Table of Contents
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering ......................... 151
Physics ........................................................................... 161
Home ................................................................................................ 3
Additional Programs .............................................................. 166
Undergraduate ................................................................................. 4
Aerospace Studies .......................................................... 166
Academic Calendar .......................................................................... 5
Design -- EPICS (Engineering Practices Introductory Course
Welcome .......................................................................................... 6
Sequence) ....................................................................... 170
Student Life ...................................................................................... 8
Military Science .............................................................. 173
International Student Services ................................................ 11
Physical Education & Athletics ....................................... 177
Multicultural Engineering Program .......................................... 11
Interdisciplinary Minors ................................................................ 181
Office of International Programs/Study Abroad/International
Bioengineering and Life Sciences ......................................... 181
Fellowships .............................................................................. 12
Energy ................................................................................... 182
Office of Women in Science, Engineering and Mathematics
(WISEM) .................................................................................. 12
Humanitarian Engineering ..................................................... 184
Tuition, Fees, Financial Assistance, Housing ................................. 13
Guy T. McBride, Jr. Honors Program in Public Affairs ........... 186
Housing & Dining ........................................................................... 18
Space and Planetary Science and Engineering .................... 190
Undergraduate Information ............................................................ 19
Underground Construction and Tunneling ............................. 191
Admission Procedures ............................................................. 21
Special Programs ......................................................................... 192
Undergraduate Grading System .............................................. 24
Division of Liberal Arts and International Studies (LAIS) Writing
Center .................................................................................... 192
General Information ................................................................. 29
Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) ................................... 193
Undergraduate Degree Requirements ..................................... 31
The Guy T. McBride, Jr. Honors Program in Public Affairs .... 194
Undergraduate Programs ........................................................ 33
Bioengineering and Life Sciences (BELS) ............................. 195
Combined ................................................................................ 40
The Energy Minor and ASI (EM) ........................................... 195
Undergraduate Programs and Departments .................................. 42
The Humanitarian Engineering Minor .................................... 195
College of Engineering & Computational Sciences ................. 42
Space and Planetary Science and Engineering (SPSE) ........ 195
Applied Mathematics & Statistics ...................................... 42
Underground Construction and Tunneling Minor ................... 195
Civil & Environmental Engineering ................................... 50
Minor Program/Area of Special Interest ................................ 195
Electrical Engineering & Computer Science ..................... 59
Study Abroad ......................................................................... 196
Engineering ....................................................................... 69
Policies and Procedures .............................................................. 197
Mechanical Engineering ................................................... 79
Directory of the School ................................................................ 203
Earth Sciences and Engineering ............................................. 84
Board of Trustees .................................................................. 203
Economics and Business ................................................. 84
Emeritus Members of BOT .................................................... 204
Geology and Geological Engineering ............................... 91
Administration Executive Staff ............................................... 205
Geophysics ..................................................................... 100
Emeriti ................................................................................... 208
Liberal Arts and International Studies ............................. 106
Professors ............................................................................. 212
Mining Engineering ......................................................... 121
Associate Professors ............................................................. 215
Petroleum Engineering ................................................... 128
Assistant Professors .............................................................. 217
Applied Sciences and Engineering ........................................ 134
Teaching Professors .............................................................. 219
Chemical and Biological Engineering ............................. 134
Teaching Associate Professor ............................................... 220
Chemistry and Geochemistry ......................................... 144

Teaching Assistant Professors .............................................. 221
Library Faculty ....................................................................... 222
Coaches/Athletics Faculty ..................................................... 223
Index ............................................................................................ 224

Colorado School of Mines 3
Colorado School of Mines Bulletin
Mission and Goals
Colorado School of Mines is a public research university devoted to
engineering and applied science related to resources. It is one of the
leading institutions in the nation and the world in these areas. It has the
highest admission standards of any university in Colorado and among
the highest of any public university in the U.S. CSM has dedicated itself
to responsible stewardship of the earth and its resources. It is one of
a very few institutions in the world having broad expertise in resource
exploration, extraction, production and utilization which can be brought to
bear on the world’s pressing resource-related environmental problems.
As such, it occupies a unique position among the world’s institutions of
higher education.
The school’s role and mission has remained constant and is written
in the Colorado statutes as: The Colorado School of Mines shall be a
specialized baccalaureate and graduate research institution with high
admission standards. The Colorado School of Mines shall have a unique
mission in energy, mineral, and materials science and engineering
and associated engineering and science fields. The school shall be
the primary institution of higher education offering energy, mineral
and materials science and mineral engineering degrees at both the
graduate and undergraduate levels. (Colorado revised Statutes, Section
23-41-105)
Throughout the school’s history, the translation of its mission into
educational programs has been influenced by the needs of society.
Those needs are now focused more clearly than ever before. We believe
that the world faces a crisis in balancing resource availability with
environmental protection and that CSM and its programs are central to
the solution to that crisis. Therefore the school’s mission is elaborated
upon as follows:
Colorado School of Mines is dedicated to educating students and
professionals in the applied sciences, engineering, and associated fields
related to
the discovery and recovery of the Earth’s resources
their conversion to materials and energy
their utilization in advanced processes and products
the economic and social systems necessary to ensure their prudent
and provident use in a sustainable global society
This mission will be achieved by the creation, integration, and exchange
of knowledge in engineering, the natural sciences, the social sciences,
the humanities, business and their union to create processes and
products to enhance the quality of life of the world’s inhabitants.
The Colorado School of Mines is consequently committed to serving the
people of Colorado, the nation, and the global community by promoting
stewardship of the Earth upon which all life and development depend.
(Colorado School of Mines Board of Trustees, 2000)

4 Undergraduate
Undergraduate
To Mines Students:
This Bulletin is for your use as a source of continuing reference. Please
save it.
Published by Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401
Address correspondence to: Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO
80401
Main Telephone: 303-273-3000 Toll Free: 800-446-9488
Inquiries to Colorado School of Mines should be directed as follows:
Admissions: Bruce Goetz, Director of Admissions, admit@mines.edu
Student Life: Dan Fox, Vice President for Student Life & Dean of
Students
Financial Aid: Jill Robertson, Director of Financial Aid
Registrar: Lara Medley, Registrar, registrar@mines.edu
Academic Affairs: Terry Parker, Provost and Executive Vice President

Colorado School of Mines 5
Academic Calendar
Last Withdrawal - New
April 26
Friday
Freshmen & Transfers
Fall Semester 2012
Classes End
May 2
Thursday
Dead Week - no exams
April 29 - May 3
Monday-Friday
Description
Date(s)
Day(s) of Week
Dead Day - no academic
May 3
Friday
Confirmation Deadline
Aug. 20
Monday
activities
Faculty Conference
Aug. 20
Monday
Final Exams
May 4, 6-9
Saturday, Monday-
Classes Start (1)
Aug. 21
Tuesday
Thursday
Graduate Student Late Fee
Aug. 24
Friday
Semester Ends
May 10
Friday
Labor Day - Classes in
Sep. 3
Monday
Commencement
May 10
Friday
Session
Final Grades Due
May 13
Monday
Census Day
Sep. 5
Wednesday
Fall Break (not always
Oct. 15 & 16
Monday & Tuesday
Summer Sessions 2013
Columbus Day)
Description
Date(s)
Day(s) of Week
Midterm Grades Due
Oct. 15
Monday
Summer I Starts (6-week
May 13
Monday
Last Withdrawal -
Nov. 13
Tuesday
session) (1)
Continuing Students (12
Summer I Census
May 17
Friday
wks)
Memorial Day - No Classes, May 27
Monday
Priority Registration for Fall
Nov. 12-16
Monday - Friday
Campus Closed
Term
Summer I Last Withdrawal - June 7
Friday
Non-Class Day prior to
Nov. 21
Wednesday
All Students
Thanksgiving Break
Summer I Ends
June 21
Friday
Thanksgiving & day after -
Nov. 22 & 23
Thursday & Friday
Summer I Grades Due
June 24
Monday
No Class, Campus Closed
Summer II Starts (6-week
June 24
Monday
Last Withdrawal - New
Nov. 30
Friday
session) (1)
Freshmen & Transfers
Summer II Census
June 28
Friday
Classes End
Dec. 6
Thursday
Independence Day - No
July 4
Thursday
Dead Week - No Exams
Dec. 3-7
Monday-Friday
Classes, Campus Closed
Dead Day - no academic
Dec. 7
Friday
Summer II Last Withdrawal
July 19
Friday
activities
- All Students
Final Exams
Dec. 8, 10-13
Saturday, Monday-
Summer II Ends (2)
Aug. 2
Friday
Thursday
Summer II Grades Due
Aug. 5
Monday
Semester Ends
Dec. 14
Friday
Commencement
Dec. 14
Friday
1
Petition for changes in tuition classification due in the Registrar’s
Final Grades Due
Dec. 17
Monday
office for this term.
2
Winter Break
Dec. 17 - Jan. 18
PHGN courses end two weeks later on Friday, August 16th.
Spring Semester 2013
Description
Date(s)
Day(s) of Week
Confirmation Deadline
Jan. 8
Tuesday
Classes Start (1)
Jan. 9
Wednesday
Graduate Student Late Fee
Jan. 11
Friday
Census Day
Jan. 24
Thursday
Non-Class Day -
Feb. 18
Monday
Presidents’ Day
Midterm Grades Due
Mar. 4
Monday
Spring Break - 9th full week Mar. 11-15
Monday-Friday
of Spring Term
Last Withdrawal -
April 9
Tuesday
Continuing & Grad (13
weeks)
E-Days
April 4-6
Thursday-Saturday
Priority Registration
April 8-12
Monday-Friday
Summer/Fall
Engineering Exam
April 13
Saturday

6 Welcome
Welcome
• Graduates should exhibit ethical behavior and integrity. They should
also demonstrate perseverance and have pride in accomplishment.
The Academic Environment
They should assume a responsibility to enhance their professions
through service and leadership and should be responsible citizens who
We strive to fulfill this educational mission through our undergraduate
serve society, particularly through stewardship of the environment.
curriculum and in an environment of commitment and partnership
among students and faculty. The commitment is directed at learning,
History of CSM
academic success and professional growth, it is achieved through
In 1865, only six years after gold and silver were discovered in the
persistent intellectual study and discourse, and it is enabled by
Colorado Territory, the fledgling mining industry was in trouble. The
professional courtesy, responsibility and conduct. The partnership
nuggets had been picked out of streams and the rich veins had been
invokes expectations for both students and faculty. Students should
worked, and new methods of exploration, mining, and recovery were
expect access to high quality faculty and to appropriate academic
needed.
guidance and counseling; they should expect access to a high quality
curriculum and instructional programs; they should expect to graduate
Early pioneers like W.A.H. Loveland, E.L. Berthoud, Arthur Lakes,
within four years if they follow the prescribed programs successfully;
George West and Episcopal Bishop George M. Randall proposed a
and they should expect to be respected as individuals in all facets of
school of mines. In 1874, the Territorial Legislature appropriated $5,000
campus activity and should expect responsive and tactful interaction
and commissioned Loveland and a Board of Trustees to found the
in their learning endeavors. Faculty should expect participation and
Territorial School of Mines in or near Golden. Governor Routt signed the
dedication from students, including attendance, attentiveness, punctuality
Bill on February 9, 1874, and when Colorado became a state in 1876,
and demonstrable contribution of effort in the learning process; and they
the Colorado School of Mines was constitutionally established. The first
should expect respectful interaction in a spirit of free inquiry and orderly
diploma was awarded in 1883.
discipline. We believe that these commitments and expectations establish
As CSM grew, its mission expanded from the rather narrow initial
the academic culture upon which all learning is founded.
focus on nonfuel minerals to programs in petroleum production and
CSM offers the bachelor of science degree in Chemical Engineering,
refining as well. Recently it has added programs in materials science
Chemistry, Economics, Engineering, Engineering Physics, Geological
and engineering, energy and environmental engineering, and a broad
Engineering, Geophysical Engineering, Mathematical and Computer
range of other engineering and applied science disciplines. CSM sees its
Sciences, Metallurgical and Material Engineering, Mining Engineering,
mission as education and research in engineering and applied science
and Petroleum Engineering. A pervasive institutional goal for all of these
with a special focus on the earth science disciplines in the context of
programs is articulated in the Profile of the Colorado School of Mines
responsible stewardship of the earth and its resources.
Graduate:
CSM long has had an international reputation. Students have come
• All CSM graduates must have depth in an area of specialization,
from nearly every nation, and alumni can be found in every corner of the
enhanced by hands-on experiential learning, and breadth in allied
globe.
fields. They must have the knowledge and skills to be able to
Unique Programs
recognize, define and solve problems by applying sound scientific
and engineering principles. These attributes uniquely distinguish our
Colorado School of Mines is an institution of engineering and applied
graduates to better function in increasingly competitive and diverse
science with a special focus in Earth, Energy, Environment and
technical professional environments.
Materials. As such, it has unique programs in many fields. This is the
only institution in the world, for example, that offers doctoral programs
• Graduates must have the skills to communicate information, concepts
in all five of the major earth science disciplines: Geology and Geological
and ideas effectively orally, in writing, and graphically. They must be
Engineering, Geophysics, Geochemistry, Mining Engineering and
skilled in the retrieval, interpretation and development of technical
Petroleum Engineering. It has one of the few Metallurgical and Materials
information by various means, including the use of computer-aided
Engineering programs in the country that still focuses on the complete
techniques.
materials cycle from mineral processing to finished advanced materials.
• Graduates should have the flexibility to adjust to the ever changing
professional environment and appreciate diverse approaches to
In addition to these traditional programs which define the institutional
understanding and solving society’s problems. They should have the
focus, the school is pioneering programs in interdisciplinary areas. One
creativity, resourcefulness, receptivity and breadth of interests to think
of the most successful of these is the Engineering Division program,
critically about a wide range of cross-disciplinary issues. They should
which currently claims more than one-third of the undergraduate majors.
be prepared to assume leadership roles and possess the skills and
This program combines civil, electrical, environmental and mechanical
attitudes which promote teamwork and cooperation and to continue
engineering in a nontraditional curriculum that is accredited by the
their own growth through life-long learning.
Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for
• Graduates should be capable of working effectively in an international
Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore,
environment, and be able to succeed in an increasingly interdependent
MD 21202-4012 – telephone (410) 347-7700. Another, at the graduate
world where borders between cultures and economies are becoming
level, is the Master of International Political Economy of Resources. Such
less distinct. They should appreciate the traditions and languages of
programs serve as models at CSM.
other cultures, and value diversity in their own society.
While many of the programs at CSM are firmly grounded in tradition,
they are all experiencing continual evolution and innovation. Recent
successes in integrating aspects of the curriculum have spurred similar
activity in other areas such as the geosciences. There, through the
medium of computer visualization, geophysicists and geologists are in
the process of creating a new emerging discipline. A similar development

Colorado School of Mines 7
is occurring in geo-engineering through the integration of aspects of civil
expression, race, religion, ethnicity, national origin, disability, military
engineering, geology and mining. CSM has played a leadership role
service, or genetic information in its administration of educational
in this kind of innovation over the last decade. Many degree programs
policies, programs, or activities; admissions policies; scholarship and
offer CSM undergraduate students the opportunity to begin work on a
loan programs; athletic or other school-administered programs; or
Graduate Certificate, Professional Master’s Degree, or Master’s Degree
employment.
while completing the requirements for their Bachelor’s Degree. These
Inquiries, concerns, or complaints should be directed by subject content
combined Bachelors-Masters programs have been created by CSM
as follows:
faculty in those situations where they have deemed it academically
advantageous to treat BS and MS degree programs as a continuous and
The Employment-related EEO and discrimination contact is:
integrated process. These are accelerated programs that can be valuable
Mike Dougherty, Associate Vice President for Human Resources
in fields of engineering and applied science where advanced education
Guggenheim Hall, Room 110
in technology and/or management provides the opportunity to be on a
Golden, Colorado 80401
fast track for advancement to leadership positions. These programs also
(Telephone: 303.273.3250)
can be valuable for students who want to get a head start on graduate
education.
The ADA Coordinator and the Section 504 Coordinator for employment
is:
Location
Ann Hix, Benefits Manager, Human Resources
Golden, Colorado has been the home for CSM since its inception.
Guggenheim Hall, Room 110
Located 20 minutes west of Denver, this community of 18,000 is located
Golden, Colorado 80401
in the foothills of the Rockies. Skiing is an hour away to the west. Golden
(Telephone: 303.273.3250)
is a unique community that serves as home to CSM, the Coors Brewing
Company, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, a major U.S.
The ADA Coordinator and the Section 504 Coordinator for students and
Geological Survey facility that also contains the National Earthquake
academic educational programs is:
Center, and the seat of Jefferson County. Golden once served as the
Ron Brummett, Director of Career Planning & Placement / Student
territorial capital of Colorado.
Development Services
Accreditation
1600 Maple Street, Suite 8
Golden, Colorado 80401
Mines is accredited through the doctoral degree by the Higher Learning
(Telephone: 303.273.3297)
Commission (HLC) of the North Central Association, 230 South
The Title IX Coordinator is:
LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500, Chicago, Illinois 60604-1413 – telephone
(312) 263-0456. The Engineering Accreditation Commission of the
Maureen Durkin, Director of Policy and Planning
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), 111
Guggenheim Hall, Room 212A
Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 – telephone
Golden, Colorado 80401
(410) 347-7700, accredits undergraduate degree programs in Chemical
(Telephone: 303.384.2236)
Engineering, Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Engineering,
The ADA Facilities Access Coordinator is:
Engineering Physics, Geological Engineering, Geophysical Engineering,
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Mining Engineering and
Gary Bowersock, Director of Facilities Management
Petroleum Engineering. The American Chemical Society has approved
1318 Maple Street
the degree program in the Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry.
Golden, Colorado 80401
(Telephone: 303.273.3330)
Administration
General management of the School is vested by State statute in a Board
of Trustees, consisting of seven members appointed by the governor.
A non-voting student member is elected annually by the student body
and a non-voting faculty member is elected to serve a two-year term by
the academic faculty. Financial support comes from student tuition and
fees and from the State through annual appropriations. These funds are
augmented by government and privately sponsored research, private gift
support from alumni, corporations, foundations and other friends.
Colorado School of Mines Non-
Discrimination Statement
In compliance with federal law, including the provisions of Titles VI and
VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendment
of 1972, Sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, the ADA Amendments Act
of 2008, Executive Order 11246, the Uniformed Services Employment
and Reemployment Rights Act, as amended, the Genetic Information
Nondiscrimination Act of 2008, and Board of Trustees Policy 10.6, the
Colorado School of Mines does not discriminate against individuals
on the basis of age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender

8 Student Life
Student Life
Services are by appointment only and can be made by calling the Dental
Clinic. Dental care is on a fee-for-service basis, and students enrolled in
Facilities
the CSM Student Health Benefits Plan pay lower rates for dental care.
The Dental Clinic takes cash or checks, no credit/debit cards
Student Center
Fees: Students are charged a mandatory Health Services fee each
The Ben H. Parker Student Center contains the offices for the Vice
semester, which allows them access to services at the Health Center.
President of Student Life and Dean of Students, Associate Dean
Spouses of enrolled CSM students can choose to pay the health center
of Students, Apartment Housing, Student Activities and Greek Life,
fee and are eligible for services. Dental services are not available to
Student Government (ASCSM), Admissions and Financial Aid, Cashier,
spouses.
International Student and Scholar Services, Career Services, Registrar,
Immunization Requirement: The State of Colorado requires that
BlasterCard, Conference Services, and student organizations. The
all students enrolled have proof of two MMR’s (measles, mumps
Student Center also contains the student dining hall (known as the Slate
and rubella). A blood test showing immunity to all three diseases is
Cafe), Diggers Den food court, bookstore, student lounges, meeting
acceptable. History of disease is not acceptable.
rooms, and banquet facilities.
Student Health Benefits Plan: The SHBP office is located on the
Student Recreation Center
second floor of the W. Lloyd Wright Student Wellness Center.
Completed in May 2007, the 108,000 square foot Student Recreation
Adequate Health Insurance Requirement: All degree seeking U.S.
Center, located at the corner of 16th and Maple Streets in the heart
citizen and permanent resident students, and all international students
of campus, provides a wide array of facilities and programs designed
regardless of degree status, are required to have health insurance.
to meet student’s recreational and leisure needs while providing for a
Students are automatically enrolled in the Student Health Benefits Plan
healthy lifestyle. The Center contains a state-of-the-art climbing wall,
and may waive coverage if they have comparable coverage under a
an eight-lane, 25 meter swimming and diving pool, a cardiovascular
personal or employer plan. International students must purchase the
and weight room, two multi-purpose rooms designed and equipped
SHBP, unless they meet specific requirements. Information about the
for aerobics, dance, martial arts programs and other similar activities,
CSM Student Health Benefits Plan, as well as the criteria for waiving,
a competition gymnasium containing three full-size basketball courts
is available online at http://shbp.mines.edu or by calling 303.273.3388.
as well as seating for 2500 people, a separate recreation gymnasium
Coverage for spouses and dependents is also available. Enrollment
designed specifically for a wide variety of recreational programs,
confirmation or waiver of the CSM Student Health Benefits Plan is done
extensive locker room and shower facilities, and a large lounge intended
online for U.S. Citizens and Permanent Residents. International students
for relaxing, playing games or watching television. In addition to
must compete a paper enrollment/waiver form. The deadline is Census
housing the Outdoor Recreation Program as well as the Intramurals
Day.
and Club Sports Programs, the Center serves as the competition
venue for the Intercollegiate Men and Women’s Basketball Programs,
Counseling Center: Located on the second floor of the W. Lloyd Wright
the Intercollegiate Volleyball Program and the Men and Women’s
Student Wellness Center, phone 303-273-3377. Services are available
Intercollegiate Swimming and Diving Program.
for students who have paid the Student Services fee. Individual personal,
academic, and career counseling is offered on a short-term basis to
W. Lloyd Wright Student Wellness Center
all enrolled CSM students. In cases where a student requires longer-
The W. Lloyd Wright Student Wellness Center, 1770 Elm Street, houses
term counseling, referrals are made to providers in the local community.
four health and wellness programs for Mines students: the Coulter
The Counseling Center also provides education and assessment on
Student Health Center, the Student Health Benefits Plan, the Counseling
alcohol and other drug use. More information is available at http://
Center and Student Disability Services. The wellness center is open from
counseling.mines.edu/.
8:00 am to 5:00 pm, Monday through Friday, during the fall and spring
Student Disability Services: Located on the second floor of the W.
semesters.
Lloyd Wright Student Wellness Center, phone 303-273-3377. Student
Coulter Student Health Center: Services are provided to all students
Disability Services provides students with disabilities an equal opportunity
who have paid the student health center fee. The Coulter Student Health
to access the institution’s courses, programs and activities. Services
Center (303) 273-3381, FAX (303) 273-3623 is located on the first floor
are available to students with a variety of disabilities, including but not
of the W. Lloyd Wright Student Wellness Center at the corner of 18th
limited to attention deficit hyperactivity disorders, learning disorders,
and Elm Streets (1770 Elm Street). Nurse practitioners and registered
psychological disorders, vision impairment, hearing impairment, and
nurses provide services Monday through Friday 8:00 am to 12:00 pm
other disabilities. A student requesting disability accommodations at
and 1:00 pm to 4:45 pm and family medicine physicians provide services
the Colorado School of Mines must comply with the Documentation
by appointment several days a week. After hours students can call New
Guidelines and submit required documents, along with a completed
West Physicians at (303) 278-4600 to speak to the physician on call
Request for Reasonable Accommodations form to Student Disability
(identify yourself as a CSM student). The Health Center offers primary
Services.
health and dental care. For X-rays, specialists or hospital care, students
Documentation Guidelines and the Request form are available at http://
are referred to appropriate providers in the community. More information
disabilities.mines.edu/.
is available at http://healthcenter.mines.edu.
Dental Clinic: The Dental Clinic is located on the second floor of the W.
Lloyd Wright Wellness Center. Services include cleanings, restoratives,
and x-rays. Students who have paid the student health fee are eligible
for this service. The dental clinic is open Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and
Fridays during the academic year with fewer hours in the summer.

Colorado School of Mines 9
Services
Public Safety
Academic Advising & Support Services
The Colorado School of Mines Department of Public Safety is a full
service, community oriented law enforcement agency, providing 24/7
Center for Academic Services and Advising
service to the campus. It is the mission of the Colorado School of Mines
(CASA)
Police Department to make the Mines campus the safest campus in
Colorado.
Academic Advising: All students entering CSM are assigned an
Academic Advising Coordinator. This assignment is made by last name.
The department is responsible for providing services such as:
This Coordinator serves as the student’s academic advisor until they
• Proactive patrol of the campus and its facilities
formally declare their major or intended degree. This declaration occurs in
• Investigation and reporting of crimes and incidents
their sophomore year. Incoming students have only noted an interest and
are not declared.
• Motor vehicle traffic and parking enforcement
• Crime and security awareness programs
The Coordinators will host individual, walk-in, and group advising
sessions throughout the semester. Every student is required to meet
• Alcohol / Drug abuse awareness / education
with their Coordinator at least once per semester. The Coordinator will
• Self defense classes
administer a PIN for course registration, each semester. Students unsure
• Consultation with campus departments for safety and security matters
of their academic path (which major to choose) should work with their
• Additional services to the campus community such as: vehicle unlocks
Coordinator to explore all different options.
and jumpstarts, community safe walks (escorts), authorized after-
CASA also hosts Peer 2 Peer advising. Students may walk-in and speak
hours building and office access, and assistance in any medical, fire,
with a fellow student on various issues pertaining to course, such as
or other emergency situation.
course registration).
The police officers employed by the Department of Public Safety are fully
CSM101: The First-Year Symposium, , is a required, credit-bearing class.
trained police officers in accordance with the Peace Officer Standards
CSM101 aims to facilitate the transition from high school to college;
and Training (P.O.S.T.) Board and the Colorado Revised Statute.
create community among peers and upper-class students; assess and
Career Center
monitor academic progress; and provide referrals to appropriate campus
resources. CSM101 is taught by 38 professional staff members (including
The Mines Career Center mission is to assist students in developing,
faculty) and 76 Peer Mentor students.
evaluating, and/or implementing career, education, and employment
decisions and plans. Career development is integral to the success
Tutoring Services: CASA offers weekly tutoring services for all core-
of Mines graduates and to the mission of Mines. All Colorado School
curriculum courses. Our services run Sunday through Thursday and are
of Mines graduates will be able to acquire the necessary job search
hosted in CASA, the Student Center, and the Library. Students may also
and professional development skills to enable them to successfully
request to meet with a private tutor at a time, location, and date of their
take personal responsibility for the management of their own careers.
mutual choosing. All tutoring services are free to students.
Services are provided to all students and for all recent graduates, up
Academic Support Services: Routinely, CASA offers great support
to 24 months after graduation. Students must adhere to the ethical and
workshops and events. CASA hosts pre-finals workshops as well as
professional business and job searching practices as stated in the Career
mid-term exam prep session. As well, students can work with our staff
Center Student Policy, which can be found in its entirety on the Student’s
to develop the skills and technique of studying well in college – such as
Homepage of DiggerNet.
test-prep and cognitive learning development. CASA hosts late-night
In order to accomplish our mission, we provide a comprehensive array of
programs in the residence halls and Greek houses.
career services:
Academic Excellence Workshops (AEW): First-Year students are
Career, Planning, Advice, and Counseling
encouraged to attend our AEW workshops. These workshops run
concurrent to many of the first-year classes (Calc, Chem, Physics, etc.)
• “The Mines Strategy" a practical, user-friendly career manual with
and reiterate/strengthen material taught in class. They are offered in the
interview strategies, resume and cover letter examples, career
evening and are free to all students.
exploration ideas, and job search tips;
Faculty in CASA: Faculty from various departments host their regular
• Online resources for exploring careers and employers at http://
office hours in CASA. Students are encouraged to utilize these
careers.mines.edu;
professors for assistance with material and/or questions on course
• Individual resume and cover letter critiques;
planning.
• Individual job search advice;
Website: CASA maintains an extensive website with resources, helpful
• Practice video-taped interviews;
tips, and guides. Check out CASA at http://casa.mines.edu.
• Job Search Workshops - successful company research, interviewing,
resumes, business etiquette, networking skills;
Motor Vehicles Parking
• Salary and overall outcomes data;
All motor vehicles on campus must be registered with the campus
• Information on applying to grad school;
Parking Services Division of Facilities Management, 1318 Maple Street,
• Career resource library.
and must display a CSM parking permit. Vehicles must be registered at
the beginning of each semester or upon bringing your vehicle on campus,
Job Resources and Events
and updated whenever you change your address.
• Career Day (Fall and Spring);

10 Student Life
• Online and in-person job search assistance for internships, CO-OPs,
are open to all interested CSM students. For more information about
and full-time entry-level job postings;
services and eligibility requirements, contact the Student Development
• Virtual Career Fairs and special recruiting events;
and Academic Services office.
• On-campus interviewing - industry and government representatives
Activities
visit the campus to interview students and explain employment
opportunities;
Student Activities Office
• General employment board;
The Office of Student Activities coordinates the various activities and
• Employer searching resource;
student organizations on the Mines campus. Student government,
• Cooperative Education Program - available to students who have
professional societies, living groups, honor societies, interest groups
completed three semesters at Mines (two for transfer students). It is
and special events add a balance to the academic side of the CSM
an academic program which offers 3 semester hours of credit in the
community. Participants take part in management training, event
major for engineering work experience, awarded on the basis of a term
planning, and leadership development. To obtain an up-to-date listing of
paper written following the CO-OP term. The type of credit awarded
the recognized campus organizations or more information about any of
depends on the decision of the department, but in most cases is
these organizations, contact the Student Activities office.
additive credit. CO-OP terms usually extend from May to December,
Student Government
or from January to August, and usually take a student off cam- pus
full time. Students must apply for CO-OP before beginning the job (a
Associated Students of CSM (ASCSM) is sanctioned by the Board of
no credit, no fee class), and must write learning objectives and sign
Trustees of the School. The purpose of ASCSM is, in part, to advance the
formal contracts with their company’s representative to ensure the
interest and promote the welfare of CSM and all of the students and to
educational component of the work experience.
foster and maintain harmony among those connected with or interested in
the School, including students, alumni, faculty, trustees and friends.
Identification Cards (BLASTER CARD)
Through funds collected as student fees, ASCSM strives to ensure
Blaster Cards are made in the Student Activities Office in the Parker
a full social and academic life for all students with its organizations,
Student Center, and all new students must have a card made as soon
publications, and special events. As the representative governing body
as possible after they enroll. Each semester the Student Activities Office
of the students ASCSM provides leadership and a strong voice for the
issues RTD Bus Pass stickers for student ID’s. Students can replace lost,
student body, enforces policies enacted by the student body, works to
stolen, or damaged Blaster Cards for a small fee.
integrate the various campus organizations, and promotes the ideals and
traditions of the School.
The Blaster Card can be used as a debit card to make purchases at all
campus food service facilities, to check material out of the CSM Library,
The Graduate Student Association was formed in 1991 and
to make purchases at the campus residence halls, and may be required
is recognized by CSM through the student government as the
to attend various CSM campus activities.
representative voice of the graduate student body. GSA’s primary goal is
to improve the quality of graduate education and offer academic support
Please visit the website at http://www.is.mines.edu/BlasterCard for more
for graduate students.
information.
The Mines Activity Council (MAC) serves as the campus special
Student Publications
events board. The majority of all-student campus events are planned by
Two student publications are published at CSM by the Associated
MAC. Events planned by MAC include comedy shows to the campus on
Students of CSM. Opportunities abound for students wishing to
most Fridays throughout the academic year, events such as concerts,
participate on the staffs.
hypnotists, and one time specialty entertainment; discount tickets to
local sporting events, theater performances, and concerts, movie nights
The Oredigger is the student newspaper, published weekly during the
bringing blockbuster movies to the Mines campus; and E-Days and
school year. It contains news, features, sports, letters and editorials of
Homecoming.
interest to students, faculty, and the Golden community.
The literary magazine, High Grade, is published each semester.
Special Events
Contributions of poetry, short stories, drawings, and photographs
Engineers’ Days festivities are held each spring. The three day affair is
are encouraged from students, faculty and staff. A Board of Student
organized entirely by students. Contests are held in drilling, hand-spiking,
Publications acts in an advisory capacity to the publications staffs
mucking, and oil-field olympics to name a few. Additional events include
and makes recommendations on matters of policy. The Public Affairs
a huge fireworks display, the Ore-Cart Pull to the Colorado State Capitol,
Department staff members serve as daily advisors to the staffs of the
the awarding of scholarships to outstanding Colorado high school seniors
Oredigger and Prospector. The Division of Liberal Arts and International
and an Engineers’ Day concert.
Studies provides similar service to the High Grade.
Homecoming weekend is one of the high points of the entire year’s
Veterans Services
activities. Events include a football rally and game, campus decorations,
election of Homecoming queen and beast, parade, burro race, and other
The Registrar’s Office provides veterans services for students
contests.
attending the School and using educational benefits from the Veterans
Administration.
International Day is planned and conducted by the International Student
Council and the International Student and Scholar Services Office.
Tutoring
It includes exhibits and programs designed to further the cause of
Individual tutoring in most courses is available through the Office for
understanding among the countries of the world. The international dinner
Student Development and Academic Services. This office also sponsors
group tutoring sessions and Academic Excellence Workshops which

Colorado School of Mines 11
and entertainment have come to be one of the campus social events of
Recreational Organizations
the year.
The recreation organizations provide the opportunity for students with
Winter Carnival, sponsored by Blue Key, is an all-school ski day held
similar interests to participate as a group in these recreational activities.
each year at one of the nearby ski areas. In addition to skiing, there are
Most of the recreational organizations compete on both the local and
also fun competitions (snowman contest, sled races, etc.) throughout the
regional levels at tournaments throughout the year.
day.
Outdoor Recreation Program
Residence Hall Association (RHA)
The Outdoor Recreation Program is housed at the Mines Park
Residence Hall Association (RHA) is a student-run organization
Community Center. The Program teaches classes in outdoor
developed to coordinate and plan activities for students living in the
activities; rents mountain bikes, climbing gear, backpacking and other
Residence Halls. Its membership is represented by students from each
equipment; and sponsors day and weekend activities such as camping,
hall floor. Officers are elected each fall for that academic year. For more
snowshoeing, rock climbing, and mountaineering.
information, go to RHA (http://residence-life.mines.edu/RSL-Residence-
For a complete list of all currently registered student organizations,
Hall-Association).
please visit the Student Activities office or website at http://
Social Fraternities and Sororities
studentactivities.mines.edu/.
There are seven national fraternities and three national sororities
active on the CSM campus. Fraternities and Sororities offer the unique
International Student Services
opportunity of leadership, service to one’s community, and fellowship.
The International Students & Scholar Services Office (IS&SS) serves
Greeks are proud of the number of campus leaders, athletes and
approximately 600 international students and scholars at CSM.
scholars that come from their ranks. Additionally, the Greek social life
provides a complement to the scholastic programs at Mines. Colorado
IS&SS provides the following services:
School of Mines chapters are:
• Admission of undergraduate international students
• Alpha Phi
• Advise on immigration regulations by individual appointment and group
• Alpha Tau Omega
seminars
• Beta Theta Pi
• Prepare legal documents that allow international students to gain work
• Kappa Sigma
experience through a period of practical training
• Phi Gamma Delta
• Provide forms required by international students and their dependents
• Pi Beta Phi
to travel outside the U.S.
• Sigma Alpha Epsilon
• Process legal documents required for the admission of all international
students (including undergraduate, graduate, special, exchange, and
• Sigma Kappa
visiting scholars)
• Sigma Nu
• Organize orientation programs for entering international undergraduate
• Sigma Phi Epsilon
and graduate students
Honor Societies
IS&SS also sponsors events and programs to help students adjust to life
Honor societies recognize the outstanding achievements of their
in the U.S. and CSM, and provides counseling related to emergencies
members in the areas of scholarship, leadership, and service. Each of the
and unexpected immigration problems.
CSM honor societies recognizes different achievements in our students.
Multicultural Engineering
Special Interest Organizations
Special interest organizations meet the special and unique needs of the
Program
CSM student body by providing co-curricular activities in specific areas.
Multicultural Engineering Program
International Student Organizations
The Multicultural Engineering Program is located at 1400 Maple Street.
The International Student Organizations provide the opportunity to
The MEP meets the needs of minority students by providing various
experience a little piece of a different culture while here at Mines, in
student services, summer programs, recruitment, academic/retention
addition to assisting the students from that culture adjust to the Mines
programs (academic advising, academic excellence workshops,
campus.
counseling, tutoring and peer study groups), professional/career
Professional Societies
development (leadership workshops, career development, time
management, study skills and national conferences), community out-
Professional Societies are generally student chapters of the national
reach, and cultural and social activities.
professional societies. As a student chapter, the professional societies
Working through student professional societies-American Indian Science
offer a chance for additional professional development outside the
and Engineering Society (AISES), Society of Asian Scientists and
classroom through guest speakers, trips, and interactive discussions
Engineers (SASE), National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE), and
about the current activities in the profession. Additionally, many of the
Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE) - the Office of
organizations offer internship, fellowship and scholarship opportunities.
Minority Engineering Program is a center for minority student activities,
and a place for students to become a community of scholars with
common goals and objectives in a comfortable learning environment.

12 Student Life
American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) chapter
sponsors programs for women students and faculty and produces the
was established at the Colorado School of Mines in 1992. It is a peer
Chevron Lecture Series.
support group for Native American students pursuing science and
For further information, contact:
engineering careers. Its main goal is to help the students get through
college so they can then use those new skills to create a better life for
Debra K. Lasich, Executive Director of Women in Science, Engineering
themselves and other Native Americans.
and Mathematics
Colorado School of Mines
Society of Asian Scientists and Engineers (SASE) is a branch of the
1133 17th Street
Minority Engineering Program which acknowledges the Asian heritage
Golden, CO 80401-1869
by involvement in various school activities, social activities, and activities
or call (303) 273-3097
with the other Minority Engineering chapters. SASE allows students with
an Asian heritage or students interested in Asian heritage to assemble
and voice shared interests and associate in organized group activities
which include attending Nuggets games, bowling, ice skating and
numerous other activities.
National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) is a non-profit
organization managed by students. It was founded to promote the
recruitment, retention and successful graduation of Black and other
under-represented groups in the field of engineering. NSBE operates
through a university-based structure coordinated through regional zones,
and administered by the National Executive Board. The local chapters,
which are the center of NSBE activity, create and conduct projects in
the areas of pre-college student interaction, university academic support
mechanisms and career guidance programs. “We instill pride and add
value to our members which causes them to want to give back to NSBE
in order to produce a continuum of success.”
Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE) is a non-profit
organization that exists for the advancement of Hispanic engineering
(sciences) students to become professional engineers and scientists, to
increase the number of Hispanics entering into the field of engineering,
and to develop and implement programs benefiting Hispanics seeking to
become engineers and scientists. Anyone interested in joining may do so.
SHPE is a national organization with student and professional chapters
in nearly 100 cities across the country. The organization is divided into
five regions representing 76 student chapters. The SHPE organization is
governed by a National Board of Directors which includes representatives
from all regions including two student representatives.
Office of International Programs/
Study Abroad/International
Fellowships
The Office of International Programs (OIP), a program in Academic
Affairs located at 1706 Illinois Street, develops international opportunities
for students and faculty at CSM, including study abroad programs. OIP
is also responsible for advising students about internationally competitive
scholarships such as Fulbright, Marshall, Churchill, Rhodes and Mitchell.
For information about the international activities of OIP, see the website
at oip.mines.edu.
Office of Women in Science,
Engineering and Mathematics
(WISEM)
The WISEM office in Academic Affairs is located in 300 Guggenheim
Hall. The mission of WISEM is to enhance opportunities for women in
science and engineering careers, to increase retention of women at
CSM, and to promote equity and diversity in higher education. The office

Colorado School of Mines 13
Tuition, Fees, Financial
Room Type
Rate
Double Room
$5,470
Assistance, Housing & Dining
*
Includes Mines Park Parking Permit
Rates
Campus-Owned Fraternity & Sorority
Tuition and fees are established by the Board of Trustees of the Colorado
Houses
School of Mines following the annual budget process and action by the
Colorado General Assembly and Governor.
Fraternity/Sorority House
Rate
Undergraduate Tuition
Alpha Phi Sorority
$5,065 / academic year
FIJI Fraternity
$5,181 / academic year
The official tuition and approved charges for the 2011- 2012 academic
Pi Phi Sorority
$5,065 / academic year
year will be available prior to the start of the 2011-2012 academic year
Sigma Kappa Sorority
$5,065 / academic year
located at http://inside.mines.edu/UserFiles/File/finance/budget/FY12/
FY12-Tuition%20Schedule.pdf.
All CSM-owned Fraternity and
$73 / week
Sorority Houses--Summer
Fees
Meal Plans
The official fees, approved charges, and fee descriptions for
the 2011-2012 academic year will be available prior to the start
() indicates commuter meal plans available.
of the 2011-2012 academic year and can be found at: http://
Meal Plan
Rate
inside.mines.edu/UserFiles/File/finance/budget/FY12/FY12%20Fees
Marble (Gold): Unlimited meals
$2,316 per semester
%20and%20Charges.pdf.
in Slate Cafe + $100 Flex per
Please note that in all instances, the costs to collect fees are not
semester
reimbursed to the Student Receivables Office. The Colorado School of
Quartz (Blue): 14 meals/week +
$2,261 per semester
Mines does not automatically assess any optional fees or charges.
$200 Flex Dollars per semester
Housing & Dining Rates
Granite (Bronze): 160 meals/
$2,125 per semester
semester + $250 Flex per semester
NOTE: Room and board charges are established by the Board of
Topaz (Silver): 115 meals per
$1,907 per semester
Trustees (BOT) and are subject to change. Payment of room and board
semester + $300 Flex per semester
charges falls under the same guidelines as payment of tuition and fees.
Rates below are in effect for the 2012-2013 Academic Year. Included is
Agate (commuter only): 25 meal
$200 per block purchased
a "flexible" meal plan which guarantees students a designated number of
block
meals per week or per semester and gives them between $100.00 and
Summer Session Housing (Weekly Rate)
$300.00 to spend as they wish on additional meals or at any of the other
campus dining locations. For more information, go to Student Housing
Room Type
Rate
(http://inside.mines.edu/Student_Housing) or Campus Dining (http://
Double Room
$80
csmdiningservices.com).
Single Room
$125
Residence Halls (academic year rate)
Apartment Housing (monthly rate)
*Meal plans required. Room rates include $50 Residence Hall
Family Housing at Mines Park
Association fee.
# of Bedrooms
Rate
Morgan/Thomas/Bradford/Randall Halls
1 Bedroom
$817
Room Type
Rate
2 Bedroom
$896
Double Room
$4,720
Single Room
$5,870
Single Student Apartments at Mines Park
Weaver Towers
# of Bedrooms
Rate
1 Bedroom
$817
Room Type
Rate
2 Bedroom
$1,075
Double Room
$5,650
3 Bedroom
$1,470
Single Room
$6,430
"E" Room, Single
$6,980
Single Student Apartments at Jones Road
Maple Hall
# of Bedrooms
Rate
1 Bedroom
$695
Room Type
Rate
Double Room
$5,974
Single Room
$6,900
Residence Halls at Mines Park*

14 Tuition, Fees, Financial Assistance, Housing
*
Tenant pays gas and electric utilities. CSM provides free wireless
Late Payment Penalties
and wired internet, basic expanded cable, water, sewer, public
A penalty will be assessed against a student if payment is not received
electric, unlimited laundry, and Jones Road/ Mines Park parking
in full by the official day of registration. The penalty is described in the
permit. Tenant may pay $18.50 for landline phone (optional).
schedule of courses for each semester. If payment is not completed
Residence Hall Application
by the sixth week of class, the student may be officially withdrawn from
classes. Students will be responsible for all collection costs.
Information and application for residence hall space is included
in the packet offering admission to the student. Students desiring
Encumbrances
accommodations are requested to forward their inquiries at the earliest
A student will not be permitted to register for future classes, graduate,
possible date.
or secure an official transcript of his/her academic record while indebted
The submission of a room application does not in itself constitute
in any way to CSM. Students will be responsible for payment of all
a residence hall reservation. A residence hall contract will be sent
reasonable costs of collection.
electronically and made available on the Residence Life website, to
Refunds
be signed by the student and his or her parents and returned to the
Residence Life Office.
Refunds for tuition and fees are made according to the following policy:
Only upon receipt of the residence hall contract by the specified deadline
• The amount of tuition and fee assessments is based primarily on each
by the Residence Life Office will the student be assured of a room
student’s enrolled courses. In the event a student withdraws from a
reservation.
course or courses, assessments will be adjusted as follows:
• If the withdrawal is made prior to the end of the add/drop period for the
Rooms and roommates are assigned in accordance with student
term of enrollment, as determined by the Registrar, tuition and fees will
preference insofar as possible, with earlier applications receiving priority.
be adjusted to the new course level without penalty.
Advance Deposits
• If the withdrawal from a course or courses is made after the add/drop
An advance deposit made payable to Colorado School of Mines must
period, and the student does not officially withdraw from school, no
accompany each application received. This deposit will be refunded in full
adjustment in charges will be made.
(or in part if there are charges against the room) when the student leaves
• If the withdrawal from courses is made after the add/drop period, and
the residence hall.
the student withdraws from school, tuition and fee assessments will be
reduced according to the following schedule:
If a student wishes to cancel a residence hall reservation, half of the
deposit will be refunded if notice of the cancellation is received in writing
• Within the 7 calendar days following the end of the add/drop period, 60
by the Residence Life Office on or before May 1 of the current year.
percent reduction in charges.
• Within the next following 7 calendar days, a 40 percent reduction in
Contracts are issued for the full academic year and no cancellation will
charges.
be accepted after May 1, except for those who decide not to attend CSM.
• Within the next following 7 calendar days, a 20 percent reduction in
Those contracts separately issued only for entering students second
charges.
semester may be cancelled no later than December 1. After that date no
cancellation will be accepted except for those who decide not to attend
• After that period, no reduction of charges will be made.
CSM.
The schedule above applies to the Fall and Spring semesters. The time
Payments and Refunds
periods for the Summer sessions - Summer I and Summer II - will be
adjusted in proportion to the reduced number of days in these semesters.
Payment Information
Room and board refunds are pro-rated to the date of checkout from the
A student is expected to complete the registration process, including the
Residence Hall. Arrangements must be made with the Housing Office.
payment of tuition and fees, room and board, before attending class.
Student health insurance charges are not refundable. The insurance
Students can mail their payment to:
remains in effect for the entire semester.
Cashier
PLEASE NOTE: Students receiving federal financial aid under the Title IV
1600 Maple Street
programs may have a different refund determined as required by federal
Colorado School of Mines
law or regulations.
Golden, CO 80401-1887
State of Colorado Residency
Financial Responsibility
Qualifications
It is important for students to recognize their financial responsibilities
when registering for classes at the school. If students do not fulfill their
A student is classified as a resident or nonresident for tuition purposes at
financial obligations by published deadlines:
the time admission is granted and upon completion of the CSM Colorado
Residency for Tuition Classification Form. The classification is based
• Late payment penalties will accrue on any outstanding balance.
upon information furnished by the student. The student who, due to
• Transcripts will not be issued.
subsequent events, becomes eligible for resident tuition must make
• Past due accounts will be turned over to Colorado Central Collection
formal application to the Registrar for a change of status.
Services in accordance with Colorado law.
A student who willfully gives wrong information to evade payment of
• Collection costs will be added to a student’s account.
nonresident tuition shall be subject to serious disciplinary action. The final
• The student’s delinquency may be reported to national credit bureaus.
decision regarding tuition status rests with the Tuition Appeals Committee
of Colorado School of Mines.

