514. GEOCHEMISTRY THERMODYNAMICS AND KINETICS. 3.0
things, particularly microorganisms, in the shaping of the earth.
Hours.
Among the subjects will be the aspects of living processes, chemical
(II) Fundamental principles of classical thermodynamics and kinetics
composition and characteristics of biological material, origin of life, role
with specific application to the earth sciences. Volume-temperature –
of microorganisms in weathering of rocks and the early diagenesis of
pressure relationships for solids, liquids, gases and solutions. Energy
sediments, and the origin of petroleum, oil shale, and coal. Prerequisite:
and the First Law, Entropy and the Second and Third Laws. Gibbs Free
Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Energy, chemical equilibria and the equilibrium constant. Solutions and
activity-composition relationships for solids, fluids and gases. Phase
CHGC598. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
equilibria and the graphical representation of equilibira. Application of
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
the fundamentals of kinetics to geochemical examples. Prerequisite:
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
Introductory chemistry, introductory thermodynamics, mineralogy and
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
petrology, or consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
Offered in alternate years.
CHGC610. NUCLEAR AND ISOTOPIC GEOCHEMISTRY. 3.0 Hours.
CHGC527. ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY OF FOSSIL FUELS AND ORE
A study of the principles of geochronology and stable isotope distributions
DEPOSITS. 3.0 Hours.
with an emphasis on the application of these principles to important case
A study of organic carbonaceous materials in relation to the genesis
studies in igneous petrology and the formation of ore deposits. U, Th, and
and modification of fossil fuel and ore deposits. The biological origin of
Pb isotopes, K-Ar, Rb-Sr, oxygen isotopes, sulfur isotopes, and carbon
the organic matter will be discussed with emphasis on contributions of
isotopes included. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
microorganisms to the nature of these deposits. Biochemical and thermal
semester hours Offered alternate years.
changes which convert the organic compounds into petroleum, oil shale,
CHGC698. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
tar sand, coal and other carbonaceous matter will be studied. Principal
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
analytical techniques used for the characterization of organic matter in
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
the geosphere and for evaluation of oil and gas source potential will be
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
discussed. Laboratory exercises will emphasize source rock evaluation,
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
and oil-source rock and oil-oil correlation methods. Prerequisite:
CHGN221, GEGN438, or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours
lab; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.

118 Graduate
CHGC699. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-3 Hour.
CHGN515. CHEMICAL BONDING IN MATERIALS. 3.0 Hours.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
(I) Introduction to chemical bonding theories and calculations and their
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
applications to solids of interest to materials science. The relationship
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
between a material’s properties and the bonding of its atoms will be
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
examined for a variety of materials. Includes an introduction to organic
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
polymers. Computer programs will be used for calculating bonding
parameters. Prerequisite: Consent of department. 3 hours lecture; 3
CHGN502. ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 3.0 Hours.
semester hours.
(II) Detailed examination of topics such as ligand field theory, reaction
mechanisms, chemical bonding, and structure of inorganic compounds.
CHGN523. SOLID STATE CHEMISTRY. 3.0 Hours.
Emphasis is placed on the correlations of the chemical reactions of the
(I) Dependence of properties of solids on chemical bonding and structure;
elements with periodic trends and reactivities. Prerequisite: Consent of
principles of crystal growth, crystal imperfections, reactions and diffusion
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
in solids, and the theory of conductors and semiconductors. Prerequisite:
Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered
CHGN503. ADV PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I. 4.0 Hours.
alternate years.
(II) Quantum chemistry of classical systems. Principles of chemical
thermodynamics. Statistical mechanics with statistical calculation of
CHGN536. ADVANCED POLYMER SYNTHESIS. 3.0 Hours.
thermodynamic properties. Theories of chemical kinetics. Prerequisite:
(II) An advanced course in the synthesis of macromolecules. Various
Consent of instructor. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
methods of polymerization will be discussed with an emphasis on the
specifics concerning the syntheses of different classes of organic and
CHGN505. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 3.0 Hours.
inorganic polymers. Prerequisite:
Detailed discussion of the more important mechanisms of organic
CHGN430, ChEN415, MLGN530 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture,
reaction. Structural effects and reactivity. The application of reaction
3 semester hours.
mechanisms to synthesis and structure proof. Prerequisite: Consent of
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CHGN555. POLYMER AND COMPLEX FLUIDS COLLOQUIUM. 1.0
Hour.
CHGN507. ADVANCED ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY. 3.0 Hours.
The Polymer and Complex Fluids Group at the Colorado School
(I) Review of fundamentals of analytical chemistry. Literature of
of Mines combines expertise in the areas of flow and field based
analytical chemistry and statistical treatment of data. Manipulation
transport, intelligent design and synthesis as well as nanomaterials
of real substances; sampling, storage, decomposition or dissolution,
and nanotechnology. A wide range of research tools employed by the
and analysis. Detailed treatment of chemical equilibrium as related to
group includes characterization using rheology, scattering, microscopy,
precipitation, acid-base, complexation and redox titrations. Potentiometry
microfluidics and separations, synthesis of novel macromolecules
and UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry.
as well as theory and simulation involving molecular dynamics and
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Monte Carlo approaches. The course will provide a mechanism for
collaboration between faculty and students in this research area by
CHGN508. ANALYTICAL SPECTROSCOPY. 3.0 Hours.
providing presentations on topics including the expertise of the group
(II) Detailed study of classical and modern spectroscopic methods;
and unpublished, ongoing campus research. Prerequisites: consent of
emphasis on instrumentation and application to analytical chemistry
instructor. 1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour. Repeatable for credit to a
problems. Topics include: UV-visible spectroscopy, infrared
maximum of 3 hours.
spectroscopy, fluorescence and phosphorescence, Raman spectroscopy,
arc and spark emission spectroscopy, flame methods, nephelometry
CHGN560. GRADUATE SEMINAR, M.S.. 1.0 Hour.
and turbidimetry, reflectance methods, Fourier transform methods in
(I, II) Required for all candidates for the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in
spectroscopy, photoacoustic spectroscopy, rapid-scanning spectroscopy.
chemistry and geochemistry. M.S. students must register for the course
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
during each semester of residency. Ph.D. students must register each
Offered alternate years.
semester until a grade is received satisfying the prerequisites for
CHGN660. Presentation of a graded non-thesis seminar and attendance
CHGN510. CHEMICAL SEPARATIONS. 3.0 Hours.
at all departmental seminars are required. Prerequisite: Graduate student
(II) Survey of separation methods, thermodynamics of phase
status. 1 semester hour.
equilibria, thermodynamics of liquid-liquid partitioning, various types of
chromatography, ion exchange, electrophoresis, zone refining, use of
CHGN580. STRUCTURE OF MATERIALS. 3.0 Hours.
inclusion compounds for separation, application of separation technology
(II) Application of X-ray diffraction techniques for crystal and molecular
for determining physical constants, e.g., stability constants of complexes.
structure determination of minerals, inorganic and organometallic
Prerequisite: CHGN507 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
compounds. Topics include the heavy atom method, data collection
semester hours. Offered alternate years.
by moving film techniques and by diffractometers, Fourier methods,
interpretation of Patterson maps, refinement methods, direct methods.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Offered alternate years.

Colorado School of Mines 119
CHGN581. ELECTROCHEMISTRY. 3.0 Hours.
CHGN660. GRADUATE SEMINAR, Ph.D.. 1.0 Hour.
(I) Introduction to theory and practice of electrochemistry. Electrode
(I, II) Required of all candidates for the doctoral degree in chemistry or
potentials, reversible and irreversible cells, activity concept. Interionic
geochemistry. Students must register for this course each semester
attraction theory, proton transfer theory of acids and bases, mechanisms
after completing CHGN560. Presentation of a graded nonthesis seminar
and fates of electrode reactions. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3
and attendance at all department seminars are required. Prerequisite:
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
CHGN560 or equivalent. 1 semester hour.
CHGN583. PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS OF SURFACE
CHGN698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY. 1-6 Hour.
ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES. 3.0 Hours.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
(II) Instru mental techniques for the characterization of surfaces of
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
solid materials; Applications of such techniques to polymers, corrosion,
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
metallurgy, adhesion science, microelectronics. Methods of analysis
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
discussed: x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), auger electron
spectroscopy (AES), ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS), secondary
CHGN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), Rutherford backscattering (RBS),
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), energy
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
and wavelength dispersive x-ray analysis; principles of these methods,
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
quantification, instrumentation, sample preparation. Prerequisite: B.S.
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
in Metallurgy, Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Physics, or consent of
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CHGN707. GRADUATE THESIS/DISSERTATION RESEARCH CREDIT.
CHGN584. FUNDAMENTALS OF CATALYSIS. 3.0 Hours.
1-14 Hour.
(II) The basic principles involved in the preparation, characterization,
(I, II, S) GRADUATE THESIS/DISSERTATION RESEARCH CREDIT
testing and theory of heterogeneous and homo geneous catalysts are
Research credit hours required for completion of a Masters-level thesis
discussed. Topics include chemisorption, adsorption isotherms, diffusion,
or Doctoral dissertation. Research must be carried out under the direct
surface kinetics, promoters, poisons, catalyst theory and design, acid
supervision of the student’s faculty advisor. Variable class and semester
base catalysis and soluble transition metal complexes. Examples of
hours. Repeatable for credit.
important industrial applications are given. Prerequisite: CHGN222 or
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CHGN585. CHEMICAL KINETICS. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Study of kinetic phenomena in chemical systems. Attention devoted
to various theoretical approaches. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
CHGN597. SPECIAL RESEARCH. 15.0 Hours.
CHGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
CHGN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
CHGN625. MOLECULAR SIMULATION. 3.0 Hours.
Principles and practice of modern computer simulation techniques
used to understand solids, liquids, and gases. Review of the statistical
foundation of thermodynamics followed by indepth discussion of Monte
Carlo and Molecular Dynamics techniques. Discussion of intermolecular
potentials, extended ensembles, and mathematical algorithms used in
molecular simulations. Prerequisites: ChEN509 or equivalent, ChEN610
or equivalent recommended. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

120 Graduate
Metallurgical and Materials
2. Approval of all courses by the Engineering-Report Committee and
the Department Head (Engineering-Report Committee consisting of
Engineering
3 or more members, including the advisor and at least 2 additional
members from the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
http://metallurgy.mines.edu/
Department.)
Degrees Offered
3. Submittal and successful oral defense, before the Engineering-
Report Committee, of an Engineering Report, which presents the
• Master of Engineering (Metallurgical and Materials Engineering)
results of a case study or an engineering development.
• Master of Science (Metallurgical and Materials Engineering)
Restrictions:
• Doctor of Philosophy (Metallurgical and Materials Engineering)
1. Only three (3) credit hours of independent course work, e.g.
Program Description
MTGN599, can be applied toward the degree.
The program of study for the Master or Doctor of Philosophy degrees
2. A maximum of nine (9) credit hours of approved 400-level course
in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering is selected by the student in
work can be applied toward the degree.
consultation with her or his advisor, and with the approval of the Thesis
3. Courses taken to remove deficiencies cannot be applied toward the
Committee. The program can be tailored within the framework of the
degree.
regulations of the Graduate School to match the student’s interests while
maintaining the main theme of materials engineering and processing.
The Master of Engineering Degree can be obtained as part of the
There are three Areas of Specialization within the Department:
combined undergraduate/graduate degree program. See "Combined
Undergraduate/Graduate Degree Programs" section of the bulletin for
• Physical and Mechanical Metallurgy;
more details.
• Physicochemical Processing of Materials; and,
Master of Science Degree
• Ceramic Engineering.
Requirements: A minimum total of 30.0 credit hours, consisting of:
The Department is home to six research centers:
1. A minimum of 18.0 credit hours of approved course work and a
• Advanced Coatings and Surface Engineering Laboratory (ACSEL);
minimum of 6.0 hours of graduate research-credits listed under
• Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research Center
MTGN707.
(ASPPRC);
2. Approval of all courses by the Thesis Committee and the
• Center for Advanced Non Ferrous Structural Alloys (CANFSA)
Department Head. (Thesis Committee: consisting of 3 or more
• Center for Welding Joining, and Coatings Research (CWJCR);
members, including the advisor and at least 1 additional member
• Colorado Center for Advanced Ceramics (CCAC); and,
from the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department.)
• Kroll Institute for Extractive Metallurgy (KIEM).
3. Submittal and successful oral defense of a thesis before a Thesis
Committee. The thesis must present the results of original scientific
The Nuclear Science and Engineering Center (NuSEC) also operates
research or development.
closely with the Department.
Restrictions:
A Graduate Certificate is offered by each Department Center – the
requirements for the Graduate Certificate are:
1. Only three (3) credit hours of independent course work, e.g.
MTGN599, can be applied toward the degree.
1. Be admitted to MME Graduate Certificate Program upon the
2. A maximum of nine (9) credit hours of approved 400-level course
recommendation of the MME Department.
work can be applied toward the degree.
2. Complete a total of 12 hours of course credits of which only 3 credit
3. Courses taken to remove deficiencies cannot be applied toward the
hours can be at the 400 level.
degree.
The specific courses to be taken are determined by the Graduate Advisor
Doctor of Philosophy Degree
in the Department Center selected by the candidate. A cumulative grade
point average of B or better must be maintained while completing these
Requirements: A minimum total of 72.0 credit hours consisting of:
requirements.
1. A minimum of 36.0 credit hours of approved course work and a
minimum of 24.0 hours of research-credits (MTGN707). Credit
Degree Program Requirements
hours previously earned for a Master’s degree may be applied,
subject to approval, toward the Doctoral degree provided that the
The program requirements for the three graduate degrees offered by the
Master’s degree was in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering or
Department are listed below:
a similar field. At least 21.0 credit hours of approved course work
Master of Engineering Degree
must be taken at the Colorado School of Mines.
2. All courses and any applicable Master’s degree credit-hours must
Requirements: A minimum total of 30.0 credit hours consisting of:
be approved by the Thesis Committee and the Department Head
1. A minimum of 24.0 credit hours of approved course work and 6.0
(Thesis Committee consisting of: 5 or more members, including the
hours of graduate research-credits listed under MTGN700.
advisor, at least 2 additional members from the Metallurgical and
Materials Engineering Department, and at least 1 member from
outside the Department.)

Colorado School of Mines 121
3. Presentation of a Proposal on the Thesis-Research Project to the
• Pyrometallurgy
Thesis Committee.
• Recycling and recovery of materials
4. Passing grade on the written and oral Qualifying-Process (Q.P.)
• Thermal plasma processing
Examinations.
5. Presentation of a Progress Report on their Research Project to
Nonferrous Research
the Thesis Committee; this presentation is usually 6 months after
• Aluminum alloys
successfully completing the Q.P. Examinations and no fewer than 6
• High entropy alloys
weeks before the Defense of Thesis.
• Magnesium alloys
6. Submittal and successful oral-defense of a thesis before the Thesis
• Nonferrous structural alloys
Committee. The thesis must present the results of original scientific
research or development.
• Shape memory alloys
• Superalloys
Restrictions:
• Titanium alloys
1. Only six (6) credit hours of independent course work, e.g.
MTGN599, can be applied toward the degree.
Polymers and Biomaterials Research
2. A maximum of nine (9) credit hours of approved 400-level course
• Advanced polymer membranes and thin films
work can be applied toward the degree.
• Biopolymers
3. Courses taken to remove deficiencies cannot be applied toward the
• Bio-mimetic and bio-inspired materials engineering
degree.
• Calcium phosphate based ceramics
Prerequisites
• Drug delivery
• Failure of medical devices
The entering graduate-student in the Department of Metallurgical
• Interfaces between materials and tissue
and Materials Engineering must have completed an undergraduate
program equivalent to that required for the B.S. degree in: Metallurgical
• Living/controlled polymerization
and Materials Engineering, Materials Science or a related field. This
• Organic-inorganic hybrid materials
undergraduate program should have included a background in science
• Porous structured materials
fundamentals and engineering principles. A student, who possesses
• Self- and directed-assembly
this background but has not taken specific undergraduate courses in
• Structural medical alloys
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, will be allowed to rectify these
course deficiencies at the beginning of their program of study.
• Tissue as a composite material
Fields of Research
Steel Research
Ceramic Research
• Advanced high strength steels
• Advanced steel coatings
• Ceramic processing
• Carburized steels
• Ceramic-metal composites
• Deformation behavior of steels
• Functional materials
• Fatigue behavior of steels
• Ion implantation
• Microalloyed steels
• Modeling of ceramic processing
• Nickel-based steels
• Solid oxide fuel cell materials and membranes
• Quench and partitioned steels
• Transparent conducting oxides
• Plate steels
Coatings Research
• Sheet steels
• Chemical vapor deposition
Welding and Joining Research
• Coating materials, films and applications
• Brazing of ultra wide gaps
• Epitaxial growth
• Explosive processing of materials
• Interfacial science
• Laser welding and processing
• Physical vapor deposition
• Levitation for kinetics and surface tension evaluation
• Surface mechanics
• Materials joining processes
• Surface physics
• Pyrochemical kinetics studies using levitation
• Tribology of thin films and coatings
• Underwater and under oil welding
Extractive and Mineral Processing Research
• Welding and joining science
• Chemical and physical processing of materials
• Welding rod development
• Electrometallurgy
• Welding stress management
• Hydrometallurgy
• Weld metallurgy
• Mineral processing
• Weld wire development

122 Graduate
Nuclear Materials Research
MTGN514. DEFECT CHEMISTRY AND TRANSPORT PROCESSES IN
CERAMIC SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
• Nuclear materials characterization
(I) Ceramic materials science in the area of structural imperfections,
• Nuclear materials processing
their chemistry, and their relation to mass and charge transport; defects
• Nuclear materials properties
and diffusion, sintering, and grain growth with particular emphasis
on the relation of fundamental transport phenomena to sintering and
Experimental Methods
microstructure development and control. Prerequisites: DCGN209
• 3D atom probe tomography
or MTGN351; MTGN311 or Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
• Atomic force microscopy
semester hours. (Fall of odd years only.).
• Computer modeling and simulation
MTGN516. MICROSTRUCTURE OF CERAMIC SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
• Electron microscopy
(II) Analysis of the chemical and physical processes controlling
• Mathematical modeling of material processes
microstructure development in ceramic systems. Development of
• Nanoindentation
the glassy phase in ceramic systems and the resulting properties.
Relationship of microstructure to chemical, electrical, and mechanical
• Non-destructive evaluation
properties of ceramics. Application to strengthening and toughening in
• X-ray diffraction
ceramic composite system. Prerequisite: Graduate status or Consent
Other Research Areas
of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of even years
only.).
• Combustion synthesis
• Corrosion science and engineering
MTGN517. REFRACTORIES. 3.0 Hours.
• Failure analysis
(I) The manufacture, testing, and use of basic, neutral, acid, and specialty
refractories are presented. Special emphasis is placed on the relationship
• Mechanical metallurgy
between
• Phase transformation and mechanism of microstructural change
physical properties of the various refractories and their uses in the
• Physical metallurgy
metallurgical industry. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture;
• Reactive metals properties
3 semester hours.
• Strengthening mechanisms
MTGN518. PHASE EQUILIBRIA IN CERAMIC SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
• Structure-property relationships
(II) Application of one to four component oxide diagrams to ceramic
engineering problems. Emphasis on refractories and glasses and their
interaction with metallic systems. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3
Courses
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of odd years only.).
MTGN505. CRYSTALLOGRAPHY AND DIFFRACTION. 3.0 Hours.
MTGN523. APPLIED SURFACE AND SOLUTION CHEMISTRY. 3.0
(I) Introduction to point symmetry operations, crystal systems, Bravais
Hours.
lattices, point groups, space groups, Laue classes, stereographic
(II) Solution and surface chemistry of importance in mineral and
projections, reciprocal lattice and Ewald sphere constructions, the
metallurgical operations. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours
new International Tables for Crystallography, and, finally, how certain
lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of odd years only.).
properties correlate with symmetry. Subsequent to the crystallography
portion, the course will move into the area of diffraction and will consider
MTGN526. GEL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
the primary diffraction techniques (x-rays, electrons and neutrons) used
An introduction to the science and technology of particulate and
to determine the crystal structure of materials. Other applications of
polymeric gels, emphasizing inorganic systems. Interparticle forces.
diffraction such as texture and residual stress will also be considered.
Aggregation, network formation, percolation, and the gel transition. Gel
Prerequisites: Graduate or Senior in good standing or consent of
structure, rheology, and mechanical properties. Application to solid-
instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
liquid separation operations (filtration, centrifugation, sedimentation) and
to ceramics processing. Prerequisite: Graduate Status or Consent of
MTGN511. SPECIAL METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS
Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of odd
ENGINEERING PROBLEMS. 1-3 Hour.
years only.).
(I) Independent advanced work, not leading to a thesis. This may take the
form of conferences, library, and laboratory work. Selection of assignment
MTGN527. SOLID WASTE MINIMIZATION AND RECYCLING. 3.0
is arranged between student and a specific Department faculty-member.
Hours.
Prerequisite: Selection of topic with consent of faculty supervisor. 1 to 3
(II) Industrial case-studies, on the application of engineering principles to
semester hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.
minimize waste formation and to meet solid waste recycling challenges.
Proven and emerging solutions to solid waste environmental problems,
MTGN512. SPECIAL METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS
especially those associated with metals. Prerequisites: ESGN500 and
ENGINEERING PROBLEMS. 1-3 Hour.
ESGN504 or Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(II) Continuation of MTGN511. Prerequisite: Selection of topic with
consent of faculty supervisor. 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for
credit under different titles.

Colorado School of Mines 123
MTGN528. EXTRACTIVE METALLURGY OF COPPER, GOLD AND
MTGN533. PARTICULATE MATERIAL PROCESSING II - APPLIED
SILVER. 3.0 Hours.
SEPARATIONS. 3.0 Hours.
Practical applications of fundamentals of chemical-processing-of-
An introduction to the fundamental principles and design criteria for
materials to the extraction of gold, silver and copper. Topics covered
the selection and use of standard mineral processing unit operations in
include: History; Ore deposits and mineralogy; Process Selection;
applied separations. Topics covered include: photometric ore sorting,
Hydrometallurgy and leaching; Oxidation pretreatment; Purification
magnetic separation, dense media separation, gravity separation,
and recovery; Refinement; Waste treatment; and Industrial examples.
electrostatic separation and flotation (surface chemistry, reagents
Prerequisites: Graduate or Senior in good-standing or consent of
selection, laboratory testing procedures, design and simulation). Two
instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
standard mineral processing plant-design simulation software (MinOCad
and JK SimMet) are used in the course. Graduate or Senior in good-
MTGN529. METALLURGICAL ENVIRONMENT. 3.0 Hours.
standing or consent of instructor.3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
(I) Effluents, wastes, and their point sources associated with metallurgical
processes, such as mineral concentration and values extraction—
MTGN534. CASE STUDIES IN PROCESS DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Hours.
providing for an interface between metallurgical process engineering and
A study of the steps required for development of a mineral recovery
the environmental engineering areas. Fundamentals of metallurgical unit
process. Technical, economic, and human factors involved in bringing
operations and unit processes, applied to waste and effluents control,
a process concept into commercial production. Prerequisite: Consent of
recycling, and waste disposal. Examples which incorporate engineering
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
design and cost components are included. Prerequisites: MTGN334 or
Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MTGN535. PYROMETALLURGICAL PROCESSES. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Detailed study of a selected few processes, illustrating the application
MTGN530. ADVANCED IRON AND STEELMAKING. 3.0 Hours.
of the principles of physical chemistry (both thermodynamics and kinetics)
(I) Physicochemical principles of gas-slag-metal reactions applied to
and chemical engineering (heat and mass transfer, fluid flow, plant
the reduction of iron ore concentrates and to the refining of liquid iron
design, fuel technology, etc.) to process development. Prerequisite:
to steel. The role of these reactions in reactor design—blast furnace
Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and direct iron smelting furnace, pneumatic steelmaking furnace,
refining slags, deoxidation and degassing, ladle metallurgy, alloying,
MTGN536. OPTIMIZATION AND CONTROL OF METALLURGICAL
and continuous casting of steel. Prerequisite: DCGN209 or MTGN351
SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
or Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of even
Application of modern optimization and control theory to the analysis
years only.).
of specific systems in extractive metallurgy and mineral processing.
Mathematical modeling, linear control analysis, dynamic response, and
MTGN531. THERMODYNAMICS OF METALLURGICAL AND
indirect optimum seeking techniques applied to the process analysis
MATERIALS PROCESSING. 3.0 Hours.
of grinding, screening, filtration, leaching, precipitation of metals from
(I) Application of thermodynamics to the processing of metals
solution, and blast furnace reduction of metals. Prerequisite: Consent of
and materials, with emphasis on the use of thermodynamics in
Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
the development and optimization of processing systems. Focus
areas will include entropy and enthalpy, reaction equilibrium,
MTGN537. ELECTROMETALLURGY. 3.0 Hours.
solution thermodynamics, methods for analysis and correlation of
(II) Electrochemical nature of metallurgical processes. Kinetics
thermodynamics data, thermodynamic analysis of phase diagrams,
of electrode reactions. Electrochemical oxidation and reduction.
thermodynamics of surfaces, thermodynamics of defect structures, and
Complex electrode reactions. Mixed potential systems. Cell design and
irreversible thermodynamics. Attention will be given to experimental
optimization of electrometallurgical processes. Batteries and fuel cells.
methods for the measurement of thermodynamic quantities. Prerequisite:
Some aspects of corrosion. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours
MTGN351 or Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of even years only.).
MTGN532. PARTICULATE MATERIAL PROCESSING I -
MTGN538. HYDROMETALLURGY. 3.0 Hours.
COMMINUTION AND PHYSICAL SEPARATIONS. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Kinetics of liquid-solid reactions. Theory of uniformly accessible
An introduction to the fundamental principles and design criteria for
surfaces. Hydrometallurgy of sulfide and oxides. Cementation
the selection and use of standard mineral processing unit operations in
and hydrogen reduction. Ion exchange and solvent extraction.
comminution and physical separation. Topics covered include: crushing
Physicochemical phenomena at high pressures. Microbiological
(jaw, cone, gyratory), grinding (ball, pebble, rod, SAG, HPGR), screening,
metallurgy. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
thickening, sedimentation, filtration and hydrocyclones. Two standard
semester hours. (Spring of odd years only.).
mineral processing plant-design simulation software (MinOCad and
JK SimMet) are used in the course. Prerequisites: Graduate or Senior
in good- standing or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester
hours.