Colorado School of Mines 15
Resident Students
the Registrar’s Office. The “Petition for In-State Tuition Classification” is
due in the Registrar’s Office by the first day of classes of the term the
A person whose legal residence is permanently established in Colorado
student is requesting resident status.
may continue to be classified as a resident student so long as such
residence is maintained even though circumstances may require
College Opportunity Fund
extended absences from the state.
The College Opportunity Fund provides State financial support to eligible
Qualification for resident tuition requires both
students for higher education. It was created by an Act of the Colorado
State Legislature and signed into law by Governor Owens in May 2004.
1. proof of adoption of the state as a fixed and permanent home,
demonstrating physical presence within the state at the time of such
What does it mean? In the past, the State gave money directly to the
adoption, together with the intention of making Colorado the true
colleges. Now, if you authorize use of the stipend for any given term,
home; and
the college you are attending will receive the funding, and you will see it
2. living within the state for 12 consecutive months immediately prior
appear as a credit on your tuition bill.
to the first day of classes for any given term.
Who is eligible? Undergraduate students who are eligible for in-state
These requirements must be met by one of the following:
tuition, and who apply for COF, are admitted to and enrolled in an eligible
institution of higher education, and who authorize the institution to collect
1. the father, mother, or guardian of the student if an unemancipated
the funds on their behalf. Once enrolled at the Colorado School of Mines,
minor, or
the student must authorize the School to collect these funds from the
2. the student if married or over 22, or
state on the student’s behalf. Once authorized, the School will continue
3. the emancipated minor.
to collect these funds on the student’s behalf unless and until the student
chooses to revoke the authorization.
The home of the unemancipated minor is assumed to be that of the
parents, or if there is a legal guardian of the student, that of such
How much is the stipend? It will vary. The amount will be determined
guardian. If the parents are separated or divorced and either separated
each year by the Colorado Legislature.
or divorced parent meet the Colorado residency requirements, the minor
For additional information please refer to:
also will be considered a resident. Statutes provide for continued resident
Colorado School of Mines website:
status, in certain cases, following parents’ moving from Colorado. Please
http://inside.mines.edu/College-Opportunity-Fund-Application-
check Colorado Revised Statutes 1973, 23-7-103(2)(m)(II) for exact
Authorization
provisions. In a case where a court has appointed a guardian or granted
custody, it shall be required that the court certify that the primary purpose
Colorado Department of Higher Education’s website:
of such appointment was not to qualify the minor for resident tuition
http://highered.colorado.gov/Finance/COF/default.html
status.
The College Opportunity Fund website:
Nonresident Students
https://cof.college-assist.org/COFApp/COFApp/Default.aspx
To become a resident of Colorado for tuition classification under state
Financial Aid and Scholarships
statutes, a student must be domiciled in Colorado for one year or more
immediately preceding the first day of class for the semester for which
Undergraduate Student Financial Assistance
such classification is sought. A person must be emancipated before
The role of the CSM Financial Assistance Program is to enable
domicile can be established separate from the domicile of the parents.
students to enroll and complete their educations, regardless of their
Emancipation for tuition purposes takes place automatically when a
financial circumstances. In fulfilling this role, the Office of Financial Aid
person turns 23 years of age or marries.
administered over $37 million in total assistance in 2010-2011, including
The establishment of domicile for tuition purposes has two inseparable
over $17.5 million in grants and scholarships. Additional information may
elements:
be found at the CSM financial aid web site, finaid.mines.edu.
1. a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and
Applying for Assistance
2. intent to remain in Colorado with no intent to be domiciled
The CSM Application for Admission serves as the application for CSM
elsewhere.
merit-based scholarships for new students (except for the Engineers’
Days Scholarship which is an essay contest run by a student government
The twelve-month waiting period does not begin until both elements
committee, and the Athletic and Military Science Departments
exist. Documentation of the following is part of the petitioning process
which have their own application procedures for their scholarships).
to document physical presence: copies of rental arrangements, rent
Continuing students may be recommended by their major department
receipts, copy of warranty deed if petitioner owns the personal residence
for scholarships designated for students from that department. To apply
property and verification of dates of employment. Documentation of the
for need-based CSM, federal and Colorado assistance, students should
following is part of the petitioning process to document intent: Colorado
complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid.
drivers license, motor vehicle registration (as governed by Colorado
Statute), voter registration, payment of Colorado state income taxes,
Once evaluated, a financial aid award notification will be sent to the
ownership of residential real estate property in the state (particularly if the
student. New students are sent a paper award letter beginning in early
petitioner resides in the home), any other factor peculiar to the individual
March. Continuing students are notified in mid May via their Mines email.
which tends to establish the necessary intent to make Colorado one’s
Types of Financial Assistance
permanent place of habitation.
Need-based assistance will typically include grants, part-time
Nonresident students wishing to obtain further information on the
employment, and student loans. Grants are provided by CSM, by
establishment of residency or to apply for resident status should contact

16 Tuition, Fees, Financial Assistance, Housing
the State of Colorado (Colorado State Grants), and by the federal
release the student’s information to scholarship providers for the purpose
government (Pell Grants and Supplemental Educational Opportunity
of assisting students in obtaining scholarships.
Grants).
Financial Aid Policies
Work Study funds also come from CSM, Colorado and the federal
government. Students work between 8 and 10 hours a week, and
General
typically earn between $500 to $1,500 to help pay for books, travel, and
CSM students requesting or receiving financial assistance sponsored
other personal expenses.
by the U.S. Government, the State of Colorado, or the Colorado School
Student Loans may be offered from two federal programs: the Perkins
of Mines are required to report to the CSM Financial Aid Office all
Student Loan, or the Federal Direct Student Loan.
financial assistance offered or received from all sources including CSM
immediately upon receipt or notification of such assistance. For the
Supplemental student loans may also be offered through private bank
purpose of this paragraph, “financial assistance” shall include, but not
loan programs.
be limited to, grants, scholarships, fellowships, or loans funded by public
The Alumni Association of CSM administers a loan program designed
or private sources, as well as all income not considered taxable income
to assist juniors and seniors who have exhausted their other sources
by the Internal Revenue Service. Upon receipt of this information, CSM
of funds. These are short term loans which require repayment within
shall evaluate, and may adjust any financial assistance provided to the
three years after graduation, and have been made available through the
student from CSM, Colorado, or federal funds. No student shall receive
contributions of CSM alumni.
financial assistance from CSM if such student’s total assistance from all
sources exceeds the total cost of the student’s education at CSM. For the
Merit-based assistance is offered to recognize students for their
purpose of this paragraph, the “total cost of education” shall be defined
achievements. Academic awards to new students are made on the basis
to include the cost of tuition, fees, books, room and board, transportation,
of their high school records and SAT or ACT composite test scores.
and personal expenses.
Continuing students can receive departmental scholarships based on
their academic performance at CSM, particularly in their major field of
Funds for the Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational
study, and on financial need.
Opportunity Grant, Federal College Work-Study Program, Federal
Perkins Loan, Federal Direct Stafford Loan, and Federal Direct PLUS
Alumni Association Grants are awarded to students who are children of
Loans are provided in whole or part by appropriations of the United
alumni who have been active in the CSM Alumni Association for the two
States Congress. The Colorado General Assembly provides funds for the
years prior to the student’s enrollment. The one-year grants carry a value
Colorado Grant and Colorado Work-Study programs. These programs
of $1,000. The students may also receive a senior award, based on their
are all subject to renewed funding each year.
academic scholarship, and the availability of funds.
Satisfactory Academic Progress
Engineers’ Day Scholarships are available to Colorado residents.
Based on high school records, an essay, and other information, a CSM
CSM students receiving scholarships must make satisfactory academic
Student Government committee selects students for these four-year
progress as specified in the rules and regulations for each individual
awards.
scholarship.
Athletic scholarships may be awarded to promising student-athletes in
Students receiving assistance from federal, Colorado or need-based
seventeen men’s and women’s sports. The scholarships are renewable
CSM funds must make satisfactory academic progress toward their
for up to three years, based on the recommendation of the Athletics
degree. Satisfactory progress is defined by maintaining adequate pace
Department.
towards graduation and maintaining a 2.0 cumulative GPA at all times.
Pace is measured by dividing the overall credit hours attempted by the
Army ROTC scholarships are available from CSM and the U.S. Army
overall credit hours completed. Students will be required to maintain a
for outstanding young men and women who are interested in a military
75% completion rate at all times. Satisfactory standing is determined
career. The one, two, three, and four-year scholarships can provide up to
after each semester, including summer. If students are deficient in either
full tuition and fees, a book allowance, and a monthly stipend for personal
the pace or grade average measure, they will receive a one semester
expenses. The CSM Military Science Department assists students in
warning period during which they must return to satisfactory standing.
applying for these scholarships.
If this is not done, their eligibility will be terminated until such time as they
U.S. Navy Scholarships through the Civil Engineering Program, Nuclear
return to satisfactory standing. In addition, if students totally withdraw
Power Officer Program, and Baccalaureate Degree Completion Program
from CSM, or receive grades of F or INC in all of their courses, their
are also available to CSM students. The local Navy Recruiting District
future financial aid eligibility will be terminated without a warning period.
Office provides information about these scholarships.
Financial aid eligibility termination may be appealed to the Financial
U.S. Air Force ROTC Scholarships are available from CSM and the
Aid Office on the basis of extenuating or special circumstances having
U.S. Air Force. The three and four year scholarships can provide up to
negatively affected the student’s academic performance. If approved,
full tuition, fees, a book allowance, and a stipend. Further information is
the student will receive a probationary period of one semester to regain
available through the Department of Aerospace Studies at the University
satisfactory standing.
of Colorado Boulder (the official home base for the CSM detachment).
Study Abroad
In addition to scholarships through CSM, many students receive
Students wishing to pursue study abroad opportunities should contact
scholarships from their hometown civic, religious or other organizations.
the Office of International Programs (OIP), listed under the Services
All students are urged to contact organizations with which they or their
section of this Bulletin, p.190. Colorado School of Mines encourages
parents are affiliated to investigate such scholarships. The Financial Aid
students to include an international study/work experience in their
Office reserves the right, unless otherwise instructed by the student, to
undergraduate education. CSM maintains student exchange programs
with engineering universities in South America, Europe, Australia, Africa,

Colorado School of Mines 17
and Asia. Courses successfully passed abroad can be substituted for
their equivalent course at CSM. Overall GPA is not affected by courses
taken abroad. A well-planned study abroad program will not delay
graduation. In addition, study abroad can be arranged on an individual
basis at universities throughout the world.
Financial aid and selected scholarships and grants can be used to
finance approved study abroad programs. The OIP has developed a
resource center for study abroad information in its office, 1706 Illinois St.,
phone 303-384-2121. Students are invited to use the resource materials
and meet with staff to discuss overseas study opportunities.
Withdrawals
We understand that unexpected events occur in life that will cause a
student to withdraw from classes at Colorado School of Mines. Federal
regulation requires financial aid to be awarded under the assumption
that a student will attend the institution for the entire period in which
federal assistance was disbursed. The following policies will help you
to understand the impact a withdrawal may have if you are receiving
financial aid. The tuition and fees refund policy set by CSM is separate
from the return calculation required by federal regulation.
An official withdrawal will be recorded once the withdrawal process
has been completed by the student. Students who withdraw from the
University should come to the financial aid office before completing
the withdrawal process to determine what effect this will have on their
financial aid. A withdrawal requires the financial aid office to determine
how much of the federal, state and institutional financial aid the student
has earned. Financial aid is not considered earned until the 60% point
of the semester. The unearned portion will be returned to the program
from which it came (i.e. student loans to the lender, Pell to the federal
department of education, etc). Students need to be aware that they
may owe Colorado School of Mines for unearned federal, state and/or
institutional aid even if they are receiving a refund in tuition and fees.
Federal regulations consider a student to be an unofficial withdrawal
if the student receives all failing grades for the term. If the student has
not completely withdrawn and has failed to earn a passing grade in at
least one class for the term, CSM is required to determine whether the
student established eligibility for financial aid by attending at least one
class or participating in any CSM academic-related activity. An unofficial
withdrawal calculation will be performed and funds returned to their
respective federal, state and/or institutional aid programs if there is not
documentation supporting the student’s last day of attendance, or the
documentation indicates the student stopped attending prior to the 60%
point of the semester.

18 Housing & Dining
Housing & Dining
Spring Break). For more information and hours, go to the Campus Dining
website (http://inside.mines.edu/CampusDining).
http://inside.mines.edu/Student_Housing
For all Housing & Dining rates, go to Tuition, Fees, Financial
Residence Halls (http://inside.mines.edu/
Assistance, Housing (https://nextbulletin.mines.edu/undergraduate/
tuitionfeesfinancialassistancehousing)
Residence-Life)
Apartment Housing (http://
Residence hall living is an integral part of the Colorado School of Mines
inside.mines.edu/Apartments-at-Mines-
experience, although no students are required to live on campus. The
“Traditional” residence halls (Morgan, Thomas, Bradford and Randall
Park)*
halls) house about 380 students in mostly double rooms with a central
The Mines Park apartment complex is located west of the 6th Avenue
restroom/shower facility on each floor. Weaver Towers has living space
and 19th Street intersection on 55 acres owned by Mines. The complex
for 230 students in suites with single and double rooms, a common
houses upperclass undergraduate students, graduate students, and
living area, and two single restroom/shower facilities. There are a limited
families. Jones Road apartments are located on Jones Road, south of
number of single rooms available. Weaver Towers features seven or
19th St. and consists of one-bedroom apartments for single students.
eight person suites with each suite containing both single and double
Residents must be full-time students.
bedrooms, a living/study room and two bathrooms. Maple Hall is our 290-
bed facility that houses 2- and 4-person suites, with single and double
Units are complete with refrigerators, stoves, dishwashers, cable
bedrooms and a private bathroom in each suite. Five social lounges, nine
television, wired and wireless internet connections, and an optional
study rooms, community kitchen and activity room, central living room
campus phone line for an additional fee. There are two community
with fireplace, music practice room, student storage and workshop space,
centers which contain the laundry facilities, recreational and study
laundry facilities, vending, mailroom, and desk assistant services are
space, and meeting rooms. For more information or to apply for
available to all residents of Maple Hall.
apartment housing , go to the Apartment Housing website (http://
studentlife.mines.edu/Apartments-at-Mines-Park).
The residence halls at Mines Park offer residence hall living in an
apartment setting for freshmen and upper-class students. In addition to
For all Housing & Dining rates, go to Tuition, Fees, Financial
having all the amenities of the other residence halls, each apartment has
Assistance, Housing (https://nextbulletin.mines.edu/undergraduate/
a full kitchen. Each residence hall complex houses mailboxes, lounge
tuitionfeesfinancialassistancehousing)
areas, TV room, and washers and dryers. All residence hall spaces are
Fraternities, Sororities
equipped with a bed, desk, waste basket, and closet for each student,
as well as wired and wireless internet connections. Cable TV connection
Any non-freshman student who is a member of one of the national Greek
with “expanded basic” service is included. The student is responsible for
organizations on campus is eligible to live in Fraternity or Sorority housing
damage to the room or furnishings. Colorado School of Mines assumes
after their freshman year. Several of the Greek Houses are owned and
no responsibility for loss or theft of personal belongings, and residents
operated by the School, while the remaining houses are owned and
are encouraged to carry personal property insurance.
operated by the organizations. All full time, undergraduate students are
eligible to join these organizations. For information, go to Greek Life
Additionally, Residence Life offers students an option to live and learn
(http://studentactivities.mines.edu/greeklife).
within a theme community that is a partnership between Residence Life,
administrative departments, and faculty across campus. Theme Housing
For all Housing & Dining rates, go to Tuition, Fees, Financial
consists of intentionally designed living experiences centered around a
Assistance, Housing (https://nextbulletin.mines.edu/undergraduate/
variety of educational, cultural, organizational, and personal interests.
tuitionfeesfinancialassistancehousing)
These communities allow students with common interests and pursuits
Off-Campus Housing
to live together and support each other through planned activities and
informal interactions. Communities include Outdoor Recreation, Women
Click here for Off-Campus Housing Resources (http://
In Engineering, Visual and Performing Arts, and Service & Social Justice.
studentlife.mines.edu/Off-Campus-Housing-Resources).
Theme Housing Webpage (http://inside.mines.edu/RSL-Theme-Housing)
For all Housing & Dining rates, go to Tuition, Fees, Financial
Assistance, Housing (https://nextbulletin.mines.edu/undergraduate/
tuitionfeesfinancialassistancehousing)
Campus Dining (http://inside.mines.edu/CampusDining)
Campus Dining at Mines operates a dining hall, known as the Slate Café,
in the Ben H. Parker Student Center. Students who live in the residence
halls are required to purchase a residential meal plan. Breakfast, lunch
and dinner are served Monday through Friday, and brunch and dinner
are served on Saturday and Sunday. Additional retail dining facilities,
including the Diggers Den Food Court in the Student Center, Subway in
the Student Recreation Center, Starbucks in Brown Hall, and Einstein
Bros. Bagels in CTLM, serve students with meal plans and/or by cash/
credit sales. Students not living in a residence hall may purchase any one
of several meal plans which best meets their individual needs. Campus
Dining options are limited during breaks (Thanksgiving, Fall, Winter and

Colorado School of Mines 19
Undergraduate Information
Academic Elective
2.0
Laboratory Science
3.0
Undergraduate Bulletin
Foreign Language
1.0
It is the responsibility of the student to become informed and to observe
Total Hours
17.0
all regulations and procedures required by the program the student is
One unit of laboratory science must be either chemistry or physics.
pursuing. Ignorance of a rule does not constitute a basis for waiving
The second and third units may be chemistry, physics, biology,
that rule. The Undergraduate Bulletin, current at the time of the
zoology, botany, geology, etc. with laboratory. Both physics and
student’s most recent admission, gives the academic requirements the
chemistry are recommended for two of the three required units.
student must meet to graduate. However, a student can change to the
General Science is not acceptable as a science unit, however it is
requirements in a later Bulletin published while the student is enrolled as
acceptable as an academic elective unit.
an undergraduate. Changes to administrative policies and procedures
4. The 2 units of academic electives (social studies, mathematics,
become effective for all students as soon as the campus community
English, science, or foreign language) must be acceptable to the
is notified of the changes. The Undergraduate Bulletin is available to
applicant’s high school to meet graduation requirements. For
students in electronic format. Electronic versions of the Undergraduate
applicants submitting GED Equivalency Diplomas, these units may
Bulletin may be updated more frequently to reflect changes approved
be completed by the GED test.
by, and communicated to, the campus community. As such, students are
5. Applicants from the United States and Canada are required to
encouraged to refer to the most recently available electronic version of
submit the scores of either the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) of
the Undergraduate Bulletin. This version is available at the CSM website.
the College Entrance Examination Board or the American College
The electronic version of the Undergraduate Bulletin is considered the
Test (ACT) battery. Applications for either the SAT or ACT may be
official version of this document. In case of disagreement between the
obtained from the high school counselors, or by writing to:
electronic and print versions (if available), the electronic version will take
precedence.
Educational Testing Service
P.O. Box 592
Admission Requirements
Princeton, NJ 08541 for the SAT
Colorado School of Mines admits students who have demonstrated the
or to the: American College Testing Program
ability to accomplish classroom and laboratory work and benefit from our
P.O. Box 168
programs. The decision to admit a student is based on his or her ability to
Iowa City, IA 52243 for the ACT
earn a degree at CSM. Criteria considered in evaluating students include:
You may also register online at www.collegeboard.com
1. pattern of course work in high school or college,
(bulletin.mines.edu/undergraduate/undergraduateinformation/
2. grades earned in those courses,
http://www.collegeboard.com) (SAT) and www.act.org
3. ACT or SAT test scores,
(bulletin.mines.edu/undergraduate/undergraduateinformation/http://
4. rank in class, and
www.act.org) (ACT).
5. other available test scores.
Transfer Students
No single criterion for admission is used; however, the most important
An applicant to CSM is considered to be a transfer student if he or she
factor is the academic record in high school or college.
has enrolled in coursework at another college after graduating from high
The admission requirements below are minimum requirements which
school. The minimum admissions requirements for all transfer students
may change after a catalog has been finalized. The Board of Trustees,
are as follows:
CSM governing board, reserves the right to deviate from published
1. Students transferring from another college or university must have
admission requirements. In such cases, changes in admission policy
completed the same high school course requirements as entering
would be widely publicized.
freshmen. A transcript of the applicant’s high school record is
Freshmen
required. ACT or SAT test scores are not required if the student has
completed a minimum of 30 credit hours of college credit.
The minimum admission requirements for all high school graduates who
2. Applicants must present official college transcripts from all colleges
have not attended a college or university are as follows:
attended. Applicants should have an overall 2.75 grade point
1. An applicant must be a graduate of an accredited high school.
average or better. Students presenting a lower GPA will be given
2. An applicant should rank in the upper quartile of their graduating
careful consideration and acted on individually.
class. Consideration will be given to applicants below this level
3. An applicant who cannot re-enroll at the institution from which he or
on evidence of strong motivation, superior test scores, and
she wishes to transfer because of scholastic record or other reason
recommendation from principal or counselor.
will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.
3. The following 17 units of secondary school work must be completed
4. Completed or "in progress" college courses - which meet CSM
upon graduation from high school:
graduation requirements - are eligible for transfer credit if the course
Algebra
2.0
is not remedial or vocational, and the grade earned is a "C" or
Geometry
1.0
better.
Advanced Mathematics (including Trigonometry)
1.0
Former Students
English
4.0
The minimum admission requirements for those students who have
History or Social Studies
3.0
previously attended CSM are as follows:

20 Undergraduate Information
1. Any student who has attended another college or university since
4. Transferable credit from an accredited US institution of higher
last enrolling at CSM must re-apply for admission through the
education equivalent to 30 credits or more.
Admissions Office.
The above English Proficiency requirement applies to students currently
2. Any student who did not complete the semester immediately
studying in the United States and for students outside the country.
preceding the beginning of the period for which he or she wishes to
enroll must be re-admitted to CSM by the Admissions Office.
Advanced Credit for International Evaluation
3. A former student, returning after a period of suspension, must
The following methods are used by Colorado School of Mines to validate
apply for admission to the Admissions Office and must furnish
the awarding of advanced standing credit for international students who
an approval for such re-enrollment from the Readmissions
have completed work in their home countries at the postsecondary level:
Committee of Colorado School of Mines. Appropriate forms to
apply for admission may be obtained from the Admissions Office.
1. Credit is granted based upon recommendation by recognized
Official transcripts for all coursework completed while away from
academic publications, primarily the World Education Series of
Mines must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office for review of
American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions
transferability of the credit.
Officers.
2. Validation by a comparable credit-granting department at Colorado
Exchange Students
School of Mines. Validation by one of the following two options will
be at the discretion of the credit-granting department.
All students participating in the CSM Exchange Program (coming to CSM
A. Option A: Course-by-course evaluation examination by
and CSM students going abroad) must be enrolled in a minimum of 15
comparable Colorado School of Mines academic department.
semester credit hours at CSM or the foreign exchange university.
B. Option B: The advisor and/or academic dean’s office makes
International Students
a preliminary evaluation of the level a student has completed
For purposes of admission, international applicants are students in a non-
and begins the student at that level. Upon successful
immigrant status who are not U.S. citizens or do not have approved and
completion of that course, all related lower-level courses in
finalized U.S. permanent residence, refugee status or political asylum.
that area, as determined by the department granting credit,
International students usually need an F1 or J1 visa to study in the United
would be validated and credit awarded.
States.
Generally, international applicants seeking admission to Colorado School
Enrollment Requirements
of Mines must meet the same academic standards for admission as those
All new students whose primary language is not English must
required of American applicants. There are wide variations, however,
demonstrate English Language proficiency before enrolling for the first
between educational systems throughout the world that make exact
time at the university. This requirement applies to international and non-
comparisons of educational standards difficult. International applicants
international, permanent residents, immigrants, transfer and non-transfer
are selected on the basis of their prior academic work, probability of
students alike.
success in the chosen curriculum (as evidenced by prior work in the
academic area involved) and proof of English proficiency. After admission
Fraudulent Applications
but prior to enrollment, certification of adequate financial resources is
Individuals who withhold or provide fraudulent information on applications
required.
for undergraduate admissions or readmissions are subject to immediate
dismissal from the university. The decision for immediate dismissal will
International applicants must submit a completed international application
be made by the Director of Enrollment Management or the Director of
form; a $45 nonrefundable international document processing fee;
International Admissions. This decision will be made after a complete
translated secondary schooling records, and/or a credentials evaluation
and thorough review of the situation and an individual conference with
report; notarized affidavit of financial sponsorship; and when applicable,
the student involved. The individual dismissed has the right to appeal
translated college transcripts.
the decision to the committee on academic policy and procedure, whose
TOEFL/English Proficiency
decision will be final.
Student applicants whose primarily language is not English, must prove
Nondegree Students
proficiency in the English language by achieving one of the following:
A nondegree student is one who has not applied to pursue a degree
1. A TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 550 on
program at CSM but wishes to take courses regularly offered on campus.
the paper-based test, or a score of 79 on the internet Based TOEFL
Such students may take any course for which they have the prerequisites
(iBT).
as listed in the CSM Bulletin or have the permission of the instructor.
Subject
Internet TOEFL
Paper TOEFL (PBT)
Transcripts or evidence of the prerequisites are required. An applicant
(iBT)
for admission to the undergraduate school who does not meet admission
Reading
20
54
requirements may not fulfill deficiencies through this means. Exception to
Writing
17
55
this rule can be made only by the Director of Enrollment Management. A
maximum of 12 hours of nondegree credit from Colorado School of Mines
Listening
21
55
may be used toward an undergraduate degree program.
Speaking
21
N/A
Total
79
550
2. An IELTS (International English Language Testing System) Score
of 6.5, with no band below a 6.0.
3. A PTE A (Pearson Test of English) score of 70 or higher.

Colorado School of Mines 21
Admission Procedures
then notify the student of his or her admission status. Admission is
subject to satisfactory completion of current courses in progress and
All Applicants
submission of a final transcript.
Documents received by CSM in connection with applications for
Advanced Placement and International
admission or transfer of credit will not be duplicated, returned to the
Baccalaureate
applicant, or forwarded to any agency or any other institution.
Course work completed for select subjects under the Advanced
A $45.00 non-refundable application fee is required from all applicants.
Placement Program in a high school may be accepted for college credit
Applications for undergraduate study cannot be accepted later than
provided that the Advanced Placement Program Test grade is either 5
21 days prior to the date of registration confirmation for any academic
(highest honors) or 4 (honors).
semester or summer session. Admission for any semester or term may
In special cases, advanced placement may be granted for course work
close whenever CSM’s budgeted number of students has been met.
not completed under the College Entrance Examination Board Program.
High School Students
Students wishing such credit may demonstrate competence by writing
the Advanced Placement Examination on the subject. Information can be
Applicants are encouraged to apply online at www.mines.edu. Questions
secured from:
can be directed to the Admissions Office via email: admit@mines.edu.; or
the College Entrance Examination Board
via postal mail:
P.O. Box 592
Admissions Office
Princeton, NJ 08541
Colorado School of Mines
More information on which subjects are accepted can be found on the
1600 Maple Street
web at www.mines.edu.
Golden, CO 80401
Course work completed for select subjects under the International
A student may apply for admission any time after completing the 11th
Baccalaureate Program in high school may be accepted for college credit
grade. The application will be evaluated upon receipt of the completed
provided that the International Baccalaureate Program Exam grade
application form, a high school transcript showing courses completed,
is a 5, 6, or 7 on selected standard and higher level exams. In some
courses remaining to be completed, ranking in class, other pertinent data,
cases, departmental approval is required before credit is granted. More
and SAT or ACT test scores. High school seniors are encouraged to
information on which subjects are accepted can be found on the web at
apply in the fall term of senior year. Additionally, it is recommended that
www.mines.edu.
the ACT and/or SAT be taken during this term. In some cases, the grades
or marks received in courses taken during the first half of the senior year
Declaration of Option (Major)
may be required. Applicants who meet freshman admission requirements
The curriculum during the first semester at CSM is generally the same
are admitted subject to completion of all entrance requirements and high
across majors. Students are not required to choose a major before the
school graduation.
end of the freshman year. All students must have declared a major by the
Transfer Students
beginning of the junior year.
Guaranteed Transfer
Medical Record
Colorado School of Mines is a signatory to the Colorado Statewide
A health history prepared by the student, a medical examination
Engineering Articulation Agreement, which can be viewed at
performed by the student’s physician and an updated immunization
www.state.co.us/cche (http://www.state.co.us/cche). Beginning with
record completed by the student and the physician, nurse or health
admissions in 2003–2004, this agreement determines transferability
authority comprise the medical record. A medical record is required for
of coursework for engineering students in the State of Colorado.
full time students entering CSM for the first time, or following an absence
All students transferring into CSM under the terms of the statewide
of more than 12 calendar months.
agreement are strongly encouraged to be advised by the CSM
The medical record will be sent to the student after acceptance for
Admissions Office on their planned course of study. Credits earned more
admission. The medical record must be updated and completed and
than 10 years prior will not transfer.
then returned to the Student Health Center before permission to
Additionally, Colorado School of Mines has formal transfer agreements
enroll is granted. Proof of immunity consists of an official Certificate
with Red Rocks Community College (RRCC), Front Range Community
of Immunization signed by a physician, nurse, or public health official
College (FRCC), Community College of Denver (CCD), and Community
which documents measles, mumps and rubella immunity. The Certificate
College of Aurora (CCA). Students are encouraged to contact the
must specify the type of vaccine and the dates (month, day, year) of
Admissions Office at these institutions for additional information.
administration or written evidence of laboratory tests showing immunity to
Transfer by Review
measles, mumps and rubella.
The completed medical record is confidential and will be kept in the
Undergraduate students at another college or university who wish to
Student Health Center. The record will not be released unless the student
transfer to CSM should apply online at www.mines.edu.
signs a written release.
A transfer student should apply for admission at the beginning of the final
two quarters or semester of attendance at his or her present college. The
Veterans
application will be evaluated upon receipt of the completed application
Colorado School of Mines is approved by the Colorado State Approving
form, high school transcript, transcripts from each university or college
Agency for Veteran Benefits under chapters 30, 31, 32, 33, 35, 1606, and
attended, and a list of courses in progress. The Admissions Office will
1607. Undergraduates must register for and maintain 12 credit hours,

22 Undergraduate Information
and graduate students must register for and maintain 9 credit hours
periodically by the Office of the Executive Vice President for Academic
of graduate work in any semester to be certified as a full-time student
Affairs (EVPAA).
for full-time benefits. Any hours taken under the full-time category will
Returning Students
decrease the benefits to 3/4 time, 1/2 time, or tuition payment only.
Students who have matriculated at CSM, withdrawn, applied for
All changes in hours, program, addresses, marital status, or dependents
readmission and wish to transfer in credit taken at an institution while
are to be reported to the Veterans Certifying Officer as soon as possible
they were absent from CSM, must obtain approval, upon return, of the
so that overpayment or under payment may be avoided. Veterans must
department head of the appropriate course, the department head of the
see the Veteran’s Certifying Officer each semester to be certified for any
student’s option, and the Registrar.
benefits for which they may be eligible. In order for veterans to continue
to receive benefits, they must make satisfactory progress as defined by
In all cases, requests for transfer credit are processed by the Registrar.
Colorado School of Mines.
Credits must be submitted on an official transcript from a regionally
accredited institution and be academic in nature. Vocational credit is not
An honorably or generally discharged military veteran providing a copy of
accepted. Only courses completed with grades of "C" or better will be
his/her DD214 is awarded two credit hours to meet the physical education
accepted.
requirement at CSM. Additionally, veterans may request substitution of a
technical elective for the institution’s core EPICS course requirement.
Course Withdrawals, Additions and Drops
Academic Regulations
Courses may be added or dropped without fee or penalty during the first
11 school days of a regular academic term (first 4 school days of a 6-
Deficiencies
week field course or the first 6 school days of the 8-week summer term).
The curricula at Colorado School of Mines have been especially designed
Continuing students may withdraw from any course after the eleventh
so that the course work flows naturally from course to course and year to
day of classes through the twelfth week for any reason with a grade of
year. Thus, it is important that deficiencies in lower numbered courses be
W. After the twelfth week, no withdrawals are permitted except in cases
scheduled in preference to more advanced work.
of withdrawal from school or for extenuating circumstances under the
auspices of the Office of Academic Affairs and the Office of the Registrar.
Prerequisites
A grade of F will be given in courses which are withdrawn from after the
It is the responsibility of each student to make certain that the proper
deadline without approval.
prerequisites for all courses have been met. Registration in a course
Freshmen and transfer students in their first and second semesters are
without the necessary prerequisite may result in dismissal from the class
permitted to withdraw from courses with no grade penalty through the
or a grade of F (Failed) in the course.
Friday prior to the last week of classes.
Remediation
All adds/drops are initiated in the Registrar’s Office. To withdraw from
a course (with a “W”) a student must obtain the appropriate form from
The Colorado Department of Higher Education specifies a remedial
the Registrar’s office, have it initialed by the instructor and signed by the
programs policy in which any first-time freshmen admitted to public
student’s advisor to indicate acknowledgment of the student’s action, and
institutions of higher education in Colorado with ACT (or equivalent)
return it to the Registrar’s Office by close of business on the last day that
scores of less than 18 in reading or English, or less than 19 in
a withdrawal is authorized. Acknowledgment (by initials) by the division/
mathematics, are required to participate in remedial studies. At the
department is required in only 2 cases:
Colorado School of Mines, these remedial studies will be conducted
through required tutoring in Nature and Human Values for reading and
1. when a course is added after the 11th day of the semester and
writing, and Calculus for Scientists and Engineers I for mathematics, and
2. when the Registrar has approved, for extenuating circumstances, a
the consequent achievement of a grade of C or better.
withdrawal after the last date specified (a “late withdrawal”).
Transfer Credit
Approval of a late withdrawal can be given by the Registrar acting on
New Transfer Students
behalf of the Office of Academic Affairs in accordance with CSM’s refund
policy, and in compliance with federal regulations.
Upon matriculation, a transfer student will receive the prescribed
A $5.00 fee will be charged for any change in class schedule after the
academic credit for courses taken at another institution if these courses
first 11 days of class, except in cases beyond the student’s control or
are listed in a current articulation agreement and transfer guide between
withdrawal from school. All adds/drops are initiated in the Registrar’s
CSM and that institution. Credits earned more than 10 years in advance
Office.
of admission will not transfer. When an articulation agreement does not
exist with another institution, the transfer student may receive credit for a
Independent Study
course taken at another institution, subject to review by the appropriate
CSM department head or designate to ensure course equivalency.
For each semester credit hour awarded for independent study a student
is expected to invest approximately 25 hours of effort in the educational
Continuing Students
activity involved. To register for independent study, a student should get
Students who are currently enrolled at CSM may transfer credit in
from the Registrar’s Office the form provided for that purpose, have it
required courses only in extenuating circumstances, upon the advance
completed by the instructor involved and the appropriate department/
approval of the Registrar, the department head of the appropriate course,
division head, and return it to the Registrar’s Office.
and the department head of the student’s option. Upon return, credit
Off-Campus Study
will be received subject to review by the Registrar. Physics courses are
subject to post-approval from the department. Forms for this purpose
A student must enroll in an official CSM course for any period of off-
are available in the Registrar’s Office, and the process is reviewed
campus, course-related study, whether U.S. or foreign, including faculty-

Colorado School of Mines 23
led short courses, study abroad, or any off-campus trip sponsored by
Personal Reason Absences:
CSM or led by a CSM faculty member. The registration must occur in
The Associate Dean of Students may authorize excused absences upon
the same term that the off-campus study takes place. In addition, the
receipt of proper documentation of the illness, injury, or other incident.
student must complete the necessary release, waiver, and emergency
The student must provide the documentation to the Associate Dean of
contact forms, transfer credit pre-approvals, and FERPA release, and
Students within one week of returning to class. Once documentation
provide adequate proof of current health insurance prior to departure. For
has been received and approved, the Associate Dean of Students will
additional information concerning study abroad requirements, contact the
send notice of excused absences to faculty members. The student
Office of International Programs at (303) 384-2121; for other information,
is responsible for contacting his/her faculty member(s) to initiate
contact the Registrar’s Office.
arrangements for making up any missed work.
Absenteeism
Important Note: Every effort will be made by the faculty to honor
Class attendance is required of all undergraduates unless the student
all excused absences. However, class attendance is essential for
has an official excused absence. Excused absences are granted for three
understanding of the material and for learning to take place. Excessive
general reasons:
absence, regardless of reason, may result in a reduced or failing grade in
the course based on course content and delivery. As content and delivery
1. Student is a varsity athlete and is representing the School in a
differ among the faculty and with each class, it is important for a student
varsity athletics activity.
missing class to discuss the absences, excused or unexcused, with his/
2. Student is representing the School in an authorized activity related
her faculty member(s) to determine what will be considered excessive.
to a club or academic endeavor (academic competitions, student
professional society conferences, club sport competition, program-
Unexcused Absences:
sponsored competitions, etc.)
All absences that are not documented as excused absences are
3. Student has a documented personal reason (illness, injury, jury
considered unexcused absences. Faculty members may deny a student
duty, life-threatening illness or death in the immediate family, etc.).
the opportunity to make up some or all of the work missed due to
unexcused absence(s). However, the faculty members do have the
Students who miss academic work (including but not limited to exams,
discretion to grant a student permission to make up any missed academic
homework, and labs) for one of the reasons listed above may be
work for an unexcused absence. The faculty member may consider the
issued an excused absence. If an excused absence is received, the
student’s class performance, as well as their attendance, in the decision.
student must be given the opportunity to make up the missed work in
a reasonable period of time without penalty. While the student is not
Withdrawal from School
responsible for actually issuing the excused absence, the student is
responsible for making sure documentation is submitted appropriately
A student may officially withdraw from CSM by processing a Withdrawal
and for contacting his/her faculty member(s) to initiate arrangements for
from School form available from the Registrar’s Office. Completion of the
making up any missed work.
form prior to the last day of scheduled classes for that term will result in
W’s being assigned to courses in progress. Failure to officially withdraw
Varsity Athletics Absences:
will result in the grades of courses in progress being recorded as F’s.
Leaving the School without having paid tuition and fees will result in a
The Athletics Department will authorize excused absences for all
hold being placed against the transcript. Either of these actions would
approved varsity athletics related absences. The Athletics Department
make future enrollment at CSM or another college more difficult.
will send notice of excused absences to faculty members on or before
Census Day each semester. The student is responsible for contacting
his/her faculty member(s) prior to the absence occurring to initiate
arrangements for making up any missed work. The Faculty Oversight
Committee on Sports and Athletics oversees the number of excused
absences permitted per semester by varsity athletes.
Authorized Activity Absences:
The Associate Dean of Students may authorize excused absences upon
receipt of proper documentation of the school related activity. All excused
absences for school-sponsored activities must be documented with the
Associate Dean of Students by Census Day of each semester. If the
absence will occur prior to Census Day, then the documentation should
be received at least two weeks prior to the absence. Once documentation
has been received and approved, the Associate Dean of Students will
send notice of excused absences to faculty members. The student is
responsible for contacting his/her faculty member(s) prior to the absence
occurring to initiate arrangements for making up any missed work.
Requests for excused absence(s) related to an authorized activity
received after Census Day may be denied or be documented as an
excused/unexcused absence at the discretion of the faculty member.

24 Undergraduate Information
Undergraduate Grading System
time as a NC student in the course and comply with all conditions
stipulated by the course instructor, except that if a student registered
Grades
as NC fails to satisfy all conditions, no record of this registration in the
course will be made. The Registration Action Form is used to request that
When a student registers in a course, one of the following grades will
a course be recorded as an audit. This form is available in the Registrar’s
appear on his/her academic record. If a student registered as NC (audit)
Office.
fails to satisfy all conditions, no record of this registration in the course
will be made. The assignment of the grade symbol is based on the level
Grade Appeal Process
of performance, and represents the extent of the student’s demonstrated
CSM faculty have the responsibility, and sole authority for, assigning
mastery of the material listed in the course outline and achievement of
grades. As instructors, this responsibility includes clearly stating the
the stated course objectives.
instructional objectives of a course, defining how grades will be assigned
Symbol
Interpretation
in a way that is consistent with these objectives, and then assigning
grades. It is the student’s responsibility to understand the grading criteria
A
Excellent
and then maintain the standards of academic performance established
A-
for each course in which he or she is enrolled.
B+
If a student believes he or she has been unfairly graded, the student
B
Good
may appeal this decision first to the instructor of the course, and if the
B-
appeal is denied, to the Faculty Affairs Committee of the Faculty Senate.
C+
The Faculty Affairs Committee is the faculty body authorized to review
C
Satisfactory
and modify course grades, in appropriate circumstances. Any decision
C-
made by the Faculty Affairs Committee is final. In evaluating a grade
appeal, the Faculty Affairs Committee will place the burden of proof on
D+
the student. For a grade to be revised by the Faculty Affairs Committee,
D
Poor (lowest passing)
the student must demonstrate that the grading decision was unfair by
D-
documenting that one or more of the following conditions applied:
F
Failed
1. The grading decision was based on something other than course
S
Satisfactory, C or better, used at
performance, unless the grade was a result of penalty for academic
mid-term
dishonesty.
U
Unsatisfactory, below C, used at
2. The grading decision was based on standards that were
mid-term
unreasonably different from those applied to other students in the
PRG
Satisfactory Progress
same section of that course.
PRU
Unsatisfactory Progress
3. The grading decision was based on standards that differed
substantially and unreasonably from those previously articulated by
In addition to these performance symbols, the following is a list of
the instructor.
registration symbols that may appear on a CSM transcript:
To appeal a grade, the student should proceed as follows:
Symbol
Interpretation
WI
Involuntary Withdrawn
1. The student should prepare a written appeal of the grade received
W
Withdrew, No Penalty
in the course. This appeal must clearly define the basis for the
appeal and must present all relevant evidence supporting the
T
Transfer Credit
student’s case.
INC
Incomplete
2. After preparing the written appeal, the student should deliver
NC
Not for Credit (Audit)
this appeal to the course instructor and attempt to resolve the
Z
Grade not yet submitted
issue directly with the instructor. Written grade appeals must be
Incomplete Grade
delivered to the instructor no later than 10 business days after the
start of the regular (fall or spring) semester immediately following
If a student, because of illness or other reasonable excuse, fails to
the semester in which the contested grade was received. In the
complete a course, a grade of INC (Incomplete) is given. The grade INC
event that the course instructor is unavailable because of leave,
indicates deficiency in quantity of work and is temporary.
illness, sabbatical, retirement, or resignation from the university, the
course coordinator (first) or the Department Head/Division Director
A GRADE OF INC MUST BE REMOVED NOT LATER THAN THE
(second) shall represent the instructor.
FIRST FOUR WEEKS OF THE FIRST SEMESTER OF ATTENDANCE
FOLLOWING THAT IN WHICH IT WAS RECEIVED. Upon failure to
3. If after discussion with the instructor, the student is still dissatisfied,
remove an INC within the time specified, it shall be changed to an F
he or she can proceed with the appeal by submitting three copies of
(failed) by the Registrar. In the event that an INC grade remains upon
the written appeal plus three copies of a summary of the instructor/
completion of degree, the INC will be converted to an F and included in
student meetings held in connection with the previous step to the
the final GPA.
President of the Faculty Senate. These must be submitted to the
President of the Faculty Senate no later than 25 business days
NC Grade (Not for Credit or Audit)
after the start of the semester immediately following the semester
in which the contested grade was received. The President of the
A student may for special reasons, with the instructor’s permission,
register in a course on the basis of NC (Not for Credit). To have the grade
NC appear on his/her transcript, the student must enroll at registration

Colorado School of Mines 25
Faculty Senate will forward the student’s appeal and supporting
Semester Hours
documents to the Faculty Affairs Committee, and the course
The number of times a class meets during a week (for lecture, recitation,
instructor’s Department Head/Division Director.
or laboratory) determines the number of semester hours assigned to that
4. The Faculty Affairs Committee will request a response to the appeal
course. Class sessions are normally 50 minutes long and represent one
from the instructor. On the basis of its review of the student’s
hour of credit for each hour meeting. Two to four hours of laboratory work
appeal, the instructor’s response, and any other information
per week are equivalent to 1-semester hour of credit. For the average
deemed pertinent to the grade appeal, the Faculty Affairs
student, each hour of lecture and recitation requires at least two hours of
Committee will determine whether the grade should be revised. The
preparation. No full-time undergraduate student may enroll for more than
decision rendered will be either:
19 credit hours in one semester. Physical education, advanced ROTC
A. the original grading decision is upheld, or
and Honors Program in Public Affairs courses are excepted. However,
B. sufficient evidence exists to indicate a grade has been
upon written recommendation of the faculty advisor, the better students
assigned unfairly.
may be given permission by the Registrar on behalf of Academic Affairs
to take additional hours.
In this latter case, the Faculty Affairs Committee will assign
the student a new grade for the course. The Committee’s
Grade-Point Averages
decision is final. The Committee’s written decision and supporting
documentation will be delivered to the President of the Faculty
Grade-Point Averages shall be specified, recorded, reported, and used to
Senate, the office of the EVPAA, the student, the instructor, and
three figures following the decimal point for any and all purposes to which
the instructor’s Department Head/Division Director no later than 15
said averages may apply.
business days following the Senate’s receipt of the grade appeal.
Overall Grade-Point Average
The schedule, but not the process, outlined above may be modified upon
Beginning Fall 2011, all attempts at every CSM course will count in the
mutual agreement of the student, the course instructor, and the Faculty
overall grade point average. No repeat exclusions apply.
Affairs Committee.
The overall grade-point average includes all attempts at courses taken at
Quality Hours and Quality Points
Colorado School of Mines with the exception of courses which fall under
the repeat policy in effect from Fall 2007 through Summer 2011.
For graduation a student must successfully complete a certain number
of required semester hours and must maintain grades at a satisfactory
If a course completed during the Fall 2007 term through Summer 2011
level. The system for expressing the quality of a student’s work is based
was a repeat of a course completed in any previous term and the course
on quality points and quality hours. The numerical value associated with
was not repeatable for credit, the grade and credit hours earned for the
the specific grades are:
most recent occurrence of the course will count toward the student’s
grade-point average and the student’s degree requirements. The most
Grade
Numerical Value
recent course occurrence must be an exact match to the previous course
A
4.000
completed (subject and number). The most recent grade is applied to the
A-
3.700
overall grade-point average even if the previous grade is higher.
B+
3.300
Courses from other institutions transferred to Colorado School of Mines
B
3.000
are not counted in any grade-point average, and cannot be used under
B-
2.700
this repeat policy. Only courses originally completed and subsequently
C+
2.300
repeated at Colorado School of Mines during Fall 2007 through Summer
2011 with the same subject code and number apply to this repeat policy.
C
2.000
C-
1.700
All occurrences of every course taken at Colorado School of Mines will
D+
1.300
appear on the official transcript along with the associated grade.
D
1.000
Courses from other institutions transferred to Colorado School of Mines
D-
0.700
are not counted in any grade-point average.
F
0.000
Option (Major) Grade-Point Average
The number of quality points earned in any course is the number of
The grade-point average calculated for the option (major) is calculated in
semester hours assigned to that course multiplied by the numerical
the same manner as the overall grade-point average. Starting Fall 2011
value of the grade received. To compute an overall or major grade-
the repeat policy is no longer in effect and all attempts at major courses
point average, the number of cumulative quality hours is divided into the
completed in the major department or division are included. However,
cumulative quality points earned. Grades of W, WI, INC, PRG, PRU, or
the major grade point average includes only the most recent attempt of a
NC are not counted in quality hours.
repeated course if the most recent attempt of that course occurs from Fall
Transfer Credit
2007 through Summer 2011.
The major grade point average includes every course completed in
Transfer credit earned at another institution will have a T grade assigned
the major department or division at Colorado School of Mines. In some
but no grade points will be recorded on the student’s permanent record.
cases, additional courses outside of the major department are also
Calculation of the grade-point average will be made only from the courses
included in the major gpa calculation. The minimum major grade-point
completed at Colorado School of Mines.
average required to earn a Mines undergraduate degree is a 2.000. For
specifics concerning your major gpa, reference your online degree audit
or contact your major department.

26 Undergraduate Information
Honor Roll and Dean’s List
Students. A student will be removed from probation when the
cumulative grade-point average is brought up to the minimum, as
To be placed on the academic honor roll, a student must complete at
specified in the table below.
least 14 semester hours with a 3.0-3.499 grade point for the semester,
have no grade below C, and no incomplete grade. Those students
Suspension
satisfying the above criteria with a semester grade-point average of 3.5 or
A student on probation who fails to meet both the last semester grade
above are placed on the Dean’s List.
period requirements and the cumulative grade-point average given in
Students are notified by the Dean of Students of the receipt of these
the table below will be placed on suspension. A student who meets the
honors. The Dean’s List notation appears on the student’s transcript.
last semester grade period requirement but fails to achieve the required
Graduation Awards
cumulative grade-point average will remain on probation.
total Quality Hours
Required Cumulative Last Semester G.P.
Colorado School of Mines awards the designations of Cum Laude,
G.P. Average
Average
Magna Cum Laude, and Summa Cum Laude upon graduation. These
designations are based on the following overall grade-point averages:
0 - 18.5
1.7
--
19 - 36.5
1.8
2.0
Grade-point average
Designation
37 - 54.5
1.8
2.0
3.500 - 3.699
Cum Laude
55 - 72.5
1.9
2.1
3.700 - 3.899
Magna Cum Laude
73 - 90.5
1.9
2.1
3.900 - 4.000
Summa Cum Laude
91 - 110.5
2.0
2.2
Commencement ceremony awards are determined by the student’s
111 - 130.5
2.0
2.2
cumulative academic record at the end of the preceding semester. For
131- end of program
2.0
2.3
example, the overall grade-point average earned at the end of the fall
term determines the honor listed in the May commencement program.
A freshman or transfer student who fails to make a grade point average
of 1.5 during the first grade period will be placed on suspension.
Final honors designations are determined once final grades have
been awarded for the term of graduation. The final honors designation
Suspension becomes effective immediately when it is imposed.
appears on the official transcript and is inscribed on the metal diploma.
Readmission after suspension requires written approval from the
Official transcripts are available approximately one to two weeks after
Readmissions Committee. While a one semester suspension period is
the term grades have been finalized. Metal diplomas are sent to the
normally the case, exceptions may be granted, particularly in the case of
student approximately two months after final grades are posted. Mailing
first-semester freshmen and new transfer students.
arrangements are made during Graduation Salute.
No student who is on suspension may enroll in any regular academic
Undergraduate students are provided one metal diploma as part of the
semester without the written approval of the Readmissions Committee.
graduation fees. Additional metal diplomas and parchment diplomas can
However, a student on suspension may enroll in a summer session (field
be ordered at the Registrar’s Office for an additional charge. Graduating
camp, academic session, or both) with the permission of the Associate
students should order these items before the end of the graduation term
Dean of Students. Students on suspension who have been given
in order to ensure delivery approximately two months after final grades
permission to enroll in a summer session by the Associate Dean may not
are awarded.
enroll in any subsequent term at CSM without the written permission of
the Readmissions Committee. Readmissions Committee meetings are
Good Standing
held prior to the beginning of each regular semester and at the end of the
A student is in good standing at CSM when he or she is enrolled in
spring term.
class(es) and is not on either academic or disciplinary probation,
A student who intends to appear in person before the Readmissions
suspension, or dismissal.
Committee must contact the Associate Dean of Students at least one
Academic Probation and
week prior to desired appointment. Between regular meetings of the
Committee, in cases where extensive travel would be required to appear
Suspension
in person, a student may petition in writing to the Committee, through the
Associate Dean of Students.
Probation
Appearing before the Readmissions Committee by letter rather than in
A student whose cumulative grade-point average falls below the minimum
person will be permitted only in cases of extreme hardship. Such cases
requirements specified (see table below) will be placed on probation for
will include travel from a great distance, e.g. overseas, or travel from a
the following semester. A student on probation is subject to the following
distance which requires leaving a permanent job.
restrictions:
The Readmissions Committee meets on six seperate occasions
1. may not register for more than 15 credit hours
throughout the year. Students applying for readmission must appear
2. may be required to withdraw from intercollegiate athletics
at those times except under conditions beyond the control of the
student. Such conditions include a committee appointment load, delay in
3. may not run for, or accept appointment to, any campus office or
producing notice of suspension, or weather conditions closing highways
committee chairmanship. A student who is placed on probation
and airports.
while holding a position involving significant responsibility and
commitment may be required to resign after consultation with
All applications for readmission after a minimum period away from
the Associate Dean of Students or the President of Associated
school, and all appeals of suspension or dismissal, must include a written
statement of the case to be made for readmission.

Colorado School of Mines 27
A student who, after being suspended and readmitted twice, again
2. Transcript of Grades: Registrar
fails to meet the required academic standards shall be automatically
3. Computer Grade Lists: Registrar
dismissed. The Readmissions Committee will hear a single appeal of
4. Encumbrance List: Controller and Registrar
automatic dismissal. The appeal will only be heard after demonstration
5. Academic Probation/Suspension List: Undergraduate Associate
of substantial and significant changes. A period of time sufficient
Dean of Students; Graduate-Graduate Dean
to demonstrate such a change usually elapses prior to the student
attempting to schedule this hearing. The decision of the Committee on
6. Advisor File: Academic Advisor
that single appeal will be final and no further appeal will be permitted.
7. Option/Advisor/Enrolled/ Minority/Foreign List: Registrar, Dean of
Students, and Graduate Dean
Readmission by the Committee does not guarantee that there is space
8. Externally Generated SAT/GRE Score Lists: Undergraduate-
available to enroll. A student must process the necessary papers with the
Registrar; Graduate-Graduate Dean
Admissions Office prior to seeing the Committee.
9. Financial Aid File: Financial Aid (closed records)
Notification
10. Medical History File: School Physician (closed records)
Notice of probation, suspension, or dismissal will be mailed to each
Student Access to Records. The undergraduate student wishing access
student who fails to meet catalog requirements.
to a record will make written request to the Registrar. The graduate
Repeated Failure
student will make a similar request to the Dean of the Graduate School.
This request will include the student’s name, date of request and type
A student who twice fails a required course at Colorado School of Mines
of record to be reviewed. It will be the responsibility of the Registrar or
and is not subject to academic suspension will automatically be placed
Graduate School Dean to arrange a mutually satisfactory time for review.
on "Special Hold" status with the Registrar, regardless of the student’s
This time will be as soon as practical but is not to be later than 45 days
cumulative or semester GPA. The student must meet with the subject
from receipt of the request. The record will be reviewed in the presence of
advisor or the faculty Readmissions Committee (in the case of three or
the designated representative. If the record involves a list including other
more Fs in the same course) and receive written permission to remove
students, steps will be taken to preclude the viewing of the other student
the hold before being allowed to register. Transfer credit from another
name and information.
school will not be accepted for a twice-failed course.
Challenge of the Record. If the student wishes to challenge any part
Access to Student Records
of the record, the Registrar or Dean of the Graduate School will be so
notified in writing. The Registrar or Dean may then
Students at the Colorado School of Mines are protected by the
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) (http://
1. remove and destroy the disputed document, or
inside.mines.edu/FERPA), as amended. This Act was designed to protect
2. inform the student that the document represents a necessary part of
the privacy of education records, to establish the right of students to
the record; and, if the student wishes to appeal,
inspect and review their education records, and to provide guidelines
3. convene a meeting of the student and the document originator
for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal and
(if reasonably available) in the presence of the Associate Vice
formal hearings. Students also have the right to file complaints with the
President for Academic Affairs as mediator, whose decision will be
FERPA office concerning alleged failures by the institution to comply with
final.
the Act. Copies of local policy, including the list of offices with access to
student records based on legitimate educational interest, can be found in
Destruction of Records. Records may be destroyed at any time by
the Registrar’s Office. Contact information for FERPA complaints is:
the responsible official if not otherwise precluded by law except that no
record may be destroyed between the dates of access request and the
Family Policy Compliance Office
viewing of the record. If during the viewing of the record any item is in
U.S. Department of Education
dispute, it may not be destroyed.
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, D. C. 20202-4605
Access to Records by Other Parties. Colorado School of Mines will not
permit access to student records by persons outside the School except
Directory Information. The School maintains lists of information
as follows:
which may be considered directory information as defined by the
regulations. This information includes name, current and permanent
1. In the case of open record information as specified in the section
addresses and phone numbers, date of birth, major field of study, dates
under Directory Information.
of attendance, part or full-time status, degrees awarded, last school
2. To those people specifically designated by the student. Examples
attended, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, class,
would include request for transcript to be sent to graduate school or
and academic honors. Students who desire that this information not be
prospective employer.
printed or released must so inform the Registrar before the end of the
3. Information required by a state or federal agency for the purpose of
first two weeks of the fall semester for which the student is registered.
establishing eligibility for financial aid.
Information will be withheld for the entire academic year unless the
4. Accreditation agencies during their on-campus review.
student changes this request. The student’s signature is required to
5. In compliance with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena after
make any changes for the current academic year. The request must be
the student has been notified of the intended compliance.
renewed each fall term for the upcoming year. The following student
6. Any institutional information for statistical purposes which is not
records are maintained by Colorado School of Mines at the various
identifiable with a particular student.
offices listed below:
7. In compliance with any applicable statue now in effect or later
1. General Records: Undergraduate-Registrar; Graduate- Graduate
enacted. Each individual record (general, transcript, advisor,
Dean
and medical) will include a log of those persons not employed by

28 Undergraduate Information
Colorado School of Mines who have requested or obtained access
to the student record and the legitimate interest that the person has
in making the request.
The School discloses education records without a student’s prior written
consent under the FERPA exception for disclosure to school officials with
legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed
by the School in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research,
or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and
health staff); a person or company with whom the School has contracted
as its agent to provide a service instead of using School employees
or officials (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person
serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official
committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting
another school official in performing his or her tasks.
A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs
to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional
responsibilities for the School.

Colorado School of Mines 29
General Information
approval of the Registrar, the heads of departments of the two courses,
the head of the student’s option department. There will be a periodic
Academic Calendar
review by the Office of the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs.
Forms for this purpose are available in the Registrar’s Office.
The academic year is based on the early semester system. The first
semester begins in late August and closes in mid-December; the second
Change of Bulletin
semester begins in mid January and closes in mid May.
It is assumed that each student will graduate under the requirements of
Classification of Students
the bulletin in effect at the time of most recent admission. However, it is
possible to change to any subsequent bulletin in effect while the student
Degree seeking undergraduates are classified as follows according to
is enrolled in a regular semester.
semester credit hours earned:
To change bulletins, a form obtained from the Registrar’s Office is
Undergraduate Year
Semester Credit Hours Earned
presented for approval to the head of the student’s option department.
Freshman
0 to 29.9 semester credit hours
Upon receipt of approval, the form must be returned to the Registrar’s
Sophomore
30 to 59.9 semester credit hours
Office.
Junior
60 to 89.9 semester credit hours
Students’ Use of English
Senior
90 or more semester credit hours
All Mines students are expected to show professional facility in the use of
Part-Time Degree Students
the English language.
A part-time degree student may enroll in any course for which he or she
English skills are emphasized, but not taught exclusively, in most of the
has the prerequisites or the permission of the department. Part-time
humanities and social sciences courses and EPICS as well as in option
degree students will be subject to all rules and regulations of Colorado
courses in junior and senior years. Students are required to write reports,
School of Mines, but they may not:
make oral presentations, and generally demonstrate their facility in the
English language while enrolled in their courses.
1. Live in student housing;
The LAIS Writing Center is available to assist students with their writing.
2. Receive financial help in the form of School-sponsored scholarships
For additional information, contact the LAIS Division, Stratton 301;
or grants;
303-273-3750.
3. Participate in any School-recognized activity unless fees are paid;
4. Take advantage of activities provided by student fees unless such
Summer Sessions
fees are paid.
The summer term is divided into two independent units. Summer
Session I is a 6-week period beginning on Monday following Spring
Course work completed by a part-time degree student who subsequently
Commencement. Summer Session II is a 6-week session which
changes to full-time status will be accepted as meeting degree
immediately follows Summer Session I.
requirements.
Seniors in Graduate Courses
Dead Day
No required class meetings, examinations or activities may take place
With the consent of the student’s department/division and the Dean of
on the Friday immediately preceding final exams for the fall and spring
Graduate Studies, a qualified senior may enroll in 500-level courses
terms. At their own discretion, faculty members may hold additional office
without being a registered graduate student. At least a 2.5 GPA is
hours or give a review session on Dead Day provided these activities
required. The necessary forms for attending these courses are available
are strictly optional. This day has been created as a break from regularly
in the Registrar’s Office. Seniors may not enroll in 600-level courses.
scheduled and/or required academic activities to allow students to
Credits in 500-level courses earned by seniors may be applied toward an
prepare for their final examinations as they see fit.
advanced degree at CSM only if:
1. The student gains admission to the Graduate School.
Final Examinations Policy
2. The student’s graduate committee agrees that these credits are a
Final examinations are scheduled by the Registrar. With the exception of
reasonable part of his graduate program.
courses requiring a common time, all finals will be scheduled on the basis
3. The student provides proof that the courses in question were not
of the day and the hour the course is offered.
counted toward those required for the Bachelor’s Degree.
In general, all final examinations will be given only during the stated
4. Graduate courses applied to a graduate degree may not count
final examination period and are to appear on the Registrar’s schedule.
toward eligibility for undergraduate financial aid. This may only be
Faculty policy adopted in January 1976 provides that no exams (final
done if a student has been admitted to a Combined BS/MS degree
or otherwise) may be scheduled during the week preceding final
program and has received the appropriate prior approvals.
examinations week, with the possible exception of laboratory exams.
The scheduling by an individual faculty member of a final exam during
Undergraduate students enrolled in graduate-level courses (500-level)
the week preceding final examinations week is to be avoided because it
are graded using the graduate grading system. See the CSM Graduate
tends to hinder the students’ timely completion of other course work and
Bulletin for a description of the grading system used in graduate-level
interfere with the schedules of other instructors. Faculty members should
courses.
not override this policy, even if the students in the class vote to do so.
Course Substitution
Academic activities that are explicitly disallowed by this policy include:
To substitute credit for one course in place of another course required as
part of the approved curricula in the catalog, a student must receive the

30 Undergraduate Information
• Scheduling an in-class examination (final or otherwise, with the possible
petition should include evidence of the reasonable expectations that the
exception of laboratory exams) for any course during the week preceding
student would have completed his or her degree requirements. For a
final exams
Baccalaureate, such evidence could consist of, but is not limited to:
• Scheduling an early make-up final examination - unless the student
• The student was a senior in the final semester of coursework,
needs to miss the regularly scheduled final for school related business
• The student was enrolled in courses that would have completed the
(athletics, school-related travel, etc…) and requested by the student and
degree requirements at the time of death
approved by the instructor.
• The student would have passed the courses with an acceptable grade,
• Assigning a take-home final examination for any course that is due
and would likely have fulfilled the requirements of the degree.
during the week preceding final exams – unless the student needs to
For a Graduate Degree:
miss the regularly scheduled final for school related business (athletics,
school-related travel, etc…) and requested by the student and approved
• For graduate degrees not requiring a research product, the student
by the instructor.
was enrolled in courses that would have completed the degree
requirements at the time of death, would have passed the courses with
Academic activities that are allowable during the week preceding final
an acceptable grade, and would likely have fulfilled the requirements
exams include:
of the degree.
• The introduction of new materials
• For graduate degrees requiring a research product, the student had
• Laboratory finals
completed all course and mastery requirements pursuant to the
• Required homework
degree and was near completion of the dissertation or thesis, and the
• Required in-class assignments such as quizzes or worksheets (NO
student’s committee found the work to be substantial and worthy of the
EXAMS)
degree.
• Quizzes are shorter exercises which take place on a fairly regular
The requirement that there be a reasonable expectation of degree
basis (e.g. 15-30 minutes in duration, 6-10 times a semester).
completion should be interpreted liberally and weight should be given
• Exams are major exercises which take place only a few times a
to the judgment of the departmental representative(s) supporting the
semester (e.g. 50-120 minutes in duration, 2-4 times a semester).
petition.
• Major course assignments such as Final Presentations or Term
In the event that the degree being sought is a Posthumous BS, MS, or
Projects provided the assignment was assigned at least 4 weeks in
Ph.D., the petition should include evidence that the student conducted
advance or was clearly indicated in the course syllabus (Presentations
himself or herself in the best tradition of a Mines’ graduate and is
must not be scheduled in conflict with regularly scheduled courses in
therefore deserving of that honor.
departments outside of the one scheduling the presentation.)
Curriculum Changes
• Take home finals (provided they are not due prior to finals week
• Make-up exams for students who miss a scheduled exam in the
The Board of Trustees of the Colorado School of Mines reserves the right
prior week due to emergency, illness, athletic event, or other CSM
to change any course of study or any part of the curriculum in keeping
sanctioned activity (provided this absence has been approved by the
with educational and scientific developments. Nothing in this catalog or
Associate Dean of Students)
the registration of any student shall be considered as a contract between
Colorado School of Mines and the student.
(Note: These policies apply only to undergraduate courses. Students
enrolled in graduate courses, are bound by policies outlined in the
Graduate Bulletin.)
Full-time Enrollment
Full-time enrollment for certification for Veterans Benefits, athletics,
loans, most financial aid, etc. is 12 credit hours per semester for the fall
and spring semesters. Full-time enrollment for Summer Session I and
Summer Session II combined is 12 credit hours.
Posthumous Degree Awards
The faculty may recognize the accomplishments of students who have
died while pursuing their educational goals. If it is reasonable to expect
that the student would have completed his or her degree requirements,
the faculty may award a Baccalaureate or Graduate Degree that is in all
ways identical to the degree the student was pursuing. Alternatively, the
faculty may award a Posthumous BS, MS, or Ph.D. to commemorate
students who distinguished themselves while at Mines by bringing honor
to the School and its traditions.
Consideration for either of these degrees begins with a petition to
the Faculty Senate from an academic department or degree granting
unit. The petition should identify the degree sought. In the event that
the degree-granting unit is seeking a conventional degree award, the

Colorado School of Mines 31
Undergraduate Degree
6. The certification by the Registrar that all required academic work is
satisfactorily completed.
Requirements
7. The recommendation of the faculty and approval of the Board of
Trustees.
Bachelor of Science Degree
Seniors must submit an Application to Graduate two semesters prior
Upon completion of the requirements and upon being recommended for
to the anticipated date of graduation or upon completion of 90 hours,
graduation by the faculty, and approved by the Board of Trustees, the
whichever comes first. Applications are available in the Registrar’s Office.
undergraduate receives one of the following degrees:
Completed Minor and ASI forms are normally due to the Registrar’s
• Bachelor of Science (Applied Mathematics and Statistics)
Office at the same as the application to graduate. If the Minor or ASI is
• Bachelor of Science (Chemical Engineering)
added later, it is due no later than Census Day of the term in which the
• Bachelor of Science (Chemical & Biochemical Engineering)
students is graduating.
• Bachelor of Science (Chemistry)
The Registrar’s Office provides the service of doing preliminary degree
• Bachelor of Science (Computer Science)
audits. Ultimately, however, it is the responsibility of students to monitor
• Bachelor of Science (Economics)
the progress of their degrees. It is also the student’s responsibility to
• Bachelor of Science (Engineering)
contact the Registrar’s Office when there appears to be a discrepancy
between the degree audit and the student’s records.
• Bachelor of Science (Engineering Physics)
• Bachelor of Science (Geological Engineering)
All graduating students must officially check out of School. Checkout
cards, available in the Dean of Student’s Office, must be completed and
• Bachelor of Science (Geophysical Engineering)
returned one week prior to the expected date of completion of degree
• Bachelor of Science (Metallurgical & Materials Engineering)
requirements.
• Bachelor of Science (Mining Engineering)
No students, graduate or undergraduate, will receive diplomas until they
• Bachelor of Science (Petroleum Engineering)
have complied with all the rules and regulations of Colorado School of
The following degrees have been approved by Colorado School of Mines
Mines and settled all accounts with the School. Transcript of grades and
and the Colorado Department of Higher Education. However, they do not
other records will not be provided for any student or graduate who has an
yet have ABET accreditation:
unsettled obligation of any kind to the School.
• Bachelor of Science (Civil Engineering)
Multiple Degrees. A student wishing to complete Bachelor of Science
• Bachelor of Science (Electrical Engineering)
degrees in more than one degree program must receive permission from
the heads of the appropriate departments to become a multiple degree
• Bachelor of Science (Environmental Engineering)
candidate. The following requirements must be met by the candidate in
• Bachelor of Science (Mechanical Engineering)
order to obtain multiple degrees:
Degree Retirement Notification and
1. All requirements of each degree program must be met.
Requirement Definion
2. Any course which is required in more than one degree need be
taken only once.
Admission into the following degree program is suspended after the Fall
3. A course required in one degree program may be used as a
2012 semester:
technical elective in another, if it satisfies the restrictions of the
• Mathematical and Computer Sciences
elective.
4. Different catalogs may be used, one for each degree program.
Both continuing students and students admitted into this degree program
Fall, 2012 are encouraged to change programs to the newly approved
5. No course substitutions are permitted in order to circumvent
programs replacing this older program (either Applied Mathematics and
courses required in one of the degree programs, or reduce the
Statistics or Computer Science). Program requirements for students
number of courses taken. However, in the case of overlap of course
admitted Fall, 2012 wishing to remain in the older program are as defined
content between required courses in the degree programs, a
in the 2011-2012 Undergraduate Bulletin.
more advanced course may be substituted for one of the required
courses upon approval of the head of each department concerned,
Graduation Requirements
and the Registrar on behalf of the office of Academic Affairs. The
To qualify for a Bachelor of Science degree from Colorado School of
course substitution form can be obtained in the Registrar’s Office.
Mines, all candidates must satisfy the following requirements:
Degree Posting and Grade Changes. Once the degree is posted,
1. A minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.000 for all
grade changes will be accepted for six weeks only. After six weeks has
academic work completed in residence.
passed, no grade changes will be allowed for any courses on the official
2. A minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.000 for courses in
transcript.
the candidate’s major.
Commencement Participation. To participate in May Commencement,
3. A minimum of 30 hours credit in 300 and 400 series technical
no more than 6 semester credit hours can remain outstanding after
courses in residence, at least 15 of which are to be taken in the
the spring term. The student must show proof of summer registration
senior year.
for these 6 or fewer credits in order to be placed on the list for August
4. A minimum of 19 hours in humanities and social sciences courses.
completion. To participate in December convocation, the undergraduate
student must be registered for all courses that lead to completion of the
5. The recommendation of their degree-granting department/ division
degree at the end of the same fall term.
to the faculty.

32 Undergraduate Information
Courses Older Than 10 Years. For returning students who wish to use
courses completed more than 10 years prior, contact the Registrar’s
Office. These courses will not apply to current degrees without special
approval from the degree-granting department or division.

Colorado School of Mines 33
Undergraduate Programs
1) The Core Curriculum
Core requirements are applicable to all undergraduate students:
All programs are designed to fulfill the expectations of the Profile of the
Colorado School of Mines Graduate in accordance with the mission
In Mathematics and the Basic Sciences
and goals of the School. To enable this, the curriculum is made up
MATH111
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND
4.0
of a common core, twelve undergraduate degree granting programs,
ENGINEERS I
and a variety of support and special programs. Each degree granting
MATH112
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND
4.0
program has an additional set of goals which focus on the technical and
ENGINEERS II
professional expectations of that program. The common core and the
MATH213
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND
4.0
degree granting programs are coupled through course sequences in
ENGINEERS III
mathematics and the basic sciences, in specialty topics in science and/
MATH225
or engineering, in humanities and the social sciences, and in design.
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS *
3.0
Further linkage is achieved through a core course sequence which
CHGN121
PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I
4.0
addresses system interactions among phenomena in the natural world,
PHGN100
PHYSICS I - MECHANICS
4.5
the engineered world, and the human world.
In Design
Through the alignment of the curriculum to these institutional goals
EPIC151
DESIGN (EPICS) I
3
and to the additional degree-granting program goals, all engineering
In Systems
programs are positioned for accreditation by the Accreditation Board for
SYGN200
HUMAN SYSTEMS
3.0
Engineering and Technology, and science programs are positioned for
approval by their relevant societies, in particular the American Chemical
In Humanities and the Social Sciences
Society for the Chemistry program.
LAIS100
NATURE AND HUMAN VALUES
4.0
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3.0
Course Numbering
In Physical Education (four separate semesters including the
Numbering of Courses:
following) **
Course numbering is based on the content of material presented in
PAGN101
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
courses.
PAGN102
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
Course Numbering:
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
Material
Level
Division
In Freshman Orientation and Success
100-199
Freshman level
Lower division
CSM101
FRESHMAN SUCCESS SEMINAR
0.5
200-299
Sophomore level
Lower division
300-399
Junior level
Upper division
Free electives ***
400-499
Senior level
Upper division
Total Hours
39.0
500-699
Graduate level
*
2 semester hours in Differential Equations for Geological
Over 700
Graduate Research or
Engineering majors.
Thesis level
**
A minimum of 2 credit hours. Neither PAGN101 nor PAGN102 may
Overview: Core & Distributed Course
be repeated for credit. See the Physical Education and Athletics
section for specifics.
Requirements
*** A minimum of 9 hours are included within each degree granting
Core & distributed course requirements for Bachelor of Science degrees
program. With the exception of the restrictions mentioned below,
are comprised of the four following groups:
the choice of free elective courses to satisfy degree requirements is
unlimited. The restrictions are:
1. Core Curriculum - Students in all degree options (majors) are
1. The choice must not be in conflict with any Graduation Requirements
required to complete all course requirements listed in this group.
(bulletin.mines.edu/undergraduate/sectionundergraduateinformation/
2. Distributed Humanities and Social Sciences Requirement
generalinformation).
- Students in all degree options (majors) must complete this
2. Free electives to satisfy degree requirements may not exceed three
semester hours in activity courses such as band, chorus, studio art,
requirement.
physical education, and athletics courses combined.
3. Distributed Science Requirement - Students in all degree options
(majors) are required to complete a minimum of three out of five
2) Distributed Humanities and Social Science
courses from this list. For some majors the three courses are
Requirement
prescribed, while other majors leave the choices to the student.
See the DSR chart to determine the requirements for your particular
DHSS Requirements are applicable to all undergraduate students:
major program.
Two courses from the approved list of requirements *
6.0
4. Distributed Engineering Requirement - Students pursuing an
At least one course at the 400-level from approved list of
3.0
engineering-based degree are required to complete the courses in
this list. However, each engineering program will place the courses
requirements *
in the sophomore year or later based on the flow of the particular
Total Hours
9.0
program. These are not considered freshman year courses.

34 Undergraduate Information
*
See the approved list in the Liberal Arts and International Studies
Complete a minimum of three of the five courses listed according to your
(https://nextbulletin.mines.edu/undergraduate/programs/earthscieng/
major requirements on the following chart: (REQ = Required, CHOICE =
liberalartsandinternationalstudies) section of this Bulletin.
Student’s Choice, NA = Not allowed)
3) Distributed Science Requirement
DS Requirements are applicable to all undergraduate students:
Program
BELS101
SYGN101
PHGN200
CHGN122
CSCI101
APPLIED MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS
CHOICE
CHOICE
REQ
CHOICE
REQ
CHEMISTRY
CHOICE
CHOICE
REQ
REQ
NA
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
REQ
NA
REQ
REQ
NA
CHEMICAL & BIOCHEMICAL ENGINEERING
REQ
NA
REQ
REQ
NA
CIVIL ENGINEERING
NA
REQ
REQ
REQ
NA
COMPUTER SCIENCE
CHOICE
CHOICE
REQ
CHOICE
REQ
ECONOMICS
CHOICE
CHOICE
CHOICE
CHOICE
CHOICE
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
CHOICE
CHOICE
REQ
CHOICE
CHOICE
ENGINEERING-CIVIL SPECIALTY
CHOICE
CHOICE
REQ
REQ
CHOICE
ENGINEERING-ELECTRICAL SPECIALTY
CHOICE
CHOICE
REQ
CHOICE
CHOICE
ENGINEERING-ENVIRONMENTAL SPECIALTY
CHOICE
CHOICE
REQ
REQ
NA
ENGINEERING-MECHANICAL SPECIALTY
CHOICE
CHOICE
REQ
REQ
CHOICE
ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING
NA
REQ
REQ
REQ
NA
GEOLOGICAL-ENGINEERING
NA
REQ
REQ
REQ
CHOICE
GEOPHYSICAL-ENGINEERING
CHOICE
REQ
REQ
CHOICE
CHOICE
MATHEMATICAL & COMPUTER SCIENCES
CHOICE
CHOICE
REQ
CHOICE
REQ
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
CHOICE
CHOICE
REQ
REQ
CHOICE
METALLURGICAL & MATERIALS ENGINEERING
CHOICE
CHOICE
REQ
REQ
NA
MINING ENGINEERING
NA
REQ
REQ
REQ
NA
PETROLEUM ENGINEERING
NA
REQ
REQ
REQ
NA
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
CHOICE
CHOICE
REQ
REQ
NA
4) Distributed Engineering Requirement (see
MATH111
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4.0
4
major program listing)
AND ENGINEERS I
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF
3.0
3
DE Requirements are applicable to undergraduate students in
engineering disciplines as specified by the major program. See
ECONOMICS*
Department and Division program descriptions in this Bulletin for specific
LAIS100
NATURE AND HUMAN
4.0
4
courses required.
VALUES*
EPIC251
DESIGN (EPICS) II (Required by all ABET
3.0
CSM101
FRESHMAN SUCCESS
0.5
0.5
accredited engineering degree programs.)
SEMINAR
One of the following Thermodynamics courses may be required:
3.0
PAGN101
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
0.5
DCGN209
DIST CORE THERMO
16.0
DCGN210
INTRO TO ENG THERMODYNAMICS
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
EGGN371
THERMODYNAMICS I
MATH112
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4.0
4
AND ENGINEERS II
DCGN241
DIST CORE - STATICS
3
EPIC151
EGGN281
INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS,
3
DESIGN (EPICS) I*
2.0
3.0
3
ELECTRONICS AND POWER
PHGN100
PHYSICS I - MECHANICS
3.5
3.0
4.5
Total Hours
12.0
PAGN102
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
2.0
0.5
The Freshman Year
Distributed Science Course*
4.0
16.0
Freshmen in all programs normally take similar subjects, as listed below:
Total Hours: 32.0
subject code** and course number
Freshman
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
CHGN121
PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY
3.0
3.0
4
I

Colorado School of Mines 35
*
For scheduling purposes, registration in combinations of SYGN101,
Core & Distributed Course
BELS101, LAIS100, EBGN201, and EPIC151 will vary between
the fall and spring semesters. Students admitted with acceptable
Requirements - Course
advanced placement credits will be registered in accordance with
Descriptions
their advanced placement status.
**
Key to Subject Codes
1) Core Curriculum Mathematics and the
ChEN Chemical Engineering
CHGC Geochemistry
Basic Sciences
CHGN Chemistry
Chemistry
CSCI Computer Science
DCGN Core Science and Engineering Fundamentals
CHGN121. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I (I, II) Study of matter
EBGN Economics and Business
and energy based on atomic structure, correlation of properties of
EGES Engineering Systems (Engineering)
elements with position in periodic chart, chemical bonding, geometry
EGGN Engineering
of molecules, phase changes, stoichiometry, solution chemistry, gas
ENGY Energy
laws, and thermochemistry. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester
EPIC EPICS
hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer.
ESGN Environmental Science and Engineering
Equivalency for GT-SC1.
GEGN Geological Engineering
Mathematics
GEGX Geochemical Exploration (Geology)
GEOC Oceanography (Geology)
MATH111. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS I (I, II,
GEOL Geology
S) First course in the calculus sequence, including elements of plane
GOGN Geo-Engineering (Mining)
geometry. Functions, limits, continuity, derivatives and their application.
GPGN Geophysical Engineering
Definite and indefinite integrals; Prerequisite: precalculus. 4 hours lecture;
HNRS Honors Program
4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education
LAIS Liberal Arts & International Studies
transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.
LICM Communication
MATH112. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS II (I, II, S)
LIFL Foreign Languages
Vectors, applications and techniques of integration, infinite series, and
LIMU Band; Choir MATH Mathematics
an introduction to multivariate functions and surfaces. Prerequisite: Grade
MNGN Mining Engineering
of C or better in MATH111. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved
MSGN Military Science
for Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for
MTGN Metallurgical & Materials Engr’ng
GT-MA1.
NUGN Nuclear Engineering
MATH113. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS II -
PAGN Physical Education and Athletics
SHORT FORM (I, II) This is a bridge course for entering freshmen and
PEGN Petroleum Engineering
new transfer students to CSM who have either a score of 5 on the BC
PHGN Physics
AP Calculus exam or who have taken an appropriate Calculus II course
SYGN Core sequence in Systems
at another institution (determined by a departmental review of course
The Sophomore Year
materials). Two, three and n-dimensional space, vectors, curves and
surfaces in 3-dimensional space, cylindrical and spherical coordinates,
Requirements for the sophomore year are listed within each degree
and applications of these topics. Prerequisites: Consent of Department. 1
granting program. Continuing requirements for satisfying the core are met
hour lecture; 1 semester hour.
in the sophomore, junior and senior years. It is advantageous, but not
essential, that students select one of the undergraduate degree programs
MATH122. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS II
early in the sophomore year.
HONORS (I) Same topics as those covered in MATH112 but with
Curriculum Changes
additional material and problems. Prerequisite: Consent of Department. 4
hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
In accordance with the statement on Curriculum Changes
MATH213. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS III (I, II, S)
(bulletin.mines.edu/undergraduate/sectionundergraduateinformation/
Multivariable calculus, including partial derivatives, multiple integration,
generalinformation), the Colorado School of Mines makes improvements
and vector calculus. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH112 or
in its curriculum from time to time. To confirm that they are progressing
MATH122. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for Colorado
according to the requirements of the curriculum, students should consult
Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.
their academic advisors on a regular basis and should carefully consult
any Bulletin Addenda that may be published.
MATH214. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTIST AND ENGINEERS III - SHORT
FORM (I, II) This is a bridge course for entering freshmen and new
transfer students to CSM who have taken an appropriate Calculus III
course at another institution (determined by a departmental review of
course materials). Vector Calculus including line and surface integrals
with applications to work and flux, Green’s Theorem, Stokes’ Theorem
and the Divergence Theorem. Prerequisites: Consent of Department. 1
hour lecture; 1 semester hour.
MATH222. INTRODUCTION TO DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS FOR
GEOLOGISTS & GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERS (II). An introduction to

36 Undergraduate Information
differential equations with a special emphasis on problems in the earth
weekly. Each unit culminates in one in-class proficiency examination or
related fields. Topics include first and second order ordinary differential
extended written assignment, plus one capstone design portfolio. Pre-
equations, Laplace Transforms, and applications relevant to the earth
requisites: permission of the EPICS Program Director. 1hour lecture, 1
related fields. Prerequisites: MATH213 or MATH223 or MATH224.
hour laboratory, 1 semester hour.
Student must also be a declared major in Geology and Geological
Note: Completion of this course in lieu of EPIC 151 is by permission only
Engineering. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
and does not alter total hours required for completion of the degree.
Note: Only one of MATH222 and MATH225 can be counted toward
Systems
graduation. Any student who completes MATH222 and then changes
majors out of Geology and Geological Engineering will be expected to
SYGN200. HUMAN SYSTEMS (I, II) This course in the CSM core
complete MATH225 to meet graduation requirements. (In this case,
curriculum articulates with LAIS100: Nature and Human Values and
MATH222 cannot be counted toward graduation in any manner - even as
with the other systems courses. Human Systems is an interdisciplinary
a free elective.)
historical examination of key systems created by humans - namely,
political, economic, social, and cultural institutions - as they have evolved
MATH223. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS III
world-wide from the inception of the modern era (ca. 1500) to the
HONORS (II) Same topics as those covered in MATH213 but with
present. This course embodies an elaboration of these human systems
additional material and problems. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in
as introduced in their environmental context in Nature and Human
MATH122. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
Values and will reference themes and issues explored therein. It also
MATH224. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS
demonstrates the cross-disciplinary applicability of the “systems” concept.
III HONORS(AP) (I) Early introduction of vectors, linear algebra,
Assignments will give students continued practice in writing. Prerequisite:
multivariable calculus. Vector fields, line and surface integrals.
LAIS100. 3 semester hours.
Prerequisite: Consent of Department. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
Humanities and the Social Sciences
MATH225. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (I, II, S) Classical techniques
EBGN201. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS-(I,II,S) Introduction to
for first and higher order equations and systems of equations. Laplace
microeconomics and macroeconomics. This course focuses on applying
transforms. Phase plane and stability analysis of non-linear equations
the economic way of thinking and basic tools of economic analysis.
and systems. Applications to physics, mechanics, electrical engineering,
Economic effects of public policies. Analysis of markets for goods,
and environmental sciences. May not also receive credit for MATH222.
services and resources. Tools of cost-benefit analysis. Measures of
Prerequisite: MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224. 3 hours lecture; 3
overall economic activity. Determinants of economic growth. Monetary
semester hours.
and fiscal policy. Prerequisites: None. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MATH235. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS HONORS (II) Same topics as
LAIS100. NATURE AND HUMAN VALUES (NHV) Nature and Human
those covered in MATH315 but with additional material and problems.
Values will focus on diverse views and critical questions concerning
Prerequisite: Consent of Department. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
traditional and contemporary issues linking the quality of human life and
Physics
Nature, and their interdependence. The course will examine various
disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches regarding two major
PHGN100. PHYSICS I - MECHANICS (I, II, S) A first course in physics
questions: 1) How has Nature affected the quality of human life and the
covering the basic principles of mechanics using vectors and calculus.
formulation of human values and ethics? (2) How have human actions,
The course consists of a fundamental treatment of the concepts and
values, and ethics affected Nature? These issues will use cases and
applications of kinematics and dynamics of particles and systems of
examples taken from across time and cultures. Themes will include but
particles, including Newton’s laws, energy and momentum, rotation,
are not limited to population, natural resources, stewardship of the Earth,
oscillations, and waves. Prerequisite: MATH111 and concurrent
and the future of human society. This is a writing-intensive course that will
enrollment in MATH112/122 or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture; 4
provide instruction and practice in expository writing, using the disciplines
hours studio; 4.5 semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed
and perspectives of the Humanities and Social Sciences. 4 hours lecture/
General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-SC1.
seminar; 4 semester hours.
Design
Physical Education
Engineering Practices Introductory Course
PAGN101. PHYSICAL EDUCATION (I) (Required) A general overview
Sequence (EPICS)
of life fitness basics which includes exposure to educational units of
EPIC151 Design EPICS I (I,II,S). Design EPICS I introduces students
Nutrition, Stress Management, Drug and Alcohol Awareness. Instruction
to a design process that includes open-ended problem solving and
in Fitness units provides the student an opportunity for learning and the
teamwork integrated with the use of computer software as tools to solve
beginning basics for a healthy life style.
engineering problems. Computer applications emphasize graphical
PAGN102. PHYSICAL EDUCATION (II) (Required) Sections in physical
visualization and production of clear and coherent graphical images,
fitness and team sports, relating to personal health and wellness
charts, and drawings. Teams assess engineering ethics, group dynamics
activities. Prerequisite: PAGN101 or consent of the Department Head.
and time management with respect to decision-making. The course
See Physical Education and Athletics section toward the end of the
emphasizes written technical communications and introduces oral
Bulletin for available 200-level courses.
presentations. 3 semester hours.
Freshman Orientation and Success
EPIC155. EPICS I Graphics (I,II). Instruction and practice in mechanical
sketching and computer-aided drafting methods. Specific lessons
CSM101. FIRST-YEAR ADVISING AND MENTORING PROGRAM is a
include perspective sketching, geometric construction, isometric and
"college transition" course, taught in small groups. Emphasis is placed
orthographic views, dimensions, and sections. Homework is assigned
on fostering connectedness to CSM, developing an appreciation of the