124 Graduate
MTGN539. PRINCIPLES OF MATERIALS PROCESSING REACTOR
MTGN547. PHASE EQUILIBRIA IN MATERIALS SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.
(I) Phase equilibria of uniary, binary, ternary, and multicomponent
(II) Review of reactor types and idealized design equations for isothermal
systems, microstructure interpretation, pressure-temperature diagrams,
conditions. Residence time functions for nonreacting and reacting
determination of phase diagrams. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3
species and its relevance to process control. Selection of reactor type
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
for a given application. Reversible and irreversible reactions in CSTR’s
under nonisothermal conditions. Heat and mass transfer considerations
MTGN548. TRANSFORMATIONS IN METALS. 3.0 Hours.
and kinetics of gas-solid reactions applied to fluo-solids type reactors.
(I) Surface and interfacial phenomena, order of transformation, grain
Reactions in packed beds. Scale up and design of experiments.
growth, recovery, recrystallization, solidification, phase transformation
Brief introduction into drying, crystallization, and bacterial processes.
in solids, precipitation hardening, spinoidal decomposition, martensitic
Examples will be taken from current metallurgical practice. Prerequisite:
transformation, gas metal reactions. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3
Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of odd
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of odd years only.).
years only.).
MTGN549. CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS IN FERROUS ALLOYS. 3.0
MTGN541. INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS OF METALS. 3.0 Hours.
Hours.
(I) Electron theory of metals. Classical and quantum-mechanical free
(I) Development and review of solid state transformations and
electron theory. Electrical and thermal conductivity, thermo electric
strengthening mechanisms in ferrous alloys. Application of these
effects, theory of magnetism, specific heat, diffusion, and reaction rates.
principles to the development of new alloys and processes such as high
Prerequisite: MTGN445.
strength low alloy steels, high temperature alloys, maraging steels, and
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
case hardening processes. Prerequisite: MTGN348. 3 hours lecture; 3
semester hours.
MTGN542. ALLOYING THEORY, STRUCTURE, AND PHASE
STABILITY. 3.0 Hours.
MTGN551. ADVANCED CORROSION ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Empirical rules and theories relating to alloy formation. Various alloy
(I) Advanced topics in corrosion engineering. Case studies and industrial
phases and constituents which result when metals are alloyed and
application. Special forms of corrosion. Advanced measurement
examined in detail. Current information on solid solutions, intermetallic
techniques. Prerequisite: MTGN451. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
compounds, eutectics, liquid immiscibility. Prerequisite: MTGN445 or
(Fall of even years only.).
Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MTGN552. INORGANIC MATRIX COMPOSITES. 3.0 Hours.
MTGN543. THEORY OF DISLOCATIONS. 3.0 Hours.
Introduction to the processing, structure, properties and applications of
(I) Stress field around dislocation, forces on dislocations, dislocation
metal matrix and ceramic matrix composites. Importance of structure
reactions, dislocation multiplication, image forces, interaction with point
and properties of both the matrix and the reinforcement and the types
defects, interpretation of macroscopic behavior in light of dislocation
of reinforcement utilized-particulate, short fiber, continuous fiber, and
mechanisms. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
laminates. Emphasis on the development of mechanical properties
semester hours. (Fall of odd years only.).
through control of synthesis and processing parameters. Other physical
properties such as electrical and thermal will also be examined.
MTGN544. FORGING AND DEFORMATION MODELING. 3.0 Hours.
Prerequisite/Co-requisite*: MTGN352, MTGN445/MLGN505*; or,
(I) Examination of the forging process for the fabrication of metal
Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Summer of
components. Techniques used to model deformation processes including
even years only.).
slab equilibrium, slip line, upper bound and finite element methods.
Application of these techniques to specific aspects of forging and metal
MTGN553. STRENGTHENING MECHANISMS. 3.0 Hours.
forming processes. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
(II) Strain hardening in polycrystalline materials, dislocation inter
semester hours. (Fall of odd years only.).
actions, effect of grain boundaries on strength, solid solution hardening,
martensitic transformations, precipitation hardening, point defects.
MTGN545. FATIGUE AND FRACTURE. 3.0 Hours.
Prerequisite: MTGN543 or concurrent enrollment. 3 hours lecture;3
(I) Basic fracture mechanics as applied to engineering materials, S-N
semester hours. (Spring of even years only.).
curves, the Goodman diagram, stress concentrations, residual stress
effects, effect of material properties on mechanisms of crack propagation.
MTGN554. OXIDATION OF METALS. 3.0 Hours.
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(II) Kinetics of oxidation. The nature of the oxide film. Transport in oxides.
(Fall of odd years only.).
Mechanisms of oxidation. The Oxidation protection of hightemperature
metal systems. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
MTGN546. CREEP AND HIGH TEMPERATURE MATERIALS. 3.0
semester hours. (Spring of even years only.).
Hours.
(II) Mathematical description of creep process. Mathematical methods
MTGN555. SOLID STATE THERMODYNAMICS. 3.0 Hours.
of extrapolation of creep data. Micromechanisms of creep deformation,
(I) Thermodynamics applied to solid state reactions, binary and
including dislocation glide and grain boundary sliding. Study of various
ternary phase diagrams, point, line and planar defects, interfaces, and
high temperature materials, including iron, nickel, and cobalt base alloys
electrochemical concepts. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours
and refractory metals, and ceramics. Emphasis on phase transformations
lecture; 3 semester hours.
and microstructure-property relationships. Prerequisite: Consent of
Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of odd years only.).

Colorado School of Mines 125
MTGN556. TRANSPORT IN SOLIDS. 3.0 Hours.
MTGN571. METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING
(I) Thermal and electrical conductivity. Solid state diffusion in metals
LABORATORY. 1-3 Hour.
and metal systems. Kinetics of metallurgical reactions in the solid state.
Basic instruction in advanced equipment and techniques in the field of
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
extraction, mechanical or physical metallurgy. Prerequisite: Selection and
(Spring of even years only.).
Consent of Instructor. 3 to 9 hours lab ; 1 to 3 semester hours.
MTGN557. SOLIDIFICATION. 3.0 Hours.
MTGN572. BIOMATERIALS. 3.0 Hours.
(I) Heat flow and fluid flow in solidification, thermodynamics of
(I) A broad overview on materials science and engineering principles
solidification, nucleation and interface kinetics, grain refining, crystal and
for biomedical applications with three main topics: 1) The fundamental
grain growth, constitutional supercooling, eutectic growth, solidification of
properties of biomaterials; 2) The fundamental concepts in biology; 3)
castings and ingots, segregation, and porosity. Prerequisite: Consent of
The interactions between biological systems with exogenous materials.
Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of odd years only.).
Examples including surface energy and surface modification; protein
adsorption; cell adhesion, spreading and migration; biomaterials
MTGN560. ANALYSIS OF METALLURGICAL FAILURES. 3.0 Hours.
implantation and acute inflammation; blood-materials interactions and
(II) Applications of the principles of physical and mechanical metallurgy
thrombosis; biofilm and biomaterials-related pathological reactions. Basic
to the analysis of metallurgical failures. Nondestructive testing.
principles of bio-mimetic materials synthesis and assembly will also be
Fractography. Case study analysis. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3
introduced. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of odd years only.).
MTGN580. ADVANCED WELDING METALLURGY. 3.0 Hours.
MTGN561. PHYSICAL METALLURGY OF ALLOYS FOR
(II) Weldability of high strength steels, high alloys, and light metals;
AEROSPACE. 3.0 Hours.
Welding defects; Phase transformations in weldments; Thermal
(I) Review of current developments in aerospace materials with particular
experience in weldments; Pre- and Post-weld heat treatment; Heat
attention paid to titanium alloys, aluminum alloys, and metal-matrix
affected zone formation, microstructure, and properties; Consumables
composites. Emphasis is on phase equilibria, phase transformations, and
development.. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
microstructure-property relationships. Concepts of innovative processing
semester hours. (Spring of odd years only.).
and microstructural alloy design are included where appropriate.
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MTGN581. WELDING HEAT SOURCES AND INTERACTIVE
(Fall of even years only.).
CONTROLS. 3.0 Hours.
(I) The science of welding heat sources including gas tungsten arc, gas
MTGN564. ADVANCED FORGING AND FORMING. 3.0 Hours.
metal arc, electron beam and laser. The interaction of the heat source
(II) Overview of plasticity. Examination and Analysis of working
with the workpiece will be explored and special emphasis will be given
operations of forging, extrusion, rolling, wire drawing and sheet metal
to using this knowledge for automatic control of the welding process.
forming. Metallurgical structure evolution during working. Laboratory
Prerequisite: Graduate Status or Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
experiments involving metal forming processes. Prerequisites: MTGN445/
semester hours. (Fall of odd years only.).
MLGN505 or Consent of Instructor, 2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab, 3
semester hours.
MTGN582. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF WELDED JOINTS. 3.0
Hours.
MTGN565. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CERAMICS AND
(II) Mechanical metallurgy of heterogeneous systems, shrinkage,
COMPOSITES. 3.0 Hours.
distortion, cracking, residual stresses, mechanical testing of joints,
(I) Mechanical properties of ceramics and ceramic-based composites;
size effects, joint design, transition temperature, fracture. Prerequisite:
brittle fracture of solids; toughening mechanisms in composites; fatigue,
Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of odd
high temperature mechanical behavior, including fracture, creep
years only.).
deformation. Prerequisites: MTGN445 or MLGN505, or Consent of
Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of even years only.).
MTGN583. PRINCIPLES OF NON-DESTRUCTIVE TESTING AND
EVALUATION. 3.0 Hours.
MTGN569. FUEL CELL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
(I) Introduction to testing methods; basic physical principles of acoustics,
(I) Investigate fundamentals of fuel-cell operation and electrochemistry
radiography, and electromagnetism; statistical and risk analysis; fracture
from a chemical-thermodynamics and materials- science perspective.
mechanics concepts; design decision making, limitations and applications
Review types of fuel cells, fuel-processing requirements and approaches,
of processes; fitness-for- service evaluations. Prerequisite: Graduate
and fuel-cell system integration. Examine current topics in fuel-cell
Status or Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of
science and technology. Fabricate and test operational fuel cells in the
odd years only.).
Colorado Fuel Cell Center. 3 credit hours.
MTGN584. NON-FUSION JOINING PROCESSES. 3.0 Hours.
MTGN570. BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF MATERIALS. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Joining processes for which the base materials are not melted.
Introduction to the diversity of biomaterials and applications through
Brazing, soldering, diffusion bonding, explosive bonding, and adhesive
examination of the physiologic environment in conjunction with
bonding processes. Theoretical aspects of these processes, as well as
compositional and structural requirements of tissues and organs.
the influence of process parameters. Special emphasis to the joining
Appropriate domains and applications of metals, ceramics and polymers,
of dissimilar materials using these processes. Prerequisite: Consent
including implants, sensors, drug delivery, laboratory automation, and
of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of even years
tissue engineering are presented. Prerequisites: ESGN301 or equivalent,
only.).
or Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

126 Graduate
MTGN586. DESIGN OF WELDED STRUCTURES AND ASSEMBLIES.
MTGN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-3 Hour.
3.0 Hours.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by
Introduction to the concepts and analytical practice of designing
a faculty member. Student and instructor to agree on subject matter,
weldments. Designing for impact, fatigue, and torsional loading.
content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” Form must
Designing of weldments using overmatching and undermatching criteria.
be completed and submitted to the Registrar. 1 to 3 semester hours.
Analysis of combined stresses. Designing of compression members,
Repeatable for credit to a maximum of 6 hours.
column bases and splices. Designing of built-up columns, welded plate
cylinders, beam-to-column connections, and trusses. Designing for
MTGN605. ADVANCED TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.
tubular construction. Weld distortion and residual stresses. Joint design.
2.0 Hours.
Process consideration in weld design. Welding codes and specifications.
Introduction to transmission electron microscopy techniques and
Estimation of welding costs. Prerequisite/Co-requisite: MATH225 or
their application to materials characterization. Topics include electron
equivalent, EGGN320 or equivalent, MTGN475 or Consent of Instructor.
optics, electron-specimen interactions, imaging, diffraction, contrast
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Summer of odd years only.).
mechanisms, defect analyses, compositional measurements using
energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and energy loss spectroscopy,
MTGN587. PHYSICAL PHENOMENA OF WELDING AND JOINING
scanning transmission electron microscopy, high angle annular dark
PROCESSES. 3.0 Hours.
field imaging, energy filtered TEM and high resolution phase contrast
(I) Introduction to arc physics, fluid flow in the plasma, behavior of
imaging. Prerequisite: MTGN505 or consent of instructor. Co-requisite;
high pressure plasma, cathodic and anodic phenomena, energy
MTGN605L. 2 hours lecture, 2 semester hours.
generation and temperature distribution in the plasma, arc stability,
metal transfer across arc, electron beam welding processes, keyhole
MTGN631. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA IN METALLURGICAL AND
phenomena. Ohmic welding processes, high frequency welding, weld
MATERIALS SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
pool phenomena. Development of relationships between physics
Physical principles of mass, momentum, and energy transport.
concepts and the behavior of specific welding and joining processes.
Application to the analysis of extraction metallurgy and other
Prerequisite/Co-requisite: PHGN300, MATH225, MTGN475, or Consent
physicochemical processes. Prerequisite: MATH225 and MTGN461 or
of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of even years only.).
equiv alent, or Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MTGN591. PHYSICAL PHENOMENA OF COATING PROCESSES. 3.0
MTGN671. ADVANCED MATERIALS LABORATORY. 1-3 Hour.
Hours.
(I) Experimental and analytical research in the fields of production,
(I) Introduction to plasma physics, behavior of low pressure plasma,
mechanical, chemical, and/or physical metallurgy. Prerequi site: Consent
cathodic and anodic phenomena, glow discharge phenomena, glow
of Instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours; 3 semester hours.
discharge sputtering, magnetron plasma deposition, ion beam deposition,
MTGN672. ADVANCED MATERIALS LABORATORY. 1-3 Hour.
cathodic arc evaporation, electron beam and laser coating processes.
(II) Continuation of MTGN671. 1 to 3 semester hours.
Development of relationships between physics concepts and the behavior
of specific coating processes. Prerequisite/ Co-requisite: PHGN300,
MTGN696. VAPOR DEPOSITION PROCESSES. 3.0 Hours.
MATH225, or Consent of Instructor. 3 hours
(II) Introduction to the fundamental physics and chemistry underlying the
lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of odd years only.).
control of deposition processes for thin films for a variety of applications
—wear resistance, corrosion/oxidation resistance, decorative coatings,
MTGN593. NUCLEAR MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. 3.0
electronic and magnetic. Emphasis on the vapor deposition process
Hours.
varia - bles rather than the structure and properties of the deposited film.
(I) Introduction to the physical metallurgy of nuclear materials, including
Prerequisites: MTGN351, MTGN461, or equivalent courses or Consent of
the nuclear, physical, thermal, and mechanical properties for nuclear
Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
materials, the physical and mechanical processing of nuclear alloys,
hours. (Summer of odd years only.).
the effect of nuclear and thermal environments on structural reactor
materials and the selection of nuclear and reactor structural materials
MTGN697. MICROSTRUCTURAL EVOLUTION OF COATINGS AND
are described. Selected topics include ceramic science of ceramic
THIN FILMS. 3.0 Hours.
nuclear material, ceramic processing of ceramic fuel, nuclear reaction
(I) Introduction to aqueous and non-aqueous chemistry for the
with structural materials, radiation interactions with materials, the aging
preparation of an effective electrolyte; for interpretation of electrochemical
of nuclear materials, cladding, corrosion and the manufacturing of fuels
principles associated with electrodeposition; surface science to describe
elements. Relevant issues in the modern fuel cycle will also be introduced
surface structure and transport; interphasial structure including space
including nuclear safety, reactor decommissioning, and environmental
charge and double layer concepts; nucleation concepts applied to
impacts. Prerequisites: Graduate or Senior in good-standing or consent
electrodeposition; electrocrystallization including growth concepts;
of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours. (Fall of even years only.).
factors affecting morphology and kinetics; co-deposition of non-Brownian
particles; pulse electrodeposition; electrodeposition parameters and
MTGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS
control; physical metallurgy of electrodeposits; and, principles associated
ENGINEERING. 1-6 Hour.
with vacuum evaporation and sputter deposition. Factors affecting
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen according
microstructural evolution of vacuum and sputtered deposits; nucleation
to special inter ests of instructor(s) and student(s). The course topic is
of vapor and sputtered deposits; modeling of matter-energy interactions
generally offered only once.. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. Variable
during co-deposition; and, Thornton’s model for coating growth.
hours lecture/lab; 1 to 6 semester hours. Repeatable for credit under
Prerequisite/ co-requisite: MATH225, MTGN351, MTGN352, or Consent
different titles.
of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Summer of even years
only.).

Colorado School of Mines 127
MTGN698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS
ENGINEERING. 1-3 Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
MTGN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-3 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
MTGN700. GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT: MASTER OF
ENGINEERING. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II, S) Research credit hours required for completion of the degree
Master of Engineering. Research under the direct supervision of a faculty
advisor. Credit is not transferable to any 400, 500, or 600 level courses.
However, MTGN 705 credit hours may be transferred, in accordance
with the requirements for this (M.E.) degree, by a Master of Science
graduate-student who previously accumulated these credit-hours and
subsequently opted to change their degree program to a Master of
Engineering. Repeatable for credit. Variable: 1 to 6 semester hours.

128 Graduate
Physics
Prerequisites
The Graduate School of the Colorado School of Mines is open to
Degrees Offered
graduates from four-year programs at accredited colleges or universities.
• Master of Science (Applied Physics)
Admission to the Physics Department M.S. and Ph.D. programs
is competitive and is based on an evaluation of undergraduate
• Doctor of Philosophy (Applied Physics)
performance, standardized test scores, and references. The
Program Description
undergraduate course of study of each applicant is evaluated according
to the requirements of the Physics Department.
The Physics Department at CSM offers a full program of instruction and
research leading to the M.S. or Ph.D. in applied physics.
Required Curriculum
Graduate students are given a solid background in the fundamentals of
Master of Science, Applied Physics
classical and modern physics at an advanced level and are encouraged
Core Courses
early in their studies to learn about the research interests of the faculty so
that a thesis topic can be identified.
PHGN511
MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS
3.0
PHGN520
QUANTUM MECHANICS I
3.0
Program Requirements
Select one of the following:
3.0
PHGN505
CLASSICAL MECHANICS I
Students entering graduate programs in Applied Physics will select an
PHGN507
ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY I
initial program in consultation with the departmental graduate student
PHGN521
QUANTUM MECHANICS II
advising committee until such time as a research field has been chosen
and a thesis committee appointed. The following are requirements for the
PHGN530
STATISTICAL MECHANICS
M.S. and Ph.D. degrees:
PH ELECT
Electives
9.0
Master’s: 20 semester hours of course work in an approved program
PHGN501
GRADUATE SEMINAR
2.0
plus 16 semester hours of research credit, with a satisfactory thesis.
& PHGN502
and GRADUATE SEMINAR *
Doctorate: 34 semester hours of course work in an approved program
PHGN707
Master’s Thesis
16.0
plus 38 semester hours of research credit, with a satisfactory thesis. 12
Total Hours
36.0
semester hours of course work will be in a specialty topic area defined
in consultation with the thesis advisor. Possible specialty topic areas
*
Graduate Seminar: Each full-time graduate student (M.S. and Ph.D.)
within the physics department exist in Optical Science and Engineering,
will register for Graduate Seminar each semester for a total of 2
Condensed Matter Physics, Theoretical Physics, Renewable Energy
semester hours credit for the M.S. and 4 semester hours credit for
Physics, and Nuclear/Particle Physics and Astrophysics.
the Ph.D.
To demonstrate adequate preparation for the Ph.D. degree in Applied
Doctor of Philosophy, Applied Physics
Physics, each student must pass the physics graduate core courses
with a grade point average of 3.0 or better. Students not achieving this
Core Courses
standard must pass oral examinations covering the areas of weakness
PHGN505
CLASSICAL MECHANICS I
3.0
identified in the core courses or retake the respective course with a grade
PHGN507
ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY I
3.0
of 3.0 or better within one year. This process is part of the requirement
PHGN511
MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS
3.0
for admission to candidacy, which full time Ph.D. students must complete
PHGN520
QUANTUM MECHANICS I
3.0
within two calendar years of admission, as described in the campus-
PHGN521
QUANTUM MECHANICS II
3.0
wide graduate degree requirements (bulletin.mines.edu/graduate/
graduatedepartmentsandprograms) section of this bulletin. Other degree
PHGN530
STATISTICAL MECHANICS
3.0
requirements, time limits, and procedural details can be found in the
PHGN501
GRADUATE SEMINAR
2.0
Physics Department Graduate Student Advising Brochure.
& PHGN502
and GRADUATE SEMINAR *
All full-time physics graduate students must attend the Physics
PHGN601
ADVANCED GRADUATE SEMINAR
2.0
Colloquium, which is represented in the curriculum by the Graduate
& PHGN602
and ADVANCED GRADUATE SEMINAR *
Seminar courses. Students must take one of these courses every
PH ELECT
Special topic area electives
12.0
semester that they are enrolled at CSM. Those students who are in
PHGN707
Doctoral Thesis
38.0
the M.S. Program, or those in the Ph.D. program who have not yet
been admitted to candidacy should sign up for PHGN501 (fall) and
Total Hours
72.0
PHGN502 (spring), while Ph.D. students who have been admitted to
*
Graduate Seminar: Each full-time graduate student (M.S. and Ph.D.)
candidacy should sign up for PHGN601 (fall) and PHGN602 (spring). All
will register for Graduate Seminar each semester for a total of 2
semester attendance grades will be combined to yield final grades for
semester hours credit for the M.S. and 4 semester hours credit for
these courses at the end of the student’s final semester. Students who
the Ph.D.
have official part-time status, and who have already taken at least one
semester of 501 and 502 for the M.S. degree, or 501, 502, 601, and 602
Fields of Research
for the Ph.D. degree, are not required to sign up for additional graduate
Applied Optics: lasers, ultrafast optics and x-ray generation,
seminar credits.
spectroscopy, near-field and multiphoton microscopy, non-linear optics,
quasi-optics and millimeter waves.

Colorado School of Mines 129
Ultrasonics: laser ultrasonics, resonant ultrasound spectroscopy, wave
PHGN520. QUANTUM MECHANICS I. 3.0 Hours.
propagation in random media.
(II) Schroedinger equation, uncertainty, change of representation, one-
dimensonal problems, axioms for state vectors and operators, matrix
Subatomic: low energy nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics, cosmic
mechanics, uncertainty relations, time-independent perturbation theory,
ray physics, nuclear theory, fusion plasma diagnostics.
time-dependent perturbations, harmonic oscillator, angular momentum;
Materials Physics: photovoltaics, nanostructures and quantum dots,
semiclassical methods, variational methods, two-level system, sudden
thin film semiconductors, transparent conductors, amorphous materials,
and adiabatic changes, applications. Prerequisite: PHGN511 and
thermoelectric materials, plasmonics, first principles materials theory.
PHGN320 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Condensed Matter: x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, self
PHGN521. QUANTUM MECHANICS II. 3.0 Hours.
assembled systems, soft condensed matter, condensed matter theory,
(I) Review of angular momentum, central potentials and applications.
quantum chaos, quantum information and quantum many body theory.
Spin; rotations in quantum mechanics. Formal scattering theory, Born
Surface and Interfaces: x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger
series, partial wave analysis. Addition of angular momenta, Wigner-
spectroscopy, scanning probe microscopies, second harmonic
Eckart theorem, selection rules, identical particles. Prerequisite:
generation.
PHGN520. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PHGN530. STATISTICAL MECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.
(I) Review of thermodynamics; equilibrium and stability; statistical
Courses
operator and ensemblesl ideal systems; phase transitions; non-
PHGN501. GRADUATE SEMINAR. 1.0 Hour.
equilibrium systems. Prerequisite: PHGN341 or equivalent and
(I) M.S. students and Ph.D. students who have not been admitted to
PHGN520. Co-requisite: PHGN521. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
candidacy will attend the weekly Physics Colloquium. Students will be
PHGN535. INTERDISCIPLINARY SILICON PROCESSING
responsible for presentations during this weekly seminar. See additional
LABORATORY. 3.0 Hours.
course registration instructions under Program Requirements above. 1
(II) Explores the application of science and engineering principles to
hour seminar; 1 semester hour.
the fabrication and testing of microelectronic devices with emphasis
PHGN502. GRADUATE SEMINAR. 1.0 Hour.
on specific unit operations and interrelation among processing steps.
(II) M.S. students and Ph.D. students who have not been admitted to
Teams work together to fabricate, test, and optimize simple devices.
candidacy will attend the weekly Physics Colloquium. Students will be
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 hour lecture, 4 hours lab; 3
responsible for presentations during this weekly seminar. See additional
semester hours.
course registration instructions under Program Requirements above. 1
PHGN542. SOLID STATE DEVICES AND PHOTOVOLTAIC
hour seminar; 1 semester hour.
APPLICATIONS. 3.0 Hours.
PHGN504. RADIATION DETECTION AND MEASUREMENT. 3.0
(II) An overview of the physical principles involved in the characterization,
Hours.
and operation of solid state devices. Topics will include: semiconductor
Physical principles and methodology of the instrumentation used in the
physics, electronic transport, recombination and generation, intrinsic
detection and measurement of ionizing radiation. Prerequisite: Consent of
and extrinsic semiconductors, electrical contacts, p-n junction devices
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(e.g., LEDs, solar cells, lasers, particle detectors); other semiconductor
devices (e.g., bipolar junction transistors and field effect transistors and
PHGN505. CLASSICAL MECHANICS I. 3.0 Hours.
capacitors). There will be emphasis on optical interactions and application
(I) Review of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations in the dynamics
to photovoltaic devices. Prerequisite: PHGN440 or equivalent or consent
of particles and rigid bodies; kinetic theory; coupled oscillations and
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
continuum mechanics; fluid mechanics. Prerequisite: PHGN350 or
equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PHGN550. NANOSCALE PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
An introduction to the basic physics concepts involved in nanoscale
PHGN507. ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY I. 3.0 Hours.
phenomena, processing methods resulting in engineered nanostructures,
(II) To provide a strong background in electromagnetic theory.
and the design and operation of novel structures and devices which
Electrostatics, magnetostatics, dynamical Maxwell equations, wave
take advantage of nanoscale effects. Students will become familiar
phenomena. Prerequisite: PHGN462 or equivalent and PHGN511. 3
with interdisciplinary aspects of nanotechnology, as well as with current
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
nanoscience developments described in the literature. Prerequisites:
PHGN320, PHGN341, co-requisite: PHGN462, or permission of
PHGN511. MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS. 3.0 Hours.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(I) Review of complex variable and finite and infinite-dimensional linear
vector spaces. Sturm-Liouville problem, integral equations, computer
PHGN566. MODERN OPTICAL ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
algebra. Prerequisite: PHGN311 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3
Provides students with a comprehensive working knowledge of optical
semester hours.
system design that is sufficient to address optical problems found in their
respective disciplines. Topics include paraxial optics, imaging, aberration
analysis, use of commercial ray tracing and optimazation, diffraction,
linear systems and optical transfer functions, detectors, and optical
system examples. Prerequisite: PHGN462 or consent of instructor. 3
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

130 Graduate
PHGN570. FOURIER AND PHYSICAL OPTICS. 3.0 Hours.
PHGN608. ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY II. 3.0 Hours.
This course addresses the propagation of light through optical systems.
Spherical, cylindrical, and guided waves; relativistic 4-dimensional
Diffraction theory is developed to show how 2D Fourier transforms and
formulation of electromagnetic theory. Prerequisite: PHGN507. 3 hours
linear systems theory can be applied to imaging systems. Analytic and
lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered on demand.
numerical Fourier and microscopes, spectrometers and holographic
imaging. They are also applied to temporal propagation in ultrafast optics.
PHGN612. MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS II. 3.0 Hours.
Prerequisite: PHGN462 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. 3 hours
Continuation of PHGN511. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
lecture; 3 semester hours.
lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered on demand.
PHGN585. NONLINEAR OPTICS. 3.0 Hours.
PHGN623. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE AND REACTIONS. 3.0 Hours.
An exploration of the nonlinear response of a medium (semiclassical
The fundamental physics principles and quantum mechanical models
and quantum descriptions) and nonlinear wave mixing and propagation.
and methods underlying nuclear structure, transitions, and scattering
Analytic and numeric techniques to treat nonlinear dynamics are
reactions. Prerequisite: PHGN521 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
developed. Applications to devices and modern research areas are
lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered on demand.
discussed, including harmonic and parametric wave modulation,
PHGN624. NUCLEAR ASTROPHYSICS. 3.0 Hours.
phase conjugation, electro-optic modulation. Prerequiste: PHGN462
The physical principles and research methods used to understand
or equivalent, PHGN520, or permission of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
nucleosynthesis
semester hours.
and energy generation in the universe. Prerequisite: Consent of
PHGN590. NUCLEAR REACTOR PHYSICS. 3.0 Hours.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered on demand.
Bridges the gap between courses in fundamental nuclear physics and the
PHGN641. ADVANCED CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS. 3.0 Hours.
practice of electrical power production using nuclear reactors. Review of
Provides working graduate-level knowledge of applications of solid state
nuclear constituents, forces, structure, energetics, decay and reactions;
physics and important models to crystalline and non-crystalline systems
interaction of radiation with matter, detection of radiation; nuclear cross
in two and three dimensions. Review of transport by Bloch electrons;
sections, neutron induced reactions including scattering, absorption,
computation, interpretation of band structures. Interacting electron gas
and fission; neutron diffusion, multiplication, criticality; simple reactor
and overview of density functional theory. Quantum theory of optical
geometries and compositions; nuclear reactor kinetics and control;
properties of condensed systems; Kramers-Kronig analysis, sum rules,
modeling and simulation of reactors. Prerequisite: PHGN422 or consent
spectroscopies. Response and correlation functions. Theoretical models
of instructor.
for metal-insulator and localization transitions in 1, 2, 3 dimensions
PHGN597. SUMMER PROGRAMS. 6.0 Hours.
(e.g., Mott, Hubbard, Anderson, Peierls distortion). Boltzmann equation.
Introduction to magnetism; spin waves. Phenomenology of soft
PHGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
condensed matter: order parameters, free energies. Conventional
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Prerequisite: Consent of
superconductivity.
Department. Credit to be determined by instructor, maximum of 6 credit
Prerequisites: PHGN440 or equivalent, PHGN520, PHGN530. 3 hours
hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
PHGN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
PHGN698. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Prerequisite: Consent of
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
Department. Credit to be determined by instructor, maximum of 6 credit
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
PHGN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
PHGN601. ADVANCED GRADUATE SEMINAR. 1.0 Hour.
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
(I) Ph.D. students who have been admitted to candidacy will attend
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
the weekly Physics Colloquium. Students will be responsible for
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
presentations during this weekly seminar. Prerequisite: credit in
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
PHGN501 and PHGN502. See additional course registration instructions
under Program Requirements above. 1 hour seminar; 1 semester hour.
PHGN707. GRADUATE THESIS/DISSERTATION RESEARCH CREDIT.
1-14 Hour.
PHGN602. ADVANCED GRADUATE SEMINAR. 1.0 Hour.
(I, II, S) Research credit hours required for completion of a Masters-level
(II) Ph.D. students who have been admitted to candidacy will attend
thesis or Doctoral dissertation. Research must be carried out under the
the weekly Physics Colloquium. Students will be responsible for
direct supervision of the student’s faculty advisor. Variable class and
presentations during this weekly seminar. See additional course
semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
registration instructions under Program Requirements above.
Prerequisite: credit in PHGN501 and PHGN502. 1 hour seminar; 1
semester hour.