Colorado School of Mines 37
value of a Mines education, and learning the techniques and University
4) Distributed Engineering Requirement
resources that will allow freshmen to develop to their fullest potential at
DCGN209. INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS
CSM. Course Objectives: Become an integrated member of the CSM
(I, II, S) Introduction to the fundamental principles of classical
community; explore, select and connect with an academic major; and
thermodynamics, with particular emphasis on chemical and phase
develop as a person and a student. 9 meetings during semester; 0.5
equilibria. Volume- temperature-pressure relationships for solids, liquids,
semester hours.
and gases; ideal and non-ideal gases. Introduction to kinetic-molecular
2) Distributed Humanities and Social
theory of ideal gases and the Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions. Work,
Science Requirement
heat, and application of the First Law to closed systems, including
chemical reactions. Entropy and the Second and Third Laws; Gibbs Free
See Liberal Arts and International Studies (http://lais.mines.edu/LAIS-
Energy. Chemical equilibrium and the equilibrium constant; introduction to
HSS-Requirements) section for the list of approved courses and the
activities & fugacities. One- and two-component phase diagrams; Gibbs
associated course descriptions.
Phase Rule. Prerequisites: CHGN121, CHGN124, MATH111, MATH112,
3) Distributed Science Requirement
PHGN100. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Students with credit in
DCGN210 may not also receive credit in DCGN209.
BELS101 BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS (I,II)
DCGN210. INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS
This course presents the basic principles and properties of biological
(I, II) Introduction to the fundamental principles of classical engineering
and environmental systems. It considers the chemistry of life and the
thermodynamics. Application of mass and energy balances to closed
structure and function of cells and organisms. Concepts related to
and open systems including systems undergoing transient processes.
physiology, energetics, and genetics are introduced. The fundamentals
Entropy generation and the second law of thermodynamics for closed
of environmental science are presented and we consider how organisms
and open systems. Introduction to phase equilibrium and chemical
interact with each other and with their environment and discuss the
reaction equilibria. Ideal solution behavior. Prerequisites: CHGN121,
possibilities and problems of these interactions. Basic engineering
CHGN124, MATH111, MATH112, PHGN100. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
principles of thermodynamics, kinetics, mass balance, transport
hours. Students with credit in DCGN209 may not also receive credit in
phenomena and material science are presented and applied to biological
DCGN210.
systems. 4 semester hours
DCGN241. STATICS (I, II, S) Forces, moments, couples, equilibrium,
CHGN122. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II (I, II, S) Continuation
centroids and second moments of areas, volumes and masses,
of CHGN121 concentrating on chemical kinetics, thermodynamics,
hydrostatics, friction, virtual work. Applications of vector algebra to
electrochemistry, organic nomenclature, and chemical equilibrium (acid-
structures. Prerequisite: PHGN100 and credit or concurrent enrollment in
base, solubility, complexation, and redox). Laboratory experiments
MATH112. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
emphasizing quantitative chemical measurements. Prerequisite: Grade of
C or better in CHGN121. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab, 4 semester hours.
EGGN371. THERMODYNAMICS I (I, II, S) A comprehensive treatment
of thermodynamics from a mechanical engineering point of view.
CSCI101. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE (I, II, S) An
Thermodynamic properties of substances inclusive of phase diagrams,
introductory course to the building blocks of Computer Science. Topics
equations of state, internal energy, enthalpy, entropy, and ideal gases.
include conventional computer hardware, data representation, the role of
Principles of conservation of mass and energy for steady-state and
operating systems and networks in modern computing, algorithm design,
transient analyses. First and Second Law of thermodynamics, heat
large databases, SQL, and security. A popular procedural programming
engines, and thermodynamic efficiencies. Application of fundamental
language will be learned by students and programming assignments will
principles with an emphasis on refrigeration and power cycles.
explore ideas in algorithm runtimes, computer simulation, computational
Prerequisite: MATH213/223. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
techniques in optimization problems, client-server communications,
encryption, and database queries. Prerequisite: none. 3 hours lecture; 3
EGGN281. INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS,
semester hours.
ELECTRONICS AND POWER (I, II, S) This course provides an
engineering science analysis of electrical circuits. DC and single-phase
PHGN200. PHYSICS II-ELECTROMAGNETISM AND OPTICS (I, II,
AC networks are presented. Transient analysis of RC, RL, and RLC
S) Continuation of PHGN100. Introduction to the fundamental laws
circuits is studied as is the analysis of circuits in sinusoidal steady-state
and concepts of electricity and magnetism, electromagnetic devices,
using phasor concepts. The following topics are included: DC and single-
electromagnetic behavior of materials, applications to simple circuits,
phase AC circuit analysis, current and charge relationships. Ohm’s Law,
electromagnetic radiation, and an introduction to optical phenomena.
resistors, inductors, capacitors, equivalent resistance and impedance,
Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in PHGN100, concurrent enrollment in
Kirchhoff’s Laws, Thévenin and Norton equivalent circuits, superposition
MATH213/223. 2 hours lecture; 4 hours studio; 4.5 semester hours.
and source transformation, power and energy, maximum power transfer,
SYGN101. EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS (I, II, S)
first order transient response, algebra of complex numbers, phasor
Fundamental concepts concerning the nature, composition and
representation, time domain and frequency domain concepts, and ideal
evolution of the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere of
transformers. The course features PSPICE, a commercial circuit analysis
the earth integrating the basic sciences of chemistry, physics, biology
software package. Prerequisite: PHGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
and mathematics. Understanding of anthropological interactions with the
hours.
natural systems, and related discussions on cycling of energy and mass,
Beginning Fall 2011, EPIC2xx courses can be taken in lieu of
global warming, natural hazards, land use, mitigation of environmental
EPIC251, subject to approval by academic departments granting
problems such as toxic waste disposal, exploitation and conservation
ABET-accredited engineering degrees. These courses adhere to the
of energy, mineral and agricultural resources, proper use of water
Design EPICS II learning objectives, which are described for each
resources, biodiversity and construction. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4
course.
semester hours.

38 Undergraduate Information
EPIC251 Design EPICS II (I,II,S). Design EPICS II builds on the
communication with the use of computer software as tools to solve
design process introduced in Design EPICS I, which focuses on open-
engineering problems. Computer applications emphasize information
ended problem solving in which students integrate teamwork and
acquisition and processing based on knowing what new information
communications with the use of computer software as tools to solve
is necessary to solve a problem and where to find the information
engineering problems. Computer applications emphasize information
efficiently. This course implements the design process with drilling
acquisition and processing based on knowing what new information is
technology and automated drilling processes to solve multidisciplinary
necessary to solve a problem and where to find the information efficiently.
drilling project issues. Based on the project conditions set by the client,
Teams analyze team dynamics through weekly team meetings and
various alternatives and configurations are possible to meet the project
progress reports. The course emphasizes oral presentations and builds
objectives. Teams select and build a body of evidence to market their
on written communications techniques introduced in Design EPICS I
most desirable alternatives. Prerequisite: EPIC151. 3 semester hours.
Prerequisite: EPIC151. 3 semester hours.
EPIC264 – GEOLOGY GIS(II): Design EPICS II builds on the design
EPIC252 Leadership in Global Design EPICS II (I,II). EPIC252
process introduced in Design EPICS I, which focuses on open-
can be taken in place of EPIC251. Students integrate teamwork,
ended problem solving in which students integrate teamwork and
communications, computer software applications and project
communication with the use of computer software as tools to solve
management skills to solve engineering problems, and the deliverables
engineering problems. Computer applications emphasize information
are equivalent to those for EPICS 251. In addition, students examine
acquisition and processing based on knowing what new information is
the global nature of modern engineering design by combining a project
necessary to solve a problem and where to find the information efficiently.
of global interest with an emphasis on leadership and communications
There are typically eight geology-based projects in the course, based on
skills across a variety of cultures. To support these objectives, students
the needs of multiple outside clients. Many of the course deliverables
conduct research in the effect of international influences and cultural
are maps with associated data sets. Prerequisite: EPIC151. 3 semester
diversity on the acceptance and implementation of their design solutions.
hours.
Prerequisite: EPIC151. 4 semester hours.
EPIC265 – BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES (I,II): Design EPICS II builds
EPIC261 – GIS (I,II): Design EPICS II builds on the design process
on the design process introduced in Design EPICS I, which focuses
introduced in Design EPICS I, which focuses on open-ended problem
on open-ended problem solving in which students integrate teamwork
solving in which students integrate teamwork and communication with
and communication with the use of computer software as tools to solve
the use of computer software as tools to solve engineering problems.
engineering problems. Computer applications emphasize information
Computer applications emphasize information acquisition and processing
acquisition and processing based on knowing what new information
based on knowing what new information is necessary to solve a problem
is necessary to solve a problem and where to find the information
and where to find the information efficiently. EPICS261 – EPICS II
efficiently. This course emphasizes steady-state design in biochemical
GIS incorporates instruction and practice in ArcView, a geographic
production processes and provides exposure to information about
information system software package, to enable students to capture,
various manufacturing and research segments. Projects are selected
manage, analyze and display geographic information in maps, charts
to represent real-world biochemical engineering problems in biofuels,
or tables, with projects that depend on GIS for their design solutions.
food sciences and pharmaceuticals, wherein creative and critical thinking
Recent projects involving the use of GIS include campus emergency
skills are necessary. These projects may often involve computer-based
management and room usage maps, groundwater testing well analysis
optimization to obtain a solution. Students are exposed to the range of
and reporting for the Colorado Department of Agriculture and trail maps
core engineering computation skills that are utilized in both the chemical
for the Foothills Recreation District. Students interested in Petroleum
and biochemical engineering disciplines, and subsequently employ these
Engineering, or another major where GIS is used, should consider
skills to their design projects. This approach also integrates the content
registering for this section. Geology and Geological Engineering students
of future courses with the application of engineering design. Prerequisite:
are directed to register for EPIC264 – EPICS II Geology GIS, which is a
EPIC151. 3 semester hours.
different course. Prerequisite: EPIC151. 3 semester hours.
EPIC266 – CHEMICAL PROCESSES (I, II): Design EPICS II builds
EPIC262-AUTOCAD (I,II): Design EPICS II builds on the design process
on the design process introduced in Design EPICS I, which focuses
introduced in Design EPICS I, which focuses on open-ended problem
on open-ended problem solving in which students integrate teamwork
solving in which students integrate teamwork and communication with
and communication with the use of computer software as tools to solve
the use of computer software as tools to solve engineering problems.
engineering problems. Computer applications emphasize information
Computer applications emphasize information acquisition and processing
acquisition and processing based on knowing what new information
based on knowing what new information is necessary to solve a problem
is necessary to solve a problem and where to find the information
and where to find the information efficiently. AutoCAD incorporates
efficiently. This course emphasizes steady-state design in chemical
semester-long instruction and practice in AutoCAD computer-aided
production processes and provides exposure to information about
drawing, with projects involving the use of AutoCAD in design solutions.
various manufacturing and research segments. Projects are selected
Recent projects include remodeling plans for the Ford Building, a solar
to represent real-world chemical engineering problems in the energy
tree house education center, an environmentally sustainable house,
sectors, chemicals and environmental stewardship, wherein creative
and new structural designs for use in Haiti following the January 2010
and critical thinking skills are necessary. These projects may often
earthquake in Haiti. Students in the Civil Engineering specialty in
involve computer-based optimization to obtain a solution. Students are
Engineering, the Environmental Engineering specialty in Engineering,
exposed to the range of core engineering computation skills that are
or Mining Engineering, should consider registering for this course.
utilized in both the chemical and biochemical engineering disciplines, and
Prerequisite: EPIC151. 3 semester hours.
subsequently employ these skills to their design projects. This approach
also integrates the content of future courses with the application of
EPIC263 – DRILLING ENGINEERING (S): Design EPICS II builds on
engineering design. Prerequisite: EPIC151. 3 semester hours.
the design process introduced in Design EPICS I, which focuses on
open-ended problem solving in which students integrate teamwork and

Colorado School of Mines 39
EPIC267 – CIVIL ENGINEERING (II): Design EPICS II builds on the
design process introduced in Design EPICS I, which focuses on open-
ended problem solving in which students integrate teamwork and
communication with the use of computer software as tools to solve
engineering problems. Computer applications emphasize information
acquisition and processing based on knowing what new information is
necessary to solve a problem and where to find the information efficiently.
Prerequisite: EPIC151. 3 semester hours.
EPIC268 – GEOPHYSICAL ENGINEERING (II): Design EPICS II builds
on the design process introduced in Design EPICS I, which focuses
on open-ended problem solving in which students integrate teamwork
and communication with the use of computer software as tools to solve
engineering problems. Computer applications emphasize information
acquisition and processing based on knowing what new information is
necessary to solve a problem and where to find the information efficiently.
Students work on projects from the geophysical engineering practice in
which they analyze (process, model, visualize) data. In their projects,
students encounter limitations and uncertainties in data and learn
quantitative means for handling them. They learn how to analyze errors
in data, and their effects on data interpretation and decision making.
Prerequisite: EPIC151. 3 semester hours.

40 Undergraduate Information
Combined Undergraduate/
provide initial counseling on degree application procedures, admissions
standards and degree completion requirements.
Graduate Degree Programs
Admission into a graduate degree program as a Combined Degree
A. Overview
Program student can occur as early as the first semester, Junior
year, and must be granted no later than the end of registration, last
Many degree programs offer CSM undergraduate students the
semester Senior year. Once admitted into a graduate degree program,
opportunity to begin work on a Graduate Certificate, Professional
students may enroll in 500-level courses and apply these directly to
Master’s Degree, Master’s Degree or Doctoral Degree while completing
their graduate degree. To apply, students must submit the standard
the requirements for their Bachelor’s Degree. These combined
graduate application package for the graduate portion of their Combined
Bachelors-Masters/Doctoral programs have been created by Mines
Degree Program. Upon admission into a graduate degree program,
faculty in those situations where they have deemed it academically
students are assigned graduate advisors. Prior to registration for the next
advantageous to treat undergraduate and graduate degree programs as
semester, students and their graduate advisors should meet and plan a
a continuous and integrated process. These are accelerated programs
strategy for completing both the undergraduate and graduate programs
that can be valuable in fields of engineering and applied science where
as efficiently as possible. Until their undergraduate degree requirements
advanced education in technology and/or management provides the
are completed, students continue to have undergraduate advisors in the
opportunity to be on a fast track for advancement to leadership positions.
home department or division of their Bachelor’s Degrees.
These programs also can be valuable for students who want to get a
C. Requirements
head start on graduate education.
Combined Degree Program students are considered undergraduate
The combined programs at Mines offer several advantages to students
students until such time as they complete their undergraduate degree
who choose to enroll in them:
requirements. Combined Degree Program students who are still
1. Students can earn a graduate degree in their undergraduate major
considered undergraduates by this definition have all of the privileges
or in a field that complements their undergraduate major.
and are subject to all expectations of both their undergraduate and
2. Students who plan to go directly into industry leave Mines with
graduate programs. These students may enroll in both undergraduate
additional specialized knowledge and skills which may allow them to
and graduate courses (see section D below), may have access to
enter their career path at a higher level and advance more rapidly.
departmental assistance available through both programs, and may
Alternatively, students planning on attending graduate school can
be eligible for undergraduate financial aid as determined by the Office
get a head start on their graduate education.
of Financial Aid. Upon completion of their undergraduate degree
3. Students can plan their undergraduate electives to satisfy
requirements, a Combined Degree Program student is considered
prerequisites, thus ensuring adequate preparation for their graduate
enrolled full-time in his/her graduate program. Once having done so, the
program.
student is no longer eligible for undergraduate financial aid, but may now
be eligible for graduate financial aid. To complete their graduate degree,
4. Early assignment of graduate advisors permits students to plan
each Combined Degree Program student must register as a graduate
optimum course selection and scheduling in order to complete their
student for at least one semester.
graduate program quickly.
5. Early acceptance into a Combined Degree Program leading to a
Once admitted into a graduate program, undergraduate Combined
Graduate Degree assures students of automatic acceptance into
Program students must maintain good standing in the Combined
full graduate status if they maintain good standing while in early-
Program by maintaining a minimum semester GPA of 3.0 in all courses
acceptance status.
taken. Students not meeting this requirement are deemed to be making
6. In many cases, students will be able to complete both a Bachelor’s
unsatisfactory academic progress in the Combined Degree Program.
and a Master’s Degrees in five years of total enrollment at Mines.
Students for whom this is the case are subject to probation and, if
occurring over two semesters, subject to discretionary dismissal from
Certain graduate programs may allow Combined Degree Program
the graduate portion of their program as defined in the Unsatisfactory
students to fulfill part of the requirements of their graduate degree by
Academic Performance section of this Bulletin.
including up to six hours of specified course credits which also were
Upon completion of the undergraduate degree requirements, Combined
used in fulfilling the requirements of their undergraduate degree. These
Degree Program students are subject to all requirements (e.g., course
courses may only be applied toward fulfilling Doctoral degree or, Master’s
requirements, departmental approval of transfer credits, research credits,
degree requirements beyond the institutional minimum Master’s degree
minimum GPA, etc.) appropriate to the graduate program in which they
requirement of 30 credit hours. Courses must meet all requirements
are enrolled
for graduate credit, but their grades are not included in calculating
the graduate GPA. Check the departmental section of the Bulletin to
D. Enrolling in Graduate Courses as a
determine which programs provide this opportunity.
Senior in a Combined Program
B. Admission Process
As described in the Undergraduate Bulletin, seniors may enroll in 500-
A student interested in applying into a graduate degree program as a
level courses. In addition, undergraduate seniors who have been granted
Combined Degree Program student should first contact the department or
admission through the Combined Degree Program into thesis-based
division hosting the graduate degree program into which he/she wishes
degree programs (Masters or Doctoral) may, with graduate advisor
to apply. Initial inquiries may be made at any time, but initial contacts
approval, register for 700-level research credits appropriate to Masters-
made soon after completion of the first semester, Sophomore year are
level degree programs. With this single exception, while a Combined
recommended. Following this initial inquiry, departments/ divisions will
Degree Program student is still completing his/her undergraduate
degree, all of the conditions described in the Undergraduate Bulletin
for undergraduate enrollment in graduate-level courses apply. 700-

Colorado School of Mines 41
level research credits are always applied to a student’s graduate degree
program.
If an undergraduate Combined Degree Program student would like to
enroll in a 500-level course and apply this course directly to his/her
graduate degree, he/she must be formally accepted as a combined
program student through the Office of Graduate Studies and notify
the Registrar of the intent to do so at the time of enrollment in the
course. The Registrar will forward this information to Financial Aid for
appropriate action. Be aware that courses taken as an undergraduate
student but applied directly toward a graduate degree are not eligible for
undergraduate financial aid or the Colorado Opportunity Fund. If prior
consent is not received or if the student has not been accepted by OGS
as a combined program student, all 500-level graduate courses taken
as an undergraduate Combined Degree Program student will be applied
to the student’s undergraduate degree transcript. If these are not used
toward an undergraduate degree requirement, they may, with program
consent, be applied to a graduate degree program as transfer credit. All
regular regulations and limitations regarding the use of transfer credit to a
graduate degree program apply to these credits.

42 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
Applied Mathematics & Statistics
Students will demonstrate a breadth and depth of knowledge within
mathematics by:
http://ams.mines.edu
• Extending course material to solve original problems,
Program Description
• Applying knowledge of mathematics to the solution of problems,
• Identifying, formulating and solving mathematics problems, and
The Applied Mathematics and Statistics Department (AMS) offers an
• Analyzing and interpreting statistical data.
undergraduate degree in which the student will be exposed to a breadth
of coursework in computational mathematics, applied mathematics, and
Students will demonstrate an understanding and appreciation for the
statistics. In the senior year, students may choose an area of emphasis
relationship of mathematics to other fields by:
in either Computational and Applied Mathematics (CAM) or Statistics
• Applying mathematics and statistics to solve problems in other fields,
(STAT). Both of these options emphasize technical competence, problem
• Working in cooperative multidisciplinary teams, and
solving, teamwork, projects, relation to other disciplines, and verbal,
• Choosing appropriate technology to solve problems in other
written, and graphical skills.
disciplines.
The Department provides the teaching skills and technical expertise to
develop capabilities in computational mathematics, applied mathematics,
Students will demonstrate an ability to communicate mathematics
and statistics for all Colorado School of Mines (CSM) students. In
effectively by:
addition, AMS programs support targeted undergraduate majors and
• Giving oral presentations,
graduate degree programs relevant to mathematical and statistical
• Completing written explanations,
aspects of the CSM mission.
• Interacting effectively in cooperative teams, and
In a broad sense, these programs stress the development of practical
• Understanding and interpreting written material in mathematics.
application and techniques to enhance the overall attractiveness of
applied mathematics and statistics majors to a wide range of employers
Curriculum
in industry. More specifically, we utilize a summer field session program
The calculus sequence emphasizes mathematics applied to problems
to introduce concepts and techniques in advanced mathematics and the
students are likely to see in other fields. This supports the curricula in
senior capstone experiences in Computational and Applied Mathematics,
other programs where mathematics is important, and assists students
and Statistics to engage high-level undergraduate students in problems
who are under prepared in mathematics. Priorities in the mathematics
of practical applicability for potential employers. These courses are
curriculum include: applied problems in the mathematics courses and
designed to simulate an industrial job or research environment. The
ready utilization of mathematics in the science and engineering courses.
close collaboration with potential employers or professors improves
This emphasis on the utilization of mathematics continues through the
communication between our students and the private sector as well as
upper division courses. Another aspect of the curriculum is the use of a
with sponsors from other disciplines on campus. Applied Mathematics
spiraling mode of learning in which concepts are revisited to deepen the
and Statistics majors can use their free electives to take additional
students’ understanding.
courses of special interest to them. This adds to the flexibility of the
program and qualifies students for a wide variety of careers.
The applications, teamwork, assessment, and communications emphasis
directly address ABET criteria and the CSM graduate profile. The
The AMS Department also supports the legacy Bachelor of Mathematical
curriculum offers the following two areas of emphases:
and Computer Sciences degree with options in Computational and
Applied Mathematics (CAM), Statistics (STAT), and Computer Science
Degree Requirements (Applied Mathematics
(CS). For more information about the Bachelor of Mathematical and
and Statistics)
Computer Sciences degree please refer to previous years’ bulletins.
Computational and Applied Mathematics (CAM)
Program Educational Objectives
EMPHASIS
Freshman
(Bachelor of Science in Applied Mathematics
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
and Statistics)
MATH111
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4.0
4
AND ENGINEERS I
In addition to contributing toward achieving the educational objectives
described in the CSM Graduate Profile and the ABET Accreditation
CSCI101
INTRODUCTION TO
3.0
3
Criteria, the Applied Mathematics and Statistics Program at CSM has
COMPUTER SCIENCE
established the following program educational objectives:
CHGN121
PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY
3.0
3.0
4
I
Students will demonstrate technical expertise within mathematics and
LAIS100
NATURE AND HUMAN
4.0
4
statistics by:
VALUES
• Designing and implementing solutions to practical problems in science
PAGN101
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
0.5
and engineering, and
CSM101
FRESHMAN SUCCESS
0.5
0.5
• Using appropriate technology as a tool to solve problems in
SEMINAR
mathematics.
16.0

Colorado School of Mines 43
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
FREE
FREE ELECTIVE
1.0
1.0
MATH112
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4.0
4
16.0
AND ENGINEERS II
Senior
PHGN100
PHYSICS I - MECHANICS
3.0
3.0
4.5
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
DSCI
DISTRIBUTED SCIENCE
4.0
4.0
MATH424
INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED
3.0
3
ELECTIVE1
STATISTICS
EPIC151
DESIGN (EPICS) I
3.0
3
MATH440
PARALLEL SCIENTIFIC
3.0
3
PAGN102
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
0.5
COMPUTING (CAM required)
16.0
MATH455
PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL
3.0
3
EQUATIONS
Sophomore
FREE
FREE ELECTIVE
3.0
3.0
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
FREE
FREE ELECTIVE
3.0
3.0
MATH213
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4.0
4
AND ENGINEERS III
15.0
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
CSCI261
PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS
3.0
3
MATH
MATHEMATICS-CAM
3.0
3.0
PHGN200
PHYSICS II-
3.0
3.0
4.5
ELECTIVE3
ELECTROMAGNETISM AND
MATH
MATHEMATICS-CAM
3.0
3.0
OPTICS
ELECTIVE3
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
MATH484
MATHEMATICAL AND
3.0
3
15.0
COMPUTATIONAL
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
MODELING (CAPSTONE)
MATH323
PROBABILITY AND
3.0
3
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS ELECTIVE III
3.0
3.0
STATISTICS FOR
FREE
FREE ELECTIVE
3.0
3.0
ENGINEERS
15.0
MATH332
LINEAR ALGEBRA or 342
3.0
3
Total Hours: 130.5
CSCIxxx
COMPUTER ELECTIVE2
3.0
3.0
1
Students may choose from the remainder of the Distributed Science
SYGN200
HUMAN SYSTEMS
3.0
3
(SYGN101,BELS101, CHGN122) course list for this course.
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3
2
May be satisfied by CSCI262 or any other approved computationally
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
intensive course.
15.5
3
CAM area of emphasis electives include: Functional Analysis,
Summer
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Complex Analysis II, Numerical PDEs, Integral Equations, Modeling
MATH300
FOUNDATIONS OF
4
with Symbolic Software, and other appropriate courses with
ADVANCED MATHEMATICS
departmental approval.
4.0
Statistics (STATS) EMPHASIS
Junior
Freshman
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
MATH301
INTRODUCTION TO
3
MATH111
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4.0
4
ANALYSIS
AND ENGINEERS I
MATH331
MATHEMATICAL BIOLOGY
3
CSCI101
INTRODUCTION TO
3.0
3
MATH334
INTRODUCTION TO
3
COMPUTER SCIENCE
PROBABILITY
CHGN121
PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY
3.0
3.0
4
MATH398
APPLIED NUMERICAL
3.0
3.0
I
METHODS
LAIS100
NATURE AND HUMAN
4.0
4
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS ELECTIVE I
3.0
3.0
VALUES
FREE
FREE ELECTIVE
3.0
3.0
PAGN101
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
0.5
18.0
CSM101
FRESHMAN SUCCESS
0.5
0.5
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
SEMINAR
MATH335
INTRODUCTION TO
3.0
3
16.0
MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
MATH407
INTRODUCTION TO
3.0
3
MATH112
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4.0
4
SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING
AND ENGINEERS II
MATH454
COMPLEX ANALYSIS
3.0
3
PHGN100
PHYSICS I - MECHANICS
3.0
3.0
4.5
MATH458
ABSTRACT ALGEBRA
3.0
3
EPIC151
DESIGN (EPICS) I
3.0
3
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS ELECTIVE II
3.0
3.0

44 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
DSCI
DISTRIBUTED SCI.
4.0
4.0
Senior
ELECTIVE1
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
PAGN102
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
0.5
MATH424
INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED
3.0
3
16.0
STATISTICS
Sophomore
MATH432
SPATIAL STATISTICS
3
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
MATH455
PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL
3.0
3
EQUATIONS
MATH213
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4.0
4
AND ENGINEERS III
FREE
FREE ELECTIVE
3.0
3.0
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS FREE ELECTIVE III
3.0
3.0
CSCI261
PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS
3.0
3
15.0
PHGN200
PHYSICS II-
3.0
3.0
4.5
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
ELECTROMAGNETISM AND
MATH
STAT ELECTIVE3
3.0
3.0
OPTICS
MATH
STAT ELECTIVE3
3.0
3.0
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
MATH482
STATISTICS PRACTICUM
3.0
3
15.0
(STAT Capstone)
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
FREE
FREE ELECTIVE
3.0
3.0
MATH323
PROBABILITY AND
3.0
3
FREE
FREE ELECTIVE
3.0
3.0
STATISTICS FOR
15.0
ENGINEERS
Total Hours: 130.5
MATH332
LINEAR ALGEBRA or 342
3.0
3
CSCIXXX
COMPUTER SCIENCE
3.0
3.0
1
Students may choose from the remainder of the Distributed Science
ELECTIVE2
(SYGN101,BELS101, CHGN122) course list for this course.
SYGN200
HUMAN SYSTEMS
3.0
3
2
May be satisfied by CSCI262 or any other approved computationally
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3
intensive course.
3
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
STAT area of emphasis electives include: Advanced Statistical
Modeling, Multivariate Analysis, Stochastic Modeling, Survival
15.5
Analysis, and other appropriate courses with departmental approval.
Summer
lec
lab
sem.hrs
MATH300
FOUNDATIONS OF
4
ADVANCED MATHEMATICS
General CSM Minor/ASI requirements can be found here (p. 195).
4.0
Minor/ASI Computational and Applied
Junior
Mathematics (CAM)
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
For an Area of Special Interest (ASI) in Computational and
MATH301
INTRODUCTION TO
3
Applied Mathematics (CAM), the student should take the
ANALYSIS
following:
MATH331
MATHEMATICAL BIOLOGY
3
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3
MATH334
INTRODUCTION TO
3.0
3
or MATH235
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS HONORS
PROBABILITY
MATH332
LINEAR ALGEBRA
3
MATH398
APPLIED NUMERICAL
3.0
3.0
or MATH342
HONORS LINEAR ALGEBRA
METHODS
MATH398
APPLIED NUMERICAL METHODS
3.0
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS ELECTIVE I
3.0
3.0
FREE
FREE ELECTIVE
3.0
3.0
3 credit hours of CAM courses (1 course) from the CAM Courses List
18.0
below.
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
For a Minor in Computational and Applied Mathematics (CAM),
MATH335
INTRODUCTION TO
3.0
3
the student should take the following:
MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3
MATH407
INTRODUCTION TO
3.0
3
or MATH235
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS HONORS
SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING
MATH332
LINEAR ALGEBRA
3
MATH454
COMPLEX ANALYSIS
3.0
3
or MATH342
HONORS LINEAR ALGEBRA
MATH458
ABSTRACT ALGEBRA
3.0
3
MATH398
APPLIED NUMERICAL METHODS
3.0
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS ELECTIVE II
3.0
3.0
9 credit hours of CAM courses (3 courses) from the CAM Courses List
FREE
FREE ELECTIVE
1.0
1.0
below.
16.0

Colorado School of Mines 45
CAM Courses
For a Minor in Mathematical Sciences, the student should take
MATH301
INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS
3.0
the following:
MATH331
MATHEMATICAL BIOLOGY
3.0
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3
MATH348
ADVANCED ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS
3
or MATH235
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS HONORS
MATH406
ALGORITHMS
3
15 credit hours of Mathematics courses (5 courses) from either the CAM
MATH407
INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING
3
or STATISTICS Courses listed above, including one course at the 400-
MATH440
PARALLEL SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING
3
level.
MATH441
COMPUTER GRAPHICS
3
MATH454
COMPLEX ANALYSIS
3
MATH455
PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3
Courses
MATH457
INTEGRAL EQUATIONS
3
MATH100. INTRODUCTORY TOPICS FOR CALCULUS. 2.0 Hours.
MATH484
MATHEMATICAL AND COMPUTATIONAL
3
(S) An introduction and/or review of topics which are essential to the
MODELING (CAPSTONE)
background of an undergraduate student at CSM. This course serves as
a preparatory course for the Calculus curriculum and includes material
MATH498
SPECIAL TOPICS (in CAM)
3.0
from Algebra, Trigonometry,
MATH5XX
GRADUATE CAM ELECTIVE
3.0
Mathematical Analysis, and Calculus. Topics include basic algebra and
Minor/ASI Statistics
equation solving, solutions of inequalities, trigonometric functions and
identities, functions of a single variable, continuity, and limits of functions.
For an Area of Special Interest (ASI) in Statistics, the student
Does not apply toward undergraduate degree or g.p.a. Prerequisite:
should take the following:
Consent of Instructor. 2 hours lecture, 2 semester hours.
MATH323
PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS FOR
3
ENGINEERS
MATH111. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS I. 4.0
MATH334
INTRODUCTION TO PROBABILITY
3
Hours.
(I, II, S) First course in the calculus sequence, including elements of
MATH335
INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL
3
plane geometry. Functions, limits, continuity, derivatives and their
STATISTICS
application. Definite
MATH424
INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED STATISTICS
3
and indefinite integrals; Prerequisite: precalculus. 4 hours lecture; 4
For a Minor in Statistics, the student should take the following:
semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education
transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.
MATH323
PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS FOR
3
ENGINEERS
MATH112. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS II. 4.0
MATH334
INTRODUCTION TO PROBABILITY
3
Hours.
MATH335
INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL
3
(I, II, S) Vectors, applications and techniques of integration, infinite
STATISTICS
series, and an introduction to multivariate functions and surfaces.
MATH424
INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED STATISTICS
3
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH111. 4 hours lecture; 4
semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education
6 credit hours of Statistics courses (2 courses) from the Statistics
transfer. Equivalency for GT-MA1.
Courses List below.
MATH113. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS II -
MATH432
SPATIAL STATISTICS
3
SHORT FORM. 1.0 Hour.
MATH436
ADVANCED STATISTICAL MODELING
3
(I, II) This is a bridge course for entering freshmen and new transfer
MATH438
STOCHASTIC MODELS
3
students to CSM who have either a score of 5 on the BC AP Calculus
MATH439
SURVIVAL ANALYSIS
3
exam or who have taken an appropriate Calculus II course at another
MATH498
SPECIAL TOPICS (in STATISTICS)
3.0
institution (determined by a departmental review of course materials).
Two, three and n-dimensional space, vectors, curves and surfaces in 3-
MATH5XX
GRADUATE STATISTICS ELECTIVE
3.0
dimensional space, cylindrical and spherical
Mathematical Sciences (could include a mixture of CAM and
coordinates, and applications of these topics. Prerequisites: Consent of
STATISTICS courses).
Department. 1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour.
For an Area of Special Interest (ASI) in Mathematical Sciences,
MATH122. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS II
the student shoudl take the following:
HONORS. 4.0 Hours.
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3
(I) Same topics as those covered in MATH112 but with additional material
or MATH235
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS HONORS
and problems. Prerequisite: Consent of Department. 4 hours lecture; 4
semester hours.
9 credit hours of Mathematics courses (5 courses) from either the CAM or
STATISTICS Courses listed above, including one course at the 400-level.

46 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
MATH199. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
MATH235. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS HONORS. 3.0 Hours.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
(II) Same topics as those covered in MATH225 but with additional
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
material and problems. Prerequisite: Consent of Department. 3 hours
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
lecture; 3 semester hours.
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
MATH298. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
MATH213. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS III. 4.0
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
Hours.
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
(I, II, S) Multivariable calculus, including partial derivatives, multiple
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
integration, and vector calculus. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in
MATH112 or MATH122. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours. Approved for
MATH300. FOUNDATIONS OF ADVANCED MATHEMATICS. 4.0
Colorado Guaranteed General Education transfer. Equivalency for GT-
Hours.
MA1.
(S) (WI) This course is an introduction to communication in mathematics
as well computational tools for mathematics. This writing intensive
MATH214. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTIST AND ENGINEERS III - SHORT
course provides a transition from the Calculus sequence to the upper-
FORM. 1.0 Hour.
division mathematics curriculum at CSM. Topics include logic and
(I, II) This is a bridge course for entering freshmen and new transfer
recursion, techniques of mathematical proofs, reading and writing proofs,
students to CSM who have taken an appropriate Calculus III course at
mathematics software. Prerequisites: MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224.
another institution
2 hours lecture, 1 hour seminar, 2 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
(determined by a departmental review of course materials). Vector
Calculus including line and surface integrals with applications to work and
MATH301. INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS. 3.0 Hours.
flux, Green’s Theorem, Stokes’ Theorem and the Divergence Theorem.
(I) This course is a first course in real analysis that lays out the context
Prerequisites: Consent
and motivation of analysis in terms of the transition from power series
of Department. 1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour.
to those less predictable series. The course is taught from a historical
perspective. It covers an introduction to the real numbers, sequences
MATH222. INTRODUCTION TO DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS FOR
and series and their convergence, real-valued functions and their
GEOLOGISTS & GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERS. 2.0 Hours.
continuity and differentiability, sequences of functions and their pointwise
(II) An introduction to differential equations with a special emphasis on
and uniform convergence, and Riemann-Stieltjes integration theory.
problems in the earth related fields. Topics include first and second order
Prerequisite: MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224, and MATH332 or
ordinary differential equations, Laplace Transforms, and applications
MATH342. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
relevant to the earth related fields. Prerequisites: MATH213 or MATH223
or MATH224. Student must also be a declared major in Geology and
MATH323. PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS FOR ENGINEERS. 3.0
Geological Engineering. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
Hours.
Note: Only one of MATH222 and MATH225 can be counted toward
(I, II, S) Elementary probability, propagation of error, discrete and
graduation in GE. Any student who completes MATH222 and then
continuous probability models, interval estimation, hypothesis testing,
changes majors out of Geology and Geological Engineering, will be
and linear regression with emphasis on applications to science and
expected to complete MATH225 to meet graduation requirements. (In this
engineering. Pre -requisite: MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224. 3 hours
case, MATH222 cannot be counted toward graduation in any manner –
lecture; 3 semester hours.
even as a free elective.
MATH331. MATHEMATICAL BIOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
MATH223. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS III
(I) This course will discuss methods for building and solving both
HONORS. 4.0 Hours.
continuous and discrete mathematical models. These methods will be
(II) Same topics as those covered in MATH213 but with additional
applied to population dynamics, epidemic spread, pharmacokinetics
material and problems. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH122. 4
and modeling of physiologic systems. Modern Control Theory will be
hours lecture;
introduced and used to model living systems. Some concepts related to
4 semester hours.
self-organizing systems will be introduced. Prerequisite: MATH225 or
MATH235. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
MATH224. CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS III
HONORS. 4.0 Hours.
MATH332. LINEAR ALGEBRA. 3.0 Hours.
(I) Early introduction of vectors, linear algebra, multivariable calculus.
(I, II) Systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants and
Vector fields, line and surface integrals. Prerequisite: Consent of
eigenvalues. Linear
Department.
operators. Abstract vector spaces. Applications selected from linear
4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
programming, physics, graph theory, and other fields. Prerequisite:
MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MATH225. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. 3.0 Hours.
(I, II, S) Classical techniques for first and higher order equations and
systems of equations. Laplace transforms. Phase plane and stability
analysis on nonlinear equations and systems. Applications to physics,
mechanics, electrical engineering, and environmental sciences.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH112 or MATH122. 3 hours
lecture; 3 semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 47
MATH334. INTRODUCTION TO PROBABILITY. 3.0 Hours.
MATH406. ALGORITHMS. 3.0 Hours.
(I) An introduction to the theory of probability essential for problems
(I, II) Divide-and-conquer: splitting problems into subproblems of a finite
in science and engineering. Topics include axioms of probability,
number. Greedy: considering each problem piece one at a time for
combinatorics, conditional probability and independence, discrete and
optimality. Dynamic programming: considering a sequence of decisions
continuous probability density functions,
in problem solution. Searches and traversals: determination of the
expectation, jointly distributed random variables, Central Limit Theorem,
vertex in the given data set that satisfies a given property. Techniques of
laws of large numbers. Prerequisite: MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224.
backtracking, branch-andbound techniques, techniques in lower bound
3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
theory. Prerequisite: CSCI262 and (MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224,
and MATH358/CSCI358). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MATH335. INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS. 3.0
Hours.
MATH407. INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING. 3.0 Hours.
(II) An introduction to the theory of statistics essential for problems in
(I, II) Round-off error in floating point arithmetic, conditioning and stability,
science and engineering. Topics include sampling distributions, methods
solution techniques (Gaussian elimination, LU factorization, iterative
of point estimation, methods of interval estimation, significance testing for
methods) of linear algebraic systems, curve and surface fitting by the
population means and variances and goodness of fit, linear regression,
method of least-squares, zeros of nonlinear equations and systems by
analysis of variance. Prerequisite: MATH334. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester
iterative methods, polynomial interpolation and cubic splines, numerical
hours.
integration by adaptive quadrature and multivariate quadrature, numerical
methods for initial value problems in ordinary differential equations.
MATH340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION. 3.0 Hours.
Emphasis is on problem solving using efficient numerical methods in
(I, II, S) (WI) Supervised, full-time engineering-related employment
scientific computing. Prerequisite: MATH225 or MATH235 and knowledge
for a continuous six-month period (or its equivalent) in which specific
of computer programming. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
educational objectives are achieved. Prerequisite: Second semester
sophomore status and a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.00.
MATH424. INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED STATISTICS. 3.0 Hours.
0 to 3 semester hours. Cooperative Education credit does not count
(I) Linear regression, analysis of variance, and design of experiments,
toward graduation except under special conditions. Repeatable.
focusing on the construction of models and evaluation of their fit.
Techniques covered will include stepwise and best subsets regression,
MATH342. HONORS LINEAR ALGEBRA. 3.0 Hours.
variable transformations, and residual analysis. Emphasis will be placed
(II) Same topics as those covered in MATH332 but with additional
on the analysis of data with statistical software. Prerequisites: MATH323
material and problems as well as a more rigorous presentation.
or MATH335. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisite: MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224. 3 hours lecture; 3
semester hours.
MATH432. SPATIAL STATISTICS. 3.0 Hours.
(I) Modeling and analysis of data observed in a 2- or 3-dimensional
MATH348. ADVANCED ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS. 3.0 Hours.
region. Random fields, variograms, covariances, stationarity,
(I, II, S) Introduction to partial differential equations, with applications to
nonstationarity, kriging, simulation, Bayesian hierarchical models, spatial
physical phenomena. Fourier series. Linear algebra, with emphasis on
regression, SAR, CAR, QAR, and MA models, Geary/Moran indices,
sets of simultaneous equations. This course cannot be used as a MATH
point processes, K-function, complete spatial randomness, homogeneous
elective by MCS or AMS majors. Prerequisite: MATH225 or MATH235. 3
and inhomogeneous processes, marked point processes. Prerequisite:
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MATH335. Corequisite: MATH424. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MATH358. DISCRETE MATHEMATICS. 3.0 Hours.
MATH436. ADVANCED STATISTICAL MODELING. 3.0 Hours.
(I, II) This course is an introductory course in discrete mathematics and
(II) Modern methods for constructing and evaluating statistical models.
algebraic structures. Topics include: formal logic; proofs, recursion,
Topics include generalized linear models, generalized additive models,
analysis of algorithms; sets and combinatorics; relations, functions, and
hierarchical Bayes methods, and resampling methods. Prerequisites:
matrices; Boolean algebra and computer logic; trees, graphs, finite-state
MATH335 and MATH424. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
machines and regular languages. Prerequisite: MATH213, MATH223 or
MATH224. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MATH437. MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Introduction to applied multivariate techniques for data analysis.
MATH398. SPECIAL TOPICS. 6.0 Hours.
Topics include principal components, cluster analysis, MANOVA
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
and other methods based on the multivariate Gaussian distribution,
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
discriminant analysis, classification with nearest neighbors.Prerequisites:
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
MATH335 or MATH323. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
MATH438. STOCHASTIC MODELS. 3.0 Hours.
MATH399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(II) An introduction to stochastic models applicable to problems in
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
engineering,
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
physical science, economics, and operations research. Markov chains in
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
discrete and continuous time, Poisson processes, and topics in queuing,
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
reliability, and renewal theory. Prerequisite: MATH334. 3 hours lecture, 3
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
semester hours.

48 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
MATH439. SURVIVAL ANALYSIS. 3.0 Hours.
MATH457. INTEGRAL EQUATIONS. 3.0 Hours.
(I) Basic theory and practice of survival analysis. Topics include survival
(I) This is an introductory course on the theory and applications of integral
and hazard functions, censoring and truncation, parametric and non-
equations. Abel, Fredholm and Volterra equations. Fredholm theory:
parametric inference, hypothesis testing, the proportional hazards model,
small kernels, separable kernels, iteration, connections with linear
model diagnostics. Prerequisite: MATH335 or permission of instructor. 3
algebra and Sturm-Liouville problems. Applications to boundary-value
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
problems for Laplace’s equation and other partial differential equations.
Prerequisites: MATH332 or MATH342, and MATH455. 3 hours lecture; 3
MATH440. PARALLEL SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING. 3.0 Hours.
semester hours.
(I) This course is designed to facilitate students’ learning of parallel
programming techniques to efficiently simulate various complex
MATH458. ABSTRACT ALGEBRA. 3.0 Hours.
processes modeled by mathematical equations using multiple and multi-
(II) This course is an introduction to the concepts of contemporary
core processors. Emphasis will be placed on implementation of various
abstract algebra
scientific computing algorithms in FORTRAN 90 and its variants using
and applications of those concepts in areas such as physics and
MPI and OpenMP. Prerequisite: CSCI407/MATH407. 3 hours lecture; 3
chemistry. Topics include groups, subgroups, isomorphisms and
semester hours.
homomorphisms, rings, integral domains and fields. Prerequisites:
MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224, and MATH300 or consent of the
MATH441. COMPUTER GRAPHICS. 3.0 Hours.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(I) Data structures suitable for the representation of structures, maps,
three-dimensional plots. Algorithms required for windowing, color plots,
MATH474. INTRODUCTION TO CRYPTOGRAPHY. 3.0 Hours.
hidden surface and line, perspective drawings. Survey of graphics
(II) This course is primarily oriented towards the mathematical aspects of
software and hardware systems. Prerequisite: CSCI262. 3 hours lecture,
cryptography, but is also closely related to practical and theoretical issues
3 semester hours.
of computer security. The course provides mathematical background
required for cryptography including relevant aspects of number theory
MATH444. ADVANCED COMPUTER GRAPHICS. 3.0 Hours.
and mathematical statistics. The following aspects of cryptography
(I, II) This is an advanced computer graphics course, focusing on modern
will be covered: symmetric and asymmetric encryption, computational
rendering and geometric modeling techniques. Students will learn a
number theory, quantum encryption, RSA and discrete log systems,
variety of mathematical and algorithmic techiques that can be used to
SHA, steganography, chaotic and pseudo-random sequences, message
develop high-quality computer graphics software. In particular, the crouse
authentication, digital signatures, key distribution and key management,
will cover global illumination, GPU programming, geometry acquisition
and block ciphers. Many practical approaches and most commonly used
and processing, point based graphics and non-photorealistic rendering.
techniques will be considered and illustrated with real-life examples.
Prerequistes: Basic understanding of computer graphics and prior
Prerequisites: CSCI262, MATH334/MATH335, MATH358. 3 credit hours.
exposure to graphics-related programming, for example, MATH441. 3
lecture hours, 3 credit hours.
MATH482. STATISTICS PRACTICUM. 3.0 Hours.
(II) This is the capstone course in the Statistics option. Students will apply
MATH447. SCIENTIFIC VISUALIZATION. 3.0 Hours.
statistical principles to data analysis through advanced work, leading to
(I) Scientific visualization uses computer graphics to create visual
a written report and an oral presentation. Choice of project is arranged
images which aid in understanding of complex, often massive numerical
between the student and the individual faculty member who will serve
representation of scientific concepts or results. The main focus of this
as advisor. Prerequisites: MATH335 and MATH424. 3 hours lecture; 3
course is on modern visualization techniques applicable to spatial
semester hours.
data such as scalar, vector and tensor fields. In particular, the course
will cover volume rendering, texture based methods for vector and
MATH484. MATHEMATICAL AND COMPUTATIONAL MODELING
tensor field visualization, and scalar and vector field topology. Basic
(CAPSTONE). 3.0 Hours.
understanding of computer graphics and analysis of algorithms required.
(II) This is the capstone course in the Computational and Applied
Prerequisites: CSCI262 and MATH441. 3 lecture hours, 3 semester
Mathematics option. Students will apply computational and applied
hours.
mathematics modeling techniques to solve complex problems in
biological, engineering and physical systems. Mathematical methods
MATH454. COMPLEX ANALYSIS. 3.0 Hours.
and algorithms will be studied within both theoretical and computational
(II) The complex plane. Analytic functions, harmonic functions. Mapping
contexts. The emphasis is on how to formulate,
by elementary functions. Complex integration, power series, calculus of
analyze and use nonlinear modeling to solve typical modern problems.
residues. Conformal mapping. Prerequisite: MATH225 or MATH235. 3
Prerequisites: MATH331, MATH407, and MATH455. 3 hours lecture; 3
hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
semester hours.
MATH455. PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. 3.0 Hours.
MATH491. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1-3 Hour.
(I) Linear partial differential equations, with emphasis on the classical
(I) (WI) Individual investigation under the direction of a department faculty
second-order equations: wave equation, heat equation, Laplace’s
member. Written report required for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of
equation. Separation of variables, Fourier methods, Sturm-Liouville
Department Head. Variable - 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit
problems. Prerequisite: MATH225
to a maximum of 12 hours.
or MATH235. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 49
MATH492. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1-3 Hour.
(II) (WI) Individual investigation under the direction of a department
faculty member. Written report required for credit. Prerequisite: Consent
of Department Head. Variable - 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for
credit to a maximum of 12 hours.
MATH498. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
MATH499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

50 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
Civil and Environmental
In the final two years, students complete an advanced core that includes
electric circuits, engineering mechanics, advanced mathematics,
Engineering
thermodynamics, economics (sophomore year for EV), engineering
design, and additional studies in liberal arts topics. Students then also
http://cee.mines.edu/
begin a set of unique upper-division course requirements. Free electives
Program Description
(9 to 12 credits), at the student’s discretion, can be used to either satisfy
a student’s personal interest in a topic or they can be used as coursework
The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering offers design-
as part of an "area of special interest" of at least 12 semester hours or a
oriented, interdisciplinary, non-traditional undergraduate programs
minor of at least 18 semester hours in another department or division.
in Civil Engineering and Environmental Engineering. The degrees
All students must complete a capstone design course which is focused
emphasize fundamental engineering principles and require in-depth
on an in-depth multi-disciplinary engineering project. The projects are
understanding of either Civil or Environmental Engineering. Graduates
generated by customer demand, and include experiential verification to
are in a position to take advantage of a broad variety of professional
ensure a realistic design experience.
opportunities, and are well- prepared for an engineering career in a world
of rapid technological change. This department also supports the legacy
Prospective students should note that this is an integrated, broad-
Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering with specialties in Civil or
based and interdisciplinary engineering program. Engineering analysis
Environmental Engineering offered by the College of Engineering &
and design is emphasized with interdisciplinary application for
Computational Sciences.
industrial projects, structures and processes. For example, our unique
Multidisciplinary Engineering Laboratory sequence promotes life-long
The legacy B.S. in Engineering degree is accredited by ABET. The
learning skills using state-of-the-art instrumentation funded through a
B.S. degrees in Civil and Environmental Engineering are new as
combination of grants from the U.S. Department of Education, private
of the 2012-2013 school year and are therefore not yet accredited.
industry contributions, and investment by CSM.
Accreditation for those degrees will be sought during the 2013-2014
school year.
The Civil Engineering degree builds on the multidisciplinary engineering
principles of the core curriculum to focus in Geotechnical Engineering,
Program Educational Objectives
Engineering Mechanics, Environmental Engineering, and Structural
(Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering
Engineering. Civil students are also asked to choose three civil elective
and Bachelor of Science in Environmental
courses from a list that includes offerings from CEE and other civil-
oriented departments at CSM such as Geological Engineering and Mining
Engineering)
Engineering. These electives give students the opportunity for further
The CEE Department contributes to the educational objectives described
specialization in other areas of Civil Engineering.
in the CSM Graduate Profile and the ABET Accreditation Criteria. In
The Environmental Engineering degree introduces students to the
addition, the Civil and Environmental Engineering Programs at CSM have
fundamentals of environmental engineering including the scientific and
established the following program educational objectives:
regulatory basis of public health and environmental protection. The
Within three years of attaining the BS degree:
degree is designed to prepare students to investigate and analyze
• Graduates will be situated in growing careers or will be successfully
environmental systems and assess risks to public health and ecosystems
pursuing a graduate degree in civil or environmental engineering or a
as well as evaluate and design natural and engineered solutions to
related field.
mitigate risks and enable beneficial outcomes. Programs of study are
interdisciplinary in scope, and consequently the appropriate coursework
• Graduates will be advancing in their professional standing, generating
may be obtained from multiple departments at CSM. Topics covered
new knowledge and/or exercising leadership in their field.
include water reclamation and reuse, hazardous waste management,
contaminated site remediation, environmental science, and regulatory
• Graduates will be contributing to the needs of society through
processes.
professional practice, research, and/or service.
Students interested in a more research-oriented component to their
Curriculum
undergraduate curriculum are encouraged to take on an Independent
During the first two years at CSM, students complete a set of core
Study project with one of the Civil and Environmental Engineering
courses that includes mathematics, basic sciences, and engineering
Faculty. These projects can offer a useful experience that is relevant to
sciences. Course work in mathematics is an essential part of the
future graduate work.
curriculum which gives engineering students tools for modeling,
analyzing, and predicting physical phenomena. The basic sciences are
Bachelor of Science in
represented by physics and chemistry which provide an appropriate
foundation in the physical sciences. Engineering sciences build upon the
Civil Engineering Degree
basic sciences and are focused on applications.
Requirements:
The first two years also include Engineering design course work within
the Engineering Practice Introductory Course Sequence (EPICS I and
Freshman
II). This experience teaches design methodology and stresses the
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
creative and synthesis aspects of the engineering profession. Finally,
the first two years include systems-oriented courses with humanities and
PAGN101
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
social sciences content; these courses explore the linkages within the
LAIS100
NATURE AND HUMAN
4
environment, human society, and engineered systems.
VALUES

Colorado School of Mines 51
CHGN121
PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY
4
EGGN413
COMPUTER AIDED
3
I
ENGINEERING
CSM101
FRESHMAN SUCCESS
0.5
16.0
SEMINAR
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
SYGN101
EARTH & ENV SYSTEMS
4
EGCV
Civil Engineering Elective*
3.0
MATH111
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4
ELECT
AND ENGINEERS I
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
17.0
DCGN210
INTRO TO ENG
3
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
THERMODYNAMICS
PAGN102
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
EGGN464
FOUNDATIONS
3
CHGN122
PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY
4
EGGN444
DESIGN OF STEEL
3
II (SC1)
STRUCTURES or 445
PHGN100
PHYSICS I - MECHANICS
4.5
EGGN353
FUNDAMENTALS OF
3
MATH112
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
AND ENGINEERS II
AND ENGINEERING I or 354
EPIC151
DESIGN (EPICS) I
3
18.0
16.0
Senior
Sophomore
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
EGCV
Civil Engineering Elective*
3.0
ELECT
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective II
3.0
PHGN200
PHYSICS II-
4.5
ELECTROMAGNETISM AND
EGGN350
MULTIDISCIPLINARY
1.5
OPTICS
ENGINEERING LABORATORY
II
MATH213
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4
AND ENGINEERS III
MATH323
PROBABILITY AND
3
STATISTICS FOR
DCGN241
DIST CORE - STATICS
3
ENGINEERS
CSCI260
FORTRAN PROGRAMMING,
2
EGGN315
DYNAMICS
3
261, or EGGN 205
EGGN491
SENIOR DESIGN I
3
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
16.5
17.0
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
EGCV
SYGN200
HUMAN SYSTEMS
3
Civil Engineering Elective*
3.0
ELECT
EGGN250
MULTIDISCIPLINARY
1.5
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective III
3.0
ENGINEERING LABORATORY
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
EGGN281
INTRODUCTION TO
3
ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS,
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
ELECTRONICS AND POWER
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
EGGN351
FLUID MECHANICS
3
EGGN492
SENIOR DESIGN II
3
EGGN320
MECHANICS OF MATERIALS
3
18.0
EPIC251
DESIGN (EPICS) II
3
Total Hours: 138.5
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
* Civil Engineering students are required to take three Civil elective
17.0
courses from the following lists. Students must take at least two electives
Summer
lec
lab
sem.hrs
form the A list.
EGGN234
ENGINEERING FIELD
3
List A Electives:
SESSION, CIVIL SPECIALTY
3.0
EGGN353
FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL
3
Junior
SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING I
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
EGGN354
FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL
3
SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING II
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective I
3.0
EGGN451
HYDRAULIC PROBLEMS
3
EGGN361
SOIL MECHANICS
3
EGGN453
WASTEWATER ENGINEERING
3
EGGN363
SOIL MECHANICS
1
LABORATORY
EGGN454
WATER SUPPLY ENGINEERING
3
EGGN342
STRUCTURAL THEORY
3
EGGN455
SOLID AND HAZARDOUS WASTE
3
ENGINEERING
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3

52 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
EGGN456
SCIENTIFIC BASIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL
3
CSM101
FRESHMAN SUCCESS
0.5
REGULATIONS
SEMINAR
EGGN457
SITE REMEDIATION ENGINEERING
3
PAGN101
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
EGGN307
INTRODUCTION TO FEEDBACK CONTROL
3
17.0
SYSTEMS
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
EBGN321
ENGINEERING ECONOMICS
3
CHGN122
PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY
4
EGGN460
NUMERICAL METHODS FOR ENGINEERS
3
II (SC1)
EGGN433
SURVEYING II
3
MATH112
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4
EGGN465
UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS
3
AND ENGINEERS II
EGGN448
ADVANCED SOIL MECHANICS
3
EPIC151
DESIGN (EPICS) I
3
EGGN534
SOIL BEHAVIOR
3
PHGN100
PHYSICS I - MECHANICS
4.5
EGGN531
SOIL DYNAMICS
3
PAGN102
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
MNGN321
INTRODUCTION TO ROCK MECHANICS
3
16.0
EGGN422
ADVANCED MECHANICS OF MATERIALS
3
Sophomore
EGGN442
FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR ENGINEERS
3
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
EGGN473
FLUID MECHANICS II
3
MATH213
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4
AND ENGINEERS III
EGGN478
ENGINEERING VIBRATION
3
SYGN200
HUMAN SYSTEMS
3
EGGN441
ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS
3
DCGN209
DIST CORE THERMO, 210, or
3
EGGN444
DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES
3
EGGN 371
or EGGN445
DESIGN OF REINFORCED CONCRETE
PHGN200
PHYSICS II-
4.5
STRUCTURES
ELECTROMAGNETISM AND
EGGN447
TIMBER AND MASONRY DESIGN
3
OPTICS
or EGGN547
TIMBER AND MASONRY DESIGN
DCGN241
DIST CORE - STATICS
3
EGGN549
ADVANCED DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES
3
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
EGGN556
DESIGN OF REINFORCED CONCRETE
3
18.0
STRUCTURES
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
List B Electives:
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3
EBGN553
PROJECT MANAGEMENT
3
EGGN281
INTRODUCTION TO
3
ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS,
ESGN399
INDEPENDENT STUDY
1-6
ELECTRONICS AND POWER
EGGN490
SUSTAINABLE ENGINEERING DESIGN
3
EGGN320
MECHANICS OF MATERIALS
3
MNGN404
TUNNELING
3
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3
MNGN405
ROCK MECHANICS IN MINING
3
EGGN250
MULTIDISCIPLINARY
1.5
MNGN406
DESIGN AND SUPPORT OF UNDERGROUND
3
ENGINEERING LABORATORY
EXCAVATIONS
EPIC251
DESIGN (EPICS) II
3
GEGN466
GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING
3
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
GEGN468
ENGINEERING GEOLOGY AND GEOTECHNICS
4
17.0
GEGN473
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING SITE
3
Junior
INVESTIGATION
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Bachelor of Science in
BIOSCI
Bioscience Elective**
3.0
Environmental Engineering
ELECT
ESGN353
FUNDAMENTALS OF
3
Degree Requirements:
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
AND ENGINEERING I
Freshman
CSCI260
FORTRAN PROGRAMMING or
2
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
261
CHGN121
PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY
4
EGGN315
DYNAMICS
3
I
EGGN351
FLUID MECHANICS
3
MATH111
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
AND ENGINEERS I
17.0
SYGN101
EARTH & ENV SYSTEMS
4
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
LAIS100
NATURE AND HUMAN
4
ESGN354
FUNDAMENTALS OF
3
VALUES
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
AND ENGINEERING II

Colorado School of Mines 53
ESGN355
ENVIRONMENTAL
3
EGGN/
WATER SUPPLY ENGINEERING
3
ENGINEERING LABORATORY
ESGN454
MATH323
PROBABILITY AND
3
EGGN/
SITE REMEDIATION ENGINEERING
3
STATISTICS FOR
ESGN457
ENGINEERS
ESGN460
ONSITE WATER RECLAMATION AND REUSE
3
EGGN350
MULTIDISCIPLINARY
1.5
ESGN462
SOLID WASTE MINIMIZATION AND
3
ENGINEERING LABORATORY
RECYCLING
II
ESGN463
POLLUTION PREVENTION: FUNDAMENTALS
3
EGEV
Environmental Engineering
3.0
AND PRACTICE
ELECT
Elective*
ESGN490
ENVIRONMENTAL LAW
3
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective I
3.0
GEGN466
GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING
3
16.5
or GEGN467
GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING
Summer
lec
lab
sem.hrs
** Environmental Engineering students are required to take one
EGGN335
ENGINEERING FIELD
3
Bioscience Elective course from the following list:
SESSION, ENVIRONMENTAL
SPECIALTY
Environmental Engineering Bioscience
3.0
Electives:
Senior
BELS101
BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL
4
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
SYSTEMS
EGGN491
SENIOR DESIGN I
3
BELS301
GENERAL BIOLOGY I
3
ESGN459
HYDROLOGIC AND WATER
3
CHGN462
MICROBIOLOGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
3
RESOURCES ENGINEERING
ESGN401
FUNDAMENTALS OF ECOLOGY
3
or EGGN 451
ESGN453
WASTEWATER ENGINEERING
3
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
EGEV
Environmental Engineering
3.0
ELECT
General CSM Minor/ASI requirements can be found here (p. 195).
Elective*
EGEV
Environmental Engineering
3.0
Civil or Environmental Engineering Minor and
ELECT
Elective*
ASI
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective II
3.0
The Civil and Environmental Engineering department supports the Civil
18.0
Engineering and Environmental Engineering Specialty Minors housed
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
within the College of Engineering and Computational Sciences. Please
EGGN492
SENIOR DESIGN II
3
refer to the Minor tab within the Engineering section of the bulletin for
more information.
ESGN490
ENVIRONMENTAL LAW
3
EGEV
Environmental Engineering
3.0
ELECT
Elective*
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective III
3.0
Courses
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
EGGN234. ENGINEERING FIELD SESSION, CIVIL SPECIALTY. 3.0
15.0
Hours.
Total Hours: 137.5
(S) The theory and practice of modern surveying. Lectures and hands-
on field work teaches horizontal, vertical, and angular measurements and
* Environmental Engineering students are required to take four
computations using traditional and modern equipment. Subdivision of
Environmental Elective courses from the following list:
land and applications to civil engineering practice, GPS and astronomic
Environmental Engineering Electives:
observations. Prerequisite: EPIC251. Three weeks (6 day weeks) in
summer field session; 3 semester hours.
ESGN401
FUNDAMENTALS OF ECOLOGY
3
ESGN403
INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL
3
EGGN320. MECHANICS OF MATERIALS. 3.0 Hours.
CHEMISTRY
(I, II, S) Fundamentals of stresses and strains, material properties
including axial, torsional, bending, and combined loadings. Stress
ESGN440
ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION: SOURCES,
3.0
at a point; stress transformations and Mohr’s circle for stress; beam
CHARACTERISTICS, TRANSPORT AND FATE
deflections, thin-wall pressure vessels, columns and buckling, and
ESGN459
HYDROLOGIC AND WATER RESOURCES
3
stress concentrations. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Prerequisite:
ENGINEERING
DCGN241 or MNGN317. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
or EGGN451
HYDRAULIC PROBLEMS
EGGN/
WASTEWATER ENGINEERING
3
ESGN453

54 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
EGGN335. ENGINEERING FIELD SESSION, ENVIRONMENTAL
EGGN431. SOIL DYNAMICS. 3.0 Hours.
SPECIALTY. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Soil Dynamics combines engineering vibrations with soil mechanics,
(S) The environmental module is intended to introduce students
analysis, and design. Students will learn to apply basic principles of
to laboratory and field analytical skills used in the analysis of an
dynamics towards the analysis and design of civil infrastructure systems
environmental engineering problem. Students will receive instruction on
when specific issues as raised by the inclusion of soil materials must be
the measurement of water quality parameters (chemical, physical, and
considered. Prerequisites: EGGN320,
bio logical) in the laboratory and field. The student will use these skills to
EGGN361, and MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
collect field data and analyze a given environmental engineering problem.
Prerequisites:
EGGN433. SURVEYING II. 3.0 Hours.
EGGN353, EPIC251, MATH323. Three weeks in summer session; 3
(I) Engineering projects with local control using levels, theodolites and
semester hours.
total stations, including surveying applications of civil engineering work in
the "field". Also includes engineering astronomy and computer generated
EGGN342. STRUCTURAL THEORY. 3.0 Hours.
designs; basic road design including centerline staking, horizontal and
(I, II) Analysis of determinate and indeterminate structures for both
vertical curves, slope staking and earthwork volume calculations. Use
forces and deflections. Influence lines, work and energy methods,
of commercial software for final plan/profile and earthwork involved for
moment distribution, matrix operations, computer methods. Prerequisite:
the road project data collected in the field. Conceptual and mathematical
EGGN320. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
knowledge of applying GPS data to engineering projects. Some
discussion of the principles and equations of projections (Mercator,
EGGN353. FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND
Lambert, UTM, State Plane, etc.) and their relationship to the databases
ENGINEERING I. 3.0 Hours.
of coordinates based on (North American Datum) NAD ’27, NAD ’83 and
(I, II) Introductory level fundamentals in atmospheric systems, air pollution
(High Accuracy Reference Network) HARN. Prerequisite: EGGN234. 2
control, solid waste management, hazardous waste management,
hours lecture; 8-9 field work days; 3 semester hours.
waste minimization, pollution prevention, role and responsibilities
of public institutions and private organizations in environmental
EGGN435. HIGHWAY AND TRAFFIC ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
management(relative to air, solid and hazardous waste). Prerequisite:
The emphasis of this class is on the multi-disciplinary nature of highway
CHGN122, PHGN100 and MATH213, or consent of instruc tor. 3 hours
and traffic engineering and its application to the planning and design
lecture; 3 semester hours.
of transportation facilities. In the course of the class the students will
examine design problems that
EGGN354. FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND
will involve: geometric design, surveying, traffic operations, hydrology,
ENGINEERING II. 3.0 Hours.
hydraulics, elements of bridge design, statistics, highway safety,
(I, II) Topics covered include history of water related environmental
transportation planning, engineering ethics, soil mechanics, pavement
law and regulation, major sources and concerns of water pollution,
design, economics, environmental
water quality parameters and their measurement, material and energy
science. 3 credit hours. Taught on demand.
balances, water chemistry concepts, microbial concepts, aquatic
toxicology and risk assessment. Prerequisite: CHGN122, PHGN100 and
EGGN441. ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS. 3.0 Hours.
MATH213, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(II) Introduction to advanced structural analysis concepts. Nonprismatic
structures. Arches, Suspension and cable-stayed bridges. Structural
EGGN361. SOIL MECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.
optimization. Computer Methods. Structures with nonlinear materials.
(I, II) An introductory course covering the engineering
Internal force redistribution for statically indeterminate structures.
properties of soil, soil phase relationships and classification. Principle of
Graduate credit requires additional homework and projects. Prerequisite:
effective stress. Seepage through soils and flow nets. Soil
EGGN342. 3 hour lectures; 3 semester hours.
compressibility,
consolidation and settlement prediction. Shear strength of soils.
EGGN442. FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR ENGINEERS. 3.0 Hours.
Prerequisite: EGGN320. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(I, II) General theories of stress and strain; stress and strain
transformations, principal stresses and strains, octahedral shear stresses,
EGGN363. SOIL MECHANICS LABORATORY. 1.0 Hour.
Hooke’s law for isotropic material, and failure criteria. Introduction to
(I, II) Intro duction to laboratory testing methods in soil mechanics.
elasticity and to energy methods. Torsion of noncircular and thin-walled
Classification, permeability, compressibility, shear strength. Prerequisite:
members. Unsymmetrical bending and shear-center, curved beams, and
EGGN361 or concurrent enrollment. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
beams
on elastic foundations. Introduction to plate theory. Thick-walled cylinders
EGGN398C. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGINEERING. 1-6 Hour.
and contact stresses. Prerequisite: EGGN320 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
hours.
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.

Colorado School of Mines 55
EGGN444. DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES. 3.0 Hours.
EGGN454. WATER SUPPLY ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
(I, II) To learn application and use the American Institute of Steel
(I) Water supply availability and quality. Theory and design of
Construction (AISC) Steel Construction Manual. Course develops an
conventional potable water treatment unit processes. Design of
understanding of the underlying theory for the design specifications.
distribution systems. Also includes regulatory analysis under the Safe
Students learn basic steel structural
Drinking Water Act (SDWA). Prerequisite: EGGN353/ESGN353, or
member design principles to select the shape and size of a structural
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
member. The design and analysis of tension members, compression
members, flexural members, and members under combined loading is
EGGN455. SOLID AND HAZARDOUS WASTE ENGINEERING. 3.0
included, in addition to basic
Hours.
bolted and welded connection design. Prerequisite: EGGN342. 3 hours
(I) This course provides an introduction and overview of the engineering
lecture; 3 semester hours.
aspects of solid and hazardous waste management. The focus is on
control technologies for solid wastes from common municipal and
EGGN445. DESIGN OF REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES. 3.0
industrial sources and the end-of-pipe waste streams and process
Hours.
residuals that are generated in some key industries. Prerequisite:
(I, II) This course provides an introduction to the materials and
EGGN354/ESGN354. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
principles involved in the design of reinforced concrete. It will allow
students
EGGN456. SCIENTIFIC BASIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS.
to develop an understanding of the fundamental behavior of reinforced
3.0 Hours.
concrete under compressive, tensile, bending, and shear loadings, and
(II) A critical examination of the experiments, calculations and
gain a
assumptions underpinning numerical and narrative standards contained
working knowledge of strength design theory and its application to the
in federal and state environmental regulations. Top-down investigations
design
of the his torical development of selected regulatory guidelines and
of reinforced concrete beams, columns, slabs, and footings.
permitting procedures. Student directed design of improved regulations.
Prerequisite: EGGN342. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisite: EGGN/ESGN353 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
semester hours.
EGGN447. TIMBER AND MASONRY DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.
(II) The course develops the theory and design methods required for the
EGGN457. SITE REMEDIATION ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
use of timber and masonry as structural materials. The design of walls,
(II) This course describes the engineering principles and practices
beams, columns, beam-columns, shear walls, and structural systems are
associated with the characterization and remediation of contaminated
covered for each material. Gravity, wind, snow, and seismic loads are
sites. Methods for site characterization and risk assessment will be
calculated and utilized for design. Prerequisite: EGGN320 or equivalent.
highlighted while the emphasis will be on remedial action screening
3 hours lecture: 3 semester hours. Spring odd years.
processes and technology principles and conceptual design. Common
isolation and containment and in situ and ex situ treatment technology will
EGGN448. ADVANCED SOIL MECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.
be covered. Computerized decision-support tools will be used and case
Advanced soil mechanics theories and concepts as applied to analysis
studies will be presented. Prerequisite: EGGN/ESGN354 or consent of
and design in geotechnical engineering. Topics covered will include
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
seepage, consolidation, shear strength and probabilistic methods.
The course will have an emphasis on numerical solution techniques
EGGN460. NUMERICAL METHODS FOR ENGINEERS. 3.0 Hours.
to geotechnical problems by finite elements and finite differences.
(S) Introduction to the use of numerical methods in the solution of
Prerequisite: EGGN361. 3 hour lectures; 3 semester hours. Fall even
problems encountered in engineering analysis and design, e.g. linear
years.
simultaneous equations (e.g. analysis of elastic materials, steady heat
flow); roots of nonlinear equations (e.g. vibration problems, open channel
EGGN451. HYDRAULIC PROBLEMS. 3.0 Hours.
flow); eigen-value problems (e.g. natural frequencies, buckling and
(I) Review of fundamentals, forces on submerged surfaces, buoyancy
elastic stability); curve fitting and differentiation (e.g. interpretation of
and flotation, gravity dams, weirs, steady flow in open channels,
experimental data, estimation of gradients); integration (e.g. summation
backwater curves, hydraulic machinery, elementary hydrodynamics,
of pressure distributions, finite element properties, local averaging );
hydraulic structures. Prerequisite: EGGN351. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
ordinary differential equations (e.g. forced vibrations, beam bending)
hours.
All course participants will receive source code consisting of a suite
of numerical methods programs. Prerequisite: CSCI260 or CSCI261,
EGGN453. WASTEWATER ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
MATH225, EGGN320. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(I) The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the fundamental
phenomena involved in wastewater treatment processes (theory) and
EGGN464. FOUNDATIONS. 3.0 Hours.
the engineering approaches used in designing such processes (design).
(I, II) Techniques of subsoil investigation, types of foundations and
This course will focus on the physical, chemical and biological processes
foundation problems, selection of basis for design of foundation types.
applied to liquid wastes of municipal origin. Treatment objectives will be
Open-ended problem solving and decision making. Prerequisite:
discussed as the driving force for wastewater treatment. Prerequisite:
EGGN361. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN353/ESGN353 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
hours.

56 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
EGGN465. UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.
ESGN353. FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND
The focus of this course is on soil mechanics for unsaturated soils. It
ENGINEERING I. 3.0 Hours.
provides an introduction to thermodynamic potentials in partially saturated
(I, II) Introductory level fundamentals in atmospheric systems, air pollution
soils, chemical potentials of adsorbed water in partially saturated soils,
control, solid waste management, hazardous waste management,
phase properties and relations, stress state variables, measurements of
waste minimization, pollution prevention, role and responsibilities
soil water suction, unsaturated flow laws, measurement of unsaturated
of public institutions and private organizations in environmental
permeability, volume change theory, effective stress principle, and
management(relative to air, solid and hazardous waste). Prerequisite:
measurement of volume changes in partially saturated soils. The course
CHGN122, PHGN100 and MATH213, or consent of instruc tor. 3 hours
is designed for seniors and graduate students in various branches of
lecture; 3 semester hours.
engineering and geology that are concerned with unsaturated soil’s
hydrologic and mechanics behavior. Prerequisites: EGGN361 or consent
ESGN354. FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Taught on demand.
ENGINEERING II. 3.0 Hours.
(I, II) Topics covered include history of water related environmental
EGGN494. INTRODUCTION TO THE SEISMIC DESIGN OF
law and regulation, major sources and concerns of water pollution,
STRUCTURES. 3.0 Hours.
water quality parameters and their measurement, material and energy
(I) This course provides students with an introduction to seismic design
balances, water chemistry concepts, microbial concepts, aquatic
as it relates to structures. Students will become familiar with the sources
toxicology and risk assessment. Prerequisite: CHGN122, PHGN100 and
of seismic disturbances, the physics of seismic energy transmission, and
MATH213, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
the relationship between ground disturbance and the resulting forces
experienced by structures. The theory and basis for existing building
ESGN355. ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY. 3.0
code provisions relating to seismic design of structures will be introduced.
Hours.
Building code requirements and design methodologies will be examined
(I) This course introduces the laboratory and experimental techniques
and applied. Prerequisites: EGGN444, or EGGN445, or EGGN447. 3
used for generating and interpreting data in environmental science
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and engineering related to water, land, and environmental health.
An emphasis is placed on quantitative chemical and microbiological
EGGN498C. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGINEERING. 1-6 Hour.
analysis of water and soil samples relevant to water supply and
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
wastewater discharge. Topics include basic water quality measurements
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
(pH, conductivity, etc.) and quantitative analysis of chemicals by
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
chromatographic and mass spectrometric techniques. Advanced topics
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
include quantitative and qualitative analysis of bioreactor performance,
bench testing for water treatment, and measurement and control of
EGGN499C. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
disinfection by-products. Prerequisites: ESGN 353 or ESGN 354, or
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
consent of instructor. 1 hour lecture, 6 hour lab. 3 semester hours.
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
ESGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
ESGN203. NATURAL AND ENGINEERED ENVIRONMENTAL
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
Introduction to natural and engineered enviornmental systems
analysis. Environmental decision making, sustainable development,
ESGN401. FUNDAMENTALS OF ECOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
pollution sources, effects and prevention, and environmental life
(II) Biological and ecological principles discussed and industrial examples
cycle assessment. The basic concepts of material balances, energy
of their use given. Analysis of ecosystem processes, such as erosion,
balances, chemical equilibrium and kinetics and structure and function
succession, and how these processes relate to engineering activities,
of biological systems will be used to analyze environmental systems.
including engineering design and
Case studies in sustainable development, industrial ecology, pollution
plant operation. Criteria and performance standards analyzed for facility
prevention and life cycle assessment with be covered. The goal of this
siting, pollution control, and mitigation of impacts. North American
course is to develop problem-solving skills associated with the analysis
ecosystems analyzed. Concepts of forestry, range, and wildlife
of environmental systems. Prerequisites: CHGN122 or concurrent;
management integrated as they apply to
MATH112 or concurrent; PHGN 100; SYGN101. 3 semester hours.
all of the above. Three to four weekend trips will be arranged during the
semester. 3 lecture hours, 3 semester hours.
ESGN299. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

Colorado School of Mines 57
ESGN403. INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY. 3.0
ESGN456. SCIENTIFIC BASIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS.
Hours.
3.0 Hours.
(I) Processes by which natural and anthropogenic chemicals interact,
(I) A critical examination of the experiments, calculations and
react and are
assumptions underpinning numerical and narrative standards contained
transformed and redistributed in various environmental compartments.
in federal and state environmental regulations. Top-down investigations
Air, soil and aqueous (fresh and saline surface and groundwaters)
of the historical development of selected regulatory guidelines and
environments are covered, along with specialized environments such
permitting procedures. Student directed design of improved regulations.
as waste treatment facilities and the upper atmosphere. Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: EGGN/ESGN353. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
SYGN101, DCGN209, and
CHGN222. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ESGN457. SITE REMEDIATION ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
(II) This course describes the engineering principles and practices
ESGN440. ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION: SOURCES,
associated with the characterization and remediation of contaminated
CHARACTERISTICS, TRANSPORT AND FATE. 3.0 Hours.
sites. Methods for site characterization and risk assessment will be
(I) This course describes the environmental behavior of inorganic and
highlighted while the emphasis will be on remedial action screening
organic chemicals in multimedia environments, including water, air,
processes and technology principles and conceptual design. Common
sediment and biota. Sources and characteristics of contaminants in
isolation and containment and in-situ and ex-situ treatment technology
the environment are discussed as broad categories, with some specific
will be covered. Computerized decision-support tools will be used and
examples from various industries. Attention is focused on the persistence,
case studies will be presented. Prerequisites: EGGN/ESGN354 or
reactivity, and partitioning behavior of contaminants in
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
environmental media. Both steady and unsteady state multimedia
environmental models are developed and applied to contaminated sites.
ESGN460. ONSITE WATER RECLAMATION AND REUSE. 3.0 Hours.
The principles of contaminant transport in surface water, groundwater
(II). Appropriate solutions to water and sanitation in the U.S. and globally
and air are also introduced.
need to be effective in protecting public health and preserving water
The course provides students with the conceptual basis and
quality while also being acceptable, affordable and sustainable. Onsite
mathematical tools for predicting the behavior of contaminants in the
and decentralized systems have the potential to achieve these goals
environment. Prerequisite: EGGN/ESGN353 or consent of instructor. 3
in rural areas, peri-urban developments, and urban centers in small
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and large cities. Moreover they can improve water use efficiency,
conserve energy and enable distributed energy generation, promote
ESGN453. WASTEWATER ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
green spaces, restore surface waters and aquifers, and stimulate new
(I) The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the fundamental
green companies and jobs. A growing array of approaches, devices and
phenomena involved in wastewater treatment processes (theory) and
technologies have evolved that include point-of-use water purification,
the engineering approaches used in designing such processes (design).
waste source separation, conventional and advanced treatment units,
This course will focus on the physical, chemical and biological processes
localized natural treatment systems, and varied resource recovery and
applied to liquid wastes of municipal origin. Treatment objectives will be
recycling options. This course will focus on the engineering selection,
discussed as the driving force for wastewater treatment. Prerequisite:
design, and implementation of onsite and decentralized systems for
EGGN/ESGN353 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
water reclamation and reuse. Topics to be covered include process
hours.
analysis and system planning, water and waste stream attributes, water
and resource conservation, confined unit and natural system treatment
ESGN454. WATER SUPPLY ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
technologies, effluent collection and clustering, recycling and reuse
(II) Water supply availability and quality. Theory and design of
options, and system management. Prerequisite: EGGN353/ESGN353 or
conventional potable water treatment and processes. Design of
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
distribution systems. Also includes regulatory analysis under the Safe
Drinking Water Act (SDWA). Prerequisite: EGGN353/ESGN353 or
ESGN462. SOLID WASTE MINIMIZATION AND RECYCLING. 3.0
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Hours.
(I) The course objective is to put the student into the shoes of a plant
ESGN455. SOLID AND HAZARDOUS WASTE ENGINEERING. 3.0
manager having process responsibility for waste minimization, focusing
Hours.
on recycling. Emphasis is on proven and emerging solutions, especially
(II) This course provides an introduction and overview of the engineering
those associated with heavy metals. Waste minimization generally
aspects of solid and hazardous waste management. The focus is on
requires a solid understanding of alternative raw materials and process
control technologies
technologies, in combination with creativity and sensitivity to economics.
for solid wastes from common municipal and industrial sources and the
Prerequisites: Senior standing, or consent of instructor 3 hours lecture; 3
end-of-pipe waste streams and process residuals that are generated in
semester hours.
some key industries. Prerequisite: EGGN354/ESGN354. 3 hours lecture;
3 semester hours.

58 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
ESGN463. POLLUTION PREVENTION: FUNDAMENTALS AND
PRACTICE. 3.0 Hours.
(II) The objective of this course is to introduce the principles of pollution
prevention, environmentally benign products and processes, and
manufacturing
systems. The course provides a thorough foundation in pollution
prevention concepts and methods. Engineers and scientists are given
the tools to incorporate environmental consequences into decision-
making. Sources of pollution and its consequences are detailed. Focus
includes sources and minimization of industrial pollution; methodology for
life-cycle assessments and developing successful pollution prevention
plans; technological means for minimizing the use of water, energy, and
reagents in manufacturing; and tools for achieving a sustainable society.
Materials selection, process and product design, and packaging are also
addressed. Prerequisite: EGGN/ESGN353 or EGGN354/ESGN354 or
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ESGN490. ENVIRONMENTAL LAW. 3.0 Hours.
(I) Specially designed for the needs of the environmental quality
engineer, scientist, planner, manager, government regulator,
consultant, or advocate. Highlights include how our legal system works,
environmental law fundamentals, all major US EPA/state enforcement
programs, the National Environmental Policy Act, air and water pollutant
laws, risk assessment and management, and toxic and hazardous
substance laws (RCRA, CERCLA, TSCA, LUST, etc). Prerequisites:
EGGN353/ESGN353 or EGGN354/ESGN354, or consent of instructor. 3
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ESGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND
ENGINEERING. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
ESGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

Colorado School of Mines 59
Electrical Engineering and
Students will demonstrate technical expertise within computer science by:
Computer Science
• Designing and implementing solutions to practical problems in science
and engineering,
http://eecs.mines.edu
• Using appropriate technology as a tool to solve problems in computer
sicence, and
Program Description
• Creating efficient algorithms and well-structured computer programs.
The Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Students will demonstrate a breadth and depth of knowledge within
develops graduates that enable the management of tremendous
computer science by:
amounts of data and energy around the world. The department offers
two undergraduate degrees: Bachelor of Science in Computer Science
• Extending course material to solve original problems,
and Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering. The department
• Applying knowledge of computer science to the solution of problems,
also supports the Electrical specialty in the interdisciplinary Bachelor
and
of Science in Engineering degree. Graduates of both programs are
• Identifying, formulating and solving computer science problems.
in a position to take advantage of a broad variety of professional
opportunities, and are well-prepared for a career in a world of rapid
Students will demonstrate an understanding and appreciation for the
technological change.
relationship of computer science to other fields by:
BS in Computer Science
• Applying computer science to solve problems in other fields,
• Working in cooperative multi-discplinary teams, and
Computing has become ubiquitous, impacting almost every aspect
of modern life and playing an important role in many technological
• Choosing appropriate technology to solve problems in other
advances. Computing jobs are among the highest paid, and computing
disciplines.
professionals generally report high job satisfaction. Graduates from our
Students will demonstrate an ability to communicate computer science
program have found employment with many different types of companies
effectively by:
including technology, engineering, and financial companies.
• Giving oral presentations,
The CS degree at CSM is designed to be accessible to students with
• Completing written explanations,
or without prior programming experience. The Introduction to Computer
Science course introduces students to the building blocks of CS and
• Interacting effectively in cooperative teams,
provides a brief introduction to procedural programming in Python.
• Creating well-documented programs, and
The second computing course, Programming Concepts, emphasizes
• Understanding and interpreting written material in computer science.
development of programming skills in an object-oriented language. The
third introductory course, Data Structures, provides an understanding
BS in Electrical Engineering
of the classic data representation schemes, algorithms, and algorithm
A distinguishing feature of the EE program at CSM is a focus in two
analysis that form the foundation for all advanced work in computing.
specific areas: energy and power systems; and information and systems
Required CS courses provide the fundamental skills and knowledge that
sciences, which includes embedded processors, signal processing
are critical to success in computing. These courses reflect a mixture of
and control systems. Graduates from our program find employment
theory and practice, including discrete structures, design and analysis of
in the power industry, engineering consulting firms, renewable energy
algorithms, principles of programming languages, computer architecture,
companies, aerospace and communications firms, as well as a wide
operating systems, and software engineering. In the required Elements
variety of companies that rely on embedded intelligence to manage data
of Computing Systems course, students consolidate their understanding
and systems. Another popular choice of our students after graduation is
of CS by constructing a simulator for an entire modern computer from
graduate school, where an advanced degree will open up opportunities
the ground up. The capstone field session course provides students an
in corporate and government research labs or academia, and the
opportunity to work in teams to create software products for real clients.
opportunity to be come technological leaders.
Elective courses in CS allow students to explore a variety of important
Students in the Electrical Engineering program complete a set of core
computing topics, such as graphics and visualization, human computer
courses that include mathematics, basic sciences, and engineering
interaction, artificial intelligence, database management, and web
sciences during their first two years. Course work in mathematics is
programming. Elective courses often relate to recent trends in computing,
an essential part of the curriculum, which gives engineering students
covering topics such as security, high performance computing, wireless
essential tools for modeling, analyzing, and predicting physical
sensor networks, and mobile applications.
phenomena. The basic sciences are represented by physics and
chemistry, which provide an appropriate foundation in the physical
Computing is a broad field with applicability to most science and
sciences. Engineering sciences build upon the basic sciences and are
engineering domains. The CS minor is designed for students in other
focused on applications.
disciplines to receive a solid grounding in the basics, which should enable
them to apply their computing skills to solve problems in other domains.
The first two years also includes Engineering design course work within
the Engineering Practice Introductory Course Sequence (EPICS I and
Program Educational Objectives (Bachelor of
II). This experience teaches design methodology and stresses the
Science in Computer Science)
creative and synthesis aspects of the engineering profession. Finally, the
In addition to contributing toward achieving the educational objectives
first two years includes systems-oriented courses with humanities and
described in the CSM Graduate Profile, the Computer Science Program
social sciences content; these courses explore the linkages within the
at CSM has established the following program educational objectives:
environment, human society, and engineered devices.