Colorado School of Mines 131
Geochemistry
GEOL512
MINERALOGY AND CRYSTAL CHEMISTRY
CHGC514
GEOCHEMISTRY THERMODYNAMICS AND
Degrees Offered
KINETICS
CHGC610
NUCLEAR AND ISOTOPIC GEOCHEMISTRY
• Professional Masters in Environmental Geochemistry
• Master of Science (Geochemistry)
In addition, all students must complete a 1-2 hour laboratory course
• Doctor of Philosophy (Geochemistry)
selected from several available. Master of Science (Geochemistry)
students must also complete an appropriate thesis, based upon original
Program Description
research they have conducted. A thesis proposal and course of study
must be approved by the student’s thesis committee before the student
The Geochemistry Program is an interdisciplinary graduate program
begins substantial work on the thesis research.
administered by the Department of Geology and Geological Engineering
and the Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry. The geochemistry
The requirement for the Doctor of Philosophy (Geochemistry) program
faculty from each department are responsible for the operations of
will be established individually by a student’s thesis committee, but
the program. Students reside in either the Department of Geology
must meet the minimum requirements presented below. The Doctor of
and Geological Engineering or the Department of Chemistry and
Philosophy (Geochemistry) program will require a minimum of 72 credit
Geochemistry.
hours. At least 24 hours must be research credit and at least 18 hours
must be course work. Up to 24 hours of course credit may be transferred
The program comprises a core group of courses, required of all students
from previous graduate-level work upon approval of the thesis committee.
unless individually exempted by the Geochemistry Committee of the
Research credits may not be transferred. Students who enter the Doctor
Whole based on previous background. Descriptions for individual classes
of Philosophy (Geochemistry) program with a thesis-based Master of
may be found in the sections of the Graduate Bulletin (p. 7) for each of
Science degree from another institution may transfer up to 36 semester
the participating departments. For classes with "CHGC" and "CHGN"
hours, upon approval of the thesis committee, in recognition of the course
prefixes see the section for Chemistry and Geochemistry; for classes with
work and research completed for that degree.
"GEGN" and "GEOL" prefixes see the section for Geology and Geological
Engineering.
Doctor of Philosophy (Geochemistry) students must take:
Students determine their program of study in consultation with the advisor
CHGC503
INTRODUCTION TO GEOCHEMISTRY
4.0
or thesis committee. Students entering with background in chemistry will
CHGC504
METHODS IN GEOCHEMISTRY
2.0
take more coursework in geology to strengthen their backgrounds in this
CHGC514
GEOCHEMISTRY THERMODYNAMICS AND
3.0
discipline; the converse is true for students with a background in geology.
KINETICS
Laboratory course
1.0
Master of Science and Doctor of
Select two of the following:
3-4
Philosophy
CHGN503
ADV PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I
Prerequisites
CHGC509
INTRODUCTION TO AQUEOUS
GEOCHEMISTRY
Each entering student will have an entrance interview with members of
GEOL512
MINERALOGY AND CRYSTAL CHEMISTRY
the Geochemistry faculty. Each department recognizes that entering
CHGC610
NUCLEAR AND ISOTOPIC GEOCHEMISTRY
students may not be proficient in both areas. A placement examination
in geology and/or chemistry may be required upon the discretion of the
Doctor of Philosophy (Geochemistry) students must also complete an
interviewing faculty. If a placement examination is given, the results may
appropriate thesis, based upon original research they have conducted. A
be used to establish deficiency requirements. Credit toward a graduate
thesis proposal and course of study must be approved by the student’s
degree will not be granted for courses taken to fulfill deficiencies.
thesis committee before the student begins substantial work on the thesis
Requirements
research.
Master of Science (Geochemistry) and Doctor of Philosophy
The Master of Science (Geochemistry) degree requires a minimum of 36
(Geochemistry) students resident in the Department of Chemistry and
semester hours including:
Geochemistry or the Department of Geology and Geological Engineering
Course work
24.0
shall adhere to the seminar rules and requirements of the department of
Research credits
12.0
residence.
Total Hours
36.0
Qualifying Examination
To ensure breadth of background, the course of study for the Master of
Doctor of Philosophy (Geochemistry) students must take a qualifying
Science (Geochemistry) degree must include:
examination. It is expected that this exam will be completed within
three years of matriculation or after the bulk of course work is finished,
CHGC503
INTRODUCTION TO GEOCHEMISTRY
4.0
whichever occurs earlier. This examination will be administered by
CHGC504
METHODS IN GEOCHEMISTRY
2.0
the student’s thesis committee and will consist of an oral and a written
Master of Science (Geochemistry) students select two of the
3-4
examination, administered in a format to be determined by the thesis
following:
committee. Two negative votes in the thesis committee constitute failure
CHGN503
ADV PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I
of the examination.
CHGC509
INTRODUCTION TO AQUEOUS
GEOCHEMISTRY

132 Graduate
In case of failure of the qualifying examination, a re-examination may be
Requirements
given upon the recommendation of the thesis committee and approval of
A minimum of 30 credit hours are required, with an overall GPA of at least
the Dean of Graduate Studies. Only one re-examination may be given.
3.0. The overall course requirements will depend on the background of
Tuition
the individual, but may be tailored to professional objectives.
The Master of Science (Geochemistry) and Doctor of Philosophy
A 10 credit-hour core program consists of:
(Geochemistry) programs have been admitted to the Western Regional
GEGN466
Graduate Program. This entity recognizes the Geochemistry Program
GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING *
3.0
as unique in the region. Designation of the Geochemistry Program by
CHGC503
INTRODUCTION TO GEOCHEMISTRY
4.0
Western Regional Graduate program allows residents of western states
CHGC509
INTRODUCTION TO AQUEOUS
3.0
to enroll in the program at Colorado resident tuition rates. Eligible states
GEOCHEMISTRY
include Alaska, Arizona, California ,Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada,
Total Hours
10.0
New Mexico, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, Washington and
Wyoming.
*
If this course is transferred from the undergraduate program, another
course out of the core areas listed below must be substituted.
Professional Masters in Environmental
Geochemistry
In addition, 14 credit hours must be selected from the list below,
representing the following core areas: geochemical methods, geographic
Introduction
information system, geological data analysis, groundwater engineering
or modeling, hydrothermal geochemistry, isotope geochemistry, physical
The Professional Masters in Environmental Geochemistry program is
chemistry, microbiology, mineralogy, organic geochemistry, and
intended to provide:
thermodynamics. This selection of courses must include at least one
1. an opportunity for CSM undergraduates to obtain, as part of a fifth
laboratory course.
year of study, a Master in addition to the Bachelor degree; and
CHGN503
ADV PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I
4.0
2. additional education for working professionals in the area of
CHGC504
METHODS IN GEOCHEMISTRY
2.0
geochemistry as it applies to problems relating to the environment.
CHGC506
WATER ANALYSIS LABORATORY
2.0
This is a non-thesis Master degree program administered by the
GEOL512
MINERALOGY AND CRYSTAL CHEMISTRY
3.0
Geochemistry program, and may be completed as part of a combined
CHGC527
ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY OF FOSSIL FUELS 3.0
degree program by individuals already matriculated as undergraduate
AND ORE DEPOSITS
students at CSM, or by individuals already holding undergraduate
or advanced degrees and who are interested in a graduate program
GEOL530
CLAY CHARACTERIZATION
1.0
that does not have the traditional research requirement. The program
GEGN532
GEOLOGICAL DATA ANALYSIS
3.0
consists primarily of coursework in geochemistry and allied fields with an
GEOL550
INTEGRATED BASIN MODELING
3.0
emphasis on environmental applications. No research is required though
CHGC555
ENVIRONMENTAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
3.0
the program does allow for independent study, professional development,
CHGC562
MICROBIOLOGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
3.0
internship, and cooperative experience.
CHGC563
ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY
2.0
Application
CHGC564
BIOGEOCHEMISTRY AND
3.0
Undergraduate students at CSM must declare an interest during their
GEOMICROBIOLOGY
third year to allow for planning of coursework that will apply towards
GEGN575
APPLICATIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC
3.0
the program. These students must have an overall GPA of at least 3.0.
INFORMATION SYSTEMS
Students majoring in other departments besides the Department of
GEGN581
ADVANCED GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING
3.0
Geology and Geological Engineering and the Department of Chemistry
GEGN583
MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF
3.0
and Geochemistry may want to decide on the combined degree program
GROUNDWATER SYSTEMS
option earlier to be sure prerequisites are satisfied. Applicants other than
ESGN586
MOLECULAR MICROBIAL ECOLOGY AND THE 3.0
CSM undergraduates who are applying for this non-thesis Master degree
ENVIRONMENT
program must follow the same procedures that all prospective graduate
students follow. However, the requirement of the general GRE may be
CHGC610
NUCLEAR AND ISOTOPIC GEOCHEMISTRY
3.0
waived.
GEGN683
ADVANCED GROUND WATER MODELING
3.0
Prerequisites
Laboratory courses:
Each entering student will have an entrance interview with members
CHGC506
WATER ANALYSIS LABORATORY
1-2
of the geochemistry faculty. Each department recognizes that entering
or GEOL530
CLAY CHARACTERIZATION
students may not be proficient in both areas. A placement examination
in geology and/or chemistry may be required upon the discretion of the
An additional 6 credit-hours of free electives may be selected to complete
interviewing faculty. If a placement examination is given, the results may
the 30 credit-hour requirement. Free electives may be selected from
be used to establish deficiency requirements. Credit toward a graduate
the course offerings of the Department of Geology and Geological
degree will not be granted for courses taken to fulfill deficiencies.
Engineering, the Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry, or the
Environmental Science and Engineering Division, and may also be
independent study credits taken to fulfill a research cooperative, or other
professional development experience. A course program will be designed

Colorado School of Mines 133
in advanced through consultation between the student and an advisor
from the Geochemistry Committee of the Whole.
CHGC503
INTRODUCTION TO GEOCHEMISTRY
4
CHGC504
METHODS IN GEOCHEMISTRY
2
CHGC505
INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL
3
CHEMISTRY
CHGC506
WATER ANALYSIS LABORATORY
2
CHGC509
INTRODUCTION TO AQUEOUS
3
GEOCHEMISTRY
CHGC511
GEOCHEMISTRY OF IGNEOUS ROCKS
3
CHGC514
GEOCHEMISTRY THERMODYNAMICS AND
3
KINETICS
CHGC527
ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY OF FOSSIL FUELS
3
AND ORE DEPOSITS
CHGC555
ENVIRONMENTAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
3
CHGC562
MICROBIOLOGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
3
CHGC563
ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY
2
CHGC564
BIOGEOCHEMISTRY AND
3
GEOMICROBIOLOGY
CHGC598
SPECIAL TOPICS
1-6
CHGC610
NUCLEAR AND ISOTOPIC GEOCHEMISTRY
3
CHGC698
SPECIAL TOPICS
1-6

134 Graduate
Hydrologic Science and
Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon,
South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.
Engineering
For more information on HSE curriculum please refer to the HSE website
Degrees Offered
at hydrology.mines.edu or see the HSE Graduate Handbook at http://
hydrology.mines.edu/hydroclasses.html
• Master of Science (Hydrology), Thesis option
Combined Degree Program Option
• Master of Science (Hydrology), Non-thesis option
• Doctor of Philosophy (Hydrology)
CSM undergraduate students have the opportunity to begin work on a
M.S. degree in Hydrology while completing their Bachelor’s degree. The
Program Description
CSM Combined Degree Program provides the vehicle for students to
complete graduate coursework while still an undergraduate student. For
The Hydrologic Science and Engineering (HSE) Program is an
more information please contact the HSE program faculty.
interdisciplinary graduate program comprised of faculty from several
different CSM departments.
Program Requirements
The program offers programs of study in fundamental hydrologic science
and applied hydrology with engineering applications. Our program
M.S. Non-Thesis Option
encompasses groundwater hydrology, surface-water hydrology, vadose-
Course work
30.0
zone hydrology, watershed hydrology, contaminant transport and fate,
Independent Study, working on a research project with HSE faculty, 6.0
contaminant remediation, hydrogeophysics, and water policy/law.
including a written report
Students may elect to follow the Science or the Engineering Track.
Total Hours
36.0
HSE requires a core study of 4 formal graduate courses. Programs of
study are interdisciplinary in nature, and coursework is obtained from
M.S. Thesis Option
multiple departments at CSM and is approved for each student by the
Course work
24.0
student’s advisor and thesis Committee.
Research
6.0
To achieve the Master of Science (M.S.) degree, students may elect the
Total Hours
30.0
Non-Thesis option, based exclusively upon coursework and a project
Students must also write and orally defend a research thesis.
report, or the Thesis option. The thesis option is comprised of coursework
in combination with individual laboratory, modeling and/or field research
Ph.D.: 72 total credit hours, consisting of coursework (at least 36 h post-
performed under the guidance of a faculty advisor and presented in a
baccalaureate), and research (at least 24 h).
written thesis approved by the student’s committee.
Students must also successfully complete qualifying examinations,
HSE also offers a combined baccalaureate/masters degree program
write and defend a dissertation proposal, write and defend a doctoral
in which CSM students obtain an undergraduate degree as well as
dissertation, and are expected to submit the dissertation work for
a Thesis or Non-thesis M.S. in Hydrology. In the Combined Degree
publication in scholarly journals.
Program as many as six credit hours may be counted towards the
B.S. and M.S. degree requirements. Please see the Combined
Thesis & Dissertation Committee
Undergraduate/Graduate Programs (bulletin.mines.edu/undergraduate/
Requirements
sectionundergraduateinformation/combinedundergraduategraduate)
Students must meet the general requirements listed in the graduate
sections in the Graduate and Undergraduate Bulletins for additional
bulletin section Graduate Degrees and Requirements. In addition, the
information.
student’s advisor or co-advisor must be an HSE faculty member. For
To achieve the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree, students are
M.S. thesis students, at least two committee members must be members
expected to complete a combination of coursework and novel, original
of the HSE faculty. For doctoral students, at least 3 members must be
research, under the guidance of a faculty advisor and Doctoral
a member of the HSE faculty. For all committees one at-large member
committee, which culminates in a significant scholarly contribution
must be from a department outside the student’s home department and
to a specialized field in hydrologic sciences or engineering. Full-time
HSE.
enrollment is expected and leads to the greatest success, although part-
Prerequisites Science Track
time enrollment may be allowed under special circumstances. All doctoral
students must complete the full-time, on-campus residency requirements
• baccalaureate degree in a science or engineering discipline
(p. 15).
• college calculus: two semesters required
Currently, students will apply to the hydrology program through the
• differential equations: one semester required
Graduate School and be assigned to the HSE participating department
• college physics: one semester required
or division of the student’s HSE advisor. Participating units include:
• college chemistry: two semesters required
Chemistry and Geochemistry, Engineering, Environmental Science
• fluid mechanics, one semester required
and Engineering (ESE), Geology and Geological Engineering (GE),
• college statistics: one semester required
Geophysical Engineering, Mining Engineering (ME), and Petroleum
Engineering (PE). HSE is part of the Western Regional Graduate
Prerequisites Engineering Track
Program, a recognition that designates these programs as unique within
• baccalaureate degree in a science or engineering discipline
the Western United States. An important benefit of this designation is
that students from several western states are given the tuition status of
• college calculus: two semesters required
Colorado residents. These states include Alaska, Arizona, California,
• differential equations: one semester required

Colorado School of Mines 135
• college physics: two semesters required
Engineering Track
• college chemistry: two semesters required
Curriculum areas of emphasis consist of core courses, and electives.
• college statistics: one semester required
Core courses include all core courses in the Science Track and a relevant
• statics, one semester required
Capstone Design Course (e.g. Ground Water Engineering GEGN470)
• mechanics of materials, one semester required
Elective courses may be chosen from a list approved by the HSE
• dynamics, one semester required
program faculty with one free elective that may be chosen from any of
• thermodynamics, one semester required
the graduate courses offered at CSM and other local universities. At least
• fluid mechanics: one semester required
half of the elective credits must come from the following list:
• engineering design (equivalent of a 400-level capstone design course
GEGN581
ADVANCED GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING
3.0
or GEGN 470 Groundwater Engineering Design)
GEGN683
ADVANCED GROUND WATER MODELING
3.0
Note that some prerequisites may be completed in the first few
ESGN622
MULTIPHASE CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT
3.0
semesters of the graduate program if approved by the hydrology program
GEGN681
VADOSE ZONE HYDROLOGY
3.0
faculty. Graduate courses may be used to fulfill one or more of these
GEGN584
FIELD METHODS IN HYDROLOGY
3.0
requirements after approval by the HSE Graduate Admissions Committee
GEGN682
FLOW AND TRANSPORT IN FRACTURED
3.0
and the student’s Thesis Committee.
ROCK
Required Curriculum
ESGN575
HAZARDOUS WASTE SITE REMEDIATION
3.0
GEGN683
ADVANCED GROUND WATER MODELING
3
Students will work with their academic advisors and graduate thesis
committees to establish plans of study that best fit their individual
EGGN454
WATER SUPPLY ENGINEERING
3.0
interests and goals. Each student will develop and submit a plan of study
ESGN506
ADVANCED WATER TREATMENT
3
to their advisor during the first semester of enrollment. Doctoral students
ENGINEERING AND WATER REUSE
may transfer in credits from an earned M.S. graduate program according
GEGN532
GEOLOGICAL DATA ANALYSIS
3.0
to requirements listed in the Graduate Degrees and Requirements
GEGN575
APPLICATIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC
3.0
(bulletin.mines.edu/graduate/graduatedepartmentsandprograms) section
INFORMATION SYSTEMS
of the graduate bulletin, and after approval by the student’s thesis
GEGN573
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING SITE
3.0
committee. Recommended prerequisite courses may be taken for
INVESTIGATION
credit during the first year a student is enrolled in HSE. In some cases,
graduate courses may satisfy one or more prerequisites if approved by
ESGN501
RISK ASSESSMENT
3
the hydrology program faculty. For more information also see the HSE
Graduate Handbook - http://hydrology.mines.edu/hydroclasses.html
Science Track
Curriculum areas of emphasis consist of core courses, and electives.
Core courses include the following:
GEGN466
GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING
3.0
GEGN582
INTEGRATED SURFACE WATER HYDROLOGY 3.0
ESGN500
ENVIRONMENTAL WATER CHEMISTRY
3.0
ESGN522
SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT
3.0
or ESGN520
SURFACE WATER QUALITY MODELING
Total Hours
12.0
HSE seminar is also required and will typically have a 598 course
number. These are one-credit reading and discussion seminars. PhD
students are required to complete at least two during their studies, and
M.S. students must complete one seminar. The seminar courses are
taught nearly every semester, with different topics depending on the
instructor. Students who plan to incorporate hydrochemistry into their
research may elect to replace ESGN500 with a two-course combination
that includes an aqueous inorganic chemistry course (CHGC509) and an
environmental organic chemistry course (ESGN555).
A grade of B- or better is required in all core classes for graduation.
Elective courses may be chosen from a list approved by the HSE
program faculty with one free elective that may be chosen from any of
the graduate courses offered at CSM and other local universities. A list of
these courses can be found in the HSE Handbook.

136 Graduate
Interdisciplinary
• Specialty area must be, within the context of Mines, interdisciplinary
in nature. That is, expertise that would be reasonably expected to be
Degrees Offered
required to deliver the specialty must span multiple degree programs
at Mines.
• Master of Science (Interdisciplinary)
• Faculty participating in the Specialty must be derived from no fewer
• Doctor of Philosophy (Interdisciplinary)
than two separate home units.
Program Description
• There must be a minimum of six tenure/tenure-track core faculty
participating in the Specialty.
In addition to its traditional degree programs, Mines offers innovative,
interdisciplinary, research-based degree programs that fit the institutional
The package of materials to be reviewed for Specialty approval must, at a
role and mission, but cannot easily be addressed within a single discipline
minimum, include the following items:
or degree program. Specialties offered under this option are provided for
• Descriptive overview of Specialty degree area,
a limited time during which faculty from across campus come together
• List of participating Faculty and the Departments/Divisions in which
to address relevant, timely, interdisciplinary issues. The Interdisciplinary
they are resident,
Graduate Program is intended to:
• Name of Specialty to be included on the transcript,
1. Encourage faculty and students to participate in broadly
• Listing and summary description of all Specialty degree requirements,
interdisciplinary research,
• A description of how program quality is overseen by participating
2. Provide a mechanism by which a rigorous academic degree
Specialty faculty including the Admission to Candidacy process to be
program may be tightly coupled to this interdisciplinary research,
used within the Specialty,
and
• A copy of Bylaws (i.e., operating parameters that define how the
3. Provide a mechanism for faculty to develop and market test, timely
Specialty is managed, how faculty participate, how admissions is
and innovative interdisciplinary degree programs in the hope that, if
handled, etc.) under which the Specialty and its faculty operate,
successful, may become full-fledged, stand-alone degree programs
• A listing and justification for any additional resources needed to offer
in the future.
the Specialty, and
• A draft of the Graduate Bulletin text that will be used to describe the
Program Requirements
Specialty in the Interdisciplinary Degree section of Bulletin.
Graduates of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program must meet all
Materials for Specialty approval must be approved by all of the following
institutional requirements for graduation and the requirements of the
groups. Faculty advancing a Specialty should seek approval from each
Specialty under which they are admitted.
group in the order in which they are presented below:
Program Management
• Faculty and Department Heads/Division Directors of each of the
departments/divisions contributing staffing to the Specialty,
Overall management and oversight of the Interdisciplinary Degree
• Interdisciplinary Program Oversight Committee,
Program is undertaken by a Program Oversight Committee consisting of
the:
• Graduate Council,
• Faculty Senate, and
• Dean of Graduate Studies (Chair and Program Director),
• Provost.
• One Representative from the Faculty Senate,
• One Representative from Department Heads/Division Directors, and
Failure to receive approval at any level constitutes an institutional
• One Faculty Representative from each active Specialty Areas.
decision to not offer the Specialty as described.
The role of the Oversight Committee is fourfold:
Full-Fledged Degree Creation and
Specialty Time Limits
• Specialty Oversight: includes advising and assisting faculty in the
creation of new Specialty areas, periodic Specialty review and
Documentation related to specific program Specialties, as published
termination of Specialties having exceed the allowed time limits,
in the Graduate Bulletin, includes the inception semester of the
• Specialty Mentoring: includes providing assistance to, and support
Specialty. For Specialties garnering significant enrollment and support
of existing Specialties as they move toward applying for full degree
by participating academic faculty, the Program Oversight Committee
status,
encourages the participating faculty to seek approval – both on campus,
Program Advocacy: includes promotion of program at the institutional
and through the Board of Trustees and DHE – for a stand alone degree
level, and promotion, development and support of new Specialty areas
program. Upon approval, all students still in the Specialty will be moved to
with individual groups of faculty, and
the full-fledged degree program.
Council Representation: upon the advise of the directors of the
Admissions to all doctoral-level Specialties will be allowed for a maximum
individual Specialties offered, the Oversight Committee appoints an
of 7 years after the Specialty inception date. Specialties may apply to the
Interdisciplinary Degree program representative to Graduate Council.
Oversight Committee for a one-time extension to this time limit that shall
not exceed 3 additional years. If successful, the Oversight Committee
Specialty Requirements and Approval
shall inform Graduate Council and the Faculty Senate of the extension.
Processes
Specialties
Specialties must meet the following minimum requirements:
Operations Research with Engineering (ORwE) (initiated Fall, 2011)

Colorado School of Mines 137
Degrees Offered
CSCI262
DATA STRUCTURES
3
EBGN555
LINEAR PROGRAMMING
3
• Doctor of Philosophy (Interdisciplinary); Specialty (Operations
Research with Engineering)
MATH530
STATISTICAL METHODS I
3
Program Description
and the following in the first spring semester of study:
CSCI406
ALGORITHMS
3
Operations Research (OR) involves mathematically modeling physical
systems (both naturally occurring and man-made) with a view to
EBGN552
NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING
3
determining a course of action for the system to either improve or
or EGGN593
ENGINEERING DESIGN OPTIMIZATION
optimize its functionality. Examples of such systems include, but are
Unsatisfactory progress will also be assigned to any students who
not limited to, manufacturing systems, chemical processes, socio-
do not complete requirements as specified in their admission letter.
economic systems, mechanical systems (e.g., those that produce
Any exceptions to the stipulations for unsatisfactory progress must
energy), and mining systems. The ORwE PhD Specialty allows students
be approved by the ORwE committee. Part-time students develop an
to complete an interdisciplinary doctoral degree in Operations Research
approved course plan with their advisor.
with Engineering by taking courses and conducting research in eight
departments/divisions: Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Electrical
Prerequisites
Engineering and Computer Sciences, Engineering and Computational
Students must have completed the following undergraduate prerequisite
Sciences, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Economics & Business,
courses with a grade of B or better:
Mining Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Metallurgical &
Materials Engineering.
CSCI261
PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS
3
Specialty Requirements
CSCI262
DATA STRUCTURES
3
Doctoral students develop a customized curriculum to fit their needs. The
Students entering in the fall semester must have completed the
degree requires a minimum of 72 graduate credit hours that includes
Programming (CSCI261) prerequisite or equivalent. Students will only be
course work and a thesis. Coursework is valid for nine years towards a
allowed to enter in the spring semester if they have developed a course
Ph.D. degree; any exceptions must be approved by the Director of the
program such that they are able to take the qualifying exam within 3
ORwE program and student advisor.
semesters.
Course Work
Required Course Curriculum
Core Courses
25.0
All Ph.D. students are required to take a set of core courses that provides
basic tools for the more advanced and specialized courses in the
Area of Specialization Courses
12.0
program.
Total Hours
37.0
Core Courses
Research Credits
CSCI/MATH406
ALGORITHMS
3
At least 24.0 research credits. The student’s faculty advisor and the
EGGN502
ADVANCED ENGINEERING ANALYSIS
4
doctoral thesis committee must approve the student’s program of study
MATH530
STATISTICAL METHODS I
3
and the topic for the thesis.
EBGN552
NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING
3
Qualifying Examination Process and
or EGGN593
ENGINEERING DESIGN OPTIMIZATION
Thesis Proposal
EBGN555
LINEAR PROGRAMMING
3
EBGN557
INTEGER PROGRAMMING
3
Upon completion of the core coursework, students must pass qualifying
written examinations to become a candidate for the Ph.D. ORwE
EBGN556
NETWORK MODELS
3
specialty. The proposal defense should be done within ten months of
EBGN561
STOCHASTIC MODELS IN MANAGEMENT
3
passing the qualifying exam.
SCIENCE
or MATH438
STOCHASTIC MODELS
Transfer Credits
Total Hours
25.0
Students may transfer up to 24.0 hours of graduate-level coursework
from other institutions toward the Ph.D. degree subject to the restriction
Area of Specialization Courses
that those courses must not have been used as credit toward a
Select Four of the Following:
12.0
Bachelor’s degree. The student must have achieved a grade of B or
EBGN528
INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS SIMULATION
better in all graduate transfer courses and the transfer must be approved
or MATH542
SIMULATION
by the student’s Doctoral Thesis Committee and the Director of the
or CSCI542
SIMULATION
ORwE program.
MTGN450/
STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL AND
Unsatisfactory Progress
MLGN550
DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS
In addition to the institutional guidelines for unsatisfactory progress
EBGN560
DECISION ANALYSIS
as described elsewhere in this bulletin: Unsatisfactory progress will
EGGN517
THEORY AND DESIGN OF ADVANCED
be assigned to any full-time student who does not pass the following
CONTROL SYSTEMS
prerequisite and core courses in the first fall semester of study:
EBGN655
ADVANCED LINEAR PROGRAMMING
EBGN657
ADVANCED INTEGER PROGRAMMING

138 Graduate
CSCI562
APPLIED ALGORITHMS AND DATA
STRUCTURES
MNGN536
OPERATIONS RESEARCH TECHNIQUES IN
THE MINERAL INDUSTRY
MNGN538
GEOSTATISTICAL ORE RESERVE
ESTIMATION
EBGN509
MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS
EBGN575
ADVANCED MINING AND ENERGY VALUATION
MATH531
STATISTICAL METHODS II
xxxx598/698
Special Topics (Requires approval of the advisor
and ORwE program director)

Colorado School of Mines 139
Materials Science
• Fuel cell materials
• Fullerene synthesis, combustion chemistry
Degrees Offered
• Heterogeneous catalysis, reformulated and alcohol fuels, surface
analysis, electrophotography
• Master of Science (Materials Science; thesis option or non-thesis
option)
• High temperature ceramics
• Doctor of Philosophy (Materials Science)
• Intelligent automated systems, intelligent process control, robotics,
artificial neural systems
Program Description
• Materials synthesis, interfaces, flocculation, fine particles
The Departments of Chemistry and Geochemistry, Metallurgical and
• Mathematical modeling of material processes
Materials Engineering, Physics, and Chemical and Biological Engineering
• Mechanical metallurgy, failure analysis, deformation of materials,
jointly administer the interdisciplinary materials science program. This
advanced steel coatings
interdisciplinary degree program coexists along side strong disciplinary
• Mechanical properties of ceramics and ceramic composites
programs, in Chemistry, Chemical and Biochemical Engineering,
• High entropy alloys
Mechanical Engineering, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, and
• Mössbauer spectroscopy, ion implantation, small-angle X-ray
Physics. For administrative purposes, the student will reside in the
scattering, semiconductor defects
advisor’s home academic department. The student’s graduate committee
will have final approval of the course of study.
• Nano materials
• Non-destructive evaluation
The interdisciplinary graduate program in Materials Science exists
• Non-ferrous structural alloys
to educate students, with at least a Bachelor of Science degree in
engineering or science, in the diverse field of Materials Science.
• Novel separation processes: membranes, catalytic membrane
This diversity includes the four key foundational aspects of Materials
reactors, biopolymer adsorbents for heavy metal remediation of
Science – materials properties including characterization and modeling,
ground surface water
materials structures, materials synthesis and processing and materials
• Numerical modeling of particulate media, thermomechanical analysis
performance – as applied to materials of a variety of types (i.e., metals,
• Optical properties of materials and interfaces
ceramics, polymers, electronic materials and biomaterials). The Materials
• Phase transformations and mechanisms of microstructural change
Science graduate program is responsible for administering MS (thesis
• Photovoltaic materials and device processing
and non-thesis) and PhD Degrees in Materials Science.
• Physical metallurgy, ferrous and nonferrous alloy systems
Fields of Research
• Physical vapor deposition, thin films, coatings
• Advanced polymeric materials
• Power electronics, plasma physics, pulsed power, plasma material
• Alloy theory, concurrent design, theory-assisted materials engineering,
processing
and electronic structure theory
• Processing and characterization of electroceramics (ferro-electrics,
• Applications of artificial intelligence techniques to materials processing
piezoelectrics, pyroelectrics, and dielectrics)
and manufacturing, neural networks for process modeling and sensor
• Semiconductor materials and device processing
data processing, manufacturing process control
• Soft materials
• Atomic scale characterization
• Solidification and near net shape processing
• Atom Probe Tomography
• Surface physics, epitaxial growth, interfacial science, adsorption
• Biomaterials
• Transport phenomena and mathematical modeling
• Ceramic processing, modeling of ceramic processing
• Weld metallurgy, materials joining processes
• Characterization, thermal stability, and thermal degradation
• Welding and joining science
mechanisms of polymers
• Chemical and physical processing of materials, engineered materials,
materials synthesis
Program Requirements
• Chemical vapor deposition
Each of the three degree programs require the successful completion
• Coating materials and applications
of three core courses for a total of 9 credit hours that will be applied to
• Computational condensed-matter physics, semiconductor alloys, first-
the degree program course requirements. Depending upon the individual
principles phonon calculations
student’s background, waivers for these courses may be approved by the
program director. In order to gain a truly interdisciplinary understanding
• Computer modeling and simulation
of Materials Science, students in the program are encouraged to select
• Control systems engineering, artificial neural systems for senior data
elective courses from several different departments outside of the
processing, polymer cure monitoring sensors, process monitoring and
Materials Science program. Course selection should be completed in
control for composites manufacturing
consultation with the student’s advisor or program director as appropriate.
• Crystal and molecular structure determination by X-ray crystallography
Listed below are the three required Materials Science core courses:
• Electrodeposition
• Electron and ion microscopy
MLGN591
MATERIALS THERMODYNAMICS
3
• Experimental condensed-matter physics, thermal and electrical
MLGN592
ADVANCED MATERIALS KINETICS AND
3
properties of materials, superconductivity, photovoltaics
TRANSPORT

140 Graduate
MLGN593
BONDING, STRUCTURE, AND
3.0
Qualifying Examination – A qualifying examination is given annually
CRYSTALLOGRAPHY
at the end of the spring semester under the direction of the Materials
Total Hours
9.0
Science Graduate Affairs Committee. All first-year Materials Science
students are expected to successfully complete the qualifying
Master of Science (Thesis Option)
examination within three semesters to remain in good standing in the
program. The examination covers material from the core curriculum plus
The Master of Science degree requires a minimum of 30.0 semester
a standard introductory text on Materials Science, such as "Materials
hours of acceptable coursework and thesis research credits (see table
Science and Engineering: An Introduction", by William Callister.
below). The student must also submit a thesis and pass the Defense of
Thesis examination before the Thesis Committee.
Thesis Proposal – A student’s thesis committee administers a Thesis
Proposal defense. The proposal defense should occur no later than the
COURSEWORK Materials Science Courses *
24.0
student’s fourth semester. While the proposal itself should focus on the
MLGN707
Thesis Research Credits
6.0
central topic of a student’s research efforts, during the proposal defense,
Total Hours
30.0
candidates may expect to receive a wide range of questions from the
Committee. This would include all manner of questions directly related to
*
Must include 9.0 credit hours of core courses.
the proposal. Candidates, however, should also expect questions related
Master of Science (Non-Thesis Option with a
to the major concept areas of Materials Science within the context of a
candidate’s research focus. The Committee formally reports results of the
case study)
proposal defense to the Materials Science Program Director using the
The Master of Science degree requires a minimum of 30.0 semester
Committee Reporting form developed by the Office of Graduate Studies.
hours of acceptable course work and case study credit including:
Upon completion of these steps and upon completion of all required
COURSEWORK
coursework, candidates are admitted to candidacy.
Materials Science Courses *
24.0
MLGN
Case Study
6.0
Following successful completion of coursework and the PhD qualifying
process, candidates must also submit a thesis and successfully complete
*
Must include 9.0 credit hours of core courses.
the Defense of Thesis examination before the Thesis Committee.
Doctor of Philosophy
The Doctor of Philosophy degree requires a minimum of 72.0 hours of
Courses
course and research credit including:
MLGN500. PROCESSING, MICROSTRUCTURE, AND PROPERTIES
COURSEWORK Materials Science Courses (minimum) *
24.0
OF MATERIALS. 3.0 Hours.
MLGN707
Thesis Research Credits (minimum)
24.0
(II) A summary of the important relationships between the processing,
microstructure, and properties of materials. Topics include electronic
*
Must include 9.0 credit hours of core courses.
structure and bonding, crystal structures, lattice defects and mass
Deficiency Courses
transport, glasses, phase transformation, important materials processes,
and properties including: mechanical and rheological, electrical
All doctoral candidates must complete at least 6 credit hours of
conductivity, magnetic, dielectric, optical,
background courses. This course requirement is individualized for
thermal, and chemical. In a given year, one of these topics will be
each candidate, depending on previous experience and research
given special emphasis. Another area of emphasis is phase equilibria.
activities to be pursued. Competitive candidates may already possess
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
this background information. In these cases, the candidate’s Thesis
Committee may award credit for previous experience. In cases where
MLGN501. STRUCTURE OF MATERIALS. 3.0 Hours.
additional coursework is required as part of a student’s program, these
(I) Application of X-ray diffraction techniques for crystal and molecular
courses are treated as fulfilling a deficiency requirement that is beyond
structure determination of minerals, inorganic and organometallic
the total institutional requirement of 72 credit hours.
compounds. Topics include the heavy atom method, data collection by
PhD Qualifying Process
moving film techniques and by
diffractometers, Fourier methods, interpretation of Patterson maps,
The following constitutes the qualifying processes by which doctoral
refinement methods, and direct methods. Prerequisite: Consent of
students are admitted to candidacy in the Materials Science program.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
Core Curriculum – The three required core classes must be completed in
MLGN502. SOLID STATE PHYSICS. 3.0 Hours.
the first Fall semester for all doctoral candidates. Students must obtain
An elementary study of the properties of solids including crystalline
a grade of B- or better in each class to be eligible to take the qualifying
structure and its determination, lattice vibrations, electrons in metals,
examination at the end of the succeeding spring semester. If a student
and semiconductors. (Graduate students in physics may register only for
receives a grade of less than B- in a class, the student may request
PHGN440.) Prerequisite: PHGN320. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
an additional final examination be given during the mid-term break of
the following spring semester. If the result of this examination is a B- or
better, the student will be allowed to take the qualifying examination. The
grade originally obtained in the course will not be changed as a result.
If not allowed to complete the qualifying examination at the end of the
spring semester, students will be discouraged from the PhD program and
encouraged, rather, to finish with a Masters degree

Colorado School of Mines 141
MLGN503. CHEMICAL BONDING IN MATERIALS. 3.0 Hours.
MLGN513. PROBLEM SOLVING IN MATERIALS SCIENCE. 3.0 Hours.
(I) Introduction to chemical bonding theories and calculations and their
(I) Review the theoretical aspects of various physical phenomena of
applications to solids of interest to materials science. The relationship
major importance to materials scientists. Develop mathematical models
between a material’s properties and the bonding of its atoms will be
from these theories, and construct quantitative solution procedures based
examined for a variety
on analytical and numerical techniques. Prerequisite: MATH225. 3 hours
of materials. Includes an introduction to organic polymers. Computer
lecture; 3 semester hours.
programs will be used for calculating bonding parameters. Prerequisite:
Consent of department. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MLGN515. ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS OF
MATERIALS. 3.0 Hours.
MLGN504. SOLID STATE THERMODYNAMICS. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Survey of the electrical properties of materials, and the applications
(I) Thermodynamics applied to solid state reactions, binary and
of materials as electrical circuit components. The effects of chemistry,
ternary phase diagrams, point, line and planar defects, interfaces, and
processing, and microstructure on the electrical properties will be
electrochemical concepts. Prerequisites: consent of instructor. 3 hours
discussed, along with functions, performance requirements, and testing
lecture; 3 semester hours.
methods of materials for each type of circuit component. The general
topics covered are conductors, resistors, insulators, capacitors, energy
MLGN505. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS. 3.0 Hours.
convertors, magnetic materials, and integrated circuits. Prerequisites:
(I) Mechanical properties and relationships. Plastic deformation of
PHGN200; MTGN311 or MLGN501; MTGN412/MLGN512, or consent of
crystalline materials. Relationships of microstructures to mechanical
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
strength. Fracture, creep, and fatigue. Prerequisite: MTGN348. 3
hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 3/4 semester hours. *This is a 3 credit-hour
MLGN516. PROPERTIES OF CERAMICS. 3.0 Hours.
graduate course in the Materials Science Program and a 4 credit-hour
(II) A survey of the properties of ceramic materials and how these
undergraduate-course in the MTGN program.
properties are determined by the chemical structure (composition), crystal
structure, and the microstructure of crystalline ceramics and glasses.
MLGN506. TRANSPORT IN SOLIDS. 3.0 Hours.
Thermal, optical, and mechanical properties of single-phase and multi-
(II) Thermal and electrical conductivity. Solid state diffusion in metals
phase ceramics, including composites, are covered. Prerequisites:
and metal systems. Kinetics of metallurgical reactions in the solid state.
PHGN200, MTGN311 or MLGN501, MTGN412 or consent of instructor. 3
Prerequisite: Consent of department. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
semester hours: 3 hours lecture.
(Spring of even years only.).
MLGN517. SOLID MECHANICS OF MATERIALS. 3.0 Hours.
MLGN509. SOLID STATE CHEMISTRY. 3.0 Hours.
(I) Review mechanics of materials. Introduction to elastic and non-linear
(I) Dependence on properties of solids on chemical bonding and
continua. Cartesian tensors and stresses and strains. Analytical solution
structure; principles of crystal growth, crystal imperfections, reactions
of elasticity problems. Develop basic concepts of fracture mechanics.
and diffusion in solids, and the theory of conductors and semiconductors.
Prerequisite: EGGN320 or equivalent, MATH225 or equivalent. 3 hours
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
Offered alternate years.
MLGN518. PHASE EQUILIBRIA IN CERAMICS SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
MLGN510. SURFACE CHEMISTRY. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Application of one of four component oxide diagrams to ceramic
(I) Introduction to colloid systems, capillarity, surface tension and contact
engineering problems. Emphasis on refractories and glasses and their
angle, adsorption from solution, micelles and microemulsions, the solid/
interaction with metallic systems. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3
gas interface, surface analytical techniques, Van Der Waal forces,
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring of odd years only.).
electrical properties and colloid stability, some specific colloid systems
(clays, foams and emulsions). Students enrolled for graduate credit in
MLGN519. NON-CRYSTALLINE MATERIALS. 3.0 Hours.
MLGN510 must complete a special project. Prerequisite: DCGN209 or
(I) An introduction to the principles of glass science and engineering
DCGN210 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and non-crystalline materials in general. Glass formation, structure,
crystallization and properties will be covered, along with a survey of
MLGN511. KINETIC CONCERNS IN MATERIALS PROCESSING. 3.0
commercial glass compositions,
Hours.
manufacturing processes and applications. Prerequisites: MTGN311
(I) Introduction to the kinetics of materials processing, with emphasis
or MLGN501; MLGN512/MTGN412, or consent of instructor. 3 hours
on the momentum, heat and mass transport. Discussion of the basic
lecture; 3 semester hours.
mechanism of transport in gases, liquids and solids. Prerequisite:
MTGN352, MTGN361, MATH225 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3
MLGN521. KINETIC CONCERNS IN MATERIAL PROCESSING II. 3.0
semester hours.
Hours.
(I, II) Advanced course to address the kinetics of materials processing,
MLGN512. CERAMIC ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
with emphasis in those processes that promote phase and structural
(II) Application of engineering principles to nonmetallic and ceramic
transformations.
materials. Processing of raw materials and production of ceramic bodies,
Processes that involve precipitation, sintering, oxidation, solgel, coating,
glazes, glasses, enamels, and cements. Firing processes and reactions
etc., will be discussed in detail. Prerequisite: MLGN511. 3 hours lecture;
in glass bonded as well as mechanically bonded systems. Prerequisite:
3 semester hours.
MTGN348. 3 hours. lecture; 3 semester hours.

142 Graduate
MLGN523. APPLIED SURFACE AND SOLUTION CHEMISTRY. 3.0
MLGN544. PROCESSING OF CERAMICS. 3.0 Hours.
Hours.
(II) A description of the principles of ceramic processing and the
(II) Solution and surface chemistry of importance in mineral and
relationship between processing and microstructure. Raw materials and
metallurgical operations. Pre requisite: Consent of department. 3
raw material preparation, forming and fabrication, thermal processing,
semester hours. (Spring of odd years only.).
and finishing of ceramic materials will be covered. Principles will be
illustrated by case studies on specific ceramic materials. A project to
MLGN526. GEL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
design a ceramic fabrication process is required. Field trips to local
An introduction to the science and technology of particulate and
ceramic manufacturing operations are included. Prerequisites: MTGN311,
polymeric gels, emphasizing inorganic systems. Interparticle forces.
MTGN331, and MTGN412/MLGN512 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
Aggregation, network formation, percolation, and the gel transition. Gel
lecture; 3 semester hours.
structure, rheology, and mechanical properties. Application to solid-liquid
separation operations (filtration, centrifugation, sedimentation) and to
MLGN550. STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL AND DESIGN OF
ceramics processing. Prerequisite: Graduate level status or consent of
EXPERIMENTS. 3.0 Hours.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Spring of odd years only.
(I) An introduction to statistical process control, process capability
analysis and experimental design techniques. Statistical process control
MLGN530. INTRODUCTION TO POLYMER SCIENCE. 3.0 Hours.
theory and techniques will be developed and applied to control charts
Chemistry and thermodynamics of polymers and polymer solutions.
for variables and attributes involved in process control and evaluation.
Reaction engineering of polymerization. Characterization techniques
Process capability concepts will be
based on solution properties. Materials science of polymers in varying
developed and applied for the evaluation of manufacturing processes.
physical states. Processing
The theory and application of designed experiments will be developed
operations for polymeric materials and use in separations. Prerequisite:
and applied for full factorial experiments, fractional factorial experiments,
CHGN221, MATH225, CHEN357 or consent of instructor. 3 hour lecture,
screening experiments, multilevel experiments and mixture experiments.
3 semester hours.
Analysis of designed experiments will be carried out by graphical and
statistical techniques. Computer software will be utilized for statistical
MLGN531. POLYMER ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
process control and for the design and analysis of experiments.
(II) This class provides a background in polymer fluid mechanics, polymer
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
rheological response and polymer shape forming. The class begins with
a discussion of the definition and measurement of material properties.
MLGN552. INORGANIC MATRIX COMPOSITES. 3.0 Hours.
Interrelationships among the material response functions are elucidated
(I) An introduction to the processing, structure, properties and
and relevant correlations between experimental data and material
applications of metal matrix and ceramic matrix composites. Importance
response in real flow situations are given. Processing operations for
of structure and properties of both the matrix and the reinforcement
polymeric materials will then be addressed. These include the flow of
and the types of reinforcement utilized, e.g., particulate, short fiber,
polymers through circular, slit, and complex dies. Fiber spinning, film
continuous fiber, and laminates. Special emphasis will be placed on the
blowing, extrusion and co-extrusion will be covered as will injection
development of properties such as electrical and thermal will also be
molding. Graduate students are required to write a term paper and take
examined. Prerequisite/Co-requisite: MTGN311, MTGN352, MTGN445/
separate examinations which are at a more advanced level. Prerequisite:
MLGN505 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours
CRGN307, EGGN351 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(Summer of even years only.).
MLGN535. INTERDISCIPLINARY MICROELECTRONICS
MLGN555. POLYMER AND COMPLEX FLUIDS COLLOQUIUM. 1.0
PROCESSING LABORATORY. 3.0 Hours.
Hour.
(II) Application of science and engineering principles to the design,
The Polymer and Complex Fluids Group at the Colorado School
fabrication, and testing of microelectronic devices. Emphasis on specific
of Mines combines expertise in the areas of flow and field based
unit operations and the
transport, intelligent design and synthesis as well as nanomaterials
interrelation among processing steps. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
and nanotechnology. A wide range of research tools employed by the
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
group includes characterization using rheology, scattering, microscopy,
microfluidics and separations, synthesis of novel macromolecules
MLGN536. ADVANCED POLYMER SYNTHESIS. 3.0 Hours.
as well as theory and simulation involving molecular dynamics and
(II) An advanced course in the synthesis of macromolecules. Various
Monte Carlo approaches. The course will provide a mechanism for
methods of polymerization will be discussed with an emphasis on the
collaboration between faculty and students in this research area by
specifics concerning the syntheses of different classes of organic and
providing presentations on topics including the expertise of the group
inorganic polymers. Prerequisite: CHGN430, ChEN415, MLGN530 or
and unpublished, ongoing campus research. Prerequisites: consent of
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
instructor. 1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour. Repeatable for credit to a
maximum of 3 hours.

Colorado School of Mines 143
MLGN561. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA IN MATERIALS
MLGN572. BIOMATERIALS. 3.0 Hours.
PROCESSING. 3.0 Hours.
(I) A broad overview on materials science and engineering principles
(II) Fluid flow, heat and mass transfer applied to processing of materials.
for biomedical applications with three main topics: 1) The fundamental
Rheology of polymers, liquid metal/particles slurries, and particulate
properties of biomaterials; 2) The fundamental concepts in biology; 3)
solids. Transient flow behavior of these materials in various geometries,
The interactions between biological systems with exogenous materials.
including infiltration of liquids in porous media. Mixing and blending.
Examples including surface energy and surface modification; protein
Flow behavior of jets, drainage of films and particle fluidization. Surface-
adsorption; cell adhesion, spreading and migration; biomaterials
tension-, electromagnetic-, and bubble-driven flows. Heat -transfer
implantation and acute inflammation; blood-materials interactions and
behavior in porous bodies applied to sintering and solidification of
thrombosis; biofilm and biomaterials-related pathological reactions. Basic
composites. Simultaneous heat-and-mass-transfer applied to spray
principles of bio-mimetic materials synthesis and assembly will also be
drying and drying porous bodies. Prerequisites: ChEN307 or ChEN308 or
introduced. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MTGN461 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MLGN583. PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS OF SURFACE
MLGN563. POLYMER ENGINEERING: STRUCTURE, PROPERTIES
ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES. 3.0 Hours.
AND PROCESSING. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Instrumental techniques for the characterization of surfaces of solid
(II) An introduction to the structure and properties of polymeric materials,
materials. Applications of such techniques to polymers, corrosion,
their deformation and failure mechanisms, and the design and fabrication
metallurgy, adhesion science, micro-electronics. Methods of analysis
of polymeric end items. The molecular and crystallographic structures
discussed: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), auger electron
of polymers will be developed and related to the elastic, viscoelastic,
spectroscopy (AES), ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS), secondary
yield and fracture properties of polymeric solids and reinforced polymer
ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), Rutherford backscattering (RBS),
composites. Emphasis will be placed on forming techniques for end
scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), energy
item fabrication including: extrusion, injection molding, reaction injection
and wavelength dispersive X-ray analysis; principles of these methods,
molding, thermoforming, and blow molding. The design of end items
quantification, instrumentation, sample preparation. Prerequisite: B.S.
will be considered in relation to: materials selection, manufacturing
in metallurgy, chemistry, chemical engineering, physics, or consent
engineering, properties, and applications. Prerequisite: MTGN311 or
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. This course taught in
equivalent or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
alternate even numbered years.
MLGN565. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CERAMICS AND
MLGN589. MATERIALS THERMODYNAMICS. 3.0 Hours.
COMPOSITES. 3.0 Hours.
A review of the thermodynamic principles of work, energy, entropy,
(II) Mechanical properties of ceramics and ceramic-based composites;
free energy, equilibrium, and phase transformations in single and multi-
brittle fracture of solids; toughening mechanisms in composites; fatigue,
component systems. Students will apply these principles to a broad
high temperature mechanical behavior, including fracture, creep
range of materials systems of current importance including solid state
deformation. Prerequisites: MTGN445 or MLGN505, or consent of
materials, magnetic and piezoelectric materials, alloys, chemical and
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall of even years only.).
electrochemical systems, soft and biological materials and nanomaterials.
Prerequisites: A 300 level or higher course in
MLGN569. FUEL CELL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
thermodynamics or permission of instructor. 3 semester hours lecture, 3
(II) Investigate fundamentals of fuel-call operation and electrochemistry
semester hours.
from a chemical thermodynamics and materials science perspective.
Review types of fuel cells, fuel-processing requirements and approaches,
MLGN591. MATERIALS THERMODYNAMICS. 3.0 Hours.
and fuel-cell system integration. Examine current topics in fuel-cell
(I) A review of the thermodynamic principles of work, energy, entropy,
science and technology. Fabricate and test operational fuel cells in the
free energy, equilibrium, and phase transformations in single and multi-
Colorado Fuel Cell Center. Prerequisites: EGGN371 or ChEN357 or
component systems. Students will apply these principles to a broad
MTGN351 Thermodynamics I, MATH225 Differential
range of materials systems of current importance including solid state
Equations, or consent of instructor. 3 credit hours.
materials, magnetic and piezoelectric materials, alloys, chemical and
electrochemical systems, soft and biological materials and nanomaterials.
MLGN570. BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF MATERIALS. 3.0 Hours.
Prerequisites: A 300 level or higher course in thermodynamics or
(II) Introduction to the diversity of biomaterials and applications
permission of instructor. 3 semester hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
through examination of the physiologic environment in conjunction
with compositional and structural requirements of tissues and organs.
MLGN592. ADVANCED MATERIALS KINETICS AND TRANSPORT.
Appropriate domains and applications of metals, ceramics and polymers,
3.0 Hours.
including implants, sensors, drug delivery, laboratory automation, and
(I) A broad treatment of homogenous and heterogeneous kinetic
tissue engineering are presented. Prerequisites: ESGN301 or equivalent,
transport and reaction processes in the gas, liquid, and solid states,
or instructor consent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
with a specific emphasis on heterogeneous kinetic processes involving
gas/solid, liquid/solid, and solid/solid systems. Reaction rate theory,
nucleation and growth, and phase transformations will be discussed.
A detailed overview of mass, heat, and charge transport in condensed
phases is provided including a description of fundamental transport
mechanisms, the development of general transport equations, and
their application to a number of example systems. Prerequisites: A
300 level or higher course in thermodynamics, introductory college
chemistry, electricity and magnetism, differential equations, or permission
of instructor. 3 semester hours.

144 Graduate
MLGN593. BONDING, STRUCTURE, AND CRYSTALLOGRAPHY. 3.0
MLGN635. POLYMER REACTION ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
Hours.
This class is aimed at engineers with a firm technical background who
(I) This course will be an overview of condensed matter structure from
wish to apply that background to polymerization production techniques.
the atomic scale to the mesoscale. Students will gain a perspective
The class begins with a review of the fundamental concepts of reaction
on electronic structure as it relates to bonding, long range order as
engineering, introduces the needed terminology and describes different
it relates to crystallography and amorphous structures, and extend
reactor types. The applied kinetic models relevant to polymerization
these ideas to nanostructure and microstructure. Examples relating to
reaction engineering are then developed. Next, mixing effects are
each hierarchy of structure will be stressed, especially as they relate to
introduced; goodness of mixing and effects on reactor performance
reactivity, mechanical properties, and electronic and optical properties.
are discussed. Thermal effects are then introduced and the subjects of
Prerequisites: A 300 level or higher course in thermodynamics or
thermal runaway, thermal instabilities, and multiple steady states are
permission of instructor. 3 semester hours.
included. Reactive processing, change in viscosity with the extent of
reaction and continuous
MLGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS. 6.0 Hours.
drag flow reactors are described. Polymer de-volatilization constitutes the
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
final subject of the class. Prerequisites: CHEN518 or equivalent. 3 hours
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
lecture; 3 semester hours.
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
MLGN648. CONDENSED MATTER II. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Principles and applications of the quantum theory of electronic and
MLGN599. CASE STUDY MATERIALS SCIENCE. 1-6 Hour.
phonons in solids; phonon states in solids; transport properties; electron
(I, II) An independent study of a selected materials processing or material
states and excitation in semiconductors and insulators; magnetism;
characterization problem involving a thorough analysis of the various
superconductivity. Prerequisite: PHGN640/MLGN607 or consent of
solutions reported in the technical literature and/or a thorough industrial
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
survey. The case study will prepare a case study report of technical merit.
Prerequisite/co-requisite: MLGN501, MLGN502, MLGN503, MLGN504,
MLGN673. STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF POLYMERS. 3.0
and MLGN511, and MLGN517 or consent of advisor. 3 semester hours.
Hours.
Repeatable for credit.
This course will provide an understanding of structure- properties
relations in polymeric materials. The topics include: phase separation,
MLGN607. CONDENSED MATTER. 3.0 Hours.
amorphous structures, crystalline structures, liquid crystals, glass-
(I) Principles and applications of the quantum theory of electronic in
rubber transition behavior, rubber elasticity, viscoelasticity, mechanical
solids: structure and symmetry, electron states and excitations in metals;
properties of polymers, polymer forming processes, and electrical
transport properties. Prerequisite: PHGN520 and PHGN440/MLGN502 or
properties of polymers. Prerequisite: MLGN563 or consent of instructor. 3
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MLGN625. MOLECULAR SIMULATION METHODS. 3.0 Hours.
MLGN696. VAPOR DEPOSITION PROCESSES. 3.0 Hours.
(I Even Years), Principles and practice of modern computer simulation
(II) Introduction to the fundamental physics and chemistry underlying the
techniques used to understand solids, liquids, and gases. Review of the
control of vapor deposition processes for the deposition of thin films for
statistical foundation of thermodynamics followed by in-depth discussion
a variety of applications, e.g.,corrosion/oxidation resistance, decorative
of Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics techniques. Discussion of
coatings, electronic and magnetic thin films. Emphasis on the vapor
intermolecular potentials, extended ensembles, and mathematical
deposition processes and the control of process variables rather than
algorithms used in molecular simulations. Prerequisites: graduate level
the structure and properties of the thin films. Prerequisites: MTGN351,
thermodynamics (required), statistical mechanics (recommended). 3
MTGN461, or equivalent courses, or consent of instructor. 3 hours
semester hours.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
MLGN634. ADVANCED TOPICS IN THERMODYNAMICS. 3.0 Hours.
MLGN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
Advanced study of thermodynamic theory and application of
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
thermodynamic principles. Possible topics include stability, critical
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
phenomena, chemical thermodynamics, thermodynamics of polymer
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
solutions and thermodynamics of aqueous and ionic solutions.
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
MLGN707. GRADUATE THESIS/DISSERTATION RESEARCH CREDIT.
1-12 Hour.
(I, II, S) Research credit hours required for completion of a Masters-level
thesis or Doctoral dissertation. Research must be carried out under the
direct supervision of the student’s faculty advisor. Variable class and
semester hours. Repeatable for credit.