60 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
In the final two years, students complete an advanced core that includes
PAGN102
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
circuit analysis, electronics, electromagnetic fields and waves, and
15.0
digital systems. Because of our program focus, the core curriculum
Sophomore
also includes courses in signal processing, embedded microprocessor
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
systems design, machines and power systems, and control systems.
Students can also take specialized electives that further develop their
MATH213
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4
expertise in one of these focus areas, or in other areas such as robotics,
AND ENGINEERS III
biomedical engineering, and computing.
SYGN101
EARTH & ENV SYSTEMS,
4
BELS 101, or CHGN 122
In their final year, students complete a capstone design course that is
focused on an in-depth engineering project. The projects are generated
PHGN200
PHYSICS II-
4.5
by customer demand, and include experiential verification to ensure a
ELECTROMAGNETISM AND
realistic design experience.
OPTICS
CSCI262
DATA STRUCTURES
3
The legacy B.S. in Engineering degree is accredited by ABET. The B.S.
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
degree in Electrical Engineering is new as of the 2012-2013 school year
and is therefore not yet accredited. Accreditation for those degrees will be
16.0
sought during the 2013-2014 school year.
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Program Educational Objectives (Bachelor of
CSCI341
COMPUTER ORGANIZATION
3
Science in Electrical Engineering)
CSCI358
DISCRETE MATHEMATICS
3
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3
The Electrical Engineering program contributes to the educational
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3
objectives described in the CSM Graduate Profile. In addition, the
Electrical Engineering Program at CSM has established the following
SYGN200
HUMAN SYSTEMS
3
program educational objectives:
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
Within three years of attaining the BS degree:
15.5
Junior
• Graduates will be situated in growing careers in their chosen field of
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
electrical engineering or computer science, or will be successfully
pursuing a graduate degree.
CSCI306
SOFTWARE ENGINEERING
3
• Graduates will be advancing in their professional standing, generating
MATH323
PROBABILITY AND
3
new knowledge and/or exercising leadership in their field.
STATISTICS FOR
ENGINEERS
• Graduates will be contributing to the needs of society through
professional practice, research, and/or service.
MATH332
LINEAR ALGEBRA
3
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
Bachelor of Science in Computer
15.0
Science Degree Requirements:
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
CSCI406
ALGORITHMS
3
Freshman
CSCI410
ELEMENTS OF COMPUTING
3
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
SYSTEMS
CSCI101
INTRODUCTION TO
3
CSCI ELECT Computer Science Elective*
3.0
COMPUTER SCIENCE
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective I
3.0
CHGN121
PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY
4
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
I
FREE
Free Elective
1.0
MATH111
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4
AND ENGINEERS I
16.0
LAIS100
NATURE AND HUMAN
4
Summer
lec
lab
sem.hrs
VALUES
CSCI370
ADVANCED SOFTWARE
6
CSM101
FRESHMAN SUCCESS
0.5
ENGINEERING
SEMINAR
6.0
PAGN101
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
Senior
16.0
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
CSCI442
OPERATING SYSTEMS
3
CSCI261
PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS
3
CSCI ELECT Computer Science Elective*
3.0
MATH112
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4
CSCI ELECT Computer Science Elective*
3.0
AND ENGINEERS II
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective II
3.0
EPIC151
DESIGN (EPICS) I
3
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
PHGN100
PHYSICS I - MECHANICS
4.5
15.0

Colorado School of Mines 61
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
MATH111
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4
CSCI400
PRINCIPLES OF
3
AND ENGINEERS I
PROGRAMMING
LAIS100
NATURE AND HUMAN
4
LANGUAGES
VALUES
CSCI ELECT Computer Science Elective*
3.0
CSM101
FRESHMAN SUCCESS
0.5
SEMINAR
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective III
3.0
PAGN101
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
17.0
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
15.0
MATH112
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4
Total Hours: 129.5
AND ENGINEERS II
*
CSCI Electives can be chosen from any 400-level CSCI course.
EPIC151
DESIGN (EPICS) I
3
Please see the Courses Tab for course listings.
PHGN100
PHYSICS I - MECHANICS
4.5
Combined BS/MS in Computer Science
PAGN102
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
CSCI101
INTRODUCTION TO
3
The Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
COMPUTER SCIENCE, BELS
offers a combined Bachelor of Science/Master of Science program
101, CHGN 122, or SYGN 101
in Computer Science that enables students to work on a Bachelor of
(Distributed Science 2)
Science and a Master of Science simultaneously. Normally a Master’s
15.0
Degree requires 36 credit hours and takes two years to complete. Under
the Combined Program, students will count two courses (CSCI406
Sophomore
and CSCI442) toward both degrees, so only 30 additional credit hours
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
are needed to complete the degree. One additional 400-level course
DCGN241
DIST CORE - STATICS
3
may be counted toward the graduate degree. Students selecting the
SYGN200
HUMAN SYSTEMS
3
Thesis option will be required to complete 18 hours of coursework and
MATH213
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4
a thesis (12 credit hours). Students selecting the Non-Thesis option
AND ENGINEERS III
will be required to complete 30 credit hours of coursework. There are
two required graduate-level courses: CSCI564 (Advanced Architecture)
PHGN200
PHYSICS II-
4.5
and CSCI561 (Theory of Computation). The remaining courses are all
ELECTROMAGNETISM AND
electives. Descriptions can be found in the EECS Graduate Bulletin.
OPTICS
CSCI261
PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS
3
Students may not apply for the combined program until they have taken
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
five or more Computer Science classes at CSM (classes transferred from
other universities will not be considered). This requirement may be met
18.0
by any 200-level or above course with a CSCI prefix (e.g., CSCI261,
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
CSCI306, CSCI442, etc.). Since CSCI370 (Field Session) is based
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3
almost exclusively on team work, it may not be counted as one of the five
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3
courses. Independent study courses (i.e., CSCI499) are also not included
EGGN284
DIGITAL LOGIC
4
in the five courses. CSCI274 is a one credit hour course which also may
not be counted as one of the five courses.
EGGN281
INTRODUCTION TO
3
ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS,
Students should have an overall GPA of at least 2.5 and a GPA of 3.2
ELECTRONICS AND POWER
for courses in the major. The calculation of GPA in the major will be
EGGN250
MULTIDISCIPLINARY
1.5
based on all 200-level or above CSCI courses except those excluded
ENGINEERING LABORATORY
above (i.e., CSCI274, CSCI370 and CSCI499). If a course is taken
EPIC251
DESIGN (EPICS) II
3
multiple times, all of the grades will be included into the GPA calculation.
Interested students with a lower GPA must write an essay to explain why
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
they should be admitted to the program.
18.0
Bachelor of Science in
Junior
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Electrical Engineering Degree
MATH323
PROBABILITY AND
3
Requirements:
STATISTICS FOR
ENGINEERS
Freshman
EGGN315
DYNAMICS, 320, 351, or 371
3
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
EGGN382
ENGINEERING CIRCUIT
3
ANALYSIS
SYGN101
EARTH & ENV SYSTEMS,
4
BELS 101, CSCI 101, or CHGN
EGGN383
MICROCOMPUTER
4
122 (Distributed Science 1)
ARCHITECTURE AND
INTERFACING
CHGN121
PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY
4
I

62 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
EGGN388
INFORMATION SYSTEMS
4
EGGN484
POWER SYSTEMS ANALYSIS
3
SCIENCE
EGGN485
INTRODUCTION TO HIGH POWER
3
17.0
ELECTRONICS
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
EGGN486
PRACTICAL DESIGN OF SMALL RENEWABLE
3
MATH332
LINEAR ALGEBRA
3
ENERGY SYSTEMS
EGGN307
INTRODUCTION TO
3
EGGN487
ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF ADVANCED
3
FEEDBACK CONTROL
ENERGY SYSTEMS
SYSTEMS
CSCI341
COMPUTER ORGANIZATION
3
EGGN385
ELECTRONIC DEVICES AND
4
CSCI410
ELEMENTS OF COMPUTING SYSTEMS
3
CIRCUITS
CSCI440
PARALLEL COMPUTING FOR SCIENTISTS
3
EGGN386
FUNDAMENTALS
3
AND ENGINEERS
OF ENGINEERING
MATH334
INTRODUCTION TO PROBABILITY
3
ELECTROMAGNETICS
MATH335
INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL
3
EGGN389
FUNDAMENTALS OF
4
STATISTICS
ELECTRIC MACHINERY
MATH455
PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3
17.0
PHGN300
PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS I
3
Summer
lec
lab
sem.hrs
PHGN320
MODERN PHYSICS II: BASICS OF QUANTUM
4
EGGN334
ENGINEERING FIELD
3
MECHANICS
SESSION, ELECTRICAL
PHGN435
INTERDISCIPLINARY MICROELECTRONICS
3
SPECIALTY
PROCESSING LABORATORY
3.0
PHGN440
SOLID STATE PHYSICS
3
Senior
PHGN441
SOLID STATE PHYSICS APPLICATIONS AND
3
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
PHENOMENA
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective I
3.0
PHGN462
ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES AND OPTICAL
3
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective II
3.0
PHYSICS
EGGN450
MULTIDISCIPLINARY
1
Combined BS/MS in Electrical
ENGINEERING LABORATORY
III
Engineering
EGGN491
SENIOR DESIGN I
3
The Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science offers a
EGEL
Electrical Engineering Elective*
3.0
combined program in which students have the opportunity to supplement
ELECT
an undergraduate degree with graduate coursework. Upon completion of
EGEL
the program, students receive two degrees, the Bachelor of Science in
Electrical Engineering Elective*
3.0
ELECT
Electrical Engineering and the Mater of Science in Electrical Engineering.
16.0
Students must apply to enter this program by the beginning of their
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Senior year and must have a minimum GPA of 3.0. At the beginning of
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective III
3.0
the Senior year, a pro forma graduate school application is submitted
and as long as the undergraduate portion of the program is successfully
EGGN492
SENIOR DESIGN II
3
completed, the student is admitted to the Engineering graduate program.
EGEL
Electrical Engineering Elective*
3.0
ELECT
Students are required to take an additional 30 credit hours for the M.S.
degree. Up to nine of the 30 credit hours beyond the undergraduate
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
degree requirements can be 400-level courses. The remainder of the
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
courses will be at the graduate level (500-level and above). The EECS
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
Graduate Bulletin provides details for this program and includes specific
18.0
instructions regarding required and elective courses. Students may
Total Hours: 139.0
switch from the combined program which includes a non-thesis Master
of Science degree to an M.S. degree with a thesis optional however,
* Electrical Engineering students are required to take three Electrical
if students change degree programs they must satisfy all degree
Engineering Electives from the following list:
requirements for the M.S. with thesis degree.
Electrical Engineering Electives:
Combined Engineering Physics or
EGGN325
INTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICAL
3
Chemistry Baccalaureate and Electrical
ENGINEERING
Engineering Masters Degrees
EGGN417
MODERN CONTROL DESIGN
3
The Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, in
EGGN460
NUMERICAL METHODS FOR ENGINEERS
3
collaboration with the Departments of Physics and Chemistry, offers
EGGN481
DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING
3
five-year programs in which students have the opportunity to obtain
EGGN483
ANALOG & DIGITAL COMMUNICATION
4
specific engineering skill to complement their physics or chemistry
SYSTEMS
background. Physics or chemistry students in this program fill in their

Colorado School of Mines 63
technical and free electives over their standard four year Engineering
CSCI260. FORTRAN PROGRAMMING. 2.0 Hours.
Physics or Chemistry B.S. program with a reduced set of Electrical
(I, II) Computer programming in Fortran90/95 with applications to science
Engineering classes. at the end of the fourth year, the student is awarded
and engineering. Program design and structure, problem analysis,
an Engineering Physics B.S or a Chemistry B.S., as appropriate. Course
debugging, program testing. Language skills: arithmetic, input/output,
schedules for these five-year programs can be obtained in the EECS,
branching and looping, functions, arrays, data types. Introduction to
Physics, and Chemistry Departmental Offices.
operating systems. Prerequisite: none. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
CSCI261. PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS. 3.0 Hours.
General CSM Minor/ASI requirements can be found here (p. 195).
(I, II, S) Computer programming in a contemporary language such as
Computer Science
C++ or Java, using software engineering techniques. Problem solving,
program design, documentation, debugging practices. Language skills:
For an Area of Special Interest in Computer Science, the student
input/output, control, repetition, functions, files, classes and abstract data
should take:
types, arrays, and pointers.
CSCI262
DATA STRUCTURES
3
Introduction to operating systems and object-oriented programming.
Application to problems in science and engineering. Prerequisite: none. 3
CSCI306
SOFTWARE ENGINEERING
3
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and either
CSCI262. DATA STRUCTURES. 3.0 Hours.
CSCI358
DISCRETE MATHEMATICS
3
(I, II, S) Defining and using data structures such as linked lists, stacks,
CSCI406
ALGORITHMS
3
queues, binary trees, binary heap, hash tables. Introduction to algorithm
analysis, with emphasis on sorting and search routines. Language skills:
or
abstract data types, templates and inheritance. Prerequisite: CSCI261
CSCI341
COMPUTER ORGANIZATION
3
with a grade of C- or higher. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CSCI442
OPERATING SYSTEMS
3
CSCI274. INTRODUCTION TO THE LINUX OPERATING SYSTEM. 1.0
For a Minor in Computer Science, the student should take:
Hour.
(I,II) Introduction to the Linux Operating System will teach students
CSCI262
DATA STRUCTURES
3
how to become proficient with using a Linux operating system from
CSCI306
SOFTWARE ENGINEERING
3
the command line. Topics will include: remote login (ssh), file system
and either
navigation, file commands, editors, compilation, execution, redirection,
output, searching, processes, usage, permissions, compression, parsing,
CSCI358
DISCRETE MATHEMATICS
3
networking, and bash scripting. Prerequisites: CSCI261 or instructor
CSCI406
ALGORITHMS
3
approval. 1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour.
or
CSCI298. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
CSCI341
COMPUTER ORGANIZATION
3
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
CSCI442
OPERATING SYSTEMS
3
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
along with
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
two 400- level Computer Science courses, which may not be languages
CSCI299. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
transferred from another university.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
Electrical Engineering
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
The Electrical Engineering and Computer Science department supports
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
the Electrical Engineering Specialty Minor housed within the College of
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
Engineering and Computational Sciences. Please refer to the Minor tab
within the Engineering section of the bulletin for more information.
CSCI306. SOFTWARE ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
(I, II) Introduction to software engineering processes and object-oriented
design principles. Topics include the Agile development methodology,
Courses
test-driven development, UML diagrams, use cases and several object-
oriented design patterns. Course work emphasizes good programming
CSCI101. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE. 3.0 Hours.
practices via version control and code reviews. Prerequisite: CSCI262
(I, II, S) An introductory course to the building blocks of Computer
with grade of C- or higher. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Science. Topics include conventional computer hardware, data
representation, the role of operating systems and networks in modern
CSCI340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION. 3.0 Hours.
computing, algorithm design, large databases, SQL, and security. A
(I, II, S) (WI) Supervised, full-time engineering-related employment
popular procedural programming language will be learned by students
for a continuous six-month period (or its equivalent) in which specific
and programming assignments will explore ideas in algorithm runtimes,
educational objectives are achieved. Prerequisite: Second semester
computer simulation, computational techniques in optimization problems,
sophomore status and a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.00.
client-server communications, encryption, and database queries.
0 to 3 semester hours. Cooperative Education credit does not count
Prerequisite: none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
toward graduation except under special conditions. Repeatable.

64 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
CSCI341. COMPUTER ORGANIZATION. 3.0 Hours.
CSCI404. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE. 3.0 Hours.
(I, II) Covers the basic concepts of computer architecture and
(I) General investigation of the Artificial Intelligence field. Several
organization. Topics include machine level instructions and operating
methods used in artificial intelligence such as search strategies,
system calls used to write programs in assembly language, computer
knowledge representation, logic and probabilistic reasoning are
arithmetics, performance, processor design, and pipelining techniques.
developed and applied to practical problems. Fundamental artificial
This course provides insight into the way computers operate at the
intelligence techniques are presented, including neural networks, genetic
machine level. Prerequisite: CSCI261 and CSCI101 or permission of
algorithms, and fuzzy sets. Selected application areas, such as robotics,
instructor. Co-requisites: CSCI262. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
natural language processing and games, are discussed. Prerequisite:
CSCI262 with a grade of C- or higher and MATH323 or consent of
CSCI358. DISCRETE MATHEMATICS. 3.0 Hours.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(I, II) This course is an introductory course in discrete mathematics and
algebraic structures. Topics include: formal logic; proofs, recursion,
CSCI406. ALGORITHMS. 3.0 Hours.
analysis of algorithms; sets and combinatorics; relations, functions, and
(I, II) Reasoning about algorithm correctness (proofs, counterexamples).
matrices; Boolean algebra and computer logic; trees, graphs, finite-state
Analysis of algorithms: asymptotic and practical complexity. Review of
machines and regular languages.
dictionary data structures (including balanced search trees). Priority
Prerequisite: MATH213, MATH223 or MATH224. 3 hours lecture; 3
queues. Advanced sorting algorithms (heapsort, radix sort). Advanced
semester hours.
algorithmic concepts illustrated through sorting (randomized algorithms,
lower bounds, divide and conquer). Dynamic programming. Backtracking.
CSCI370. ADVANCED SOFTWARE ENGINEERING. 6.0 Hours.
Algorithms on unweighted graphs (traversals) and weighted graphs
(S) (WI) This is the capstone course in which students apply their course
(minimum spanning trees, shortest paths, network flows and bipartite
work knowledge to a challenging applied problem for a real client. The
matching); NP-completeness and its consequences. Prerequisite:
students work in groups of three or four for a period of six forty-hour
CSCI262 with a grade of C- or higher, MATH213, MATH223 or
weeks. Communication skills are emphasized. By the end of the field
MATH224, MATH358/CSCI358. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
session they must have a finished product with appropriate supporting
documents. Prerequisite: CSCI306. 6-week summer session; 6 semester
CSCI407. INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING. 3.0 Hours.
hours.
(I, II) Course goals are to introduce basic concepts of scientific
computing, explain how, why, and when numerical methods can be
CSCI399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
expected to work, and provide a basis for future study in scientific
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
computing. Topics include number representation and errors in a
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
computer, locating roots of equations, interpolation and numerical
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
differentiation, numerical integration, systems of linear equations (Gauss
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
elimination with pivoting, LU factorization), approximation by spline
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
functions, the method of least squares, ordinary differential equations. 3
hours lecture. 3 semester hours.
CSCI400. PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES. 3.0 Hours.
(I, II) Study of the principles relating to design, evaluation and
CSCI410. ELEMENTS OF COMPUTING SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
implementation of programming languages, including basic compiler
(II) This comprehensive course will help students consolidate their
techniques and context-free grammars. Students will be exposed to
understanding of all fundamental computer science concepts. Topics
different categories of programming languages, such as functional,
include symbolic communication, Boolean logic, binary systems,
imperative, object-oriented and scripting. Best practices for programming
logic gates, computer architecture, assembly language, assembler
will be explored, including effective use of exceptions and threads.
construction, virtual machines, object-oriented programming languages,
The primary languages discussed are: Java, C++, Scheme, and Perl.
software engineering, compilers, language design, and operating
Prerequisite: CSCI306. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
systems. Using a hardware simulator and a programming language of
their choice, students construct an entire modern computer from the
CSCI403. DATA BASE MANAGEMENT. 3.0 Hours.
ground up, resulting in an intimate understanding of how each component
(I) Design and evaluation of information storage and retrieval systems,
works. Prerequisites:.
including defining and building a database and producing the necessary
queries for access to the stored information. Relational database
CSCI422. USER INTERFACES. 3.0 Hours.
management systems, structured query language, and data storage
(I) User Interface Design is a course for programmers who want to learn
facilities. Applications of data structures such as lists, inverted lists and
how to create more effective software. This objective will be achieved by
trees. System security, maintenance, recovery and definition. Interfacing
studying principles and patterns of interaction design, critiquing existing
host languages to database systems and object-relational mapping tools.
software using criteria presented in the textbooks, and applying criteria
NoSQL databases and distributed databases. Prerequisite: CSCI262 with
to the design and implementation of one larger product. Students will
a grade of C- or higher. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
also learn a variety of techniques to guide the software design process,
including Cognitive Walkthrough, Talk-aloud and others. Prerequisite:
CSCI262. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 65
CSCI440. PARALLEL COMPUTING FOR SCIENTISTS AND
CSCI445. WEB PROGRAMMING. 3.0 Hours.
ENGINEERS. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Web Programming is a course for programmers who want to develop
(II) This course is designed to introduce the field of parallel computing
web-based applications. It covers basic website design extended by
to all scientists and engineers. The students will be taught how to solve
client-side and server-side programming. Students should acquire
scientific problems using parallel computing technologies. They will be
an understanding of the role and application of web standards to
introduced to basic terminologies and concepts of parallel computing,
website development. Topics include Cascading Style Sheets (CSS),
learn how to use MPI to develop parallel programs, and study how to
JavaScript, PHP and database connectivity. At the conclusion of the
design and analyze parallel algorithms. Prerequisite: CSCI262 with a
course students should feel confident that they can design and develop
grade of C- or higher. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
dynamic Web applications on their own. Prerequisites: CSCI262 or
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
CSCI441. COMPUTER GRAPHICS. 3.0 Hours.
(I) This class focuses on the basic 3D rendering and modeling
CSCI446. WEB APPLICATIONS. 3.0 Hours.
techniques. In particular, it covers ray tracing, graphics pipeline, modeling
(I) Web Applications is a course for programmers who want to learn how
techniques based on polynomial curves and patches, subdivision for
to move beyond creating dynamic web pages and build effective web-
curves and surfaces, scene graphs, BSP trees and their applications, and
based applications. At the completion of this course, students should
elements of global illumination. Prerequisite: CSCI262 with a grade of C-
know HTTP, Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), Cascading Style
or higher. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
Sheets (CSS), JavaScript, Ajax, Ruby, RESTful architectures and Web
services. Additionally students should have considered a variety of
CSCI442. OPERATING SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
issues related to web application architecture, including but not limited
(I, II) Introduces the essential concepts in the design and implementation
to security, performance and cloud-based deployment environments.
of operating systems: what they can do, what they contain, and how
Prerequisites: CSCI445. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
they are implemented. Despite rapid OS growth and development,
the fundamental concepts learned in this course will endure. We will
CSCI447. SCIENTIFIC VISUALIZATION. 3.0 Hours.
cover the following high-level OS topics, roughly in this order: computer
(I) Scientific visualization uses computer graphics to create visual
systems, processes, processor scheduling, memory management, virtual
images which aid in understanding of complex, often massive numerical
memory, threads, and process/thread synchronization. This course
representation of scientific concepts or results. The main focus of this
provides insight into the internal structure of operating systems; emphasis
course is on modern visualization techniques applicable to spatial
is on concepts and techniques that are valid for all computers. We
data such as scalar, vector and tensor fields. In particular, the course
suggest the student takes "Introduction to the Linux Operating System"
will cover volume rendering, texture based methods for vector and
before this course (if the student is new to the Unix/Linux environment).
tensor field visualization, and scalar and vector field topology. Basic
Prerequisite: CSCI262 with a grade of C- or higher, CSCI341. 3 hours
understanding of computer graphics and analysis of algorithms required.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisites: CSCI262 and MATH441. 3 lecture hours, 3 semester
hours.
CSCI443. ADVANCED PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS USING JAVA. 3.0
Hours.
CSCI471. COMPUTER NETWORKS I. 3.0 Hours.
(I, II) This course will quickly review programming constructs using the
(I) This introduction to computer networks covers the fundamentals
syntax and semantics of the Java programming language. It will compare
of computer communications, using TCP/IP standardized protocols
the constructs of Java with other languages and discuss program design
as the main case study. The application layer and transport layer of
and implementation. Object oriented programming concepts will be
communication protocols will be covered in depth. Detailed topics include
reviewed and applications, applets, servlets, graphical user interfaces,
application layer protocols (HTTP, FTP, SMTP, and DNS), transport
threading, exception handling, JDBC, and network - ing as implemented
layer protocols (reliable data transfer, connection management, and
in Java will be discussed. The basics of the Java Virtual Machine will be
congestion control), network layer protocols, and link layer protocols.
presented. Prerequisites: CSCI306. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
In addition, students will program client/server network applications.
Prerequisite: CSCI442 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3
CSCI444. ADVANCED COMPUTER GRAPHICS. 3.0 Hours.
semester hours.
(I, II) This is an advanced computer graphics course, focusing on modern
rendering and geometric modeling techniques. Students will learn a
CSCI474. INTRODUCTION TO CRYPTOGRAPHY. 3.0 Hours.
variety of mathematical and algorithmic techiques that can be used to
(II) This course is primarily oriented towards the mathematical aspects of
develop high-quality computer graphic software. In particular, the crouse
cryptography, but is also closely related to practical and theoretical issues
will cover global illumination, GPU programming, geometry acquisition
of computer security. The course provides mathematical background
and processing, point based graphics and non-photorealistic rendering.
required for cryptography including relevant aspects of number theory
Prerequistes: Basic understanding of computer graphics and prior
and mathematical statistics. The following aspects of cryptography
exposure to graphics-related programming, for exmaple, MACS 441. 3
will be covered: symmetric and asymmetric encryption, computational
lecture hours, 3 credit hours.
number theory, quantum encryption, RSA and discrete log systems,
SHA, steganography, chaotic and pseudo-random sequences, message
authentication, digital signatures, key distribution and key management,
and block ciphers. Many practical approaches and most commonly used
techniques will be considered and illustrated with real-life examples.
Prerequisites: CSCI262, MATH334/MATH335, MATH358. 3 credit hours.

66 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
CSCI475. INFORMATION SECURITY AND PRIVACY. 3.0 Hours.
EGGN307. INTRODUCTION TO FEEDBACK CONTROL SYSTEMS. 3.0
(I) Information Security and Privacy provides a hands-on introduction to
Hours.
the principles and best practices in information and computer security.
(I, II) System modeling through an energy flow approach is presented,
Lecture topics will include basic components of information security
with examples from linear electrical, mechanical, fluid and/or thermal
including threat assessment and mitigation, policy development, forensics
systems. Analysis of system
investigation, and the legal and political dimensions of information
response in both the time domain and frequency domain is discussed
security. Prerequisite: CSCI262 and CSCI341 (required); CSCI274
in detail. Feedback control design techniques, including PID, are
(recommended). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
analyzed using both analytical and computational methods. Prerequisites:
(DCGN381 or PHGN215) and MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
CSCI491. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1-3 Hour.
hours.
(I) (WI) Indi vidual investigation under the direction of a department
faculty member. Written report required for credit. Prerequisite: Consent
EGGN334. ENGINEERING FIELD SESSION, ELECTRICAL
of Department Head. Variable - 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for
SPECIALTY. 3.0 Hours.
credit to a maximum of 12
(S) Experience in the engineering design process involving analysis,
hours.
design, and simulation. Students use engineering, mathematics and
computers to model, analyze, design and evaluate system performance.
CSCI492. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1-3 Hour.
Teamwork emphasized. Prerequisites: EGGN382,
(II) (WI) Indi vidual investigation under the direction of a department
EGGN388, and two of the following: EGGN384, EGGN385, EGGN389,
faculty member. Written report required for credit. Prerequisite: Consent
and EPIC251. Three weeks in summer session; 3 semester hours.
of Department Head. Variable - 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for
credit to a maximum of 12
EGGN382. ENGINEERING CIRCUIT ANALYSIS. 3.0 Hours.
hours.
(I, II) This course provides for the continuation of basic circuit analysis
techniques developed in EGGN 381, by providing the theoretical and
CSCI498. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
mathematical fundamentals to understand and analyze complex electric
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
circuits. The key topics covered include: (i) Steady-state analysis of
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
single-phase and three-phase ac power circuits, (ii) Laplace transform
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
techniques, (iii) transfer functions, (iv) frequency response, (v) Bode
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
diagrams, (vi) Fourier series expansions, and (vii) two-port networks. The
course features PSPICE, a commercial circuit analysis software package.
CSCI499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
Prerequisites: EGGN281 or consent of instructor. 3 Semester Hours.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
EGGN383. MICROCOMPUTER ARCHITECTURE AND INTERFACING.
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
4.0 Hours.
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
(I) Microprocessor and microcontroller architecture focusing on
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
hardware structures and elementary machine and assembly language
programming skills essential for use of microprocessors in data
EGGN281. INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS,
acquisition, control, and instrumentation systems. Analog and digital
ELECTRONICS AND POWER. 3.0 Hours.
signal conditioning, communication, and processing. A/D and D/A
This course provides an engineering science analysis of electrical
converters for microprocessors. RS232 and other communication
circuits. DC and single-phase AC networks are presented. Transient
standards. Laboratory study and evaluation of microcomputer system;
analysis of RC, RL, and RLC circuits is studied as is the analysis of
design and implementation of interfacing projects. Prerequisite:
circuits in sinusoidal steady-state using phasor concepts. The following
EGGN284 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4
topics are included: DC and single-phase AC circuit analysis, current
semester hours.
and charge relationships. Ohm’s Law, resistors, inductors, capacitors,
equivalent resistance and impedance, Kirchhoff’s Laws, Thévenin and
EGGN385. ELECTRONIC DEVICES AND CIRCUITS. 4.0 Hours.
Norton equivalent circuits, superposition and source transformation,
(I, II) Semiconductor materials and characteristics, junction diode
power and energy, maximum power transfer, first order transient
operation, bipolar junction transistors, field effect transistors, biasing
response, algebra of complex numbers, phasor representation, time
techniques, four layer devices, amplifier and power supply design,
domain and frequency domain concepts, and ideal transformers. The
laboratory study of semiconductor circuit characteristics. Prerequisite:
course features PSPICE, a commercial circuit analysis software package.
EGGN382 or PHGN215. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
Prerequisites: PHGN200; 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN284. DIGITAL LOGIC. 4.0 Hours.
(I, II) Fundamentals of digital logic design. Covers combinational
and sequential logic circuits, programmable logic devices, hardware
description languages, and computer-aided design (CAD) tools.
Laboratory component introduces simulation and synthesis software and
hands-on hardware design. Co-requisites: EGGN281 or PHGN215. 3
hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 67
EGGN386. FUNDAMENTALS OF ENGINEERING
EGGN481. DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING. 3.0 Hours.
ELECTROMAGNETICS. 3.0 Hours.
(I) This course introduces the mathematical and engineering aspects of
(II) This course provides an introduction to electromagnetic theory as
digital signal processing (DSP). An emphasis is placed on the various
applied to electrical engineering problems in wireless communications,
possible representations for discrete-time signals and systems (in the
transmission lines, and high-frequency circuit design. The theory and
time, z-, and frequency domains) and how those representations can
applications are based on Maxwell’s equations, which describe the
facilitate the identification of signal properties, the design of digital filters,
electric and magnetic force-fields, the interplay between them, and how
and the sampling of continuous-time signals. Advanced topics include
they transport energy. Matlab and PSPICE will be used in homework
sigma-delta conversion techniques, multi-rate signal processing, and
assignments, to perform simulations of electromagnetic interference,
spectral analysis. The course will be useful to all students who are
electromagnetic energy propagation along transmission lines on
concerned with information bearing signals and signal processing in a
printed circuit boards, and antenna radiation patterns. Prerequisites:
wide variety of application settings, including sensing, instrumentation,
EGGN382, MATH225 and/or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
control, communications, signal interpretation and diagnostics, and
semester hours.
imaging. Prerequisite: EGGN388 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture;
3 semester hours.
EGGN388. INFORMATION SYSTEMS SCIENCE. 4.0 Hours.
(I, II) The interpretation, representation and analysis of timevarying
EGGN483. ANALOG & DIGITAL COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS. 4.0
phenomena as signals which convey information and noise;
Hours.
applications are drawn from filtering, audio and image processing,
(II) Signal classification; Fourier transform; filtering; sampling; signal
and communications. Topics include convolution, Fourier series and
representation; modulation; demodulation; applications to broadcast, data
transforms, sampling and discretetime processing of continuous-time
transmission, and instrumentation. Prerequisite: EGGN388 or consent of
signals, modulation, and z-transforms. Prerequisite: DCGN381 or
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
PHGN215 and MATH225. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
EGGN484. POWER SYSTEMS ANALYSIS. 3.0 Hours.
EGGN389. FUNDAMENTALS OF ELECTRIC MACHINERY. 4.0 Hours.
(I) 3-phase power systems, per-unit calculations, modeling and equivalent
(I, II) This course provides an engineering science analysis of electrical
circuits of major components, voltage drop, fault calculations, symmetrical
machines. The following topics are included: DC, single-phase and three-
components and unsymmetrical faults, system grounding, power-flow,
phase AC circuit
selection of major equipment, design of electric power distribution
analysis, magnetic circuit concepts and materials, transformer analysis
systems. Prerequisite: EGGN389. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and operation, steady-state and dynamic analysis of rotating machines,
synchronous and poly-phase induction motors, and laboratory study
EGGN485. INTRODUCTION TO HIGH POWER ELECTRONICS. 3.0
of external characteristics of machines and transformers. Prerequisite:
Hours.
EGGN382 or PHGN215. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
(II) Power electronics are used in a broad range of applications from
control of power flow on major transmission lines to control of motor
EGGN398E. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGINEERING. 1-6 Hour.
speeds in industrial facilities and electric vehicles, to computer power
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
supplies. This course introduces the basic principles of analysis and
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
design of circuits utilizing power electronics, including AC/DC, AC/
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
AC, DC/DC, and DC/AC conversions in their many configurations.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
Prerequisites: EGGN385, EGGN389. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN399E. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
EGGN486. PRACTICAL DESIGN OF SMALL RENEWABLE ENERGY
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
(Taught on Demand) This course provides the fundamentals to
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
understand and analyze renewable energy powered electric circuits. It
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
covers practical topics related to the design of alternative energy based
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
systems. It is assumed the students will have some basic and broad
knowledge of the principles of electrical machines, thermodynamics,
EGGN417. MODERN CONTROL DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.
electronics, and fundamentals of electric power systems. One of the main
(I) Control system design with an emphasis on observer-based methods,
objectives of this course is to focus on the interdisciplinary aspects of
from initial open-loop experiments to final implementation. The course
integration of the alternative sources of energy, including hydropower,
begins with an overview of feedback control design technique from the
wind power, photovoltaic, and energy storage for those systems. Power
frequency domain perspective, including sensitivity and fundamental
electronic systems will be discussed and how those electronic systems
limitations. State space realization theory is introduced, and system
can be used for stand-alone and grid-connected electrical energy
identification methods for parameter estimation are introduced.
applications. Prerequisite: EGGN382 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
Computerbased methods for control system design are presented.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisite: EGGN307. 3 lecture hours, 3 semester hours.

68 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
EGGN487. ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF ADVANCED ENERGY
SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
(II) The course investigates the design, operation and analysis of
complex interconnected electric power grids, the basis of our electric
power
infrastructure. Evaluating the system operation, planning for the future
expansion under deregulation and restructuring, ensuring system
reliability, maintaining security, and developing systems that are safe to
operate has become increasingly
more difficult. Because of the complexity of the problems encountered,
analysis and design procedures rely on the use of sophisticated power
system simulation computer programs. The course features some
commonly used commercial software packages. Prerequisites: EGGN
484 or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory; 3
semester hours.
EGGN499E. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
ESGN459. HYDROLOGIC AND WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING.
3.0 Hours.
(II) This course introduces the principles of physical hydrology in the
framework of hydrologic and water resources engineering. Topics include
groundwater, surface water, infiltration, evapotranspiration, sediment
transport, flood and drought analysis, lake and reservoir analysis,
water-resources planning, water quality engineering, and storm-sewer
hydraulics, water-wastewater distribution /collection, engineering design
problems. Prerequisites: ESGN 353 or consent of instructor. 3 hour
lecture; 3 semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 69
Engineering
skills to complement their physics or chemistry background. Physics or
chemistry students in this program fill in their technical and free electives
http://cecs.mines.edu
over their standard four year Engineering Physics or Chemistry B.S.
program with a reduced set of engineering classes. These classes come
Program Description
in one of two specialties within the College: Electrical engineering and
The College of Engineering and Computational Sciences offers
Mechanical engineering. At the end of the fourth year, the student is
a design-oriented, interdisciplinary, accredited non-traditional
awarded an Engineering Physics B.S. or Chemistry B.S., as appropriate.
undergraduate program in engineering with specialization in civil,
Students in this program are automatically entered into the Engineering
electrical, environmental or mechanical engineering. The program
Masters degree program. Course schedules for these five-year programs
emphasizes fundamental engineering principles and requires in-depth
can be obtained in the Engineering, Physics and Chemistry Departmental
understanding within one of the four specialty areas that are offered.
Offices.
Graduates are in a position to take advantage of a broad variety of
Students must apply to enter this program by the beginning of their
professional opportunities, and are well- prepared for an engineering
Senior year and must have a minimum GPA of 3.0. To complete the
career in a world of rapid technological change.
undergraduate portion of the program, students must successfully finish
The program leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in Engineering is
the classes indicated by the “typical” class sequence for the appropriate
accredited by the:
track. At the beginning of the Senior year, a pro forma graduate school
application is submitted and as long as the undergraduate portion of
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET)
the program is successfully completed, the student is admitted to the
111 Market Place, Suite 1050
Engineering graduate program.
Baltimore, MD 21202-4012
telephone (410) 347-7700
Interested students can obtain additional information and detailed
curricula from the College of Engineering & Computational Sciences or
Combined Engineering Baccalaureate and
the Physics Department.
Engineering Systems Masters Degrees
The College of Engineering & Computational Sciences offers a five year
Program Educational Objectives (Bachelor of
combined program in which students have the opportunity to obtain
Science in Engineering)
specific engineering skills supplemented with graduate coursework in
Engineering. Upon completion of the program, students receive two
The Engineering program contributes to the educational objectives
degrees, the Bachelor of Science in Engineering and the Master of
described in the CSM Graduate Profile and the ABET Accreditation
Science in Engineering.
Criteria. In addition, the Engineering Program at CSM has established the
following program educational objectives: within three years of attaining
Students must apply to enter this program by the beginning of their
the BS degree:
Senior year and must have a minimum GPA of 3.0. To complete the
undergraduate portion of the program, students must successfully
• Graduates will be situated in growing careers in their chosen
finish the classes indicated in any of the four specialty programs (civil,
engineering fields or will be successfully pursuing a graduate degree.
electrical, environmental or mechanical engineering). At the beginning
• Graduates will be advancing in their professional standing, generating
of the Senior year, a pro forma graduate school application is submitted
new knowledge and/or exercising leadership in their field.
and as long as the undergraduate portion of the program is successfully
• Graduates will be contributing to the needs of society through
completed, the student is admitted to the Engineering graduate program.
professional practice, research, and/or service.
Students are required to take an additional thirty credit hours for the M.S.
Curriculum
degree. Up to nine of the 30 credit hours beyond the undergraduate
degree requirements can be 4XX level courses. The remainder of
During the first two years at CSM, students complete a set of core
the courses will be at the graduate level (5XX and above). Students
courses that include mathematics, basic sciences, and engineering
will need to choose a program specialty (Civil, Electrical, Mechanical,
sciences. Course work in mathematics is an essential part of the
and Systems). The College of Engineering & Computational Sciences
curriculum which gives engineering students essential tools for modeling,
Graduate Bulletin provides details for each of these programs and
analyzing, and predicting physical phenomena. The basic sciences are
includes specific instructions regarding required and elective courses.
represented by physics and chemistry which provide an appropriate
Students may switch from the combined program which includes a non-
foundation in the physical sciences. Engineering sciences build upon the
thesis Master of Science degree to a M.S. degree with a thesis option;
basic sciences and are focused on applications.
however, if students change degree programs they must satisfy all
The first two years also includes Engineering design course work within
degree requirements for the M.S. with thesis degree.
the Engineering Practice Introductory Course Sequence (EPICS I and
Interested students can obtain additional information from the College of
II). This experience teaches design methodology and stresses the
Engineering & Computational Sciences.
creative and synthesis aspects of the engineering profession. Finally, the
first two years includes systems-oriented courses with humanities and
Combined Engineering Physics or Chemistry
social sciences content; these courses explore the linkages within the
Baccalaureate and Engineering Systems
environment, human society, and engineered devices.
Masters Degrees
In the final two years, students complete an advanced core that includes
The College of Engineering & Computational Sciences in collaboration
electric circuits, engineering mechanics, advanced mathematics,
with the Departments of Physics and Chemistry offers five-year programs
thermodynamics, economics, engineering design, and additional studies
in which students have the opportunity to obtain specific engineering
in liberal arts and international topics. Students must choose a specialty
in civil, electrical, environmental or mechanical engineering and each

70 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
specialty includes a set of unique upper-division course requirements.
equipment, as well as PC-based instrumentation systems, and the
Free electives (9 credits), at the student’s discretion, can be used to
program makes extensive use of computer-based analysis techniques.
either satisfy a student’s personal interest in a topic or they can be
The College of Engineering & Computational Sciences is housed in
used as coursework as part of an "area of special interest" of at least
George R. Brown Hall. Emphasis on hands-on education is reflected
12 semester hours or a minor of at least 18 semester hours in another
in the division’s teaching and research laboratories. All students are
department or division.
encouraged to take the Fundamental of Engineering examination before
All students must complete a capstone design course which is focused
graduation.
on an in-depth multidisciplinary engineering project. The projects are
Degree Requirements in Engineering
generated by customer demand, and include experiential verification to
ensure a realistic design experience.
Civil Specialty
Prospective students should note that this is an integrated, broad-
Freshman
based and interdisciplinary engineering program. Engineering analysis
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
and design is emphasized with interdisciplinary application for
PAGN101
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
industrial projects, structures and processes. For example, our unique
LAIS100
NATURE AND HUMAN
4
Multidisciplinary Engineering Laboratory sequence promotes life-long
VALUES
learning skills using state-of-the-art instrumentation funded through a
combination of grants from the Department of Education, private industry
CHGN121
PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY
4
contributions, and investment by CSM.
I
CSM101
FRESHMAN SUCCESS
0.5
The Civil Engineering Specialty builds on the multidisciplinary
SEMINAR
engineering principles of the core curriculum to focus in Geotechnical and
Structural Engineering. Civil Specialty students are also asked to choose
BELS101
BIOLOGICAL AND
4
three civil elective courses from a list that includes offerings from other
ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS,
civil-oriented departments at CSM such as Geological Engineering and
SYGN 101, or CSCI 101
Mining Engineering. These electives give students the opportunity for
MATH111
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4
further specialization in other areas of Civil Engineering. Civil Specialty
AND ENGINEERS I
students interested in a more research-oriented component to their
17.0
undergraduate curriculum are encouraged to take on an Independent
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Study project with one of the Civil Engineering Faculty. These projects
PAGN102
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
can offer a useful experience that is relevant to future graduate work.
CHGN122
PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY
4
The Electrical Engineering Specialty builds on the engineering
II (SC1)
principles of the core curriculum to provide exposure to the fundamentals
PHGN100
PHYSICS I - MECHANICS
4.5
of electrical engineering. The program includes core electrical
MATH112
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4
engineering coursework in circuit analysis, signal processing, electronics,
AND ENGINEERS II
electromagnetic fields and waves, digital systems, machines and power
systems, and control systems. Students also take specialized electives
EPIC151
DESIGN (EPICS) I
3
in the areas of microprocessor-based systems design, digital signal
16.0
processing, control systems, and power systems.
Sophomore
The Environmental Engineering Specialty introduces students to the
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
fundamentals of environmental engineering including the scientific and
DCGN241
DIST CORE - STATICS
3.0
3
regulatory basis of public health and environmental protection. Topics
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3.0
3
covered include environmental science and regulatory processes, water
MATH213
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4.0
4
and waste-water engineering, solid and hazardous waste management,
AND ENGINEERS III
and contaminated site remediation.
PHGN200
PHYSICS II-
3.0
3.0
4.5
The Mechanical Engineering Specialty complements the core
ELECTROMAGNETISM AND
curriculum with courses that provide depth in material mechanics
OPTICS
and the thermal sciences with emphases in computational methods
CSCI260
FORTRAN PROGRAMMING,
2.0
2
and engineering design. Topics such as computational engineering,
261, or EGGN 205
machine design, control theory, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer are an
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
important part of the mechanical engineering program. The Mechanical
17.0
Engineering program has close ties to the metallurgical and materials
engineering, physics, chemical engineering and biological life sciences
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
communities on campus, and undergraduates are encouraged to get
SYGN200
HUMAN SYSTEMS
3.0
3
involved in one of the large number of research programs conducted by
EGGN281
INTRODUCTION TO
3
the Mechanical Engineering faculty. Many students go on to graduate
ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS,
school.
ELECTRONICS AND POWER
Students in each of the four specialties will spend considerable time
EGGN250
MULTIDISCIPLINARY
4.5
1.5
in laboratories. The College is well equipped with basic laboratory
ENGINEERING LABORATORY
EGGN320
MECHANICS OF MATERIALS
3.0
3