Colorado School of Mines 145
Nuclear Engineering
Master of Science
Core courses
13.0
http://nuclear.mines.edu
Elective core courses
6.0
Degrees Offered
Nuclear Science and Engineering Seminar
2.0
• Master of Science (Nuclear Engineering), Thesis option
Graduate research (minimum)
12.0
• Master of Science (Nuclear Engineering), Non-thesis option
Graduate research or elective courses
3.0
• Doctor of Philosophy (Nuclear Engineering)
Total Hours
36.0
In addition, students majoring in allied fields may complete a minor
M.S. students must complete and defend a research thesis in accordance
degree through the Nuclear Science and Engineering Program,
with this Graduate Bulletin and the Nuclear Science and Engineering
consisting of 12 credit hours of coursework. The Nuclear Science and
Thesis Procedures. The student must complete the preparation and
Engineering Minor programs are designed to allow students in allied
defense of a Thesis Proposal as described by the Nuclear Science and
fields to acquire and then indicate, in a formal way, specialization in a
Engineering Proposal Procedures at least one semester before the
nuclear-related area of expertise.
student defends his or her M.S. thesis.
Program Description
Doctor of Philosophy
The Nuclear Science and Engineering program at the Colorado School
Core courses
13.0
of Mines is interdisciplinary in nature and draws substantial contributions
Elective core courses
9.0
from the the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, the
Additional elective courses
12.0
Department of Chemistry, the College of Engineering and Computational
Nuclear Science and Engineering Seminar
4.0
Sciences, the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, the
Graduate research (minimum)
24.0
Department of Liberal Arts and International Studies, the Department of
Mechanical Engineering, the Department of Metallurgical and Materials
Graduate research or elective courses
10.0
Engineering, and the Department of Physics. While delivering a traditional
Total Hours
72.0
Nuclear Engineering course core, the School of Mines program in
Ph.D. students must successfully complete the program’s quality control
Nuclear Science and Engineering emphasizes the nuclear fuel life cycle.
process.
Faculty bring to the program expertise in all aspects of the nuclear
fuel life cycle; fuel exploration and processing, nuclear power systems
The Ph.D. quality control process includes the following:
production, design and operation, fuel recycling, storage and waste
• Prior to admission to candidacy, the student must complete all seven
remediation, radiation detection and radiation damage as well as the
of the Nuclear Engineering required and elective core classes;
policy issues surrounding each of these activities. Related research is
• Prior to admission to candidacy, the student must pass a qualifying
conducted in CSM’s Nuclear Science and Engineering Center.
examination in accordance with the Nuclear Science and Engineering
Students in all three Nuclear Engineering degrees are exposed to a
Qualifying Exam Procedures for any of his or her seven core classes
broad systems overview of the complete nuclear fuel cycle as well as
in which he or she did not receive a grade of B or better;
having detailed expertise in a particular component of the cycle. Breadth
• Prior to admission to candidacy, a Ph.D. thesis proposal must be
is assured by requiring all students to complete a rigorous set of core
presented to, and accepted by, the student’s thesis committee in
courses. The core consists of a 21 credit-hour course sequence. The
accordance with the Nuclear Science and Engineering Proposal
remainder of the course and research work is obtained from the multiple
Procedures; and
participating departments, as approved for each student by the student’s
• The student must complete and defend a Ph.D. thesis in accordance
advisor and the student’s thesis committee (as appropriate).
with this Graduate Bulletin and the Nuclear Science and Engineering
The Master of Science (Non-Thesis) is a non-thesis graduate degree
Thesis Procedures.
intended to supplement the student’s undergraduate degree by providing
the core knowledge needed to prepare the student to pursue a career
Students seeking a Ph.D in Nuclear Engineering are also generally
in the nuclear engineering field. The Master of Science and Doctor of
expected to complete a thesis-based Master’s degree in Nuclear
Philosophy degrees are thesis-based degrees that emphasize research.
Engineering or a related field prior to their admission to Ph.D. candidacy.
Thesis Committee Requirements
Program Requirements
The student’s thesis committee must meet the general
requirements listed in the Graduate Bulletin section on Graduate
The Nuclear Science and Engineering Program offers programs of study
Degrees and Requirements (bulletin.mines.edu/graduate/
leading to three graduate degrees:
graduatedepartmentsandprograms). In addition, the student’s advisor or
Master of Science (Non-Thesis)
co-advisor must be an active faculty member of CSM’s Nuclear Science
and Engineering Program. For M.S. students, at least two, and for Ph.D.
Core courses
13.0
students, at least three, committee members must be faculty members
Elective core courses
12.0
of the Nuclear Science and Engineering Program and must come from
Additional elective courses
9.0
at least two different departments. At least one member of the Ph.D.
Nuclear Science and Engineering Seminar
2.0
committee must be a faculty member from outside the Nuclear Science
Total Hours
36.0
and Engineering Program.

146 Graduate
Required Curriculum
Graduate Seminar
In order to be admitted to the Nuclear Science and Engineering
Full-time graduate students in the Nuclear Science and Engineering
Graduate Degree Program, students must meet the following minimum
Program are expected to maintain continuous enrollment in Nuclear
requirements:
Science and Engineering Seminar (NUGN505). Students who are
concurrently enrolled in a different degree program that also requires
• baccalaureate degree in a science or engineering discipline from an
seminar attendance may have this requirement waived at the discretion
accredited program
of the Program Director.
• mathematics coursework up to and including differential equations
• physics coursework up to and including courses in modern physics
Nuclear Engineering Combined Degree
and introductory nuclear physics
Program Option
• coursework in engineering thermodynamics, heat transfer, and fluid
CSM undergraduate students have the opportunity to begin work on an
flow (or equivalent)
M.S. degree in Nuclear Engineering while completing their Bachelor’s
Students who do not meet these minimum requirements may be admitted
degree. The Nuclear Engineering Combined Degree Program provides
with specified coursework to be completed in the first semesters of the
the vehicle for students to use up to 6 credit hours of undergraduate
graduate program. Entering students without an appropriate nuclear
coursework as part of their Nuclear Engineering Graduate Degree
engineering background will be advised to take introductory nuclear
curriculum, as well as the opportunity to take additional graduate courses
engineering coursework prior to starting the nuclear engineering core
while completing their undergraduate degree. Students in the Nuclear
course sequence. These introductory courses will be selected in
Engineering Combined Degree Program are expected to apply for
consultation with the student’s graduate advisor.
admission to the graduate program by the beginning of their Senior
Year. For more information please contact the Nuclear Science and
All degree offerings within the Nuclear Science and Engineering program
Engineering Combined Degree Program Coordinator.
are based on a set of required and elective core courses. The required
core classes are:
Minor Degree Programs
NUGN510
INTRODUCTION TO NUCLEAR REACTOR
3.0
PHYSICS
Students majoring in allied fields may choose to complete minor degree
programs through the Nuclear Science and Engineering Program
NUGN520
INTRODUCTION TO NUCLEAR REACTOR
3
indicating specialization in a nuclear-related area of expertise. Minor
THERMAL-HYDRAULICS
programs require completion of 12 credit hours of approved coursework.
NUGN580
NUCLEAR REACTOR LABORATORY (taught in
3.0
Existing minors and their requirements are as follows:
collaboration with the USGS)
NUGN585
NUCLEAR REACTOR DESIGN I
4.0
Nuclear Engineering
& NUGN586
and NUCLEAR REACTOR DESIGN II
NUGN510
INTRODUCTION TO NUCLEAR REACTOR
3.0
Total Hours
13.0
PHYSICS
Additionally, students pursuing a Nuclear Engineering graduate degree
NUGN520
INTRODUCTION TO NUCLEAR REACTOR
3
must take a certain number of courses from the elective core (all four for
THERMAL-HYDRAULICS
an M.S. (Non-Thesis), two for an M.S. and three for a Ph.D.). The core
NUGN580
NUCLEAR REACTOR LABORATORY
3.0
electives consist of the following:
LAIS589
NUCLEAR POWER AND PUBLIC POLICY
3.0
PHGN504
RADIATION DETECTION AND MEASUREMENT 3.0
or ESGN511
ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP OF NUCLEAR
RESOURCES
MTGN593
NUCLEAR MATERIALS SCIENCE AND
3.0
ENGINEERING
Total Hours
12.0
ESGN511
ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP OF
3.0
Nuclear Materials Processing
NUCLEAR RESOURCES
NUGN510
INTRODUCTION TO NUCLEAR REACTOR
3.0
LAIS589
NUCLEAR POWER AND PUBLIC POLICY
3.0
PHYSICS
Students will select additional coursework in consultation with their
MTGN593
NUCLEAR MATERIALS SCIENCE AND
3.0
graduate advisor and their thesis committee (where applicable). This
ENGINEERING
additional coursework may include offerings from all of the academic
MTGN591
PHYSICAL PHENOMENA OF COATING
3.0
units participating in the degree program: Applied Math and Statistics,
PROCESSES
Chemistry, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Liberal Arts and
ESGN511
ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP OF
3.0
International Studies, Mechanical Engineering, Metallurgical and
NUCLEAR RESOURCES
Materials Engineering, Mining Engineering and Physics. Through these
additional courses, students gain breadth and depth in their knowledge
Total Hours
12.0
the Nuclear Engineering industry.
Nuclear Detection
Students seeking M.S. (Thesis) and Ph.D. degrees are required to
PHGN422
NUCLEAR PHYSICS
3.0
complete the minimum research credit hour requirements ultimately
leading to the completion and defense of a thesis. Research is conducted
NUGN510
INTRODUCTION TO NUCLEAR REACTOR
3.0
under the direction of a member of CSM’s Nuclear Science and
PHYSICS
Engineering faculty and could be tied to a research opportunity provided
PHGN504
RADIATION DETECTION AND MEASUREMENT 3.0
by industry partners.

Colorado School of Mines 147
NUGN580
NUCLEAR REACTOR LABORATORY
3.0
Total Hours
12.0
Nuclear Geoscience and Geoengineering
PHGN422
NUCLEAR PHYSICS
3.0
Select three of the following:
9.0
Nuclear and Isotope Geochemistry
In-situ Mining
Uranium Mining
Total Hours
12.0
NUGN505
NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
1
SEMINAR
NUGN510
INTRODUCTION TO NUCLEAR REACTOR
3
PHYSICS
NUGN520
INTRODUCTION TO NUCLEAR REACTOR
3
THERMAL-HYDRAULICS
NUGN535
INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH PHYSICS
3
NUGN580
NUCLEAR REACTOR LABORATORY
3
NUGN585
NUCLEAR REACTOR DESIGN I
2
NUGN586
NUCLEAR REACTOR DESIGN II
2
NUGN598
SPECIAL TOPICS
1-6
NUGN698
SPECIAL TOPICS
6
NUGN707
GRADUATE THESIS/DISSERTATION
1-12
RESEARCH CREDIT

148 Graduate
Policies and Procedures
Sexual harassment shall, without regard to the gender of the
Complainant or Respondent, consist of unwelcome sexual advances,
Standards, Codes of Conduct
requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a
sexual nature when: (1) either explicitly or implicitly, submission to such
In addition to the academic policies listed in the Academic Regulations
conduct is made a term or condition of an individual’s employment or
section of this Bulletin, the Colorado School of Mines has a number
educational endeavors; (2) submission to or rejection of such conduct
of other policies which govern student behavior and expectations on
by an individual is used as the basis for employment or educational
campus. Students can access campus rules and regulations, including
decisions affecting the individual; or (3) such conduct has the purpose or
the student code of conduct, alcohol policy, public safety and parking
effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work or academic
policies, the distribution of literature and free speech policy, and a variety
performance, or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working or
of others by visiting the School’s policy website (http://inside.mines.edu/
educational environment.
Policies). We encourage all students to review the website and expect
Sexual violence and sexual assault are forms of sexual harassment.
that students know and understand the campus policies, rules and
Sexual harassment shall also be defined to include retaliation against
regulations as well as their rights as a student. Questions and comments
an individual for reporting sexual harassment or cooperating in a sexual
regarding the above mentioned policies can be directed to the Associate
harassment investigation.
Dean of Students located in the Student Center, Suite 172.
2.3 Sanctions for Sexual Harassment
For emphasis, the following policies are included in this section below:
Appropriate sanctions may be imposed upon an employee or student
• Policy Prohibiting Sexual Harassment
who has sexually harassed another. The sanctions may include, but
• Unlawful Discrimination Policy and Complaint Procedure (currently
are not limited to one or more of the following: oral reprimand and
under revision)
warning; written reprimand and warning; student probation; suspension or
• Electronic Communications (Email) Policy
expulsion; monetary fine; attendance at a sexual harassment prevention
seminar; suspension without pay; or termination of employment or
Also addressed in this section are rules, procedures, and/or information
appointment.
related to the following:
3.0 IMPLEMENTATION
• Student Complaint Process
• Access to Student Records
The Mines Board of Trustees authorizes and directs the President
• Posthumous Degree Awards
or President’s delegates to develop, administer, and maintain the
• Equal Opportunity, Equal Access and Affirmative Action
appropriate administrative policies, procedures, and guidelines to
implement this policy.
Policy Prohibiting Sexual Harassment*
Title IX Coordinator:
*Note: This policy is inclusive of all forms of sexual harassment, including
Maureen Durkin, Director of Policy, Planning & Analysis, Guggenheim
sexual assault and sexual violence.
Hall, Room 212A, Golden, CO 80401. Telephone: 303/384-2236.
1.0 STATEMENT OF AUTHORITY AND PURPOSE
Contact for Complaints about Employee or Third-Party Behavior:
This policy is promulgated pursuant to the authority conferred by
Mike Dougherty, Associate Vice President for Human Resources,
§23-41-104(1), C.R.S., and Title IX of the Education Amendments
Guggenheim Hall, Room 110, Golden, CO 80401. Telephone:
of 1972 (Title IX), 20 U.S.C. §§ 1681 et seq., and its implementing
303/273-3250.
regulations, 34 C.F.R. Part 106; Title IV of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42
Contact for Complaints about Student Behavior:
U.S.C. § 2000c). Its purpose is to set forth a policy statement from the
Board of Trustees concerning sexual harassment at the Colorado School
Derek Morgan, Associate Dean of Students, Student Center, Room 175,
of Mines (“Mines” or “the School”). This policy shall supersede any Mines’
1200 a6th Street, Golden, CO 80401. Telephone: 303/273-3288.
policy that is in conflict herewith.
Related Administrative Policies, Procedures, Resources:
2.0 SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY
For Complaints about Employee or Third-Party Behavior:
2.1 Policy Statement
• Sexual Harassment Complaint, Investigation and Resolution
The Mines Board of Trustees wishes to foster an environment for
Procedure for Complaints Involving Employees or Third
the Mines’ campus community that is free from all forms of sexual
Parties (http://inside.mines.edu/UserFiles/File/policies/HUR/
harassment. Accordingly, the School will not tolerate any forms of
HRS_Sexual_Harrassment_Complaint_Procedure_Employee.pdf)
sexual harassment and will take all necessary measures to deter such
• Sexual Harassment Complaint Investigation Authorization Form
misconduct, including but not limited to preventive educational programs,
thorough investigation of sexual harassment complaints, and discipline of
For Complaints about Student Behavior:
policy violators with appropriate sanctions. Retaliation in any form against
• Sexual Harassment Complaint, Investigation, Resolution
an individual for reporting sexual harassment or cooperating in a sexual
and Adjudication Procedure for Complaints about Student
harassment investigation is strictly prohibited. Such retaliation shall be
Behavior (http://inside.mines.edu/UserFiles/File/policies/STU/
dealt with as a separate instance of sexual harassment. Complaints of
STU_Sexual_Harassment_Complaint_Procedure_Students.pdf)
sexual harassment will be handled in accordance with the administrative
• Procedures/Resources for Survivors of Sexual Assault or Other
procedures that accompany this policy.
Sexual Violence (http://inside.mines.edu/UserFiles/File/policies/STU/
2.2 Definition of Sexual Harassment
STU_Procedures_Resources_Sexual_Assault.pdf)

Colorado School of Mines 149
• Anonymous Sexual Violence Reporting Form (http://
use and acceptance of electronic communication, Mines is adopting the
inside.mines.edu/UserFiles/File/policies/STU/
following policy regarding electronic communications with students.
STU_Anonymous_Reporting_Form_Sexual_Violence.pdf)
2.0 POLICY
This policy was promulgated by the Colorado School of Mines Board of
It is the policy of the Colorado School of Mines that official university-
Trustees on March 13, 1992. Amended by the Colorado School of Mines
related communications with students will be sent via Mines’ internal
Board of Trustees on March 26, 1998. Amended by the Colorado School
email system or via campus or targeted Trailhead announcements. All
of Mines Board of Trustees on June 10, 1999. Amended by the Colorado
students will be assigned a Mines email address and are expected to
School of Mines Board of Trustees on June 22, 2000. Amended by the
periodically check their Mines assigned email as well as their Trailhead
Colorado School of Mines Board of Trustees on June 7, 2003. Amended
portal page. It is also expected that email sent to students will be read
by the Colorado School of Mines Board of Trustees on December 15,
in a timely manner. Communications sent via email to students will be
2011.
considered to have been received and read by the intended recipients.
Unlawful Discrimination Policy and
3.0 PROCEDURES
Complaint Procedure
1. All students will be given an EKey, which is an activation code that
I. STATEMENT OF AUTHORITY AND PURPOSE
offers access to electronic resources at Mines. With their EKey,
students must activate their assigned Mines email address.
This policy is promulgated by the Board of Trustees pursuant to the
2. Once their email address is activated, students are expected
authority conferred upon it by §23-41-104(1), C.R.S. (1999) in order to
to check their Mines email inbox on a frequent and consistent
set forth a policy concerning unlawful discrimination at CSM. This policy
basis and have the responsibility to recognize that certain
shall supersede any previously promulgated CSM policy that is in conflict
communications from the university may be timecritical. As such,
herewith.
students also are responsible for responding in a timely manner
II. UNLAWFUL DISCRIMINATION POLICY
to official communications from the university when a response is
requested.
Attendance and employment at CSM are based solely on merit and
fairness. Discrimination on the basis of age, gender, race, ethnicity,
3. The policy does not prevent students from using a personal email
religion, national origin, disability, sexual orientation, and military
address for university-related communications and purposes. If
veteran status is prohibited. No discrimination in admission, application
a student chooses to use a personal email address as his or her
of academic standards, financial aid, scholastic awards, promotion,
address of choice for receiving university-related communications,
compensation, transfers, reductions in force, terminations, re-
he or she must forward email from the Mines assigned email
employment, professional development, or conditions of employment
address to the personal email address. However, if a student
shall be permitted. The remainder of this policy shall contain a complaint
chooses to forward communications to a personal email address,
procedure outlining a method for reporting alleged violations of this policy
she or he must be aware that Mines personnel may not be able
and a review mechanism for the impartial determination of the merits of
to assist in resolving technical difficulties with personal email
complaints alleging unlawful discrimination.
accounts. Furthermore, forwarding communications to a personal
email address does not absolve a student from the responsibilities
As of June 2011, this policy is under revision. For a complete
associated with communication sent to his or her official Mines
policy statement please see http://inside.mines.edu/Board_Policies.
email address. Please note: If a student changes his or her official
Promulgated by the CSM Board of Trustees on March 13, 1992.
Mines email address to a personal address, it will be changed back
Amended by the CSM Board of Trustees on June 10, 1999. Amended by
to the Mines assigned email address. Students have the option
the CSM Board of Trustees on June 22, 2000.
to forward their Mines email to a personal address to avoid this
Electronic Communications (Email) Policy
problem. Should a student choose the forwarding option, he or she
must ensure that SPAM filters will not block email coming from the
1.0 BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE
mines.edu address.
Communication to students at the Colorado School of Mines (Mines) is
4. Nothing in these procedures should be construed as prohibiting
an important element of the official business of the university. It is vital
university-related communications being sent via traditional
that Mines have an efficient and workable means of getting important
means. Use of paper-based communication may be necessary
and timely information to students. Examples of communications that
under certain circumstances or may be more appropriate to
require timely distribution include information from Fiscal Services, the
certain circumstances. Examples of such communications could
Registrar’s Office, or other offices on campus that need to deliver official
include, but not be limited to disciplinary notices, fiscal services
and time-sensitive information to students. (Please note that emergency
communications, graduation information and so forth.
communications may occur in various forms based on the specific
circumstances).
Student Complaint Process
Electronic communication through email and Trailhead Portal
Students are consumers of services offered as part of their academic
announcements provides a rapid, efficient, and effective form of
and co-curricular experience at the Colorado School of Mines. If a
communication. Reliance on electronic communication has become
student needs to make a complaint, specific or general, about their
the accepted norm within the Mines community. Additionally, utilizing
experience at Mines, he or she should contact the Office of the Dean
electronic communications is consistent with encouraging a more
of Students at 303-273-3231. If the issue is related to discrimination or
environmentally-conscious means of doing business and encouraging
sexual harassment, there are specific procedures that will be followed
continued stewardship of scarce resources. Because of the wide-spread
(these are noted and linked in this section). Regardless, the student
should begin with the Dean’s Office if interested in making any complaint.
All complaints, as well as the interests of all involved parties, will be

150 Graduate
considered with fairness, impartiality, and promptness while a complaint
2. inform the student that it is his decision that the document
is being researched and/or investigated by the School.
represents a necessary part of the record; and, if the student
wishes to appeal,
Access to Student Records
3. convene a meeting of the student and the document originator
Students at the Colorado School of Mines are protected by the Family
(if reasonably available) in the presence of the Executive Vice
Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended. This Act was
President for Academic Affairs as mediator, whose decision will be
designed to protect the privacy of education records, to establish the
final.
right of students to inspect and review their education records, and to
provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data
Destruction of Records. Records may be destroyed at any time by
through informal and formal hearings. Students also have the right to file
the responsible official if not otherwise precluded by law except that no
complaints with The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office
record may be destroyed between the dates of access request and the
(FERPA) concerning alleged failures by the institution to comply with the
viewing of the record. If during the viewing of the record any item is in
Act. Copies of local policy can be found in the Registrar’s Office. Contact
dispute, it may not be destroyed.
information for FERPA complaints is
Access to Records by Other Parties. Colorado School of Mines will not
Family Policy Compliance Office
permit access to student records by persons outside the School except
U.S. Department of Education
as follows:
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
1. In the case of open record information as specified in the section
Washington, D. C. 20202-4605
under Directory Information.
Directory Information. The School maintains lists of information
2. To those people specifically designated by the student. Examples
which may be considered directory information as defined by the
would include request for transcript to be sent to graduate school or
regulations. This information includes name, current and permanent
prospective employer.
addresses and phone numbers, date of birth, major field of study, dates
3. Information required by a state or federal agency for the purpose of
of attendance, part or full-time status, degrees awarded, last school
establishing eligibility for financial aid.
attended, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, class,
4. Accreditation agencies during their on-campus review.
and academic honors. Students who desire that this information not be
5. In compliance with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena after
printed or released must so inform the Registrar before the end of the
the student has been notified of the intended compliance.
first two weeks of the fall semester for which the student is registered.
6. Any institutional information for statistical purposes which is not
Information will be withheld for the entire academic year unless the
identifiable with a particular student.
student changes this request. The student’s signature is required to
make any changes for the current academic year. The request must be
7. In compliance with any applicable statue now in effect or later
renewed each fall term for the upcoming year. The following student
enacted. Each individual record (general, transcript, advisor,
records are maintained by Colorado School of Mines at the various
and medical) will include a log of those persons not employed by
offices listed below:
Colorado School of Mines who have requested or obtained access
to the student record and the legitimate interest that the person has
1. General Records: Registrar and Graduate Dean
in making the request.
2. Transcript of Grades: Registrar
The School discloses education records without a student’s prior written
3. Computer Grade Lists: Registrar
consent under the FERPA exception for disclosure to school officials with
4. Encumbrance List: Controller and Registrar
legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed
5. Academic Probation/Suspension List: Graduate Dean
by the School in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research,
6. Advisor File: Academic Advisor
or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and
7. Option/Advisor/Enrolled/ Minority/Foreign List: Registrar, Dean of
health staff); a person or company with whom the School has contracted
Students, and Graduate Dean
as its agent to provide a service instead of using School employees
8. Externally Generated SAT/GRE Score Lists: Graduate Dean
or officials (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person
serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official
9. Financial Aid File: Financial Aid (closed records)
committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting
10. Medical History File: School Physician (closed records)
another school official in performing his or her tasks.
Student Access to Records. The graduate student wishing access to
A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs
his or her educational records will make a written request to the Graduate
to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional
Dean. This request will include the student’s name, date of request and
responsibilities for the School.
type of record to be reviewed. It will be the responsibility of the Dean to
arrange a mutually satisfactory time for review. This time will be as soon
Posthumous Degree Awards
as practical but is not to be later than 30 business days from receipt of
The faculty may recognize the accomplishments of students who have
the request. The record will be reviewed in the presence of the Dean or
died while pursuing their educational goals. If it is reasonable to expect
designated representative. If the record involves a list including other
that the student would have completed his or her degree requirements,
students, steps will be taken to preclude the viewing of the other student
the faculty may award a Baccalaureate or Graduate Degree that is in all
name and information.
ways identical to the degree the student was pursuing. Alternatively, the
Challenge of the Record. If the student wishes to challenge any part of
faculty may award a Posthumous BS, MS, or Ph.D. to commemorate
the record, the Dean will be so notified in writing. The Dean may then
students who distinguished themselves while at Mines by bringing honor
to the School and its traditions.
1. remove and destroy the disputed document, or

Colorado School of Mines 151
Consideration for either of these degrees begins with a petition to
the Faculty Senate from an academic department or degree granting
unit. The petition should identify the degree sought. In the event that
the degree-granting unit is seeking a conventional degree award, the
petition should include evidence of the reasonable expectations that the
student would have completed his or her degree requirements. For a
Baccalaureate, such evidence could consist of, but is not limited to:
• The student was a senior in the final semester of coursework,
• The student was enrolled in courses that would have completed the
degree requirements at the time of death
• The student would have passed the courses with an acceptable grade,
and would likely have fulfilled the requirements of the degree.
For a Graduate Degree:
• For graduate degrees not requiring a research product, the student
was enrolled in courses that would have completed the degree
requirements at the time of death, would have passed the courses with
an acceptable grade, and would likely have fulfilled the requirements
of the degree.
• For graduate degrees requiring a research product, the student had
completed all course and mastery requirements pursuant to the
degree and was near completion of the dissertation or thesis, and the
student’s committee found the work to be substantial and worthy of the
degree.
The requirement that there be a reasonable expectation of degree
completion should be interpreted liberally and weight should be given
to the judgment of the departmental representative(s) supporting the
petition.
In the event that the degree being sought is a Posthumous BS, MS, or
Ph.D., the petition should include evidence that the student conducted
himself or herself in the best tradition of a Mines’ graduate and is
therefore deserving of that honor.
Equal Opportunity, Equal Access, and
Affirmative Action
The institution’s Statement of Equal Opportunity and Equal Access to
Educational Programs, and associated staff contacts, can be found in the
Welcome section (bulletin.mines.edu/undergraduate/sectionwelcome)
of this Bulletin as well as the on the policy website (bulletin.mines.edu/
graduate/policiesandprocedures/The%20institution%E2%80%99s
%20Statement%20of%20Equal%20Opportunity%20and%20Equal
%20Access%20to%20Educational%20Programs,%20and%20associated
%20staff%20contacts,%20can%20be%20found%20in%20the
%20Welcome%20section%20of%20this%20Bulletin%20as%20well
%20as%20the%20following%20website:%20http://inside.mines.edu/
Policies.html). Colorado School of Mines has instituted an affirmative
action plan, which is available for perusal in numerous CSM offices
including the Library, the Dean of Students’ Office, and the Office of
Human Resources.

152 Directory of the School
Board of Trustees
STEWART BLISS
VICKI COWART
TERRY FOX
L. ROGER HUTSON
MOHAN MISRA
JAMES SPAANSTRA
RICHARD TRULY,
JOHN DORGAN, Faculty Representative
STEPHANIE BONUCCI, Student Representative

Colorado School of Mines 153
Emeritus Members of BOT
Ms. Sally Vance Allen
Mr. John J. Coors
Mr. Joseph Coors, Jr.
Mr. William K. Coors
Dr. DeAnn Craig
Mr. Frank DeFilippo
Mr. Frank Erisman
Mr. Hugh W. Evans
Mr. Jack Grynberg
Rev. Don K. Henderson
Mr. Anthony L. Joseph
Ms. Karen Ostrander Krug
Mr. J. Robert Maytag
Mr. Terence P. McNulty
Mr. Donald E. Miller
Mr. F. Steven Mooney
Mr. Randy L. Parcel
Mr. David D. Powell, Jr.
Mr. John A. Reeves, Sr.
Mr. Fred R. Schwartzberg
Mr. Charles E. Stott, Jr.
Mr. Terrance Tschatschula
Mr. David J. Wagner
Mr. J. N. Warren
Mr. James C. Wilson

154 Directory of the School
Administration Executive Staff
DIXIE CIRILLO, 1991-B.S., University of Northern Colorado; Associate
Director of Athletics
M. W. SCOGGINS, 2006-B.S., Ph.D., University of Tulsa; M.S.,
JEAN MANNING CLARK, 2008-B.A., University of Phoenix; M.A.,
University of Oklahoma; President
University of Phoenix; Director of Career Center and Coordinator of
TERENCE E. PARKER, 1994-B.S., M.S., Stanford University; Ph.D.,
Employer Relations
University of California Berkeley; Provost and Executive Vice President;
JULIE COAKLEY, 2001-B.S., University of Toledo; M.S., University of
Professor of Engineering
Toledo; Senior Vice President for Strategic Enterprises
NIGEL T. MIDDLETON, 1990-B.Sc., Ph.D., University of the
ERIC CRONKRIGHT, 2010-B.B.A., Western Michigan University,
Witwatersrand, Johannesburg; Senior Vice-President for Strategic
Assistant Director of Financial Aid
Enterprises; Professor of Engineering, P.E., S. Africa
TERRANCE DINKEL, 1999-B.S., University of Colorado; M.S., American
HUSSEIN A. AMERY, 1997-B.A., University of Calgary; M.A.,Wilfrid
Technological University; Program Coordinator, Mine Safety and Health
Laurier University; Ph.D., McMaster University; Associate Provost;
Program
Associate Professor of Liberal Arts and International Studies
STEPHEN DMYTRIW, 1999-B.S., University of Nevada; Program
JOSEPH TRUBACZ, 2011-B.Sc., University of New Hampshire; MBA.,
Coordinator, Mine Safety and Health Program
Southern New Hampshire University; Senior Vice President for Finance
and Administration
JEFF DUGGAN, 2007-B.S., M.B.A., Regis University; Sports Information
Director
JOHN POATE, 2006-B.S., M.S., Melbourne University; M.A., Ph.D.,
Australian National University; Vice President for Research and
LOUISA DULEY, 2000-B.A., Western State College; Assistant Director of
Technology Transfer
Admissions
DAN FOX, 2005-B.S., Montana State University, M.S., Eastern New
MAUREEN DURKIN, 2007-B.A., Texas A & M; M.A., Southern Methodist
Mexico University, Ph.D., University of Northern Colorado; Vice President
University; M.B.A., Simmons College; Director of Policy, Planning &
for Student Life
Analysis
PETER HAN, 1993-A.B., University of Chicago; M.B.A., University of
RHONDA L. DVORNAK, 1994-B.S., Colorado School of Mines;
Colorado; Chief of Staff
Continuing Education Program Coordinator
ANNE STARK WALKER, 1999-B.S., Northwestern University; J.D.,
JOSEPH O. ELLIS III, 2012-A.S., Santa Fe Community College; System
University of Denver; General Counsel
Administrator-Linux
MICHAEL DOUGHERTY, 2003-B.A., Cumberland College: M.B.A.,
KATHLEEN FEIGHNY, 2001-B.A., M.A., University of Oklahoma;
University of Alaska Anchorage; Associate Vice President for Human
Program Manager, Division of Economics and Business
Resources
ROBERT FERRITER, 1999-A.S., Pueblo Junior College; B.S., M.S.,
ANITA PARISEAU, 2004-B.S., Ithaca College; Director of Alumni
Colorado School of Mines; Director, Mine Safety and Health Program
Relations/Executive Director CSM Alumni Association
RICHARD FISCHER, 1999-B.A., St. John’s University; Program
DIANA M. ANGLIN, 2008-B.S., Western Michigan University; Associate
Coordinator, Mine Safety and Health Program
Registrar
REBECCA FLINTOFT, 2007-B.A., Kalamazoo College, M.A., Bowling
STEVEN M. ARDERN, 2011-B.S. and M.S., University of Nottingham;
Green State University; Director of Auxiliary Services and Housing
Information Security Engineer, Computing, Communications and
MELODY A. FRANCISCO, 1988-89, 1991-B.S., Montana State
Information Technology
University; Continuing Education Program Coordinator
DAVID G. BEAUSANG, 1993-B.S., Colorado State University; Computing
BRUCE GELLER, 2007-B.S., Dickinson College, M.A., State University of
Support Specialist
New York at Binghamton, A.M., Harvard University, Ph.D., University of
DEBORAH BEHNFIELD, 2007, B.A., Evergreen State College; B.A.
Colorado; Director, Geology Museum
Metropolitan State College of Denver; Recruitment Coordinator
KRISTI GRAHAM GITKIND, 2011-B.A,. University of Colorado at
GINA BOICE, 2007-Director of Customer Service and Support
Boulder; M.P.A., University of Colorado at Denver; Special Assistant to
the President
GARY L. BOWERSOCK, JR, 1996-B.S., Colorado Technical University;
Director of Facilities Management
LISA GOBERIS, 1998-B.S., University of Northern Colorado; Associate
Director of Auxiliary Services
HEATHER A. BOYD, 1990-B.S., Montana State University; M.Ed.,
Colorado State University; Director of Enrollment Management
KATHLEEN GODEL-GENGENBACH, 1998-B.A., M.A., University of
Denver; Ph.D., University of Colorado; Director, Office of International
THOMAS M. BOYD, 1993-B.S., M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and
Programs
State University; Ph.D., Columbia University; Associate Provost and
Dean of Graduate Studies; Associate Professor of Geophysics
BRUCE P. GOETZ, 1980-84, 1987- B.A., Norwich University; M.S.,
M.B.A., Florida Institute of Technology; Director of Admissions
RONALD L. BRUMMETT, 1993-B.A., Metropolitan State College; M.A.,
University of Northern Colorado; M.B.A., University of Colorado Denver;
DAHL GRAYCKOWSKI, 2004-B.S, MPA, DeVry University, Associate
Director of Student Services
Registrar

Colorado School of Mines 155
FERNANDO R. GUZMAN, 2012-B.S,. Santa Clara University; M.S.,
MICHAEL McMILLAN, 2010-B.B.A, Belmont College; Green Center
California State University; Ph.D. University of Denver; Executive Director
Facilities and Events Manager
of the Multicultural Engineering Program
LARA MEDLEY, 2003-B.A., University of Colorado at Boulder; M.P.A.,
JEN HAIGHT, 2011 – B.S., Metropolitan State College of Denver;
University of Colorado at Denver; Registrar
Executive Assistant to the Vice President for Student Life
KEVIN L. MOORE, 2005-B.S.E.E, Louisiana State University; M.S.E.E.,
JENNIFER HANNON, 2008-B.S., University of Kansas; M.S.W., Loyola
University of Southern California; Ph.D.E.E., Texas A&M University; Dean
University; University Counselor
of the College of Engineering and Computational Sciences and Professor
of Electrical Engineering
CRAIG S. HARMON, 2001 - Database Administrator, Computing,
Communications and Information Technology
ANDREA SALAZAR MORGAN, 1999-B.A., Colorado State University;
Senior Assistant Director of Admissions
LINN HAVELICK, 1988-B.A., M.S., University of Colorado at Denver;
CIH; Director, Environmental Health & Safety
DEREK MORGAN, 2003- B.S., University of Evansville; M.S., Colorado
State University; Associate Dean of Students
AMY HENKELMAN, 2011-B.S., University of Wisconsin-Stout
Menomonie, M.A., Michigan University, Mount Pleasant; Assistant
DAG NUMMEDAL, 2004-B.A., M.A., University of Oslo; Ph.D., University
Athletic Director-Recreational Sports
of Illinois; Executive Director of the Colorado Energy Research Institute
ESTHER HENRY, 2006-B.A, B.S., Purdue University, J.D., Indiana
CHARLES O’DELL, 2000- B.A., Metropolitan State College of Denver,
University; Associate Counsel
M.S., Capella University; Assistant Athletic Director
MARIE HORNICKEL, 2007-B.A., University of Wisconsin at Stevens
TRICIA DOUTHIT PAULSON, 1998-B.S., M.S., Colorado School of
Point, M.S., Minnesota State University at Mankato; Director of Student
Mines; Director of Institutional Research
Activities
ROGER PIERCE, 2000-B.S.,Wisconsin Institute of Technology; Program
GEORGE HUGHES, 2010-B.A., Ohio University; Director of Public Safety
Coordinator, Mine Safety and Health Program
CHRISTINA JENSEN, 1999-B.A., M.P.A., San Diego State University;
MICHAEL J. PUSEY, 2004-B.S., Homboldt State University; BI Reporting
Associate Director of Financial Aid
Administrator
TIMOTHY H. KAISER, 2008-B.S., University of Missouri Rolla; M.S.
JAMES L. PROUD, 1994-B.S., University of Wisconsin, Whitewater;
University of California; Ph.D. University of New Mexico; Director of
M.A., California State Polytechnic University; Continuing Education
Research and High Performance Computing
Program Coordinator
JENNIE J. KENNEY, 2005-Executive Assistant to the Provost and
ANGIE REYES, 1997-B.A., Chadron State College; Student System
Executive Vice President
Manager.
LISA KINZEL, 2006-B.A., State University of New York at Geneseo;
DEBRA S. ROBERGE, R.N., N.P., 2007-B.S., University of New
Executive Assistant to the Vice President for Research and Technology
Hampshire; M.S., Boston College; Director, Student Health Center
Transfer
FRANK L. ROBERTSON, 2003-A.A., Mesa College; B.S., University
MELVIN L. KIRK, 1995-B.S., M.A., University of Northern Colorado;
of Phoenix; B.S., University of New Mexico; Manager, Computing,
Student Development Center Counselor
Communications and Information Technology Customer Service Center
JOANNE LAMBERT, 2008-B.S., Kent State University; M.A., Colorado
JILL ROBERTSON, 2009-B.S., M.Ed, Northern Arizona University;
Christian University, Assistant Director of Enrollment Management
Director of Financial Aid
DAVID LARUE, 1998-B.A., St. Thomas Seminary College; M.A.,
PHILLIP ROMIG III, 1999-B.A., Nebraska Wesleyan University; M.S. and
University of Colorado at Denver; Ph.D., University of Colorado at
Ph.D., University of Nebraska; Network Engineer and Security Specialist
Boulder; Computer Support Specialist
ARTHUR B. SACKS, 1993-B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A., Ph.D.,
DEBRA K. LASICH, 1999-B.S., Kearney State College; M.A., University
University of Wisconsin-Madison; Director, Guy T. McBride Jr. Honors
of Nebraska; Executive Director of the Women in Science, Engineering,
Program in Public Affairs for Engineering and Professor of Liberal Arts
and Mathematics (WISEM) Program
and International Studies
DAVID M. LEE, 2001-B.S., United States Military Academy, West Point;
BRANDON SAMTER, 2008-B.S., Adams State College, Director of
M.S., Florida Institute of Technology; Director of Enterprise Systems
International Student and Scholar Services
VIRGINIA A. LEE, 2006-B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of California at
ERIC SCARBRO, 1991-B.S., University of South Carolina; M.S.,
Irvine; Portal, Identity Management and Help Desk Administrator
Colorado School of Mines; Financial Systems Manager
BRANDON LEIMBACH, 2002-B.A., M.A., St. Mary’s College; Associate
LORI B. SCHEIDER, 2011-B.A., University of Wyoming, Admissions
Director of Athletics
Counselor
ROBERT MASK, 2007-B.B.A., Sam Houston State University; Director of
KAY M. SCHNEIDER, 2011-B.S., M.S., Minnesota State, Moorhead;
Campus I.D. Card Services
Assessment Director
MICHAEL McGUIRE, 1999-Engineer of Mines, Colorado School of
SARA E. SCHWARZ, 2006-B.S., Colorado State University; M.S., Denver
Mines; Program Coordinator, Mine Safety and Health Program
University; Manager, Classroom Technology

156 Directory of the School
LINDA SHERMAN, 2006-B.S., University of Colorado; M.A., University of
Phoenix; Assistant Director of the Career Center
JAHI SIMBAI, 2000-B.S., M.B.A., University of Colorado at Boulder;
Director of Graduate Recruiting and Admissions
KATIE SIMONS, 2008-B.A., Regis University; Assistant Sports
Information Director
SANDRA SIMS, 2004-B.S., Pennsylvania State University, M.S., Florida
Institute of Technology, PsyD, Florida Institute of Technology; Counselor
TRAVIS A. SMITH, 2009-B.S., University of Miami, M.S., Eastern Illinois
University; Associate Director of Student Activities
THOMAS E. SPICER, 2004-B.S., M.S., Fort Hays State University;
Director of Athletics and Head of Physical Education Department
JEFFREY E. STORM, Database Administrator
DIXIE TERMIN, 1979-B.S., Regis University; International Program
Coordinator for Special Programs and Continuing Education
COLIN TERRY, 2010, B.A., Gonzaga University; M.A., New Your
University; Coordinator of Student Academic Services
JACLYNN L. TWEHUES, 2011-B.S., University of Detroit; M.S., Wayne
State University; Business Intelligence Manager
SHAM TZEGAI, 2007-B.A., Metropolitan State College; Assistant Director
of Financial Aid
WILLIAM VAUGHAN, 2008-B.S., Mariette College, M.S., Ohio University,
Ph.D., Ohio State University; Director, Technology Transfer
NATALIE VAN TYNE, 2008-B.S., Rutgers University, M.S., M.B.A.,
Lehigh University; M.S., Colorado School of Mines; Program Director and
Lecturer of EPICS
BRENT WALLER, 2009-B.S., M.B.A., Regis University; Associate
Director of Housing for Residence Life
MARSHA WILLIAMS, 1998-B.S., Kansas State University; M.S.,
University of Colorado; Director of Integrated Marketing Communications
DEREK J. WILSON, 1982-B.S., University of Montana; Chief Information
Officer and Director of the Computing, Communications and Information
Technology
JEAN YEAGER, 2006-B.A., University of Illinois at Chicago; Executive
Assistant to the Sr.Vice President for Finance and Administration
ED ZUCKER, 2001-B.A., M.S., University of Arizona; Computing Services
Support Manager

Colorado School of Mines 157
Emeriti
W. JOHN CIESLEWICZ, B.A., St. Francis College; M.A., M.S., University
of Colorado; Emeritus Associate Professor of Slavic Studies and Foreign
GEORGE S. ANSELL, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic
Languages
Institute; Emeritus President and Professor of Metallurgical Engineering,
L. GRAHAM CLOSS, 1978-A.B., Colgate University; M.S., University
P.E.
of Vermont; Ph.D., Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario; Emeritus
THEODORE A. BICKART, B.E.S., M.S.E., D.Engr., The Johns Hopkins
Associate Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering, P.E.
University; Emeritus President and Professor of Engineering
JOHN A. CORDES, B.A., J.D., M.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., Colorado
GUY T. McBRIDE, JR. B.S., University of Texas; D.Sc., Massachusetts
State University; Emeritus Associate Professor of Economics and
Institute of Technology; Emeritus President, P.E.
Business
JOHN U. TREFNY, B.S., Fordham College; Ph.D., Rutgers University;
TIMOTHY A. CROSS, B.A., Oberlin College; M.S., University of
Emeritus President, Emeritus Professor of Physics
Michigan; Ph.D., University of Southern California; Emeritus Associate
Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
JOHN F. ABEL, JR. E.M., M.Sc., E.Sc., Colorado School of Mines;
Emeritus Professor of Mining Engineering
STEPHEN R. DANIEL, Min. Eng.- Chem., M.S., Ph.D., Colorado School
of Mines; Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
R. BRUCE ALLISON, B.S., State University of New York at Cortland;
M.S., State University of New York at Albany; Emeritus Professor of
GERALD L. DEPOORTER, B.S., University of Washington; M.S., Ph.D.,
Physical Education and Athletics
University of California at Berkeley; Emeritus Associate Professor of
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
WILLIAM R. ASTLE, B.A., State University of New York at New Paltz;
M.A., Columbia University; M.A., University of Illinois; Emeritus Professor
JOHN A. DeSANTO, B.S., M.A., Villanova University; M.S., Ph.D.,
of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
University of Michigan; Emeritus Professor of Mathematical and
Computer Sciences and Physics
ROBERT M. BALDWIN, B.S., M.S., Iowa State University; Ph.D.,
Colorado School of Mines; Emeritus Professor of Chemical Engineering
DEAN W. DICKERHOOF, B.S., University of Akron; M.S., Ph.D.,
University of Illinois; Professor Emeritus of Chemistry and Geochemistry
BARBARA B. BATH, B.A., M.A., University of Kansas; Ph.D., American
University; Emerita Associate Professor of Mathematical and Computer
DONALD I. DICKINSON, B.A., Colorado State University; M.A.,
Sciences
University of New Mexico; Emeritus Professor of Liberal Arts and
International Studies
RAMON E. BISQUE, B.S., St. Norbert’s College; M.S. Chemistry, M.S.
Geology, Ph.D., Iowa State College; Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and
J. PATRICK DYER, B.P.E., Purdue University; Emeritus Associate
Geochemistry
Professor of Physical Education and Athletics
NORMAN BLEISTEIN, B.S., Brooklyn College; M.S., Ph.D., New York
WILTON E. ECKLEY, A.B., Mount Union College; M.A., The
University; University Emeritus Professor of Mathematical and Computer
Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University;
Sciences
Emeritus Professor of Liberal Arts and International Studies
ARDEL J. BOES, B.A., St. Ambrose College; M.S., Ph.D., Purdue
GLEN R. EDWARDS, Met. Engr., Colorado School of Mines; M.S.,
University; Emeritus Professor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
University of New Mexico; Ph.D., Stanford University; University Emeritus
Professor of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
AUSTIN R. BROWN, B.A., Grinnell College; M.A., Ph.D., Yale University;
Emeritus Professor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
KENNETH W. EDWARDS, B.S., University of Michigan; M.A., Dartmouth
College; Ph.D., University of Colorado; Emeritus Professor of Chemistry
JAMES T. BROWN, B.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado; Emeritus
and Geochemistry
Professor of Physics
JOHN C. EMERICK, B.S., University of Washington; M.A., Ph.D.,
W. REX BULL, B.Sc., App. Diploma in Mineral Dressing, Leeds
University of Colorado; Emeritus Associate Professor of Environmental
University; Ph.D., University of Queensland; Emeritus Professor of
Science and Engineering
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
GRAEME FAIRWEATHER, B.S., Ph.D., University of St. Andrews
ANNETTE L. BUNGE, B.S., State University of New York at Buffalo;
Scotland; Emeritus Professor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Emeritus Professor of
Chemical Engineering
EDWARD G. FISHER, B.S., M.A., University of Illinois; Emeritus
Professor of English
BETTY J. CANNON, B.A., M.A., University of Alabama; Ph.D.,
University of Colorado; Emeritus Associate Professor of Liberal Arts and
DAVID E. FLETCHER, B.S., M.A., Colorado College; M.S.B.A., Ph.D.,
International Studies
University of Denver; Emeritus Professor of Economics and Business
F. EDWARD CECIL, B.S., University of Maryland; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton
ROBERT H. FROST, B.S., Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; S.M.,M.E.,
University; University Emeritus Professor of Physics
Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Emeritus Associate Professor of
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
RICHARD L. CHRISTIANSEN, B.S.Ch.E., University of Utah; Ph.D.Ch.E.,
University of Wisconsin-Madison; Emeritus Associate Professor of
S. DALE FOREMAN, B.S., Texas Technological College; M.S., Ph.D.,
Petroleum Engineering
University of Colorado; Emeritus Professor of Civil Engineering, P.E.
JAMES H. GARY B.S., M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D.,
University of Florida; Emeritus Professor of Chemical Engineering

158 Directory of the School
DONALD W. GENTRY, B.S., University of Illinois; M.S., University of
ABDELWAHID IBRAHIM, B.S., University of Cairo; M.S., University of
Nevada; Ph.D., University of Arizona; Emeritus Professor of Mining
Kansas; Ph.D., Michigan State University; Emeritus Associate Professor
Engineering, P.E.
of Geophysics
JOHN O. GOLDEN, B.E., M.S., Vanderbilt University; Ph.D., Iowa State
JAMES G. JOHNSTONE, Geol.E., Colorado School of Mines; M.S.,
University; Emeritus Professor of Chemical Engineering
Purdue University; (Professional Engineer); Emeritus Professor of Civil
Engineering
JOAN P. GOSINK, B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.S.,
Old Dominion University; Ph.D., University of California - Berkeley;
ALEXANDER A. KAUFMAN, Ph.D., Institute of Physics of the Earth,
Emerita Professor of Engineering
Moscow; D.T.Sc., Siberian Branch Academy; Emeritus Professor of
Geophysics
THOMAS L. T. GROSE, B.S., M.S., University of Washington; Ph.D.,
Stanford University; Emeritus Professor of Geology and Geological
MARVIN L. KAY, E.M., Colorado School of Mines; Emeritus Director of
Engineering
Athletics
RAYMOND R. GUTZMAN, A.B., Fort Hays State College; M.S., State
GEORGE KELLER, B.S., M.S., Ph. D., Pennsylvania State University,
University of Iowa; Emeritus Professor of Mathematical and Computer
Emeritus Professor of Geophysics
Sciences
THOMAS A. KELLY, B.S., C.E., University of Colorado; Emeritus
FRANK A. HADSELL, B.S., M.S., University of Wyoming; D.Sc., Colorado
Professor of Basic Engineering, P.E.
School of Mines; Emeritus Professor of Geophysics
GEORGE H. KENNEDY, B.S., University of Oregon; M.S., Ph.D., Oregon
JOHN P. HAGER, B.S., Montana School of Mines; M.S., Missouri
State University; Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
School of Mines; Sc.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology;
ARTHUR J. KIDNAY, P.R.E., D.Sc., Colorado School of Mines; M.S.,
University Emeritus Hazen Research Professor of Extractive Metallurgy;
University of Colorado; Emeritus Professor of Chemical Engineering
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
RONALD W. KLUSMAN, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University; Emeritus
FRANK G. HAGIN, B.A., Bethany Nazarene College; M.A., Southern
Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
Methodist University; Ph.D., University of Colorado; Emeritus Professor of
Mathematical and Computer Sciences
R. EDWARD KNIGHT. B.S., University of Tulsa; M.A., University of
Denver; Emeritus Professor of Engineering
JOHN W. HANCOCK, A.B., Colorado State College; Emeritus Professor
of Physical Education and Athletics
KENNETH E. KOLM, B.S., Lehigh University; M.S., Ph.D., University of
Wyoming; Emeritus Associate Professor of Environmental Science and
ROBERT C. HANSEN, E.M., Colorado School of Mines; M.S.M.E.,
Engineering
Bradley University; Ph.D., University of Illinois; Emeritus Professor of
Engineering, P.E.
GEORGE KRAUSS, B.S., Lehigh University; M.S., Sc.D., Massachusetts
Institute of Technology; University Emeritus Professor of Metallurgical
JOHN D. HAUN, A.B., Berea College; M.A., Ph.D., University of
and Materials Engineering, P.E.
Wyoming; Emeritus Professor of Geology, P.E.
DONALD LANGMUIR, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University; Emeritus
T. GRAHAM HEREFORD, B.A., Ph.D. University of Virginia; Emeritus
Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry and Emeritus Professor of
Professor of Liberal Arts and International Studies
Environmental Science & Engineering
JOHN A. HOGAN, B.S., University of Cincinnati; M.A., Lehigh University;
KENNETH L. LARNER, B.S., Colorado School of Mines; Ph.D.,
Emeritus Professor of Liberal Arts and International Studies
Massachusetts Institute of Technology; University Emeritus Professor of
GREGORY S. HOLDEN, B.S., University of Redlands; M.S.,Washington
Geophysics
State University; Ph.D., University of Wyoming; Emeritus Associate
WILLIAM B. LAW, B.Sc., University of Nevada; Ph.D., Ohio State
Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
University; Emeritus Associate Professor of Physics
BRUCE D. HONEYMAN, B.S., M.S., Ph.D, Stanford University; Emeritus
KEENAN LEE, B.S., M.S., Louisiana State University; Ph.D., Stanford
Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering
University; Emeritus Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
MATTHEW J. HREBAR, III, B.S., The Pennsylvania State University;
V. ALLEN LONG, A.B., McPherson College; A.M., University of
M.S., University of Arizona; Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Emeritus
Nebraska; Ph.D., University of Colorado; Emeritus Professor of Physics
Associate Professor of Mining Engineering
GEORGE B. LUCAS, B.S., Tulane University; Ph.D., Iowa State
NEIL F. HURLEY, B.S., University of Southern California; M.S., University
University; Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
of Wisconsin at Madison; Ph.D., University of Michigan; Emeritus Charles
Boettcher Distinguished Chair in Petroleum Geology and Geology and
DONALD L. MACALADY, B.S., The Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D.,
Geological Engineering
University of Wisconsin-Madison; Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and
Geochemistry
WILLIAM A. HUSTRULID, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Minnesota;
Emeritus Professor of Mining Engineering
DONALD C.B. MARSH, B.S., M.S., University of Arizona; Ph.D.,
University of Colorado; Emeritus Professor of Mathematical and
RICHARD W. HUTCHINSON, B.Sc., University of Western Ontario;
Computer Sciences
M.Sc., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Charles Franklin Fogarty Professor
in Economic Geology; Emeritus Professor of Geology and Geological
JEAN P. MATHER, B.S.C., M.B.A., University of Denver; M.A., Princeton
Engineering
University; Emeritus Professor of Mineral Economics