Colorado School of Mines 71
EGGN351
FLUID MECHANICS
3.0
3
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
EPIC 25X
Design II
3.0
1.0
3.0
18.0
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
Total Hours: 138.5
17.0
Electrical Specialty
Summer
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Freshman
EGGN234
ENGINEERING FIELD
3.0
3
SESSION, CIVIL SPECIALTY
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
3.0
PAGN101
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
Junior
LAIS100
NATURE AND HUMAN
4
VALUES
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
CHGN121
PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY
4
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3.0
3
I
EGGN342
STRUCTURAL THEORY
3.0
3
CSM101
FRESHMAN SUCCESS
0.5
EGGN361
SOIL MECHANICS
3.0
3
SEMINAR
EGGN363
SOIL MECHANICS
3.0
1
MATH111
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4
LABORATORY
AND ENGINEERS I
EGGN413
COMPUTER AIDED
3.0
3
CSCI101
INTRODUCTION TO
3
ENGINEERING
COMPUTER SCIENCE, BELS
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective I
3.0
3.0
101, or SYGN 101
16.0
16.0
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
MATH348
ADVANCED ENGINEERING
3.0
3
PAGN102
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
MATHEMATICS
CHGN122
PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY
4
EGGN464
FOUNDATIONS
3.0
3
II (SC1)
DCGN210
INTRO TO ENG
3.0
3
PHGN100
PHYSICS I - MECHANICS
4.5
THERMODYNAMICS
MATH112
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4
EGGN444
DESIGN OF STEEL
3.0
3
AND ENGINEERS II
STRUCTURES or 445
EPIC151
DESIGN (EPICS) I
3
EGCV
Civil Specialty Elective
3.0
3.0
16.0
ELECT
Sophomore
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
18.0
DCGN241
DIST CORE - STATICS
3.0
3
Senior
SYGN200
HUMAN SYSTEMS
3
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
MATH213
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4.0
4
MATH323
PROBABILITY AND
3.0
3
AND ENGINEERS III
STATISTICS FOR
PHGN200
PHYSICS II-
3.0
2.5
4.5
ENGINEERS
ELECTROMAGNETISM AND
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective II
3.0
3.0
OPTICS
EGGN315
DYNAMICS
3.0
3
CSCI261
PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS
3.0
3
EGGN350
MULTIDISCIPLINARY
4.5
1.5
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
ENGINEERING LABORATORY
18.0
II
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
EGGN491
SENIOR DESIGN I
2.0
3.0
3
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3.0
3
EGCV
Civil Specialty Elective
3.0
3.0
ELECT
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3.0
3
16.5
EGGN320
MECHANICS OF MATERIALS
3.0
3
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
EGGN250
MULTIDISCIPLINARY
4.5
1.5
ENGINEERING LABORATORY
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective III
3.0
3.0
EGGN281
INTRODUCTION TO
3
EGGN492
SENIOR DESIGN II
1.0
6.0
3
ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS,
EGCV
Civil Specialty Elective
3.0
3.0
ELECTRONICS AND POWER
ELECT
EPIC25X
Design II
3.0
1.0
3.0
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
17.0

72 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
Junior
FREE
Free Electives
3.0
3.0
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
18.0
MATH323
PROBABILITY AND
3.0
3
Total Hours: 141.0
STATISTICS FOR
ENGINEERS
Environmental Specialty
MATH348
ADVANCED ENGINEERING
3.0
3
Freshman
MATHEMATICS
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
EGGN371
THERMODYNAMICS I
3.0
3
PAGN101
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
EGGN382
ENGINEERING CIRCUIT
3.0
3
LAIS100
NATURE AND HUMAN
4
ANALYSIS
VALUES
EGGN388
INFORMATION SYSTEMS
4
CHGN121
PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY
4
SCIENCE
I
EGGN284
DIGITAL LOGIC
4
CSM101
FRESHMAN SUCCESS
0.5
20.0
SEMINAR
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
BELS101
BIOLOGICAL AND
4
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective I
3.0
3.0
ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS,
SYGN 101, or CSCI 101
EGGN351
FLUID MECHANICS
3.0
3
MATH111
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4
EGGN385
ELECTRONIC DEVICES AND
3.0
3.0
4
AND ENGINEERS I
CIRCUITS
17.0
EGGN386
FUNDAMENTALS
3.0
3
OF ENGINEERING
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
ELECTROMAGNETICS
PAGN102
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
EGGN389
FUNDAMENTALS OF
3.0
3.0
4
CHGN122
PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY
4
ELECTRIC MACHINERY
II (SC1)
17.0
PHGN100
PHYSICS I - MECHANICS
4.5
Summer
lec
lab
sem.hrs
MATH112
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4
EGGN334
ENGINEERING FIELD
3.0
3
AND ENGINEERS II
SESSION, ELECTRICAL
EPIC151
DESIGN (EPICS) I
3
SPECIALTY
16.0
3.0
Sophomore
Senior
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
DCGN241
DIST CORE - STATICS
3.0
3
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective II
3.0
3.0
SYGN200
HUMAN SYSTEMS
3.0
3
EGGN450
MULTIDISCIPLINARY
3.0
1
MATH213
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4.0
4
ENGINEERING LABORATORY
AND ENGINEERS III
III
PHGN200
PHYSICS II-
3.0
3.0
4.5
EGGN491
SENIOR DESIGN I
2.0
3.0
3
ELECTROMAGNETISM AND
EGGN307
INTRODUCTION TO
3.0
3
OPTICS
FEEDBACK CONTROL
CSCI260
FORTRAN PROGRAMMING or
2.0
2
SYSTEMS
261
EGEL
Electrical Specialty Elective
3.0
3.0
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
ELECT
17.0
EGEL
Electrical Specialty Elective
3.0
3.0
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
ELECT
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3.0
3
16.0
EGGN320
MECHANICS OF MATERIALS
3.0
3
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
EGGN250
MULTIDISCIPLINARY
4.5
1.5
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective III
3.0
3.0
ENGINEERING LABORATORY
EGGN492
SENIOR DESIGN II
1.0
6.0
3
EGGN281
INTRODUCTION TO
3
EGEL
Electrical Specialty Elective
3.0
3.0
ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS,
ELECT
ELECTRONICS AND POWER
FREE
Free Electives
3.0
3.0
EPIC25X
Design II
3.0
1.0
3.0
FREE
Free Electives
3.0
3.0
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3.0
3
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
17.0

Colorado School of Mines 73
Junior
Mechanical Specialty
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Freshman
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective I
3.0
3.0
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
MATH348
ADVANCED ENGINEERING
3.0
3
PAGN101
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
MATHEMATICS
LAIS100
NATURE AND HUMAN
4
EGGN315
DYNAMICS
3.0
3
VALUES
EGGN351
FLUID MECHANICS
3.0
3
CHGN121
PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY
4
EGGN353
FUNDAMENTALS OF
3.0
3
I
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
CSM101
FRESHMAN SUCCESS
0.5
AND ENGINEERING I
SEMINAR
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
MATH111
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4
18.0
AND ENGINEERS I
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
CSCI101
INTRODUCTION TO
3
MATH323
PROBABILITY AND
3.0
3
COMPUTER SCIENCE, BELS
STATISTICS FOR
101, or SYGN 101
ENGINEERS
16.0
EGGN350
MULTIDISCIPLINARY
4.5
1.5
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
ENGINEERING LABORATORY
PAGN102
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
II
CHGN122
PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY
4
EGGN354
FUNDAMENTALS OF
3.0
3
II (SC1)
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
PHGN100
PHYSICS I - MECHANICS
4.5
AND ENGINEERING II
MATH112
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4
EGGN371
THERMODYNAMICS I
3.0
3
AND ENGINEERS II
EGEV
Environmental Specialty
3.0
3.0
EPIC151
DESIGN (EPICS) I
3
ELECT
Elective
16.0
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
Sophomore
16.5
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Summer
lec
lab
sem.hrs
DCGN241
DIST CORE - STATICS
3.0
3
EGGN335
ENGINEERING FIELD
3.0
3
SYGN200
HUMAN SYSTEMS
3.0
3
SESSION, ENVIRONMENTAL
SPECIALTY
MATH213
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4.0
4
AND ENGINEERS III
3.0
PHGN200
PHYSICS II-
3.0
3.0
4.5
Senior
ELECTROMAGNETISM AND
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
OPTICS
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective II
3.0
3.0
CSCI261
PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS
3.0
3
EGGN491
SENIOR DESIGN I
2.0
3.0
3
or EGGN 205
EGGN413
COMPUTER AIDED
3.0
3
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
ENGINEERING
18.0
EGEV
Environmental Specialty
3.0
3.0
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
ELECT
Elective
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3.0
3
EGEV
Environmental Specialty
3.0
3.0
MTGN202
ENGINEERED MATERIALS
3.0
3
ELECT
Elective
EGGN320
MECHANICS OF MATERIALS
3.0
3
15.0
EGGN250
MULTIDISCIPLINARY
4.5
1.5
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
ENGINEERING LABORATORY
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective III
3.0
3.0
EGGN281
INTRODUCTION TO
3
EGGN492
SENIOR DESIGN II
1.0
6.0
3
ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS,
EGEV
Environmental Specialty
3.0
3.0
ELECTRONICS AND POWER
ELECT
Elective
EPIC25X
Design II
3.0
1.0
3.0
EGEV
Environmental Specialty
3.0
3.0
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
ELECT
Elective
17.0
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
Summer
lec
lab
sem.hrs
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
EGGN235
ENGINEERING FIELD
3.0
3
18.0
SESSION, MECHANICAL
Total Hours: 137.5
SPECIALTY
3.0

74 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
Junior
convenience only. When choosing their three courses, students can elect
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
for breadth across themes or depth within a theme.
MATH323
PROBABILITY AND
3.0
3
Students must take at least two courses marked (A).
STATISTICS FOR
Environmental
ENGINEERS
EGGN353
FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL
3
MATH348
ADVANCED ENGINEERING
3.0
3
SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING I (A)
MATHEMATICS
EGGN354
FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL
3
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective I
3.0
3.0
SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING II (A)
EGGN315
DYNAMICS
3.0
3
EGGN453
WASTEWATER ENGINEERING (A)
3
EGGN371
THERMODYNAMICS I
3.0
3
EGGN454
WATER SUPPLY ENGINEERING (A)
3
EGGN388
INFORMATION SYSTEMS
0.0
4
EGGN455
SOLID AND HAZARDOUS WASTE
3
SCIENCE
ENGINEERING (A)
19.0
EGGN456
SCIENTIFIC BASIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL
3
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
REGULATIONS (A)
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3.0
3
EGGN457
SITE REMEDIATION ENGINEERING (A)
3
EGGN351
FLUID MECHANICS
3.0
3
General
EGGN350
MULTIDISCIPLINARY
4.5
1.5
EGGN307
INTRODUCTION TO FEEDBACK CONTROL
3
ENGINEERING LABORATORY
SYSTEMS (A)
II
EBGN321
ENGINEERING ECONOMICS (A)
3
EGGN307
INTRODUCTION TO
3.0
3
EGGN460
NUMERICAL METHODS FOR ENGINEERS (A)
3
FEEDBACK CONTROL
SYSTEMS
EGGN433
SURVEYING II (A)
3
EGGN413
COMPUTER AIDED
3.0
3
EGGN490
SUSTAINABLE ENGINEERING DESIGN (B)
3
ENGINEERING
EBGN553
PROJECT MANAGEMENT (B)
3
EGMC
Mechanical Specialty Elective
3.0
3.0
Geotechnical
ELECT
EGGN465
UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS (A)
3
16.5
EGGN448
ADVANCED SOIL MECHANICS (A)
3
Senior
EGGN534
SOIL BEHAVIOR (A)
3
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
EGGN531
SOIL DYNAMICS (A)
3
EGGN450
MULTIDISCIPLINARY
3.0
1
MNGN321
INTRODUCTION TO ROCK MECHANICS (A)
3
ENGINEERING LABORATORY
MNGN404
TUNNELING (B)
3
III
MNGN405
ROCK MECHANICS IN MINING (B)
3
EGGN491
SENIOR DESIGN I
2.0
3.0
3
MNGN406
DESIGN AND SUPPORT OF UNDERGROUND
3
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective II
3.0
3.0
EXCAVATIONS (B)
EGGN471
HEAT TRANSFER
3.0
3
GEGN466
GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING (B)
3
EGGN411
MACHINE DESIGN
3.0
3.0
4
GEGN468
ENGINEERING GEOLOGY AND GEOTECHNICS
4
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
(B)
17.0
GEGN473
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING SITE
3
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
INVESTIGATION (B)
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective III
3.0
3.0
Mechanics
EGGN492
SENIOR DESIGN II
1.0
6.0
3
EGGN422
ADVANCED MECHANICS OF MATERIALS (A)
3
EGMC
Mechanical Specialty Elective
3.0
3.0
EGGN442
FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR ENGINEERS
3
ELECT
(A)
EGMC
Mechanical Specialty Elective
3.0
3.0
EGGN473
FLUID MECHANICS II (A)
3
ELECT
EGGN478
ENGINEERING VIBRATION (A)
3
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
Structural
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
EGGN441
ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (A)
3
18.0
EGGN444/445
DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES (A) *
3
Total Hours: 140.5
EGGN447/547
TIMBER AND MASONRY DESIGN (A)
3
Engineering Specialty Electives
EGGN549
ADVANCED DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES
3
(A)
Civil Specialty
EGGN556
DESIGN OF REINFORCED CONCRETE
3
Civil specialty students are required to take three Civil Elective courses
STRUCTURES (A)
from the following list. The electives have been grouped by themes for

Colorado School of Mines 75
*
To count as elective credit, the companion course must be taken as
EGGN/
WASTEWATER ENGINEERING
3
part of the Civil Specialty degree requirements.
ESGN453
EGGN/
WATER SUPPLY ENGINEERING
3
Graduate courses in EG and elsewhere may occasionally be approved as
ESGN454
civil electives on an ad hoc basis. In order for a course that is not listed
here to be considered, the student should submit a written request in
EGGN/
SCIENTIFIC BASIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL
3
advance to their faculty advisor enclosing a copy of the course syllabus.
ESGN456
REGULATIONS
EGGN/
SITE REMEDIATION ENGINEERING
3
Electrical Specialty
ESGN457
Electrical specialty students are required to take three courses from the
ESGN355
ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING
3
following list of electrical technical electives:*
LABORATORY
EGGN325
INTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICAL
3
ESGN460
ONSITE WATER RECLAMATION AND REUSE
3
ENGINEERING
ESGN462
SOLID WASTE MINIMIZATION AND
3
EGGN400
INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS
3
RECYCLING
EGGN417
MODERN CONTROL DESIGN
3
ESGN463
POLLUTION PREVENTION: FUNDAMENTALS
3
EGGN460
NUMERICAL METHODS FOR ENGINEERS
3
AND PRACTICE
EGGN481
DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING
3
GEGN466
GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING
3
EGGN483
ANALOG & DIGITAL COMMUNICATION
4
Students completing the Engineering degree with an environmental
SYSTEMS
specialty may not also complete a minor or ASI in Environmental
EGGN484
POWER SYSTEMS ANALYSIS
3
Science.
EGGN485
INTRODUCTION TO HIGH POWER
3
Students should consult their faculty advisor for guidance on
ELECTRONICS
course substitutions.
EGGN486
PRACTICAL DESIGN OF SMALL RENEWABLE
3
Mechanical Specialty
ENERGY SYSTEMS
EGGN487
ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF ADVANCED
3
The list of approved Mechanical Engineering electives appears below.
ENERGY SYSTEMS
Students are required to take three of these courses and at least one
must be from List A. In addition to these courses, any graduate course
CSCI341
COMPUTER ORGANIZATION
3
taught by a member of the Mechanical Engineering faculty will also be
CSCI/MATH440
PARALLEL COMPUTING FOR SCIENTISTS
3
counted as a Mechanical Elective. Students are welcome to petition
AND ENGINEERS
to have a course approved, and the petition form is provided on the
MATH334
INTRODUCTION TO PROBABILITY
3
Mechanical Engineering web site. Courses are occasionally added to
MATH335
INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL
3
this list with the most updated version maintained on the Mechanical
STATISTICS
Engineering web site.
MATH455
PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3
List A
PHGN300
PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS I
3
EGGN403
THERMODYNAMICS II
3
PHGN320
MODERN PHYSICS II: BASICS OF QUANTUM
4
EGGN422
ADVANCED MECHANICS OF MATERIALS
3
MECHANICS
EGGN473
FLUID MECHANICS II
3
PHGN435
INTERDISCIPLINARY MICROELECTRONICS
3
EGGN478
ENGINEERING VIBRATION
3
PROCESSING LABORATORY
List B
PHGN440
SOLID STATE PHYSICS
3
EGGN325
INTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICAL
3
PHGN441
SOLID STATE PHYSICS APPLICATIONS AND
3
ENGINEERING
PHENOMENA
EGGN389
FUNDAMENTALS OF ELECTRIC MACHINERY
4
PHGN462
ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES AND OPTICAL
3
PHYSICS
EGGN400
INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS
3
EGGN417
MODERN CONTROL DESIGN
3
*
Additional courses are advisor and Division Director approved
EGGN425
MUSCULOSKELETAL BIOMECHANICS
3
special topics with a number of EGGN398/EGGN498 and all
EGGN442
FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR ENGINEERS
3
graduate courses taught in the Electrical Engineering specialty area.
Students should consult their faculty advisor for guidance.
EGGN444
DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES
3
EGGN460
NUMERICAL METHODS FOR ENGINEERS
3
Environmental Specialty
EBGN321
ENGINEERING ECONOMICS
3
All students pursuing the Environmental Specialty are required to take
ESGN527
WATERSHED SYSTEMS ANALYSIS
3
EGGN353/ESGN353 and EGGN354/ESGN354. These courses are
MTGN445
MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS
4
prerequisites for many 400 level Environmental Specialty courses. In
addition students are required to take five courses from the following list:
EGGN390
MATERIALS AND MANUFACTURING
3
PROCESSES
ESGN401
FUNDAMENTALS OF ECOLOGY
3
MTGN450
STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL AND
3
ESGN440
ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION: SOURCES,
3
DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS
CHARACTERISTICS, TRANSPORT AND FATE
MTGN464
FORGING AND FORMING
3

76 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
MTGN475/477
METALLURGY OF WELDING
2
instance, a student that is an Engineering-civil-specialty student cannot
MLGN/
BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF MATERIALS
3
get a minor in Engineering-mechanical specialty). However, the ASI
MTGN570
program in Engineering Specialties is available to all CECS students with
the note that an ASI in the students declared major area is not allowed
MNGN444
EXPLOSIVES ENGINEERING II
3
(for instance, Engineering-mechanical-specialty students cannot acquire
PEGN311
DRILLING ENGINEERING
4
an ASI in Engineering-mechanical specialty). Students earning one of the
PEGN361
COMPLETION ENGINEERING
3
new engineering Bachelors degrees, however, (i.e. B.S. Mechanical) can
PEGN419
WELL LOG ANALYSIS AND FORMATION
3
complete a CECS minor as long as it is outside of their home department.
EVALUATION
Students wishing to enroll in either program must satisfy all prerequisite
PEGN515
RESERVOIR ENGINEERING PRINCIPLES
3
requirements for each course in a chosen sequence. Students in the
PHGN300
PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS I
3
sciences or mathematics will therefore be better positioned to satisfy
PHGN350
INTERMEDIATE MECHANICS
4
prerequisite requirements in the General Engineering program, while
PHGN435
INTERDISCIPLINARY MICROELECTRONICS
3
students in engineering disciplines will be better positioned to meet the
PROCESSING LABORATORY
prerequisite requirements for courses in the Engineering Specialties.
PHGN440
SOLID STATE PHYSICS
3
Students majoring in Engineering with an Environmental Specialty
may not also complete a minor or ASI in Environmental Science and
Engineering.
General CSM Minor/ASI requirements can be found here (p. 195).
The courses listed below, constituting each program and the specialty
College of Engineering & Computational
variations, are offered as guidelines for selecting a logical sequence.
Sciences Areas of Special Interest and Minor
In cases where students have unique backgrounds or interests, these
Programs
sequences may be adapted accordingly through consultation with faculty
in the college.
General Requirements
Engineering Program
A Minor Program of study consists of a minimum of 18 credit hours of a
logical sequence of courses. With the exception of the McBride Honors
A twelve (ASI) or eighteen hour (minor) sequence must be selected from:
minor, only three of these hours may be taken in the student’s degree-
DCGN241
DIST CORE - STATICS
3
granting department and no more than three of these hours may be at the
EGGN320
MECHANICS OF MATERIALS
3
100- or 200- level. A Minor Program may not be completed in the same
department as the major.
EGGN351
FLUID MECHANICS
3
EGGN371
THERMODYNAMICS I
3
An Area of Special Interest (ASI) consists of a minimum of 12 credit
EGGN315
DYNAMICS
3
hours of a logical sequence of courses. Only three of these hours may
be taken at the 100- or 200- level and no more than three of these
EGGN281
INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS,
3
hours may be specifically required for the degree program in which the
ELECTRONICS AND POWER
student is graduating. An ASI may be completed within the same major
EBGN321
ENGINEERING ECONOMICS
3
department.
Total Hours
21.0
A Minor Program / Area of Special Interest declaration (available in the
Note: Multidisciplinary Engineering Laboratories I, II and III (EGGN250,
Registrar’s Office) should be submitted for approval prior to the student’s
EGGN350 and EGGN450, respectively) may be taken as laboratory
completion of half of the hours proposed to constitute the program.
supplements to EGGN281, EGGN351 and EGGN320.
Approvals are required from the Minor program Department Head, the
student’s advisor, and the Department Head or Division Director in the
Engineering Specialties Program Civil Minor and
department or division in which the student is enrolled.
ASI
Programs in the College of Engineering &
A twelve (ASI) or eighteen hour (minor) sequence must be selected from:
Computational Sciences
EGGN342
STRUCTURAL THEORY
3
CECS offers minor and ASI programs to meet two sets of audiences: (1)
EGGN353
FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL
3
students that are not pursuing an engineering degree and (2) students
SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING I
that are pursuing an engineering degree in another department. For the
EGGN354
FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL
3
first audience, a minor or ASI is available in Engineering. This program
SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING II
offers the foundational coursework in engineering which is compatible
EGGN361
SOIL MECHANICS
3
with many of the topics in the Fundamentals of Engineering examination.
EGGN363
SOIL MECHANICS LABORATORY
1
For the second audience, there is a program in engineering specialties.
This program recognizes that many majors will have completed the
EGGN383
MICROCOMPUTER ARCHITECTURE AND
4
fundamental engineering courses that are prerequisites to upper division
INTERFACING
engineering courses. Since these students complete the fundamental
EGGN422
ADVANCED MECHANICS OF MATERIALS
3
coursework as a part of their degree, they can pursue a minor or ASI
EGGN441
ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS
3
in the four engineering specialties (civil, electrical, environmental,
EGGN442
FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR ENGINEERS
3
mechanical) as long as they are outside of their major department.
EGGN433
SURVEYING II
3
The requirements for a minor do not allow CECS engineering students
EGGN444
DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES
3
to acquire a minor as a part of the Engineering Specialties program (for

Colorado School of Mines 77
EGGN445
DESIGN OF REINFORCED CONCRETE
3
ESGN/
WATER SUPPLY ENGINEERING
3
STRUCTURES
EGGN454
EGGN448
ADVANCED SOIL MECHANICS
3
ESGN/
SCIENTIFIC BASIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL
3
EGGN451
HYDRAULIC PROBLEMS
3
EGGN456
REGULATIONS
EGGN453
WASTEWATER ENGINEERING
3
ESGN/
SITE REMEDIATION ENGINEERING
3
EGGN457
EGGN454
WATER SUPPLY ENGINEERING
3
ESGN460
ONSITE WATER RECLAMATION AND REUSE
3
EGGN460
NUMERICAL METHODS FOR ENGINEERS
3
ESGN462
SOLID WASTE MINIMIZATION AND
3
EGGN464
FOUNDATIONS
3
RECYCLING
EGGN465
UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS
3
ESGN463
POLLUTION PREVENTION: FUNDAMENTALS
3
EGGN478
ENGINEERING VIBRATION
3
AND PRACTICE
EGGN499
INDEPENDENT STUDY
3.0
ESGN490
ENVIRONMENTAL LAW
3
GEGN467
GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING
4
GEGN468
ENGINEERING GEOLOGY AND GEOTECHNICS
4
Engineering specialties program Mechanical
MNGN321
INTRODUCTION TO ROCK MECHANICS
3
Minor and ASI
A twelve (ASI) or eighteen hour (minor) sequence must be selected from:
Engineering Specialties Program Electrical Minor
and ASI
EGGN307
INTRODUCTION TO FEEDBACK CONTROL
3
SYSTEMS
A twelve (ASI) or eighteen hour (minor) sequence must be selected from
EGGN351
FLUID MECHANICS
3
a basic electrical program comprising:*
EGGN403
THERMODYNAMICS II
3
EGGN382
ENGINEERING CIRCUIT ANALYSIS
3
EGGN400
INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS
3
EGGN281
INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS,
3
EGGN411
MACHINE DESIGN
4
ELECTRONICS AND POWER
EGGN413
COMPUTER AIDED ENGINEERING
3
Additional courses are to be selected from:
EGGN422
ADVANCED MECHANICS OF MATERIALS
3
EGGN307
INTRODUCTION TO FEEDBACK CONTROL
3
EGGN471
HEAT TRANSFER
3
SYSTEMS
EGGN473
FLUID MECHANICS II
3
EGGN334
ENGINEERING FIELD SESSION, ELECTRICAL
3
SPECIALTY
EGGN385
ELECTRONIC DEVICES AND CIRCUITS
4
EGGN386
FUNDAMENTALS OF ENGINEERING
3
Courses
ELECTROMAGNETICS
EGGN250. MULTIDISCIPLINARY ENGINEERING LABORATORY. 1.5
EGGN388
INFORMATION SYSTEMS SCIENCE
3
Hour.
EGGN389
FUNDAMENTALS OF ELECTRIC MACHINERY
4
(I, II) (WI) Laboratory experiments integrating instrumentation, circuits
EGGN417
MODERN CONTROL DESIGN
3
and power with computer data acqui sitions and sensors. Sensor data is
used to transition between science and engineering science. Engineering
EGGN481
DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING
3
Science issues like stress, strains, thermal conductivity, pressure and
EGGN483
ANALOG & DIGITAL COMMUNICATION
4
flow are investigated using fundamentals of equilibrium,
SYSTEMS
continuity, and conservation. Prerequisite: DCGN381 or concurrent
EGGN484
POWER SYSTEMS ANALYSIS
3
enrollment. 4.5 hours lab; 1.5 semester hour.
EGGN485
INTRODUCTION TO HIGH POWER
3
ELECTRONICS
EGGN350. MULTIDISCIPLINARY ENGINEERING LABORATORY II.
1.5 Hour.
*
Additional courses are approved special topics with a number
(I, II) (WI) Laboratory experiments integrating electrical circuits, fluid
EGGN398/EGGN498 and all graduate courses taught in the
mechanics, stress analysis, and other engineering fundamentals using
Electrical Engineering specialty area. Students should consult their
computer data acquisition and transducers. Fluid mechanics issues
faculty advisor for guidance
like compressible and incompressible fluid flow (mass and volumetric),
Engineering specialties program Environmental
pressure losses, pump characteristics, pipe networks, turbulent and
laminar flow, cavitation, drag, and others are covered. Experimental
Minor and ASI
stress analysis issues like compression and tensile testing, strain gage
All students pursuing the Environmental Minor or ASI are required to take
installation, Young’s Modulus, stress vs. strain diagrams, and others are
ESGN353/EGGN353 and ESGN354/EGGN354. Additional courses for
covered. Experimental stress analysis and fluid mechanics are integrated
the ASI or Minor sequence must be selected from:
in experiments which merge fluid power of the testing machine with
applied stress and displacement of material specimen. Prerequisite:
ESGN401
FUNDAMENTALS OF ECOLOGY
3
EGGN250. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment: EGGN351, EGGN320.
ESGN440
ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION: SOURCES,
3.0
4.5 hours lab; 1.5 semester hour.
CHARACTERISTICS, TRANSPORT AND FATE
ESGN/
WASTEWATER ENGINEERING
3
EGGN453

78 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
EGGN408. INTRODUCTION TO SPACE EXPLORATION. 1.0 Hour.
EGGN492. SENIOR DESIGN II. 3.0 Hours.
(I) Overview of extraterrestrial applications of science and engineering
(I, II) (WI) This course is the second of a two-semester sequence to
by covering all facets of human and robotic space exploration, including
give the student experience in the engineering design process. Design
its history, current status, and future opportunities in the aerospace and
integrity and performance are to be demonstrated by building a prototype
planetary science
or model, or producing a complete drawing and specification package,
fields. Subtopics include: the space environment, space transportation
and performing pre-planned experimental tests, wherever feasible, to
systems, destinations (Low-Earth orbit, Moon, Mars, asteroids, other
verify design compliance with
planets), current research, missions, and projects, the international and
client requirements. Prerequisite: EGGN491. 1 hour lecture; 6 hours lab;
commercial perspectives,
3 semester hours.
and discussion of potential career opportunities. This seminarstyle class
is taught by CSM faculty, engineers and scientists from space agencies
EGGN497X. SPECIAL SUMMER COURSE. 6.0 Hours.
and research organizations, aerospace industry experts, and visionaries
and entrepreneurs
of the private space commerce sector. Prerequisites: None; 1 hour
lecture; 1 semester hour.
EGGN450. MULTIDISCIPLINARY ENGINEERING LABORATORY III.
1.0 Hour.
(I, II) Laboratory experiments integrating electrical circuits, fluid
mechanics, stress analysis, and other engineering fundamentals
using computer data acquisition and transducers. Students will design
experiments to gather data for solving engineering problems. Examples
are recommending design improvements to a refrigerator, diagnosing
and predict ing failures in refrigerators, computer control of a hydraulic
fluid power circuit in a fatigue test, analysis of structural failures in an off-
road vehicle and redesign, diagnosis and prediction of failures in a motor/
generator system. Prerequisites: EGGN320, EGGN351, either EGGN350
or
EGGN382; Corequisite: EGGN307. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
EGGN490. SUSTAINABLE ENGINEERING DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.
(I) This course is a comprehensive introduction into concept of
sustainability and sustainable development from an engineering point
of view. It involves the integration of engineering and statistical analysis
through a Life Cycle Assessment tool, allowing a quantitative, broad-
based consideration any process or product design and their respective
impacts on environment, human health and the resource base. The
requirements for considering social implications are also discussed.
Prerequisites: Senior or graduate standing, or consent of instructor.;
3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
EGGN491. SENIOR DESIGN I. 4.0 Hours.
(I, II) (WI) This course is the first of a two-semester capstone course
sequence giving the student experience in the engineering design
process. Realistic open-ended design problems are addressed for real
world clients at the conceptual, engineering analysis, and the synthesis
stages and include economic and ethical considerations necessary to
arrive at a final design. Students are assigned
to interdisciplinary teams and exposed to processes in the areas of
design methodology, project management, communications, and work
place issues. Strong emphasis is placed on this being a process course
versus a project course.
This is a writing-across-the-curriculum course where students’ written
and oral communication skills are strengthened. The design projects
are chosen to develop student creativity, use of design methodology
and application of prior course work paralleled by individual study
and research. Prerequisite: Field session appropriate to the student’s
specialty and EPIC251. For Mechanical Specialty students, concurrent
enrollment or completion of EGGN 411. 1-2 hour lecture; 6 hours lab; 3
semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 79
Mechanical Engineering
free electives (9 credits), at the student’s discretion, that can be used
to either satisfy a student’s personal interest in a topic or they can be
http://mechanical.mines.edu
used as coursework as part of an "area of special interest" of at least
12 semester hours or a minor of at least 18 semester hours in another
Program Description
department.
All students must complete a capstone design course which is focused
The Mechanical Engineering Department offers a design-oriented
on an in-depth mechanical engineering related project. The projects are
undergraduate program in mechanical engineering. The program
generated by customer demand, and include experimental verification to
emphasizes fundamental engineering principles and requires in-depth
ensure a realistic design experience.
understanding of mechanical engineering. Graduates are in a position
to take advantage of a broad variety of professional opportunities, and
Prospective students should note that this is a design–oriented
are well-prepared for a mechanical engineering career in a world of rapid
mechanical engineering program. Engineering analysis and design
technological change. This department also supports the legacy Bachelor
is emphasized with applications in mechanical engineering design,
of Science degree with a specialty in Mechanical Engineering offered by
manufacturing and processes. Classroom education is augmented with
the College of Engineering & Computational Sciences. Please see the
extensive practical laboratory experiences.
Engineering section of the bulletin for information about that degree.
The Mechanical Engineering junior and senior level courses provide
The legacy B.S. in Engineering degree is accredited by ABET. The B.S.
depth in material mechanics and the thermal sciences with emphases
degree in Mechanical Engineering is new as of the 2012-2013 school
in computational methods and engineering design. Topics such as
year and is therefore not yet accredited. Accreditation for this new degree
computational engineering, machine design, control theory, fluid
will be sought during the 2013-2014 school year.
mechanics, heat transfer and biomechanics are an important part of
Program Educational Objectives
the mechanical engineering program. The Mechanical Engineering
Department has close ties to the metallurgical and materials engineering,
(Bachelor of Science in Mechanical
engineering physics, chemical engineering and biological life sciences
Engineering)
communities on campus, and undergraduates are encouraged to become
involved in one of the large number of research programs conducted by
The Mechanical Engineering program contributes to the educational
the Mechanical Engineering faculty. Many students go on to graduate
objectives described in the CSM Graduate Profile and the ABET
school.
Accreditation Criteria. In addition, the Mechanical Engineering Program
at CSM has established the following program educational objectives:
Students in mechanical engineering will spend considerable time in
within three years of attaining the BS degree in Mechanical Engineering:
laboratories and use a variety of computer-based analysis techniques.
The department is well equipped with basic laboratory equipment, such
• Graduates will be situated in growing careers in their chosen
as PC-based instrumentation systems, a 3D printer rapid prototyping
mechanical engineering fields or will be successfully pursuing a
facility and several computational laboratory classrooms. Several
graduate degree.
advanced experimental facilities are also available within the department
• Graduates will be advancing in their professional standing, generating
and include: the robotics and automation laboratory, a biomechanics
new knowledge and/or exercising leadership in their mechanical
laboratory, an IC engines laboratory and the CSM fuel cell technology
engineering field.
center.
• Graduates will be contributing to the needs of society through
Students are encouraged to become involved in research that is being
professional practice, research, and/or service.
conducted within the Department of Mechanical Engineering. These
Curriculum
research areas include: biomechanics, solid mechanics and materials,
thermal science and engineering, and robotics, automation, and design.
During the first two years at CSM, students complete a set of core
The Mechanical Engineering Department is housed in the west wing of
courses that include mathematics, basic sciences, and engineering
the George R. Brown Hall. Emphasis on hands-on education is reflected
sciences. coursework in mathematics is an essential part of the
in the department’s teaching and research laboratories. All students are
curriculum which gives mechanical engineering students essential
encouraged to take the Fundamental of Engineering examination before
tools for modeling, analyzing, and predicting physical phenomena.
graduation.
The basic sciences are represented by physics and chemistry which
provide an appropriate foundation in the physical sciences. Engineering
sciences build upon the basic sciences and are focused on mechanical
Mechanical Engineering complements the core curriculum with courses
engineering applications.
that provide depth in material mechanics and the thermal sciences with
emphases in computational methods and engineering design. Topics
The first two years also includes engineering design coursework within
such as computational engineering, machine design, control theory, fluid
the Engineering Practice Introductory Course Sequence (EPICS I and II).
mechanics, and heat transfer are an important part of the mechanical
This experience teaches design methodology and stresses the creative
engineering program. The Mechanical Engineering program has close
and synthesis aspects of the mechanical engineering profession. Finally,
ties to the metallurgical and materials engineering, physics, chemical
the first two years includes systems-oriented courses with humanities and
engineering and biological life sciences communities on campus, and
social sciences content; these courses explore the linkages within the
undergraduates are encouraged to get involved in one of the large
environment, human society, and engineered devices.
number of research programs conducted by the Mechanical Engineering
In the final two years, students complete an advanced core that includes
faculty. Many students go on to graduate school.
fluid mechanics, engineering mechanics, advanced mathematics,
thermodynamics, heat transfer, engineering design, economics and
additional studies in liberal arts international topics. The program contains

80 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
Bachelor of Science in
Summer
lec
lab
sem.hrs
EGGN235
ENGINEERING FIELD
3
Mechanical Engineering Degree
SESSION, MECHANICAL
Requirements:
SPECIALTY
3.0
Freshman
Junior
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
PAGN101
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
MATH323
PROBABILITY AND
3
LAIS100
NATURE AND HUMAN
4
STATISTICS FOR
VALUES
ENGINEERS
CHGN121
PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY
4
MATH398
APPLIED NUMERICAL
3.0
I
METHODS
CSM101
FRESHMAN SUCCESS
0.5
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective I
3.0
SEMINAR
EGGN315
DYNAMICS
3
MATH111
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4
EGGN371
THERMODYNAMICS I
3
AND ENGINEERS I
15.0
CSCI101
INTRODUCTION TO
3
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
COMPUTER SCIENCE, BELS
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3
101, or SYGN 101
EGGN351
FLUID MECHANICS
3
16.0
EGGN350
MULTIDISCIPLINARY
1.5
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
ENGINEERING LABORATORY
PAGN102
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
II
CHGN122
PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY
4
EGGN307
INTRODUCTION TO
3
II (SC1)
FEEDBACK CONTROL
PHGN100
PHYSICS I - MECHANICS
4.5
SYSTEMS
MATH112
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4
EGGN413
COMPUTER AIDED
3
AND ENGINEERS II
ENGINEERING
EPIC151
DESIGN (EPICS) I
3
EGMC
Mechanical Engineering
3.0
16.0
ELECT
Elective*
Sophomore
16.5
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Senior
DCGN241
DIST CORE - STATICS
3
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
SYGN200
HUMAN SYSTEMS
3
EGGN450
MULTIDISCIPLINARY
1
MATH213
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4
ENGINEERING LABORATORY
AND ENGINEERS III
III
PHGN200
PHYSICS II-
4.5
EGGN491
SENIOR DESIGN I
3
ELECTROMAGNETISM AND
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective II
3.0
OPTICS
EGGN471
HEAT TRANSFER
3
CSCI261
PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS
3
EGGN411
MACHINE DESIGN
4
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
18.0
17.0
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3
EGGN492
SENIOR DESIGN II
3
MTGN202
ENGINEERED MATERIALS
3
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective III
3.0
EGGN320
MECHANICS OF MATERIALS
3
EGMC
Mechanical Engineering
3.0
EGGN281
INTRODUCTION TO
3
ELECT
Elective*
ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS,
EGMC
Mechanical Engineering
3.0
ELECTRONICS AND POWER
ELECT
Elective*
EGGN250
MULTIDISCIPLINARY
1.5
ENGINEERING LABORATORY
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
EPIC251
DESIGN (EPICS) II
3
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
18.0
17.0
Total Hours: 136.5
* Mechanical Engineering students are required to take three Mechanical
Engineering elective courses. At least one of these courses must be

Colorado School of Mines 81
from List A, the remaining must be from List B. List A electives can be
Division Director in the department or division in which the student is
found below. For a complete listing of List B electives, please consult the
enrolled.
Mechanical Engineering website here: http://mechanical.mines.edu/
The Mechanical Engineering Department offers minor and ASI programs.
Mechanical Engineering List A Electives:
Students wishing to enroll in the ASI or minor program must satisfy
all prerequisite requirements for each course in a chosen sequence.
EGGN403
THERMODYNAMICS II
3
Students in the sciences or mathematics must be prepared to satisfy
EGGN422
ADVANCED MECHANICS OF MATERIALS
3
prerequisite requirements in fundamental engineering and engineering
EGGN473
FLUID MECHANICS II
3
science courses, while students in engineering disciplines will be better
EGGN478
ENGINEERING VIBRATION
3
positioned to meet the prerequisite requirements for courses in the minor
and ASI Mechanical Engineering program. No specific course sequences
Combined Mechanical Engineering
are suggested for students wishing to include Mechanical minors or
Baccalaureate and Masters Degrees
areas of special interest in their programs. Rather, those students should
consult with the ME department head (or designated faculty member) to
Mechanical Engineering offers a five year combined program in which
design appropriate sequences.
students have the opportunity to obtain specific engineering skills
supplemented with graduate coursework in mechanical engineering.
Upon completion of the program, students receive two degrees, the
Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering and the Master of
Courses
Science in Mechanical Engineering.
BELS426. MODELING AND SIMULATION OF HUMAN MOVEMENT.
Students must apply to enter this program by the beginning of their
3.0 Hours.
Senior year and must have a minimum GPA of 3.0. To complete the
(II) Introduction to modeling and simulation in biomechanics. The course
undergraduate portion of the program, students must successfully
includes a synthesis of musculoskeletal properties and interactions with
complete all Mechanical Engineering undergraduate curriculum. At the
the environment to construct detailed computer models and simulations.
beginning of the Senior year, a pro forma graduate school application
The course will culminate in individual class projects related to each
is submitted and as long as the undergraduate portion of the program
student’s individual interests. Prerequisites: EGGN315 and EGGN325/
is successfully completed, the student is admitted to the Mechanical
BELS325, or consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Engineering graduate program.
EGGN205. PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS AND ENGINEERING
Students are required to take an additional thirty credit hours for the M.S.
ANALYSIS. 3.0 Hours.
degree. Up to nine of the 30 credit hours beyond the undergraduate
(I,II) This course provides an introduction to techniques of scientific
degree requirements can be 400-level courses. The remainder of
computation that are utilized for engineering analysis, with the software
the courses will be at the graduate level (500-level and above). The
package MATLAB as the primary computational platform. The course
Mechanical Engineering Graduate Bulletin provides details for the
focuses on methods data analysis and programming, along with
graduate program and includes specific instructions regarding required
numerical solutions to algebraic and differential equations. Engineering
and elective courses. Students may switch from the combined program,
applications are used as examples throughout the course. Prerequisite:
which includes a non-thesis Master of Science degree to a M.S. degree
MATH112 or MATH113 or MATH122 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
with a thesis option; however, if students change degree programs they
lecture; 3 semester hours.
must satisfy all degree requirements for the M.S. with thesis degree.
EGGN235. ENGINEERING FIELD SESSION, MECHANICAL
SPECIALTY. 3.0 Hours.
General CSM Minor/ASI requirements can be found here (p. 195).
(S) This course provides the student with hands-on experience in
Mechanical Engineering Areas of Special
the use of modern engineering tools as part of the design process
Interest and Minor Programs
including modeling, fabrication, and testing of components and systems.
Student use engineering, mathematics and computers to conceptualize,
General Requirements
model, create, test, and evaluate components and systems of their
creation. Teamwork is emphasized by having students work in teams.
A Minor Program of study consists of a minimum of 18 credit hours of a
Prerequisites: PHGN200, CSCI261 or EGGN205, and EPIC251/
logical sequence of courses. With the exception of the McBride Honors
EPIC262. Three weeks in summer field session; 3 semester hours.
minor, only three of these hours may be taken in the student’s degree-
granting department and no more than three of these hours may be at the
EGGN315. DYNAMICS. 3.0 Hours.
100- or 200- level. A Minor Program may not be completed in the same
(I, II, S) Absolute and relative motions. Kinetics, work-energy, impulse-
department as the major.
momentum, vibrations. Prerequisite: DCGN241 and MATH225. 3 hours
An Area of Special Interest (ASI) consists of a minimum of 12 credit
lecture; 3 semester hours.
hours of a logical sequence of courses. Only three of these hours may be
taken at the 100- or 200-level and no more than three of these hours may
be specifically required for the degree program in which the student is
graduating. An ASI may be completed within the same major department.
A Minor Program / Area of Special Interest declaration (available in the
Registrar’s Office) should be submitted for approval upon application
to graduate. Approvals are required from the Mechanical Engineering
Department Head, the student’s advisor, and the Department Head or