Colorado School of Mines 159
FRANK S. MATHEWS, B.A., M.A., University of British Columbia; Ph.D.,
THOMAS PHILIPOSE, B.A., M.A., Presidency College- University of
Oregon State University; Emeritus Professor of Physics
Madras; Ph.D., University of Denver; University Emeritus Professor of
Liberal Arts and International Studies
RUTH A. MAURER, B.S., M.S., Colorado State University; Ph.D.,
Colorado School of Mines; Emerita Associate Professor of Mathematical
EILEEN P. POETER, B.S., Lehigh University; M.S., Ph.D., Washington
and Computer Sciences
State University; Emerita Professor of Geology and Geological
Engineering, P.E.
ROBERT S. McCANDLESS, B.A., Colorado State College; Emeritus
Professor of Physical Education and Athletics
STEVEN A. PRUESS, B.S., Iowa State University; M.S., Ph.D., Purdue
University; Emeritus Professor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
MICHAEL B. McGRATH, B.S.M.E., M.S., University of Notre Dame;
Ph.D., University of Colorado; Emeritus Professor of Engineering
DENNIS W. READEY, B.S., University of Notre Dame; Sc.D.,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology; University Emeritus Herman F.
J. THOMAS McKINNON, B.S., Cornell University; Ph.D., Massachusetts
Coors Distinguished Professor of Ceramic Engineering; Professor of
Institute of Technology; Emeritus Professor of Chemical Engineering
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
JAMES A. McNEIL, B.S., Lafayette College; M.S., Ph.D., University of
SAMUEL B. ROMBERGER, B.S., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State
Maryland; University Emeritus Professor of Physics
University; Emeritus Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
JOHN J. MOORE, 1989-B.S., University of Surrey, England; Ph.D.,
PHILLIP R. ROMIG, JR., B.S., University of Notre Dame; M.S., Ph.D.,
D. Eng., University of Birmingham, England; Emeritus Professor of
Colorado School of Mines; Emeritus Professor of Geophysics
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
ODED RUDAWSKY, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State
DAVID R. MUÑOZ, 1986-B.S.M.E., University of New Mexico; M.S.M.E.,
University; Emeritus Professor of Mineral Economics
Ph.D., Purdue University; Emeritus Associate Professor of Engineering
ARTHUR B SACKS, B.A., Brooklyn College, M.A., Ph.D., University of
ERIC P. NELSON, B.S., California State University at Northridge; M.A.,
Wisconsin-Madison, Emeritus Professor of Liberal Arts and International
Rice University; M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia University; Emeritus Associate
Studies
Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
ARTHUR Y. SAKAKURA, B.S., M.S., Massachusetts Institute of
KARL R. NELSON, Geol.E., M.S., Colorado School of Mines; Ph.D.,
Technology; Ph.D., University of Colorado; Emeritus Associate Professor
University of Colorado; Emeritus Associate Professor of Engineering,
of Physics
P.E.
MIKLOS D. G. SALAMON, Dipl.Eng., Polytechnical University, Hungary;
GABRIEL M. NEUNZERT, B.S., M.Sc., Colorado School of Mines;
Ph.D., University of Durham, England; Emeritus Professor of Mining
(Professional Land Surveyor); Emeritus Associate Professor of
Engineering
Engineering
FRANKLIN D. SCHOWENGERDT, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of
KATHLEEN H. OCHS, B.A., University of Oregon; M.A.T.,Wesleyan
Missouri at Rolla; Emeritus Professor of Physics
University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Toronto; Emerita Associate
Professor of Liberal Arts and International Studies
ROBERT L. SIEGRIST, 1997-B.S., M.S., Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-
Madison; University Emeritus Professor of Environmental Science and
BARBARA M. OLDS, B.A., Stanford University; M.A., Ph.D., University of
Engineering, P.E.
Denver; Associate Provost for Educational Innovation; Emerita Professor
of Liberal Arts and International Studies
CATHERINE A. SKOKAN, 1982-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Colorado School of
Mines; Emerita Associate Professor of Engineering
EUL-SOO PANG, B.A. Marshall University; M.A., Ohio University; Ph.D.,
University of California at Berkeley; Emeritus Professor of Liberal Arts
MAYNARD SLAUGHTER, B.S., Ohio University; M.A., University of
and International Studies
Missouri; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Emeritus Professor of Chemistry
and Geochemistry
LAURA J. PANG, B.A. University of Colorado; M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt
University; Emerita Associate Professor of Liberal Arts and International
JOSEPH D. SNEED, B.A., Rice University; M.S., University of Illinois;
Studies
Ph.D., Stanford University; Emeritus Professor of Liberal Arts and
International Studies
MICHAEL J. PAVELICH, B.S., University of Notre Dame; Ph.D., State
University of New York at Buffalo; Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and
CHARLES W. STARKS, Met.E., M.Met.E, Colorado School of Mines;
Geochemistry
Emeritus Associate Professor of Chemistry, P.E.
ROBERT W. PEARSON, P.E., Colorado School of Mines; Emeritus
FRANKLIN J. STERMOLE, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State University;
Associate Professor of Physical Education and Athletics and Head
Emeritus Professor of Chemical Engineering/Mineral Economics; P.E.
Soccer Coach
ROBERT J. TAYLOR, BAE School of the Art Institute; M.A., University of
ANTON G. PEGIS, B.A.,Western State College; M.A., Ph.D., University of
Denver; Emeritus Associate Professor of Engineering
Denver; Emeritus Professor of English
JOHN E. TILTON, B.A., Princeton University; M.A., Ph.D.,Yale University;
HARRY C. PETERSON, B.S.M.E., Colorado State University; M.S.,
University Emeritus Professor of Economics and Business
Ph.D., Cornell University; Emeritus Professor of Engineering
A. KEITH TURNER, B.Sc., Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario; M.A.,
ALFRED PETRICK, JR., A.B., B.S., M.S., Columbia University; M.B.A.,
Columbia University; Ph.D., Purdue University; Emeritus Professor of
University of Denver; Ph.D., University of Colorado; Emeritus Professor of
Geology and Geological Engineering, P.E.
Mineral Economics, P.E.

160 Directory of the School
ROBERT G. UNDERWOOD, B.S., University of North Carolina; Ph.D.,
University of Virginia; Emeritus Associate Professor of Mathematical and
Computer Sciences
CRAIG W. VAN KIRK, 1978-B.S., M.S., University of Southern California;
Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Professor of Petroleum Engineering
FUN-DEN WANG, B.S., Taiwan Provincial Cheng-Kung University; M.S.,
Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana; Emeritus Professor of Mining
Engineering
JOHN E. WARME, B.A., Augustana College; Ph.D., University of
California at Los Angeles; Emeritus Professor of Geology and Geological
Engineering
ROBERT J. WEIMER, B.A., M.A., University of Wyoming; Ph.D., Stanford
University; Emeritus Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering,
P.E.
WALTER W. WHITMAN, B.E., Ph.D., Cornell University; Emeritus
Professor of Geophysics
THOMAS R. WILDEMAN, B.S., College of St. Thomas; Ph.D., University
of Wisconsin; Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
KAREN B. WILEY, B.A., Mills College; M.A., Ph.D., University of
Colorado; Emerita Associate Professor of Liberal Arts and International
Studies
JOHN T. WILLIAMS, B.S., Hamline University; M.S., University of
Minnesota; Ph.D., Iowa State College; Emeritus Professor of Chemistry
and Geochemistry
DON L. WILLIAMSON, B.S., Lamar University; M.S., Ph.D., University of
Washington; Emeritus Professor of Physics
ROBERT D. WITTERS, B.A., University of Colorado; Ph.D., Montana
State College; Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
ROBERT E. D. WOOLSEY, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Texas
at Austin; Emeritus Professor of Economics and Business and of
Mathematical and Computer Sciences
BAKI YARAR, B.Sc., M.Sc., Middle East Technical University, Ankara;
Ph.D., University of London; Emeritus Professor of Mining Engineering
F. RICHARD YEATTS, B.S., The Pennsylvania State University; M.S.,
Ph.D., University of Arizona; Emeritus Professor of Physics
VICTOR F. YESAVAGE, B.Ch.E., The Cooper Union; M.S.E., Ph.D.,
University of Michigan; Emeritus Professor of Chemical Engineering

Colorado School of Mines 161
Professors
RAMONA M. GRAVES, 1981-B.S., Kearney State College; Ph.D.,
Colorado School of Mines; Professor of Petroleum Engineering and Head
CORBY ANDERSON, 2009-B.S., Montana State University; M.S.,
of Department
Montana Tech.; Ph.D., University of Idaho; Harrison Western Professor of
UWE GREIFE, 1999-M.S., University of Munster; Ph.D., University of
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
Bochum; Professor of Physics
MICHAEL L. BATZLE, 2007-B.S., University of California, Riverside;
D. VAUGHAN GRIFFITHS, 1994-B.Sc., Ph.D., D.Sc., University of
PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Baker Hughes Professor of
Manchester; M.S., University of California Berkeley; Professor of Civil and
Petrophysics and Borehole Geophysics
Environmental Engineering
BERNARD BIALECKI, 1995-M.S., University of Warsaw, Poland; Ph.D.,
MARTE GUTIERREZ, 2008-B.S., Saint Mary’s University; M.S.,
University of Utah; Professor of Applied Mathematics and Statistics
University of the Philippines; Ph.D., University of Tokyo; James R.
TRACY CAMP, 1998-B.A. Kalamazoo College; M.S. Michigan State
Paden Distinguished Chair and Professor of Civil and Environmental
University; Ph.D. College of William and Mary; Professor of Applied
Engineering
Mathematics and Statistics
DAVE HALE, 2004-B.S., Texas A&M University; M.S., Ph.D., Stanford
REUBEN T. COLLINS, 1994-B.A., University of Northern Iowa; M.S.,
University; Charles Henry Green Professor of Exploration Geophysics
Ph.D., California Institute of Technology; Professor of Physics
WENDY J. HARRISON, 1988-B.S., Ph.D., University of Manchester;
JOHN T. CUDDINGTON, 2005-B.A., University of Regina; M.A., Simon
Associate Provost; Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
Fraser University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; William J.
RANDY L. HAUPT, 2012-B.S., USAF Academy, M.S.E.E., Northeastern
Coulter Professor of Mineral Economics and Professor of Economics and
University; Ph.D., University of Michigan; Professor of Electrical
Business
Engineering and Computer Science
JOHN B. CURTIS, 1990-B.A., M.S., Miami University; Ph.D., The Ohio
WILLY A. M. HEREMAN, 1989-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., State University of
State University; Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
Ghent, Belgium; Professor of Applied Mathematics and Statistics and
KADRI DAGDELEN, 1992-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines;
Head of Department
Professor of Mining Engineering and Head of Department
MURRAY W. HITZMAN, 1996-A.B., Dartmouth College; M.S., University
CAROL DAHL, 1991-B.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., University of
of Washington; Ph.D., Stanford University; Charles Franklin Fogarty
Minnesota; Professor of Economics and Business
Distinguished Chair in Economic Geology; Professor of Geology and
Geological Engineering
ELIZABETH VAN WIE DAVIS, 2009-B.A., Shimer College; M.A., Ph.D.,
University of Virginia; Professor of Liberal Arts and International Studies
TISSA ILLANGASEKARE, 1998-B.Sc., University of Ceylon, Peradeniya;
and Division Director
M. Eng., Asian Institute of Technology; Ph.D., Colorado State University;
Professor and AMAX Distinguished Chair in Civil and Environmental
GRAHAM A. DAVIS, 1993-B.S., Queen’s University at Kingston; M.B.A.,
Engineering, P.E.
University of Cape Town; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University;
Professor of Economics and Business
MICHAEL J. KAUFMAN, 2007-B.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois,
Urbana, Professor of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Head of
THOMAS L. DAVIS, 1980-B.E., University of Saskatchewan; M.Sc.,
Department
University of Calgary; Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Professor of
Geophysics
HOSSEIN KAZEMI, 2004-B.S., University of Texas at Austin; Ph.D.,
University of Texas at Austin; Chesebro’ Distinguished Chair in Petroleum
ANTHONY DEAN, 2000-B.S., Springhill College; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard
Engineering; Co-Director of Marathon Center of Excellence for Reservoir
University; William K. Coors Distinguished Chair in Chemical Engineering
Studies and Professor of Petroleum Engineering
and Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering
ROBERT J. KEE, 1996-B.S., University of Idaho; M.S., Stanford
JOHN R. DORGAN, 1992-B.S., University of Massachusetts Amherst;
University; Ph.D., University of California at Davis; George R. Brown
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Computer Modeling Group Chair
Distinguished Professor of Mechanical Engineering
and Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering
ROBERT H. KING, 1981-B.S., University of Utah; M.S., Ph.D., The
JÖRG DREWES, 2001-Ingenieur cand., Dipl. Ing., Ph.D., Technical
Pennsylvania State University; Professor of Mechanical Engineering
University of Berlin; Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering
DANIEL M. KNAUSS, 1996-B.S., The Pennsylvania State University;
RODERICK G. EGGERT, 1986-A.B., Dartmouth College; M.S., Ph.D.,
Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Professor of
The Pennsylvania State University; Professor of Economics and Business
Chemistry and Geochemistry and Head of Department
and Division Director
CAROLYN KOH, 2006-B.S., Ph.D., University of West London, Brunel;
JAMES F. ELY, 1981-B.S., Butler University; Ph.D., Indiana University;
Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering
FRANK V. KOWALSKI, 1980-B.S., University of Puget Sound; Ph.D.,
THOMAS E. FURTAK, 1986-B.S., University of Nebraska; Ph.D., Iowa
Stanford University; Professor of Physics
State University; Professor of Physics and Head of Department
STEPHEN LIU, 1987-B.S., M.S., Universitdade Federal de MG, Brazil;
MAHADEVAN GANESH, 2003- Ph.D., Indian Institute of Technology;
Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Professor of Metallurgical and Materials
Professor of Applied Mathematics and Statistics
Engineering, CEng, U.K.

162 Directory of the School
NING LU, 1997-B.S., Wuhan University of Technology; M.S., Ph.D.,
UGUR OZBAY, 1998-B.S., Middle East Technical University of Ankara;
Johns Hopkins University; Professor of Civil and Environmental
M.S., Ph.D., University of the Witwatersrand; Professor of Mining
Engineering
Engineering
MARK T. LUSK, 1994-B.S., United States Naval Academy; M.S.,
ERDAL OZKAN, 1998-B.S., M.Sc., Istanbul Technical University; Ph.D.,
Colorado State University; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology;
University of Tulsa; Co-Director of Marathon Center of Excellence for
Professor of Physics
Reservoir Studies and Professor of Petroleum Engineering
PATRICK MacCARTHY, 1976-B.Sc., M.Sc., University College, Galway,
TERENCE E. PARKER, 1994-B.S., M.S., Stanford University; Ph.D.,
Ireland; M.S., Northwestern University; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati;
University of California Berkeley; Provost and Executive Vice President;
Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
Professor of Engineering
DAVID W.M. MARR, 1995-B.S., University of California, Berkeley;
IVAR E. REIMANIS, 1994-B.S., Cornell University; M.S., University
M.S., Ph.D., Stanford University; Professor of Chemical and Biological
of California Berkeley; Ph.D., University of California Santa Barbara;
Engineering and Head of Department
Professor of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
PAUL A. MARTIN, 1999-B.S., University of Bristol; M.S., Ph.D.,
MAJ DAVID ROZELLE, 1995-B.A., Davidson College, Davidson, North
University of Manchester; Professor of Applied Mathematics and
Carolina, 2009 - M.M.S. Marine Corps University, Quantico, Virginia, and
Statistics, and Associate Department Head
Professor of Military Science (Army R.O.T.C.)
GERARD P. MARTINS, 1969-B.Sc., University of London; Ph.D.,
PAUL M. SANTI, 2001-B.S., Duke University; M.S., Texas A&M
State University of New York at Buffalo; Professor of Metallurgical and
University; Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Professor of Geology and
Materials Engineering
Geological Engineering
DAVID K. MATLOCK, 1972-B.S., University of Texas at Austin; M.S.,
JOHN A. SCALES, 1992-B.S., University of Delaware; Ph.D., University
Ph.D., Stanford University; Charles F. Fogarty Professor of Metallurgical
of Colorado; Professor of Physics
Engineering sponsored by the ARMCO Foundation; Professor of
PANKAJ K. (PK) SEN, 2000-B.S., Jadavpur University; M.E., Ph.D.,
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, P.E.
Technical University of Nova Scotia. P.E., Professor of Electrical
JOHN E. McCRAY, 1998-B.S.,West Virginia University; M.S. Clemson
Engineering and Computer Science
University; Ph.D., University of Arizona; Professor of Civil and
E. DENDY SLOAN, JR., 1976-B.S.Ch.E., M.S., Ph.D., Clemson
Environmental Engineering and Division Director
University; Weaver Distinguished Professor in Chemical and Biological
DINESH MEHTA, 2000-B.Tech., Indian Institute of Technology; M.S.,
Engineering and Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering
University of Minnesota; Ph.D., University of Florida; Professor of
ROEL K. SNIEDER, 2000-Drs., Utrecht University; M.A., Princeton
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
University; Ph.D., Utrecht University; W.M. Keck Foundation
RONALD L. MILLER, 1986-B.S., M.S., University of Wyoming; Ph.D.,
Distinguished Chair in Exploration Science and Professor of Geophysics
Colorado School of Mines; Professor of Chemical and Biological
STEPHEN A. SONNENBERG, 2007-B.S., M.S., Texas A&M University;
Engineering
Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Professor of Geology and Geological
BRAJENDRA MISHRA, 1997-B. Tech. Indian Institute of Technology;
Engineering and Charles Boettcher Distinguished Chair in Petroleum
M.S., Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Professor of Metallurgical and
Geology
Materials Engineering
JOHN G. SPEER, 1997-B.S., Lehigh University; Ph.D., Oxford University;
CARL MITCHAM, 1999-B.A., M.A., University of Colorado; Ph.D.,
Professor of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
Fordham University; Professor of Liberal Arts and International Studies
JEFF SQUIER, 2002-B.S., M.S., Colorado School of Mines; Ph.D.,
MICHAEL MOONEY, 2003-B.S., Washington University in St. Louis;
University of Rochester; Professor of Physics
M.S., University of California, Irvine; Ph.D., Northwestern University;
P. CRAIG TAYLOR, 2005-A.B., Carleton College; Ph.D., Brown
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering
University; Professor of Physics
BARBARA MOSKAL, 1999-B.S., Duquesne University; M.S., Ph.D.,
PATRICK TAYLOR, 2003-B.S., Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; George
University of Pittsburgh; Professor of Applied Mathematics and Statistics
S. Ansell Distinguished Chair in Metallurgy and Professor of Metallurgical
and Interim Director of the Trefny Institute
and Materials Engineering
GRAHAM G. W. MUSTOE, 1987-B.S., M.Sc., University of Aston; Ph.D.,
ILYA D. TSVANKIN, 1992-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Moscow State University;
University College Swansea; Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Professor of Geophysics
WILLIAM C. NAVIDI, 1996-B.A., New College; M.A., Michigan State
AZRA TUTUNCU, 2010-B.S., Istanbul Technical University; M.S.,
University; M.A., Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley; Professor of
Stanford University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin; Harry D.
Applied Mathematics and Statistics
Campbell Chair in Petroleum Engineering, Director of Unconventional
GARY R. OLHOEFT, 1994-B.S.E.E., M.S.E.E, Massachusetts Institute of
Natural Gas Institute (UNGI) and Professor of Petroleum Engineering
Technology; Ph.D., University of Toronto; Professor of Geophysics
CHESTER J. VAN TYNE, 1988-B.A., B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Lehigh
DAVID L. OLSON, 1972-B.S.,Washington State University; Ph.D., Cornell
University; FIERF Professor and Professor of Metallurgical and Materials
University; John H. Moore Distinguished Professor of Physical Metallurgy;
Engineering, P.E.
Professor of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, P.E.
KENT J. VOORHEES, 1978-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Utah State University;
Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry

Colorado School of Mines 163
MICHAEL R. WALLS, 1992-B.S.,Western Kentucky University; M.B.A.,
Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin; Professor of Economics and
Business
J. DOUGLAS WAY, 1994-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Colorado;
Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering
RICHARD F. WENDLANDT, 1987-B.A., Dartmouth College; Ph.D., The
Pennsylvania State University; Professor of Geology and Geological
Engineering
DAVID TAI-WEI WU, 1996-A.B., Harvard University; Ph.D., University of
California, Berkeley; Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry/Chemical
and Biological Engineering
YU-SHU WU, 2008-B.S., Daqing Petroleum Institute, China; M.S.,
Southwest Petroleum Institute, China; M.S., Ph.D., University of
California at Berkeley; Professor of Petroleum Engineering
TYRONE VINCENT, 1998-B.S. University of Arizona; M.S., Ph.D.
University of Michigan; Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer
Science and Interim Department Head
TERENCE K. YOUNG, 1979-1982, 2000-B.A., Stanford University; M.S.,
Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Professor of Geophysics and Head of
Department

164 Directory of the School
Associate Professors
California, Irvine; Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and
Computer Science
SUMIT AGARWAL, 2005-B.S., Banaras Hindu University, India; M.S.,
KATHLEEN J. HANCOCK, 2009-B.A., University of California, Santa
University of New Mexico; Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara;
Barbara; M.S. George Washington University; Ph.D., University
Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering
of California, San Diego; Associate Professor of Liberal Arts and
JOEL M. BACH, 2001-B.S., SUNY Buffalo; Ph.D., University of California
International Studies
at Davis; Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering
MICHAEL B. HEELEY, 2004-B.S., The Camborne School of Mines; M.S.,
EDWARD J. BALISTRERI, 2004-B.A., Arizona State University; M.A.,
University of Nevada; M.S., Ph.D., University of Washington; Associate
Ph.D., University of Colorado; Associate Professor of Economics and
Professor of Economics and Business
Business
JOHN R. HEILBRUNN, 2001-B.A., University of California, Berkeley;
DAVID A. BENSON, 2005-B.S., New Mexico State University; M.S., San
M.A., Boston University, University of California, Los Angeles; Ph.D.,
Diego State University; Ph.D., University of Nevada, Reno; Associate
University of California, Los Angeles; Associate Professor of Liberal Arts
Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
and International Studies
JOHN R. BERGER, 1994-B.S., M. S., Ph.D., University of Maryland;
ANDREW M. HERRING, 2006-Bs.C., Ph.D., University of Leeds;
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering
THOMAS M. BOYD, 1993-B.S., M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and
JERRY D. HIGGINS, 1986-B.S., Southwest Missouri State University;
State University; Ph.D., Columbia University; Dean of Graduate Studies;
M.S., Ph.D., University of Missouri at Rolla; Associate Professor of
Associate Professor of Geophysics
Geology and Geological Engineering
STEPHEN G. BOYES, 2005-B.S., Ph.D., University of New South Wales;
WILLIAM A. HOFF, 1994-B.S., Illinois Institute of Technology; M.S.,
Associate Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
Ph.D., University of Illinois-Champaign/Urbana; Associate Professor of
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Assistant Division
LINCOLN D. CARR, 2005-B.A., University of California at Berkeley; M.S.,
Director of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Ph.D., University of Washington; Associate Professor of Physics
TERRI S. HOGUE, 2012-B.S., University of Wisconsin; M.S. & Ph.D.,
TZAHI CATH, 2006-B.S., Tel Aviv University; M.S., Ph.D., University of
University of Arizona; Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental
Nevada; Associate Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering
Engineering
CRISTIAN CIOBANU, 2004-B.S., University of Bucharest; M.S., Ph.D.,
JOHN D. HUMPHREY, 1991-B.S., University of Vermont; M.S., Ph.D.,
Ohio State University; Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Brown University; Associate Professor of Geology and Geological
RONALD R. H. COHEN, 1985-B.A., Temple University; Ph.D., University
Engineering and Head of Department
of Virginia; Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering
KATHRYN JOHNSON, 2005-B.S., Clarkson University; M.S., Ph.D.,
SCOTT W. COWLEY, 1979-B.S., M.S., Utah State University; Ph.D.,
University of Colorado; Clare Boothe Luce Associate Professor of
Southern Illinois University; Associate Professor of Chemistry and
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Geochemistry
PANOS KIOUSIS, 1999-Ph.D., Louisiana State University; Associate
CHARLES G. DURFEE, III, 1999-B.S., Yale University; Ph.D., University
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering
of Maryland; Associate Professor of Physics
MARK E. KUCHTA, 1999- B.S. M.S., Colorado School of Mines; Ph.D.,
MARK EBERHART, 1998 - B.S., M.S. University of Colorado; Ph.D.
Lulea University of Technology, Sweden; Associate Professor of Mining
Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Associate Professor of Chemistry
Engineering
and Geochemistry
JON LEYDENS, 2004-B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Colorado State University;
ALFRED W. EUSTES III, 1996-B.S., Louisiana Tech University; M.S.,
Associate Professor of Liberal Arts and International Studies
University of Colorado at Boulder; Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines;
YAOGUO LI, 1999-B.S.,Wuhan College of Geology, China; Ph.D.,
Associate Professor of Petroleum Engineering, P.E.
University of British Columbia; Associate Professor of Geophysics
LINDA A. FIGUEROA, 1990-B.S., University of Southern California;
MATTHEW LIBERATORE, 2005-B.S., University of Chicago; M.S.,
M.S., Ph.D., University of Colorado; Associate Professor of Civil and
Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign; Associate Professor of
Environmental Engineering, P.E.
Chemical and Biological Engineering
CHRISTIAN FRENZEL, 2010-M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology,
JUAN C. LUCENA, 2002-B.S., M.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute;
Ph.D., Technische Universitat Munchen, Germany; Associate Professor
Ph.D., Virginia Tech; Associate Professor of Liberal Arts and International
of Mining Engineering
Studies
TINA L. GIANQUITTO, 2003-B.A., M.A., and Ph.D., Columbia University;
KEVIN W. MANDERNACK, 1996-B.S., University of Wisconsin at
Associate Professor of Liberal Arts and International Studies
Madison; Ph.D., University of California San Diego; Associate Professor
BRIAN GORMAN, 2008-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Missouri-Rolla;
of Chemistry and Geochemistry
Associate Professor of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
REED M. MAXWELL, 2009-B.S., University of Miami; M.S., University
QI HAN, 2005-B.S., Yanshan University of China; M.S., Huazhong
of California at Los Angeles; Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley;
University of Science and Technology China; Ph.D., University of
Associate Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering

Colorado School of Mines 165
HUGH B. MILLER, 2005-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines;
JOHN R. SPEAR, 2005-B.A., University of California, San Diego; M.S.
Associate Professor of Mining Engineering
and Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Associate Professor of Civil and
Environmental Engineering
JENNIFER L. MISKIMINS, 2002-B.S., Montana College of Mineral
Science and Technology; M.S., Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines;
JOHN P. H. STEELE, 1988-B.S., New Mexico State University; M.S.,
Associate Professor of Petroleum Engineering
Ph.D., University of New Mexico; Associate Professor of Mechanical
Engineering, P.E.
JUNKO MUNAKATA MARR, 1996-B.S., California Institute of
Technology; M.S., Ph.D., Stanford University; Associate Professor of Civil
JAMES D. STRAKER, 2005-B.A., University of Notre Dame; M.A., Ohio
and Environmental Engineering
State University; Ph.D., Emory University; Associate Professor of Liberal
Arts and International Studies
MASAMI NAKAGAWA, 1996-B.E., M.S., University of Minnesota; Ph.D.,
Cornell University; Associate Professor of Mining Engineering
NEAL SULLIVAN, 2004-B.S., University of Massachusetts; M.S., Ph.D.,
University of Colorado; Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering
ALEXANDRA NEWMAN, 2000-B.S., University of Chicago; M.S., Ph.D.,
and Director of the Colorado Fuel Cell Center
University of California, Berkeley; Associate Professor of Economics and
Business
LUIS TENORIO, 1997-B.A., University of California, Santa Cruz; Ph.D.,
University of California, Berkeley; Associate Professor of Applied
RYAN O’HAYRE, 2006-B.S., Colorado School of Mines; M.S., Ph.D.,
Mathematics and Statistics
Stanford University; Associate Professor of Metallurgical and Materials
Engineering
STEVEN W. THOMPSON, 1989-B.S., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania
State University; Associate Professor of Metallurgical and Materials
TIMOTHY R. OHNO, 1992-B.S., University of Alberta; Ph.D., University
Engineering
of Maryland; Associate Professor of Physics
BRUCE TRUDGILL, 2003 -B.S., University of Wales; Ph.D., Imperial
KENNETH OSGOOD, 2011-B.A., University of Notre Dame, M.A., Ph.D.,
College; Associate Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
University of Santa Barbara; Associate Professor of Liberal Arts and
International Studies, Director of Guy T. McBride Jr. Honors Program in
BETTINA M. VOELKER, 2004-B.S., M.S., Massachusetts Institute of
Public Affairs
Technology; Ph.D., Swiss Federal Institute of Technology; Associate
Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
ANTHONY J. PETRELLA, 2006-B.S., M.S., Purdue University; Ph.D.,
University of Pittsburgh; Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering
KIM R. WILLIAMS, 1997-B.Sc., McGill University; Ph.D., Michigan State
University; Associate Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
MANIKA PRASAD, 2007-B.S., Bombay University; M.S., Ph.D., Kiel
University; Co-Director of Center for Rock Abuse and Associate
COLIN WOLDEN, 1997-B.S., University of Minnesota; M.S., Ph.D.,
Professor of Petroleum Engineering
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Associate Professor of Chemical
Engineering
JAMES F. RANVILLE, 2004-B.S. Lake Superior State University; M.S.,
PhD., Colorado School of Mines; Associate Professor of Chemistry and
DAVID M. WOOD, 1989-B.A., Princeton University; M.S., Ph.D., Cornell
Geochemistry
University; Associate Professor of Physics
ANDRÉ REVIL, 2007-Diploma, University of Savoie; Ingeneer Diploma,
RAY RUICHONG ZHANG, 1997-B.S., M.S., Tongji University; Ph.D.,
PhD, Ecole de Physique du Globe de Strasbourg, Associate Professor of
Florida Atlantic University; Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental
Geophysics
Engineering
RYAN M. RICHARDS, 2007-B.S. Michigan State University; M.S. Central
WEI ZHOU, 2008-B.S., China Geology University; M.S., University of
Michigan University; Ph.D. Kansas State University; Associate Professor
Alaska and University of Missouri-Rolla; Ph.D., University of Missouri-
of Chemistry and Geochemistry
Rolla; Associate Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
FRÉDÉRIC SARAZIN, 2003-Ph.D., GANIL-Caen, France; Associate
Professor of Physics
PAUL SAVA, 2006-B.S., University of Bucharest; M.S., Ph.D., Stanford
University; Associate Professor of Geophysics
MAJ JANET SCHOENBERG, 2012-B.A. General Studies Columbia
College; Masters of Education, Education and Human Resources,
Colorado State University; Associate Professor of Military Science
ALAN, SELLINGER, 2012-B.S. Eastern Michigan University; M.S.,
Ph.D., University of Michigan; Associate Professor of Chemistry and
Geochemistry
E. CRAIG SIMMONS, 1977-B.S., University of Kansas; M.S., Ph.D.,
State University of New York at Stony Brook; Associate Professor of
Chemistry and Geochemistry
MARCELO G. SIMOES, 2000-B.E., M.S., Ph.D., University of Sao Paulo;
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
KAMINI SINGHA-2012-B.S., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., Stanford
University; Associate Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering

166 Directory of the School
Assistant Professors
DERRICK HUDSON, 2010-B.S., United States Air Force Academy; M.A.,
University of Central Oklahoma; Ph.D., University of Denver; Assistant
CORY AHERNS, 2011-B.S., Kansas State University; M.S., University of
Professor of Liberal Arts and International Studies
Michigan; Ph.D.,University of Colorado at Boulder; Assistant Professor of
DANIEL KAFFINE, 2007-B.A., B.S., University of St. Thomas; M.A.,
Applied Mathematics and Statistics
Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara; Assistant Professor of
JEFFREY ANDREWS-HANNA, 2008-B.A., Cornell University; Ph.D.,
Economics and Business
Washington University; Assistant Professor of Geophysics
NIGEL KELLY, 2007-B.S., Ph.D., University of Sydney (Australia);
JENNIFER L. ASCHOFF, 2008-B.S., Montana State University; M.S.,
Assistant Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
New Mexico State University; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin;
JEFFREY KING, 2009-B.S., New Mexico Institute of Technology; M.S.,
Assistant Professor of Geology and Geological Engineering
Ph.D., University of New Mexico; Assistant Professor of Metallurgical and
REED A. AYERS, 2006-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Colorado;
Materials Engineering
Assistant Professor of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
MELISSA D. KREBS, 2012-B.S., University of Rochester; M.S.,
GREGORY BOGIN, 2010-B.S., Xavier University of Lousiana, M.S.,
University of Rochester; Ph.d., Case Western Reserve University;
Ph.D., University of California, Assistant Professor of Mechanical
Assistant Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Engineering
YVETTE KUIPER, 2011-M.S., Utrecht University, The Netherlands;
JENNIFER C. BRALEY, 2012-B.S., Colorado State University; Ph.D.,
Ph.D., University of New Brunswick, Canada; Assistant Professor of
Washington State University; Assistant Professor of Chemistry and
Geology and Geological Engineering
Geochemistry
HONGJUN LIANG, 2008-B.S., University of Science and Technology of
ROBERT J. BRAUN, 2007-B.S., M.S., Marquette University; Ph.D.,
Beijing; M.S., Chinese Academy of Science; Ph.D., University of Illinois
University of Wisconsin-Madison; Assistant Professor of Mechanical
at Urbana-Champaign; Assistant Professor of Metallurgical and Materials
Engineering
Engineering
ZIZHONG (JEFFREY) CHEN, 2008-B.S., Beijing Normal University;
MATTHEW LIBERATORE, 2005-B.S., University of Chicago; M.S.,
M.S., Ph.D., University of Tennessee; Assistant Professor of Electrical
Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign; Associate Professor of
Engineering and Computer Science
Chemical Engineering
JON M. COLLIS, 2008-B.S., New Mexico Institute of Mining and
C. MARK MAUPIN, 2010- B.S., M.S., Boise State University, Ph.D.
Technology; M.S. Colorado School of Mines; Ph.D., Rensselear
University of Utah; Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering
Polytechnic Institute; Assistant Professor of Applied Mathematics and
SALMAN MOHAGHEGHI, 2011-B.Sc., M.S., University of Tehran, M.S.,
Statistics
PH.D., Georgia Institute of Technology, Assistant Professor of Electrical
STEVEN DECALUWE, 2012-B.S., Vanderbilt University; Ph.D.,
Engineering and Computer Science
University of Maryland; Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering
THOMAS MONECKE, 2008-B.S, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Germany
JASON DELBORNE, 2008-A.B., Stanford University; Ph.D., University of
and University of Edinburgh, UK; M.S., TU Bergakademie Freiberg;
California, Berkeley; Assistant Professor of Liberal Arts and International
Ph.D., TU Bergakademie Freiberg and Centre for Ore Deposit Research
Studies
at the University of Tasmania, Australia; Assistant Professor of Geology
and Geological Engineering
HARRISON G. FELL, 2011-B.S., Colorado School of Mines; M.S.,
Ph.D., University of Washington; Assistant Professor of Economics and
KEITH B. NEEVES, 2008-B.S., University of Colorado; Ph.D., Cornell
Business
University; Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering
KIP FINDLEY, 2008-B.S., Colorado School of Mines; Ph.D., Georgia
EDWIN NISSEN, 2012-B.A., M.A., University of Cambridge; Ph.D.,
Institute of Technology; Assistant Professor of Metallurgical and Materials
University of Oxford; Assistant Professor of Geophysics
Engineering
CORINNE PACKARD, 2010-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute
SYLVIA GAYLORD, 2007-B.A.and M.A., The Johns Hopkins University;
of Technology; Assistant Professor of Metallurgical and Materials
Ph.D., Northwestern University; Assistant Professor of Liberal Arts and
Engineering
International Studies
STEPHEN D. PANKAVICH, 2012-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon
ULRIKE HAGER, 2012-Ph.D., University of Jyväskylä; Assistant
University; Assistant Professor of Applied Mathematics and Statistics
Professor of Physics
IRENE POLYCARPOU, 2008-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Florida International
AMANDA HERING, 2009-B.S., Baylor University; M.S, Montana State
University; Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer
University; Ph.D., Texas A & M University; Assistant Professor of Applied
Science
Mathematics and Statistics
JASON PORTER, 2010-B.S., Brigham Young University; M.S., University
CHRISTOPHER P. HIGGINS, 2008-A.B. Harvard University; M.S.
of Texas at Austin; Ph.D., Stanford University, Assistant Professor of
Stanford University; Ph.D. Stanford University; Assistant Professor of
Mechanical Engineering
Civil and Environmental Engineering
STEFFEN REBENNACK, 2010-Diploma Ruprecht-Karls Universitaet;
B. TODD HOFFMAN, 2011-B.S. Montana Tech of the University of
M.S., Ph.D., University of Florida; Assistant Professor of Economics and
Montana; M.S., Ph.D., Stanford University; Assistant Professor of
Business
Petroleum Engineering

Colorado School of Mines 167
JESSICA S. ROLSTON, 2012-B.A., Macalester College; Ph.D., University
of Michigan; Hennebach Assistant Professor in Energy Policy of Liberal
Arts and International Studies
JENNIFER SCHNEIDER, 2004-B.A., Albertson College of Idaho; M.A.,
Ph.D., Claremont Graduate University; Assistant Professor of Liberal Arts
and International Studies
JONATHAN O. SHARP, 2008-B.A. Princeton University; M.S. University
of California at Berkeley; Ph.D. University of California at Berkeley;
Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering
ANNE SILVERMAN, 2011-B.S., University of Arizona, M.S., Ph.D.,
University of Texas at Austin, Assistant Professor of Mechanical
Engineering
M. KATHLEEN SMITS, 2012-B.S., U.S. Air Force Academy; M.S.,
University of Texas at Austin; Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Assistant
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering
AMADEU K. SUM, 2008-B.S., M.S., Colorado School of Mines; Ph.D.,
University of Delaware; Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering
ANDRZEJ SZYMCZAK, 2007-M.S., University of Gdansk; M.S. and
Ph.D., University of Washington; Assistant Professor of Electrical
Engineering and Computer Science
ARNOLD B. TAMAYO, 2009-B.S., University of the Philippines, M.S.,
Georgia Institute of Technology, Ph.D., University of Southern California;
Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
ERIC TOBERER, 2011-B.S., Harvey Mudd College; Ph.D., University of
California; Assistant Professor of Physics
BRIAN G. TREWYN, 2012-B.S., University of Wisconsin at La Crosse;
Ph.D. Iowa State University; Assistant Professor of Chemistry and
Geochemistry
CAMERON J. TURNER, 2008-B.S., University of Wyoming; M.S.,
Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin; Assistant Professor of Mechanical
Engineering
MICHAEL B. WAKIN, 2008-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Rice University; Assistant
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
HUA WANG, 2012-B.E., Tshinghua University; M.S., Namyoung
Technological University; Ph.D., University of Texas at Arlington;
Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
JUDITH WANG, 2007-B.A., B.S.E., M.S.E., Ph.D., Case Western
Reserve University; Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental
Engineering
NING WU, 2010-B.Sc., M.Sc. National University of Sinagpore, Ph.D.
Princeton University, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering
ZHIGANG WU, 2009-B.S., Peking University, Ph.D., College of William
and Mary; Assistant Professor of Physics
YONGAN YANG, 2010-B.S., Nakai University, Ph.D., Institute of
Photographic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Assistant
Professor of Chemistry and Geochemistry
XIAOLONG YIN, 2009-B.S., Beijing University, China; M.S., Lehigh
University, Ph.D., Cornell; Assistant Professor of Petroleum Engineering

168 Directory of the School
Teaching Professors
CANDACE S. SULZBACH, 1983-B.S., Colorado School of Mines;
Teaching Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering
RAVEL F. AMMERMAN, 2004-B.S., Colorado School of Mines; M.S.,
SANDY WOODSON, 1999-B.A., North Carolina State University; M.A.,
University of Colorado; Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Teaching
Colorado State University; M.F.A., University of Montana; Teaching
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Professor of Liberal Arts and International Studies
MANOHAR ARORA, 2006-B.S., University of Roorkee; M.S., University
MATTHEW YOUNG, 2004-B.S., Ph.D., University of Rochester; Teaching
of Burdwan; Ph.D., University of Mississippi; Teaching Professor of
Professor of Physics
Mining Engineering
JOSEPH P. CROCKER, 2004-B.S., M.S., Oklahoma State University;
Ph.D., University of Utah; Teaching Professor of Civil and Environmental
Engineering
JOEL DUNCAN, 2006-B.S. University of Alabama; Ph.D., Florida State
University; Teaching Professor of EPICS and Geology and Geological
Engineering
ALEX T. FLOURNOY, 2006-B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology, M.S.,
Ph.D. University of Colorado, Boulder; Teaching Professor of Physics
G. GUSTAVE GREIVEL, 1994-B.S., M.S., Colorado School of Mines;
Teaching Professor of Applied Mathematics and Statistics
HUGH KING, 1993-B.S., Iowa State University; M.S. New York
University; M.D., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of
Colorado; Teaching Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering/
BELS
JAMES V. JESUDASON, 2002-B.A. Wesleyan University; M.A., Ph.D.,
Harvard University; Teaching Professor of Liberal Arts and International
Studies
ROBERT KLIMEK, 1996-B.A., St. Mary’s of the Barrens College;
M.Div., DeAndreis Theological Institute; M.A. University of Denver; D.A.,
University of Northern Colorado; Teaching Professor of Liberal Arts and
International Studies
ROBERT KNECHT, 1978-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines;
Teaching Professor of EPICS
PATRICK B. KOHL, 2007-B.S., Western Washington University; Ph. D.
University of Colorado; Teaching Professor of Physics
H. VINCENT KUO, 2006-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Minnesota;
Teaching Professor of Physics
TONI LEFTON, 1998-B.A., Florida State University; M.A., Northern
Arizona University; Teaching Professor of Liberal Arts and International
Studies
RICHARD PASSAMANECK, 2004-B.S., M.S., University of California,
Los Angeles; Ph.D., University of Southern California; Teaching
Professor of Mechanical Engineering
CYNDI RADER, 1991-B.S., M.S., Wright State University; Ph.D.,
University of Colorado; Teaching Professor of Electrical Engineering and
Computer Science
TODD RUSKELL, 1999-B.A., Lawrence University; M.S., Ph.D.,
University of Arizona; Teaching Professor of Physics
CHRISTIAN SHOREY, 2005-B.S., University of Texas at Austin; Ph.D.,
University of Iowa; Teaching Professor of Geology and Geological
Engineering
CHARLES A. STONE, IV, 2007-B.S., North Carolina State University,
M.S., University of Wisconsin, Madison, Ph.D., University of California,
Los Angeles; Teaching Professor of Physics

Colorado School of Mines 169
Teaching Associate Professor
MARK MILLER, 1996-B.S., Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines; Teaching
Associate Professor of Petroleum Engineering
LINDA A. BATTALORA, 2006-B.S., M.S., Colorado School of Mines;
RACHEL MORRISH, 2010-B.S.c., Colorado School of Mines, Ph.D.
J.D., Loyola University New Orleans College of Law; Teaching Associate
University of Arizona; Teaching Associate Professor of Chemical and
Professor of Petroleum Engineering
Biological Engineering
GERALD R. BOURNE, 2011-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Florida;
MIKE NICHOLAS, 2012-B.A., B.S., University of Utah; M.S., Ph.D., Duke
Teaching Associate Professor of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
University; Teaching Associate Professor of Applied Mathematics and
TERRY BRIDGMAN, 2003-B.S., Furman University; M.S., University of
Statistics
North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Teaching Associate Professor of Applied
CYNTHIA NORRGRAN, 2008-B.S., University of Minnesota; M.D.,
Mathematics and Statistics
University of Nevada, Reno; Teaching Associate Professor of Chemical
DEBRA CARNEY, 2012-B.S., University of Vermont; Ph.D., University
and Biological Engineering/BELS
of Maryland; Teaching Associate Professor of Applied Mathematics and
PAUL OGG, 2007-B.A., Albion College; Ph.D., University of Iowa;
Statistics
Teaching Associate Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering/
JOHN P. CHANDLER, 2006-B.A., Transylvania University; M.A., East
BELS
Carolina University; Ph.D., Penn State University; Teaching Associate
ROSE A. PASS, 2006-A.B, M.A. Boston College; Teaching Associate
Professor of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
Professor of Liberal Arts and International Studies
STEPHANIE A. CLAUSSEN, 2012-B.E., Massachusetts Institute of
JOHN PERSICHETTI, 1997-B.S., University of Colorado; M.S., Colorado
Technology; M.A., Ph.D., Stanford University; Teaching Associate
School of Mines; Teaching Associate Professor of Chemical and
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Biological Engineering
HOLLY EKLUND, 2009-BA, Marquette University; M.S., Colorado School
JEFFREY SCHOWALTER, 2009-B.S., M.S., Air Force Institute of
of Mines; Teaching Associate Professor of Applied Mathematics and
Technology; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Teaching Associate
Statistics
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
RENEE L. FALCONER, 2012-B.S., Grove City College; Ph.D., University
CHRISTIAN SHOREY, 2005-B.S., University of Texas at Austin; Ph.D.,
of South Carolina; Teaching Associate Professor of Chemistry and
University of Iowa; Teaching Associate Professor of Geology and
Geochemistry
Geological Engineering
ALEX T. FLOURNOY, 2006-B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology, M.S.,
JOHN STERMOLE, 1988-B.S., University of Denver; M.S., Colorado
Ph.D. University of Colorado, Boulder; Teaching Associate Professor of
School of Mines; Teaching Associate Professor of Economics and
Physics
Business
JASON C. GANLEY, 2012-B.S., University of Missouri Rolla; M.S., Ph.D.,
JENNIFER STRONG, 2009-B.S., M.S., Colorado School of Mines;
University of Illinois; Teaching Associate Professor of Chemical and
Teaching Associate Professor of Applied Mathematics and Statistics
Biological Engineering
SCOTT STRONG, 2003-B.S., M.S., Colorado School of Mines; Teaching
TRACY Q. GARDNER, 1996-B.Sc., 1998-M.Sc., Colorado School of
Associate Professor of Applied Mathematics and Statistics
Mines; Ph.D., University of Colorado at Boulder, Teaching Associate
Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering
CANDACE S. SULZBACH, 1983-B.S., Colorado School of Mines;
Teaching Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering
JOY M. GODESIABOIS, 2008-B.S, Colorado State University, M.B.A.,
Southern Methodist University, Ph.D., University of Colorado; Teaching
REBECCA SWANSON, 2012-B.A., Dakota Wecleyan University; M.A.,
Associate Professor of Economics and Business
Ph.D., Indiana University; Teaching Associate Professor of Applied
Mathematics and Statistics
KEITH HELLMAN,2009-B.S., The University of Chicago; M.S. Colorado
School of Mines; Teaching Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering
ROMAN TANKELEVICH, 2003-B.S., M.S., Moscow Physics Engineering
and Computer Science
Institute; Ph.D., Moscow Energy Institute; Teaching Associate Professor
of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
SCOTT HOUSER, 2007-B.S., Colorado State University; B.S., University
of Southern Colorado; M.S., Ph.D, University of Wisconsin-Madison:
NATALIE VAN TYNE, 2008-B.S., Rutgers University, M.S., M.B.A.,
Teaching Associate Professor of Economics and Business
Lehigh University; M.S., Colorado School of Mines; Program Director and
Teaching Associate Professor of EPICS
PATRICK B. KOHL, 2007-B.S., Western Washington University; Ph. D.
University of Colorado; Teaching Associate Professor of Physics
ALEXANDRA WAYLLACE, 2008-B.S., M.S., Colorado School of Mines;
Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia; Teaching Associate Professor of
H. VINCENT KUO, 2006-B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Minnesota;
Civil and Environmental Engineering
Teaching Associate Professor of Physics
CARRIE J. MCCLELLAND, 2012-B.S., Colorado School of Mines;
M.S., Ph.D., University of Colorado; Teaching Associate Professor of
Petroleum Engineering
DAN MILLER, 2009-B.A., University of Colorado, Boulder; Ph.D.,
University of Iowa; Teaching Associate Professor and Assistant Division
Director of Liberal Arts and International Studies

170 Directory of the School
Teaching Assistant Professors
YONG J. BAKOS, 2012-B.A., Northwestern University; M.S., Regis
University; Teaching Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and
Computer Science
JONATHAN H. CULLISON, 2010-B.A., University of South Florida; M.A.,
University of Denver; Teaching Assistant Professor of Liberal Arts and
International Studies
ED A. DEMPSEY, 2007-Electronics Technician Diploma, DeVry
Technicial Institute; Teaching Assistant Professor of Chemistry and
Geochemistry
ANN DOZORETZ, 2004-B.S., University of Denver; M.S., Colorado
School of Mines; Teaching Assistant Professor of Economics and
Business
PAULA A. FARCA, 2010-B.A., M.A., West University of Timisoara,
Romania; M.A., Oklahoma State University; Ph.D., Oklahoma State
University; Teaching Assistant Professor of Liberal Arts and International
Studies
SARAH J. HITT, 2012-Ph.D., University of Denver; M.A., DePaul
University; B.A., MacMurray College; Teaching Assistant Professor of
Liberal Arts and International Studies
CORTNEY E. HOLLES, 2010-B.A., Wayne State University; M.A.,
University of Northern Colorado; Teaching Assistant Professor of Liberal
Arts and International Studies
ELIZABETH A. HOLLEY, 2012-B.A., Pomona College; M.S. University of
Otago; Ph.D. Colorado School of Mines; Teaching Assistant Professor of
Geology and Geological Engineering
MARTIN SPANN, 2006-B.S., National University; Teaching Assistant
Professor of EPICS

Colorado School of Mines 171
Library Faculty
PATRICIA E. ANDERSEN, 2002-Associate Diploma of the Library
Association of Australia, Sydney, Australia; Assistant Librarian
CHRISTINE BAKER, 2006-B.A., University of Massachusetts, Amherst;
M.L.S., Emporia State University; Assistant Librarian
PAMELA M. BLOME, 2002-B.A., University of Nebraska; M.A.L.S.,
University of Arizona, Tucson; Assistant Librarian
JULIE CARMEN, 2009-B.A., St. Mary of the Plains College; M.L.S.,
Emporia State University; Research Librarian
LISA DUNN, 1991-B.S., University of Wisconsin-Superior; M.A.,
Washington University; M.L.S., Indiana University; Librarian
LAURA A. GUY, 2000-B.A., University of Minnesota; M.L.S., University of
Wisconsin; Librarian
JOANNE V. LERUD-HECK, 1989-B.S.G.E., M.S., University of North
Dakota; M.A., University of Denver; Librarian and Director of Library
LISA S. NICKUM, 1994-B.A., University of New Mexico; M.S.L.S.,
University of North Carolina; Associate Librarian
CHRISTOPHER J. J. THIRY, 1995-B.A., M.I.L.S., University of Michigan;
Associate Librarian
LIA VELLA, 2011-B.A,, University of Rochester; Ph.D., University of
Buffalo; M.L.I.S., University of Washington; Assistant Librarian
HEATHER WHITEHEAD, 2001-B.S., University of Alberta; M.L.I.S.,
University of Western Ontario; Associate Librarian

172 Directory of the School
Coaches/Athletics Faculty
BRITTNEY SIMPSON, 2008-B.S., Mesa State College, M.B.A., University
of Colorado at Colorado Springs; Instructor and Assistant Women’s
SATYEN BHAKTA, 2011-B.A., Temple University; Instructor and
Basketball Coach
Assistant Football Coach
JAMIE L. SKADELAND, 2007-B.S., University of North Dakota, M.A.,
STEPHANIE BEGLAY, 2007-B.S., Loras College, M.A., Minnesota State
Minnesota State University at Mankato; Head Volleyball Coach
University at Mankato; Assistant Athletics Trainer
ROBERT A. STITT, 2000- B.A., Doane College; M.A., University of
BOB BENSON, 2008-B.A., University of Vermont, M.Ed, University of
Northern Colorado; Head Football Coach
Albany; Instructor and Associate Head Football Coach
NOLAN SWETT, 2010-B.A., Colorado College, Instructor and Assistant
ARDEL J. BOES, B.A., St. Ambrose College; M.S., Ph.D., Purdue
Football Coach
University; Emeritus Professor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
ROB THOMPSON, 2004-B.A., Bowling Green State University, M.A.,
and Co-Head Cross Country Coach
Bowling Green State University; Instructor and Director of the Outdoor
W. SCOTT CAREY, 2011-B.S., Tarleton State University; M.S.,
Recreation Center
Northeastern State University; Instructor and Assistant Football Coach
CLEMENT GRINSTEAD, 2001-B.A., B.S. Coe College; Instructor and
Assistant Football Coach
KRISTIE HAWKINS, 2010-B.S., University of Maine; Instructor and Head
Softball Coach
JOHN HOWARD,2005-B.S., M.S., Western Illinois University; Director of
Intramural and Club Sports
JOSHUA HUTCHENS, 2007-B.S. Purdue, M.S. James Madison;
Instructor and Co-Head Wrestling Coach
GREGORY JENSEN, 2000-B.S., M.S., Colorado State University;
Instructor and Assistant Trainer
TYLER KIMBLE, 2007-B.S., Colorado State University; Instructor and
Head Golf Coach
FRANK KOHLENSTEIN, 1998-B.S., Florida State University; M.S.,
Montana State University; Instructor and Head Soccer Coach
PAULA KRUEGER, 2003-B.S, M.S., Northern State University Head
Women’s Basketball Coach
ADAM LONG, 2010-B.S., M.S., Northwest Missori State University;
Instructor and Assistant Football Coach
JENNIFER MCINTOSH, 1996-B.S., Russell Sage College, M.S.,
Chapman University; Head Athletic Trainer
GREG MULHOLLAND, 2007-B.S., Millersville University, M.S., University
of Colorado at Denver; Instructor and Assistant Men’s Soccer Coach
JERRID OATES, 2004-B.S., Nebraska Wesleyan University, M.S., Fort
Hayes State University; Instructor and Head Baseball Coach
PRYOR ORSER, 2002- B.S., M.A., Montana State University; Instructor
and Head Men’s Basketball Coach
HEATHER ROBERTS, 2008- B.S., William Woods University, M.S.,
Bemidji State University; Instructor and Assistant Volleyball Coach
NATHAN ROTHMAN, 2008-B.A., University of Colorado; Instructor and
Head Swimming and Diving Coach
BRAD J. SCHICK, 2007-B.A., University of Northern Colorado; M.S.
University of Nebraska at Omaha; Instructor and Assistant Men’s
Basketball Coach
ARTHUR SIEMERS, 2004-B.S., Illinois State University-Normal, M.S.,
University of Colorado-Boulder, Instructor and Head Track and Field and
Cross Country Coach

Colorado School of Mines 173
Index
Library Faculty ......................................................................................171
M
A
Materials Science .................................................................................139
Academic Calendar ..................................................................................4
Mechanical Engineering ......................................................................... 60
Academic Regulations ........................................................................... 20
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering .............................................. 120
Administration Executive Staff ............................................................. 154
Mining Engineering ................................................................................ 97
Admission to the Graduate School .......................................................... 8
N
Applied Mathematics & Statistics ...........................................................36
Nuclear Engineering .............................................................................145
Applied Sciences and Engineering ...................................................... 110
P
Assistant Professors ............................................................................ 166
Petroleum Engineering .........................................................................103
Associate Professors ........................................................................... 164
Physics ................................................................................................. 128
B
Policies and Procedures ...................................................................... 148
Board of Trustees ................................................................................ 152
Professors ............................................................................................ 161
C
R
Chemical and Biological Engineering .................................................. 110
Registration and Tuition Classification ................................................... 15
Chemistry and Geochemistry ...............................................................115
S
Civil & Environmental Engineering .........................................................40
Student Life at CSM .............................................................................. 10
Coaches/Athletics Faculty .................................................................... 172
T
College of Engineering & Computational Sciences ................................36
Teaching Assistant Professors .............................................................170
D
Teaching Associate Professor ............................................................. 169
Directory of the School ........................................................................ 152
Teaching Professors ............................................................................ 168
E
The Graduate School ...............................................................................7
Earth Sciences and Engineering ........................................................... 65
Tuition, Fees, Financial Assistance ....................................................... 27
Economics and Business .......................................................................65
Electrical Engineering & Computer Science .......................................... 49
Emeriti .................................................................................................. 157
Emeritus Members of BOT .................................................................. 153
Engineering Systems ............................................................................. 58
G
General Information ................................................................................. 5
Geochemistry ....................................................................................... 131
Geology and Geological Engineering .................................................... 74
Geophysics .............................................................................................85
Graduate .................................................................................................. 3
Graduate Departments and Programs ................................................... 29
H
Home ........................................................................................................2
Hydrologic Science and Engineering ................................................... 134
I
Interdisciplinary .....................................................................................136
Interdisciplinary Programs ....................................................................131
L
Liberal Arts and International Studies ....................................................92