82 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
EGGN325. INTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 3.0
EGGN400. INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS. 3.0 Hours.
Hours.
(I, II) Overview and introduction to the science and engineering of
(I) The application of mechanical engineering principles and techniques
intelligent mobile robotics and robotic manipulators. Covers guidance and
to the human body presents many unique challenges. The discipline of
force sensing, perception of the environment around a mobile vehicle,
Biomedical Engineering (more specifically, Biomechanical Engineering)
reasoning about the environment to identify obstacles and guidance path
has evolved over the past 50 years to address these challenges.
features and adaptively
Biomechanical Engineering includes such areas as biomechanics,
controlling and monitoring the vehicle health. A lesser emphasis is
biomaterials, bioinstrumentation, medical imaging, and rehabilitation.
placed on robot manipulator kinematics, dynamics, and force and tactile
This course is intended to provide an introduction to, and overview
sensing. Surveys manipulator and intelligent mobile robotics research
of, Biomechanical Engineering and to prepare the student for more
and development. Intro duces
advanced Biomechanical coursework. At the end of the semester,
principles and concepts of guidance, position, and force sensing; vision
students should have a working knowledge of the special considerations
data processing; basic path and trajectory planning algorithms; and force
necessary to apply various mechanical engineering principles to the
and position control. Prerequi site: CSCI261 and DCGN381. 2 hours
human body. Prerequisites: EGGN320, PHGN200. Co-requisites:
lecture; 1 hour lab; 3 semester hours.
EGGN315. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EGGN403. THERMODYNAMICS II. 3.0 Hours.
EGGN351. FLUID MECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.
(I) This course includes the study of thermodynamic relations,
(I, II, S) Fluid properties, fluid statics, control-volume analysis,
Clapeyron equation, mixtures and solutions, Gibbs function, combustion
Bernoulli equation, differential analysis and Navier-Stokes equations,
processes, first and second law applied to reacting systems, third
dimensional analysis, internal flow, external flow, open-channel flow,
law of thermodynamics, real combustion processes, equilibrium of
turbomachinery.
multicomponent systems, simultaneous chemical reactions of real
Prerequisite: DCGN241 or MNGN317. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
combustion processes, ionization, overview of the major characteristics of
spark-ignition and compression-ignition engines, define parameters used
EGGN371. THERMODYNAMICS I. 3.0 Hours.
to describe engine operation, develop the necessary thermodynamic
(I, II, S) A comprehensive treatment of thermodynamics from a
and combustion theory required for a quantitative analysis of engine
mechanical engineering point of view. Thermodynamic properties of
behavior, develop an integrated treatment of the various methods of
substances inclusive of phase diagrams, equations of state, internal
analyzing idealized models of internal combustion engine cycles, and
energy,
finally summarize how operating characteristics of spark-ignition and
enthalpy, entropy, and ideal gases. Principles of conservation of mass
compressionignition
and
engine depend on the major engine design and operating variables.
energy for steady-state and transient analyses. First and Second Law of
Prerequisite: EGGN351, EGGN371. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
thermodynamics, heat engines, and thermodynamic efficiencies.
Application
EGGN410. MECHANICAL DESIGN USING GD&T. 3.0 Hours.
of fundamental principles with an emphasis on refrigeration and power
(II) The mechanical design process can be broadly grouped into
cycles.
three phases: requirements and concept, design and analysis, details
Prerequisite: MATH213/MATH223. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and drawing package. In this class students will learn concepts and
techniques for the details and drawing package phase of the design
EGGN390. MATERIALS AND MANUFACTURING PROCESSES. 3.0
process. The details of a design are critical to the success of a design
Hours.
project. The details include selection and implementation of a variety of
This course focuses on available engineering materials and the
mechanical components such as fasteners (threaded, keys, retaining
manufacturing processes used in their conversion into a product or
rings), bearing and bushings. Fits and tolerances will also be covered.
structure as critical consid -
Statistical tolerance analysis will be used to verify that an assembly
erations in design. Properties, characteristics, typical selection criteria,
will fit together and to optimize the design. Mechanical drawings have
and applications are reviewed for ferrous and nonferrous metals, plastics
become sophisticated communication tools that are used throughout
and composites. The nature, features, and economics of basic shaping
the processes of design, manufacturing, and inspection. Mechanical
operations are addressed with regard to their limitations and applications
drawings are interpreted either by the ANSI or ISO standard which
and the types of processing equipment available. Related technology
includes Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD&T). In this course
such as measurement and inspection procedures, numerical control
the student will learn to create mechanical drawings that communicate
systems and automated operations are introduced throughout the course.
all of the necessary information to manufacture the part, inspect the
Prerequisite: EGGN320, SYGN202. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
part, and allow the parts to be assembled successfully. Prerequisite:
Taught on demand.
EGGN235. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
EGGN398M. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGINEERING. 1-6 Hour.
EGGN411. MACHINE DESIGN. 4.0 Hours.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
(I, II) This course is an introduction to the principles of mechanical design.
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
Methods
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
for determining static, fatigue and surface failure are presented. Analysis
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
and selection of machine components such as shafts, keys, couplings,
bearings, gears, springs, power screws, and fasteners is covered.
Prerequisites: EPIC251; EGGN315 or PHGN350; EGGN320; and
EGGN413. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 83
EGGN413. COMPUTER AIDED ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
EGGN469. FUEL CELL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
(I, II) This course introduces the student to the concept of computer-
(I) Investigate fundamentals of fuel-cell operation and electrochemistry
aided engineering. The major objective is to provide the student with the
from a chemical-thermodynamics and materials- science perspective.
necessary background to use the computer as a tool for engineering
Review types of fuel cells, fuel-processing requirements and approaches,
analysis and design. The Finite Element Analysis (FEA) method and
and fuel-cell system integration. Examine current topics in fuel-cell
associated computational engineering software have become significant
science and technology. Fabricate and test operational fuel cells in the
tools in engineering analysis and design. This course is directed to
Colorado Fuel Cell Center. Prerequisites: EGGN371 or ChEN357 or
learning the concepts of FEA and its application to
MTGN351, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
civil and mechanical engineering analysis and design. Note that critical
evaluation of the results of a FEA using classical methods (from statics
EGGN471. HEAT TRANSFER. 3.0 Hours.
and mechanics of materials) and engineering judgment is employed
(I, II) Engineering approach to conduction, convection, and radiation,
throughout the course. Prerequisite: EGGN320. 3 hours lecture; 3
including steadystate conduction, nonsteady-state conduction, internal
semester hours.
heat generation conduction in one, two, and three dimensions, and
combined conduction and convection. Free and forced convection
EGGN422. ADVANCED MECHANICS OF MATERIALS. 3.0 Hours.
including laminar and turbulent flow, internal and external flow. Radiation
(I, II) General theories of stress and strain; stress and strain
of black and grey surfaces, shape factors and electrical equivalence.
transformations, principal stresses and strains, octahedral shear stresses,
Prerequisite: MATH225; EGGN351; EGGN371 or PHGN341. 3 hours
Hooke’s law for isotropic material, and failure criteria. Introduction to
lecture; 3 semester hours.
elasticity and to energy methods. Torsion of noncircular and thin-walled
members. Unsymmetrical bending and shear-center, curved beams, and
EGGN473. FLUID MECHANICS II. 3.0 Hours.
beams on elastic foundations. Introduction to plate theory. Thick-walled
(II) Review of elementary fluid mechanics and engineering, two-
cylinders and contact stresses. Prerequisite: EGGN320,
dimensional external flows, boundary layers, flow separation;
EGGN413. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Compressible flow, isentropic flow, normal and oblique shocks, Prandtl-
Meyer expansion fans, Fanno and Rayleigh flow; Introduction to flow
EGGN425. MUSCULOSKELETAL BIOMECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.
instabilities (e.g., Kelvin-Helmholtz instability,
(II) This course is intended to provide mechanical engineering students
Raleigh Benard convection). Prerequisite: EGGN351 or consent of
with a second course in musculoskeletal biomechanics. At the end of the
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
semester, students should have in-depth knowledge and understanding
necessary to apply mechanical engineering principles such as statics,
EGGN478. ENGINEERING VIBRATION. 3.0 Hours.
dynamics, and mechanics of materials to the human body. The course
(II) Theory of mechanical vibrations as applied to single- and multi-
will focus on the biomechanics of injury since understanding injury
degreeof-
will require developing an understanding of normal biomechanics.
freedom systems. Analysis of free and forced vibrations to different
Prerequisite: EGGN315, EGGN320, EGGN325/BELS325, or instructor
types of loading - harmonic, impulse, periodic and general transient
permission. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
loading. Derive model systems using D’Alambert’s principle, Lagrange’s
equations and Hamilton’s principle. Analysis of natural frequencies and
EGGN426. MODELING AND SIMULATION OF HUMAN MOVEMENT.
mode shapes. Role of damping in machines and structures. Analysis and
3.0 Hours.
effects of resonance. Use of the modal superposition method and the
(II) Introduction to modeling and simulation in biomechanics. The course
transient Duhamel integral method. Prerequisite:
includes a synthesis of musculoskeletal properties and interactions with
EGGN315. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
the environment to construct detailed computer models and simulations.
The course will culminate in individual class projects related to each
EGGN493. ENGINEERING DESIGN OPTIMIZATION. 3.0 Hours.
student’s individual interests. Prerequisites: EGGN315 and EGGN325/
(II) The application of gradient, stochastic and heuristic optimization
BELS325, or consent of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
algorithms to linear and nonlinear optimization problems in constrained
and unconstrained design spaces. Students will consider problems
EGGN428. COMPUTATIONAL BIOMECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.
with continuous, integer and mixed-integer variables, problems with
Computational Biomechanics provides an introduction to the application
single or multiple objectives and the task modeling design spaces and
of computer simulation to solve some fundamental problems in
constraints. Design optimization methods are becoming of increasing
biomechanics and bioengineering. Musculoskeletal mechanics, medical
importance in engineering design and offer the potential to reduce design
image reconstruction, hard and soft tissue modeling, joint mechanics,
cycle times while improving design quality by leveraging simulation
and inter-subject variability will be considered. An emphasis will be
and historical design data. Prerequisites: MATH213 and MATH225
placed on understanding the limitations of the computer model as a
(Required), CSCI260 or CSCI261 or other experience with computer
predictive tool and the need for rigorous verification and validation of
programming languages (Suggested). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
computational techniques. Clinical application of biomechanical modeling
tools is highlighted and impact on patient quality of life is demonstrated.
EGGN499M. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
Prerequisites: EGGN413, EGGN325. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
Fall odd years.
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

84 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
Economics and Business
Degree Requirements in Economics
Freshman
Program Description
lec
lab
sem.hrs
The economy is becoming increasingly global and dependent on
CORE
Common Core
33.0
advanced technology. In such a world, private companies and public
33.0
organizations need leaders and managers who understand economics
Sophomore
and business, as well as science and technology.
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Programs in the Division of Economics and Business are designed to
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3.0
3
bridge the gap that often exists between economists and managers,
DIST SCI
on the one hand, and engineers and scientists, on the other. All Mines
Distributed Science III*
3.0
3.0
undergraduate students are introduced to economic principles in a
MATH213
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4.0
4
required course, and many pursue additional course work in minor
AND ENGINEERS III
programs or elective courses. The courses introduce undergraduate
SYGN200
HUMAN SYSTEMS
3
students to economic and business principles so that they will understand
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
the economic and business environments, both national and global, in
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
which they will work and live.
16.5
In keeping with the mission of the Colorado School of Mines, the Division
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
of Economics and Business offers a Bachelor of Science in Economics.
Most economics degrees at other universities are awarded as a Bachelor
EBGN301
INTERMEDIATE
3.0
3
of Arts, with a strong liberal arts component. Our degree is grounded in
MICROECONOMICS
mathematics, engineering and the sciences. We graduate technologically
MATH323
PROBABILITY AND
3.0
3
literate economists with quantitative economics and business skills that
STATISTICS FOR
give them a competitive advantage in today’s economy.
ENGINEERS
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3.0
3
Economics majors have a range of career options following their
undergraduate studies. Some pursue graduate degrees in economics,
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
business, or law. Others begin careers as managers, economic advisors,
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
and financial officers in business or government, often in organizations
EBGN
EBGN Elective I**
3.0
3.0
that deal with engineering, applied science, and advanced technology.
15.5
Junior
Program Educational Objectives (Bachelor of
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Science in Economics)
EBGN302
INTERMEDIATE
3.0
3
In addition to contributing toward achieving the educational objectives
MACROECONOMICS
described in the CSM Graduate Profile and the ABET Accreditation
EBGN325
OPERATIONS RESEARCH
3.0
3
Criteria, the educational objectives of the undergraduate program in
EBGN
EBGN Elective II**
3.0
3.0
economics and business are:
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS GenEd Restricted
3.0
3.0
1. To provide students with a strong foundation in economic theory
Elective I
and analytical techniques, taking advantage of the mathematical
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
and quantitative abilities of CSM undergraduate students; and
15.0
2. To prepare students for the work force, especially in organizations
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
in CSM’s areas of traditional strength (engineering, applied science,
mathematics and computer science), and for graduate school,
EBGN303
ECONOMETRICS
3.0
3
especially in economics, business, and law.
EBGN321
ENGINEERING ECONOMICS
3.0
3
EBGN409
MATHEMATICAL
3.0
3
Curriculum
ECONOMICS***
All economics majors take forty-five percent of their courses in math,
or EBGN Elective III**
science, and engineering, including the same core required of all CSM
undergraduates. Students take another forty percent of their courses in
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS GenEd Restricted
3.0
3.0
economics and business. The remaining fifteen percent of the course
Elective II
work can come from any field. Many students complete minor programs
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
in a technical field, such as computer science, engineering, geology or
15.0
environmental science. A number of students pursue double majors.
Summer
lec
lab
sem.hrs
To complete the economics major, students must take 45 hours of 300
EBGN403
FIELD SESSION
3.0
3
and 400 level economics and business courses. Of these, 18 hours
3.0
must be at the 400 level. At least 30 of the required 45 hours must be
taken in residence in the home department. For students participating
in an approved foreign study program, up to 19 hours of the 30 hours in
residence requirement may be taken abroad.

Colorado School of Mines 85
Senior
These tools include financial forecasting, business models and the
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
interrelationships of business functions including accounting, marketing,
finance, human resources and operations. The processes include
EBGN401
ADVANCED TOPICS IN
3.0
3
developing feasibility studies and business plans.
ECONOMICS
EBGN455
The area of Special Interest in Entrepreneurship requires that students
LINEAR PROGRAMMING***
3.0
3
complete Principles of Economics (EBGN201), Business Principles for
or EBGN Elective III**
Entrepreneurs (EBGN361), Introduction to Entrepreneurship (EBGN360)
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS GenEd Restricted
3.0
3.0
and Business Plan Development (EBGN460), for a total of 12 credit
Elective III
hours.
EBGN
EBGN Elective IV**
3.0
3.0
Economics Focus
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
EBGN301
INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS
3
15.0
EBGN302
INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS
3
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
EBGN303
ECONOMETRICS
3
EBGN
EBGN Elective V**
3.0
3.0
EBGN310
ENVIRONMENTAL AND RESOURCE
3
EBGN
ECONOMICS
EBGN Elective VI**
3.0
3.0
EBGN315
BUSINESS STRATEGY
3
EBGN
EBGN Elective VII**
3.0
3.0
EBGN320
ECONOMICS AND TECHNOLOGY
3
FREE
Free Electives
6.0
6.0
EBGN330
ENERGY ECONOMICS
3
15.0
EBGN340
ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY
3
Total Hours: 128.0
EBGN342
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
3
*
Students in all degree options (majors) are required to complete
EBGN401
ADVANCED TOPICS IN ECONOMICS
3
a minimum of three out of five courses from the list of Distributed
EBGN409
MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS
3
Science Requirements. For Economics Majors, students have a
EBGN437
REGIONAL ECONOMICS
3
choice of three of the following: BELS101, SYGN101, PHGN200,
EBGN441
INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS
3
CHGN122, and CSCI101. A total of 12.5 credit hours must be
completed for the DSR requirement. If the DSR courses chosen
EBGN443
PUBLIC ECONOMICS
3
do not equal 12.5 credit hours, additional free elective credit will be
EBGN470
ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS
3
required to meet the program total.
EBGN495
ECONOMIC FORECASTING
3
**
At least 2 EBGN elective courses must be at the 400-level or above.
Business Focus
*** Students must take either EBGN409 or EBGN455.
EBGN304
PERSONAL FINANCE
3
EBGN305
FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING
3
General CSM Minor/ASI requirements can be found here (p. 195).
EBGN306
MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING
3
Minor Program in Economics and Business
EBGN314
PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT
3
The minor in Economics requires that students complete 6 economics
EBGN321
ENGINEERING ECONOMICS
3
courses, for a total of 18 credit hours. Minors are required to take
EBGN325
OPERATIONS RESEARCH
3
Principles of Economics (EBGN201) and either Intermediate
EBGN345
PRINCIPLES OF CORPORATE FINANCE
3
Microeconomics (EBGN301) or Intermediate Macroeconomics
EBGN360
INTRODUCTION TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP
3
(EBGN302). Students must complete 4 additional courses from the lists
below. Students may choose courses from either the economics focus
EBGN361
BUSINESS PRINCIPLES FOR
3
or the business focus list (or both). Regardless of their course selection,
ENTREPRENEURS
the minor remains "Economics and Business." Economics courses taken
EBGN452
NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING
3
as part of the Humanities and Social Sciences electives can be counted
EBGN455
LINEAR PROGRAMMING
3
toward the minor.
EBGN456
NETWORK MODELS
3
Area of Special Interest in Economics and
EBGN457
INTEGER PROGRAMMING
3
Business
EBGN459
SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT
3
EBGN460
BUSINESS PLAN DEVELOPMENT
3
The area of special interest in Economics and Business requires that
students complete Principles of Economics (EBGN201) and 3 other
EBGN461
STOCHASTIC MODELS IN MANAGEMENT
3
courses in economics and business chosen from the lists below, for a
SCIENCE
total of 12 credit hours. Except for Principles of Economics (EBGN201)
EBGN474
INVENTING, PATENTING AND LICENSING
3.0
Economics courses taken to complete any other graduation requirement
may not be counted toward the area of special interest.
Minor Program in Operations Research (OR)
Area of Special Interest in Entrepreneurship
The Operations Research minor consists of a minimum of 18 credit hours
of a logical sequence of courses. Only three of these hours may be
The objective of the Area of Special Interest in Entrepreneurship is to
taken in the student’s degree-granting department. Three of these hours
supplement an engineering or applied science education with tools and
must consist of a deterministic modeling course, three must consist of a
processes to recognize and evaluate entrepreneurial opportunities.

86 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
stochastic modeling course, and no more than three must draw from a
EBGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 0.5-6 Hour.
survey course (combining both stochastic and deterministic modeling).
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
The objectives of the minor are to supplement an engineering or applied
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
science background with a formal approach to mathematical modeling
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
that includes assessing and/or improving the performance of a system.
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
Such a system could be naturally occurring or man-made. Examples of
such systems are manufacturing lines, mines, wind farms, mechanical
EBGN201. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS. 3.0 Hours.
systems such as turbines and generators (or a collection of such objects),
(I,II,S) Introduction to microeconomics and macroeconomics. This course
waste water treatment facilities, and chemical processes. The formal
focuses on applying the economic way of thinking and basic tools of
approach includes optimization, (e.g., linear programming, nonlinear
economic analysis. Economic effects of public policies. Analysis of
programming, integer programming), decision analysis, stochastic
markets for goods, services and resources. Tools of cost-benefit analysis.
modeling, and simulation.
Measures of overall economic activity. Determinants of economic growth.
Deterministic Modeling (minimum of one)
Monetary and fiscal policy. Prerequisites: None. 3 hours lecture; 3
semester hours.
CSCI262
DATA STRUCTURES
3
CSCI406
ALGORITHMS
3
EBGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS. 1-6
MATH406
ALGORITHMS
3
Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
CSCI404
ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE
3
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
EBGN452
NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING
3
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
EBGN455
LINEAR PROGRAMMING
3
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
EBGN456
NETWORK MODELS
3
EBGN457
INTEGER PROGRAMMING
3
EBGN299. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
EGGN307
INTRODUCTION TO FEEDBACK CONTROL
3
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
SYSTEMS
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
MATH332
LINEAR ALGEBRA
3
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
EGGN417
MODERN CONTROL DESIGN
3
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
EGGN502
ADVANCED ENGINEERING ANALYSIS
4
EBGN301. INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS. 3.0 Hours.
Stochastic Modeling (minimum of one)
(I,II) This course introduces the theoretical and analytical foundations
EBGN459
SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT
3
of microeconomics and applies these models to the decisions and
interactions of consumers, producers and
EBGN461
STOCHASTIC MODELS IN MANAGEMENT
3
governments. Develops and applies models of consumer choice and
SCIENCE
production with a focus on general equilibrium results for competitive
EBGN528
INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS SIMULATION
3
markets. Examines the effects of
EBGN560
DECISION ANALYSIS
3
market power and market failures on prices, allocation of resources and
MATH424
INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED STATISTICS
3
social welfare. Prerequisites: EBGN201 and MATH213. 3 hours lecture; 3
MATH438
STOCHASTIC MODELS
3
semester hours.
MNGN438
GEOSTATISTICS
3
EBGN302. INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS. 3.0 Hours.
PEGN438
GEOSTATISTICS
3
(I,II) Intermediate macroeconomics provides a foundation for analyzing
MTGN450
STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL AND
3
both short-run and long-run economic performance across countries and
DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS
over time. The course discusses macroeconomic data analysis (including
national income and balance of payments accounting), economic
Survey Course (Maximum of one)
fluctuations and the potentially stabilizing roles of monetary, fiscal and
EBGN325
OPERATIONS RESEARCH
3
exchange rates policies, the role of expectations and intertemporal
MNGN433
MINE SYSTEMS ANALYSIS I
3
considerations, and the determinants of long-run growth. The effects of
external and internal shocks (such as oil price shocks, resource booms
and busts) are analyzed. Prerequisites: EBGN201 and MATH213. 3
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Courses
EBGN303. ECONOMETRICS. 3.0 Hours.
EBGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS. 1-6
(II) (WI) Introduction to econometrics, including ordinary least-squares
Hour.
and single- equation models; two-stage least-squares and multiple-
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
equation models; specification error, serial correlation, heteroskedasticity,
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
and other problems; distributive-lag models
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
and other extensions, hypothesis testing and forecasting applications.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
Prerequisites: EBGN201 and MATH323. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
hours.

Colorado School of Mines 87
EBGN304. PERSONAL FINANCE. 3.0 Hours.
EBGN321. ENGINEERING ECONOMICS. 3.0 Hours.
(S) The management of household and personal finances. Overview of
(II) Time value of money concepts of present worth, future worth,
financial concepts
annual worth, rate of return and break-even analysis applied to after-
with special emphasis on their application to issues faced by individuals
tax economic analysis of mineral, petroleum and general investments.
and households: budget management, taxes, savings, housing and other
Related topics on proper handling of (1) inflation and escalation, (2)
major acquisitions, borrowing,
leverage (borrowed money), (3) risk adjustment of analysis using
insurance, investments, meeting retirement goals, and estate planning.
expected value concepts, (4) mutually exclusive alternative analysis and
Survey of principles and techniques for the management of a household’s
service producing alternatives. Prerequisite: EBGN201. 3 hours lecture; 3
assets and liabilities. Study of financial institutions and their relationship
semester hours.
to households, along with a discussion of financial instruments commonly
held by individuals and families. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EBGN325. OPERATIONS RESEARCH. 3.0 Hours.
(I) This survey course introduces fundamental operations research
EBGN305. FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING. 3.0 Hours.
techniques in the optimization areas of linear programming, network
(I, II) Survey and evaluation of balance sheets and income and expense
models (i.e., maximum flow, shortest part, and minimum cost flow),
statements, origin and purpose. Evaluation of depreciation, depletion,
integer programming, and nonlinear programming. Stochastic
and reserve methods for tax and internal management purposes. Cash
(probabilistic) topics include queuing theory and simulation. Inventory
flow analysis in relation to planning and -decision making. Inventory
models are discussed as time permits. The emphasis in this applications
methods and cost controls related to dynamics of production and
course is on problem formulation and obtaining solutions using Excel
processing. Prerequisite: EBGN201. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Software. Prerequisite: Junior Standing, EBGN201, MATH112. 3 hours
lecture; 3 semester hours.
EBGN306. MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Introduction to cost concepts and principles of management
EBGN330. ENERGY ECONOMICS. 3.0 Hours.
accounting including cost accounting. The course focuses on activities
(I) Study of economic theories of optimal resource extraction, market
that create value for customers and owners of a company and
power, market failure, regulation, deregulation, technological change
demonstrates how to generate cost-accounting information to be used
and resource scarcity. Economic tools used to analyze OPEC, energy
in management decision making. Prerequisite: EBGN201, EBGN305. 3
mergers, natural gas price controls and deregulation, electric utility
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
restructuring, energy taxes, environmental impacts of energy use,
government R&D programs, and other
EBGN310. ENVIRONMENTAL AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS. 3.0
energy topics. Prerequisite: EBGN201. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Hours.
(I) (WI) Application of microeconomic theory to topics in environmental
EBGN340. ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY. 3.0 Hours.
and resource economics. Topics include analysis of pollution control,
This course considers the intersection of energy and environmental policy
benefit/cost analysis in decision-making and the associated problems
from an economic perspective. Policy issues addressed include climate
of measuring benefits and costs, non-renewable resource extraction,
change, renewable resources, externalities of energy use, transportation,
measures of resource scarcity, renewable resource management,
and economic development and sustainability. Prerequisites: EBGN201.
environmental justice, sustainability, and the analysis of environmental
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
regulations and resource policies. Prerequisite: EBGN201. 3 hours
lecture; 3 semester hours.
EBGN342. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Hours.
(II) (WI) Theories of development and underdevelopment. Sectoral
EBGN314. PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT. 3.0 Hours.
development
(II) Introduction of underlying principles, fundamentals, and knowledge
policies and industrialization. The special problems and opportunities
required of the manager in a complex, modern organization. Prerequisite:
created by an extensive mineral endowment, including the Dutch disease
EBGN201. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and the resource-curse argument. The effect of value-added processing
and export diversification on development. Prerequisite: EBGN201. 3
EBGN315. BUSINESS STRATEGY. 3.0 Hours.
lecture hours; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
(II) An introduction to game theory and industrial organization (IO)
principles at a
EBGN345. PRINCIPLES OF CORPORATE FINANCE. 3.0 Hours.
practical and applied level. Topics include economies of scale and scope,
(II) Introduction to corporate finance, financial management, and financial
the economics of the make-versus-buy decision, market structure and
markets. Time value of money and discounted cash flow valuation, risk
entry, dynamic pricing rivalry,
and returns, interest rates, bond and stock valuation, capital budgeting
strategic positioning, and the economics of organizational design.
and financing decisions. Introduction to financial engineering and
Prerequisite: EBGN201. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
financial risk management, derivatives, and hedging with derivatives.
Prerequisite: EBGN201, EBGN305. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EBGN320. ECONOMICS AND TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
(II) The theoretical, empirical and policy aspects of the economics of
technology and technological change. Topics include the economics of
research and development, inventions and patenting, the Internet, e-
commerce, and incentives for efficient implementation of technology.
Prerequisite: EBGN201. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

88 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
EBGN360. INTRODUCTION TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP. 3.0 Hours.
EBGN404. ADVANCED TOPICS IN MICROECONOMICS. 3.0 Hours.
(I) This course introduces students to the entrepreneurial process,
(I) Application of economic theory to microeconomic problems. This
focusing on the concepts, practices, and tools of the entrepreneurial
course will involve both theoretical and empirical modeling of consumers,
world. This will be accomplished through a combination of readings,
producers and markets. Topics
cases, speakers, and projects designed to convey the unique
may include game theory, risk and uncertainty, the economics of
environment of entrepreneurship and new ventures. The mastery of
information, intertemporal allocations and general equilibrium modeling.
concepts covered in this course will lead to an initial evaluation of new
Prerequisites: EBGN301, EBGN302 and EBGN303. 3 hours lecture; 3
venture ideas. In this course students will interact with entrepreneurs,
semester hours.
participate in class discussion, and be active participants in the teaching/
learning process. Prerequisite: EBGN201. Corequisite: EBGN361. 3
EBGN405. ADVANCED TOPICS IN MACROECONOMICS. 3.0 Hours.
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(I) This course is a sequel to Intermediate Macroeconomics. The
course will cover (i) modern economic growth theory and empirics;
EBGN361. BUSINESS PRINCIPLES FOR ENTREPRENEURS. 3.0
(ii) microfoundations and econometric estimation of macroeconomic
Hours.
relationships, such as consumption, gross fixed investment, inventory
(I) Students will be introduced to each of the functional areas of an
behavior and the sustainability of fiscal deficits; and (iii) multi-sectoral
entrepreneurial business, including marketing, accounting, finance,
models of international trade and finance. Other topics may include
operations, human resources management, and business operations.
real business cycle models, macroeconomic policy simulation,
The course is designed to help students appreciate the interrelationship
macroeconomic policy efficacy in globally integrated economies, foreign
of these business functions and, understand how they operate in an
repercussions effects, empirical relationships between interest rates and
entrepreneurial start-up business. In this course students are expected to
exchange rates, and interactions between resource industries and the
participate in class discussion, and be active participants in the teaching/
rest of the economy. Prerequisites: EBGN301, ENGN302, EBGN303. 3
learning process. The class will be highly interactive and your engaged
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
participation and presence will be required. Prerequisite: EBGN201. 3
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EBGN409. MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Application of mathematical tools to economic problems. Coverage
EBGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS. 1-6
of mathematics needed to read published economic literature and
Hour.
to do graduate study in economics. Topics from differential and
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
integral calculus, matrix algebra, differential equations, and dynamic
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
programming. Applications are taken from mineral, energy, and
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
environmental issues, requiring both analytical and computer solutions
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
using programs such as GAMS and MATHEMATICA. Prerequisites:
MATH213, EBGN301, EBGN302; or permission of the instructor. 3 hours
EBGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
EBGN437. REGIONAL ECONOMICS. 3.0 Hours.
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
(I) (WI) Analysis of the spatial dimension of economies and economic
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
decisions.
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
Interregional capital and labor mobility. Location decisions of firms and
households. Agglomeration economies. Models of regional economic
EBGN401. ADVANCED TOPICS IN ECONOMICS. 3.0 Hours.
growth. Measuring and forecasting
(I) Application of economic theory to microeconomic and macroeconomic
economic impact and regional growth. Local and regional economic
problems. This course will involve both theoretical and empirical
development policy. Urban and regional spatial structure. Emphasis on
modeling. Specific topics will vary by semester depending on faculty
application of tools and techniques of
and student interest. Topics may include general equilibrium modeling,
regional analysis. Prerequisite: EBGN301. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
computational economics, game theory, the economics of information,
hours.
intertemporal allocations, economic growth, microfoundations of
macroeconomic models and policy simulation. Prerequisites: EBGN301,
EBGN441. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS. 3.0 Hours.
EBGN302 and EBGN303. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(II) (WI) Theories and determinants of international trade, including static
and dynamic comparative advantage and the gains from trade. The
EBGN403. FIELD SESSION. 3.0 Hours.
history of arguments for and against free trade. The political economy of
(S) (WI) An applied course for students majoring in economics. The field
trade policy in both developing and developed countries. Prerequisite:
session may consist of either participation in a computer simulation or an
EBGN301. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
independent research project under the supervision of a faculty member.
In the computer simulation, students work as part of the senior executive
team of a company and are responsible for developing and executing a
strategy for their company with on-going decisions on everything from
new product development, to marketing, to finance and accounting.
Prerequisites: EBGN301, EBGN302, EBGN303; or permission of the
instructor. 3 semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 89
EBGN443. PUBLIC ECONOMICS. 3.0 Hours.
EBGN457. INTEGER PROGRAMMING. 3.0 Hours.
(I) (WI) This course covers public-sector economics, including the
(II) As an advanced course in optimization, this course will address
fundamental
computational
institutions and relationships between the government and private
performance of linear and linear-integer optimization problems, and,
decision makers. It covers the fundamental generalequilibrium welfare
using state-of-the-art hardware and software, will introduce solution
theorems and their interaction with government policy instruments that
techniques for "difficult" optimization problems. We will discuss such
affect efficiency and distribution. Normative topics include an intensive
methodologies applied to the monolith, e.g., branch-and-bound and its
study of the causes and consequences of, and policy prescriptions for,
variations, cutting planes, strong formulations, as well as decomposition
market failure due to public goods, or other problems associated with
and reformulation techniques, e.g., Lagrangian relaxation, Benders
externalities and income distribution. Positive analysis focuses on policy
decomposition, column generation. Additional special topics may be
formation in the context of political- economy and public choice theories.
introduced as time permits. Prerequisite: EBGN455 or permission of
Prerequisite: EBGN301. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EBGN452. NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING. 3.0 Hours.
EBGN459. SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT. 3.0 Hours.
(II) As an advanced course in optimization, this course will address
(II) As a quantitative managerial course, the course will explore how firms
both unconstrained and constrained nonlinear model formulation and
can better organize their operations so that they more effectively align
corresponding algorithms, e.g., gradient search and Newton’s method,
their supply with the demand for their products and services. Supply
Lagrange multiplier methods and reduced gradient
Chain Management (SCM) is concerned
algorithms. Applications of state-of-the-art hardware and software will
with the efficient integration of suppliers, factories, warehouses and
emphasize solving real-world problems in areas such as mining, energy,
retail-stores (or other forms of distribution channels) so that products
transportation and the military.
are provided to customers in the right quantity and at the right time.
Prerequisite: EBGN455 or permission of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
Topics include managing economies of scale for functional products,
semester hours.
managing market- mediation costs for innovative products, make-to order
versus make-to-stock systems, quick response strategies, risk pooling
EBGN455. LINEAR PROGRAMMING. 3.0 Hours.
strategies, supply-chain contracts and revenue management. Additional
(I) This course addresses the formulation of linear programming models,
"special topics" will also be introduced, such as reverse logistics issues
examines linear programs in two dimensions, covers standard form and
in the supply-chain or contemporary operational and financial hedging
other basics essential to understanding the Simplex method, the Simplex
strategies. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
method itself, duality theory, complementary slackness conditions, and
semester hours.
sensitivity analysis. As time permits, multi-objective programming, an
introduction to linear integer programming, and the interior point method
EBGN460. BUSINESS PLAN DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Hours.
are introduced. Applications of linear programming models discussed in
(II) This course leads students through the process of developing a
this course include, but are not limited to, the areas of manufacturing,
detailed business plan for a start-up company. The creation of a business
finance, energy, mining, transportation and logistics, and the military.
plan can be challenging, frustrating, fascinating and will lead to a more
Prerequisites: MATH332 or MATH348 or EBGN409 or permission of
in-depth understand of how businesses start and operate. Most new
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ventures are started by teams, with complementary skills and experience
sets. In this class, therefore, students will work in teams to develop and
EBGN456. NETWORK MODELS. 3.0 Hours.
write a business plan. This class is also about identifying a new product
(II) Network models are linear programming problems that possess
or service with a viable market and potential to develop into a profitable
special mathematical
enterprise by expanding the feasibility study work from EBGN360. This
structures. This course examines a variety of network models,
course is the hands-on work of developing a business plan, and as such
specifically, spanning tree problems, shortest path problems, maximum
is intense and demanding. Additionally, this course will integrate previous
flow problems, minimum cost flow problems, and transportation and
entrepreneurship, business and economics classes. In this course
assignment problems. For each class of problem, we present applications
students are expected to participate in class discussion, and be active
in areas such as manufacturing, finance, energy, mining, transportation
participants in the teaching/learning process. The class will be highly
and
interactive and engaged participation and presence will be required.
logistics, and the military. We also discuss an algorithm or two applicable
Prerequisites: EBGN360, EBGN361; 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
to each problem class. As time permits, we explore combinatorial
problems that can be depicted on graphs, e.g., the traveling salesman
problem and the Chinese postman problem, and discuss the tractability
issues associated with these problems in contrast to "pure" network
models. Prerequisites: MATH111; EBGN325 or EBGN455; or permission
of the instructor.

90 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
EBGN461. STOCHASTIC MODELS IN MANAGEMENT SCIENCE. 3.0
EBGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
Hours.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
(II) As a quantitative managerial course, the course is an introduction to
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
the use of probability models for analyzing risks and economic decisions
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
and doing performance
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
analysis for dynamic systems. The difficulties of making decisions under
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
uncertainty are familiar to everyone. We will learn models that help us
quantitatively analyze uncertainty
and how to use related software packages for managerial decision-
making and to do optimization under uncertainty. Illustrative examples
will be drawn from many fields including marketing, finance, production,
logistics and distribution, energy and mining. The main focus of the
course is to see methodologies that help to quantify the dynamic
relationships of sequences of "random" events that evolve over time.
Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
hours.
EBGN470. ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS. 3.0 Hours.
(II) (WI) This course considers the role of markets as they relate to
the environment. Topics discussed include environmental policy and
economic incentives, market and non-market approaches to pollution
regulation, property rights and the environment, the use of benefit/cost
analysis in environmental policy decisions, and methods for measuring
environmental and nonmarket values. Prerequisite: EBGN301. 3 hours
lecture; 3 semester hours.
EBGN474. INVENTING, PATENTING AND LICENSING. 3.0 Hours.
(S) (WI) This course provides an introduction to the legal framework
of inventing and patenting and addresses practical issues facing
inventors. The course examines patent law, inventing and patenting in
the corporate environment, patent infringement and litigation, licensing,
and the economic impact of patents. Methods and resources for
market evaluation, searching prior art, documentation and disclosure of
invention, and preparing patent applications are presented. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EBGN495. ECONOMIC FORECASTING. 3.0 Hours.
(II) An introduction to the methods employed in business and
econometric forecasting. Topics include time series modeling, Box-
Jenkins models, vector autoregression, cointegration, exponential
smoothing and seasonal adjustments. Covers data collection methods,
graphing, model building, model interpretation, and presentation of
results. Topics include demand and sales forecasting, the use of
anticipations data, leading
indicators and scenario analysis, business cycle forecasting, GNP, stock
market prices and commodity market prices. Includes discussion of links
between economic forecasting and government policy. Prerequisites:
EBGN301, EBGN302, EBGN303. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
EBGN497. SUMMER PROGRAMS. 6.0 Hours.
EBGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS. 1-6
Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.

Colorado School of Mines 91
Geology and Geological
engineering geology and geotechnics, or geoenvironmental engineering
applications follow the Environmental, Engineering Geology and
Engineering
Geotechnics, and Ground-Water Engineering Concentration. Students
anticipating careers in resource exploration and development or who
Program Description
expect to pursue graduate studies in geological sciences follow the
Mineral and Petroleum Exploration Engineering Concentration.
A Bachelor of Science degree in Geological Engineering is the basis
for careers concentrating on the interaction of humans and the earth.
At all levels the Geological Engineering Program emphasizes laboratory
Geological Engineers deal with a wide variety of the resource and
and field experience. All courses have a laboratory session, and after the
environmental problems that come with accommodating more and more
junior year students participate in a field course, which is six weeks of
people on a finite planet. Geologic hazards and conditions must be
geologic and engineering mapping and direct observation. The course
recognized and considered in the location and design of foundations
involves considerable time outdoors in the mountains and canyons of
for buildings, roads and other structures; waste disposal facilities must
Utah and southwestern Colorado.
be properly located, designed and constructed; contaminated sites and
At the senior level, students begin to focus on a career path by taking
ground water must be accurately characterized before cleanup can be
course sequences in at least two areas of geological engineering
accomplished; water supplies must be located, developed and protected;
specialization. The course sequences begin with a 4 unit course in the
and new mineral and energy resources must be located and developed
fundamentals of a field of geological engineering which is followed by
in an environmentally sound manner. Geological Engineers are the
a 3 unit design-oriented course that emphasizes experience in direct
professionals trained to meet these challenges.
application of principles through design projects.
The Geological Engineering curriculum provides a strong foundation
Combined Undergraduate/Graduate
in the basic sciences, mathematics, geological science and basic
engineering along with specialized upper level instruction in integrated
Programs
applications to real problems. Engineering design is integrated
Several degree programs offer CSM undergraduate students the
throughout the four year program, beginning in Design I (Freshman year)
opportunity to begin work on a Graduate Certificate, Professional Degree,
and ending with the capstone design courses in the senior year. The
or Master Degree while completing the requirements for their Bachelor
program is accredited by the:
Degree. These programs can give students a head start on graduate
Engineering Accreditation Commission of Accreditation Inc
education. An overview of these combined programs and description
111 Market Place, Suite 1050
of the admission process and requirements are found in the Graduate
Baltimore, MD 21202-4012
Degrees and Requirements section of the Graduate Bulletin.
Telephone: (410) 347-7700.
Students have the background to take the Fundamentals of Engineering
Program Educational Objectives (Bachelor of
Exam, the first step in becoming a registered Professional Engineer.
Science in Geological Engineering)
Graduates follow five general career paths:
In addition to contributing toward achieving the educational objectives
Engineering Geology and Geotechnics. Careers in site investigation,
described in the CSM Graduate Profile and the ABET Accreditation
design and stabilization of foundations and slopes; site characterization,
Criteria, the Geological Engineering Program at CSM has established the
design, construction and remediation of waste disposal sites or
following program educational objectives:
contaminated sites; and assessment of geologic hazards for civil, mining
Objective 1. Demonstrate a high level of
or environmental engineering projects.
technical competence. Outcomes. Graduates
Ground-Water Engineering. Careers in assessment and remediation
of the program will:
of ground-water contamination, design of ground-water control facilities
for geotechnical projects and exploration for and development of ground-
• Successfully complete a required course curriculum
water supplies.
• Participate in senior year design experiences
Petroleum Exploration and Development Engineering. Careers in
• Complete two capstone design courses
search for and development of oil and gas and their efficient extraction.
• Be encouraged to gain practical work experience
• Advance to careers or graduate school programs related to geological
Mineral Exploration and Development Engineering. Careers in search
engineering
for and development of natural deposits of metals, industrial materials
and rock aggregate.
Objective 2. Demonstrate prowess in
Geological Science. Students are also well prepared to pursue careers
written, oral, and graphical communication.
in basic geoscience. Graduates have become experts in fields as
Outcomes. Graduates of the program will
divergent as global climate change, the early history of the Earth,
planetary science, fractal representation of ground-water flow and
• Have quality role models for effective communication
simulation of sedimentary rock sequences, to name a few. Careers are
• Be capable of producing concise and professional technical
available in research and education.
documents
The curriculum may be followed along two concentration paths with
• Be capable of giving specialized technical presentations using
slightly different upper division requirements. Both concentrations
computer software
are identical in the first two years as students study basic science,
mathematics, engineering science, and geological science. In the junior
year those students pursuing careers in ground-water engineering,

92 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
• Demonstrate computer literacy, including skills at writing computer
MATH222
INTRODUCTION TO
2
programs, retrieving information on the internet, and applying
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
computer software to solve problems
FOR GEOLOGISTS &
Objective 3. Experience progressive
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERS*
EGGN320
MECHANICS OF MATERIALS
3.0
3
leadership roles and good teamwork
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
practices. Outcomes. Graduates of the
16.0
program will:
Total Hours: 31.5
• Demonstrate leadership and teamwork by completing team projects
while contributing in a variety of roles
*
Only one of MATH222 and MATH225 can be counted toward
• Gain appreciation for leadership and teamwork by participating in
graduation in GE. Any student who completes MATH222 and then
student organizations
changes majors out of Geology and Geological Engineering will be
expected to complete MATH225 to meet graduation requirements.
Objective 4. Demonstrate professional
(In this case, MATH222 cannot be counted toward graduation in any
growth through life-long learning
manner - even as a free elective.)
experiences. Outcomes. Graduates of the
Following the sophomore year, Geological Engineering students choose
program will:
from one of two concentrations:
• Develop an awareness of how world events relate to their profession
1. Minerals and Petroleum Exploration Engineering
• Complete internships (33% of each class), independent study or
2. Environmental, Engineering Geology and Geotechnics, and
special topics (10%), and advance to graduate or professional school
Ground-water Engineering
(33%)
Minerals and Petroleum Exploration Engineering
Objective 5. Practice ethical behavior and
Concentration
integrity in professional activities. Outcomes.
Recommended for students intending careers in exploration and
Graduates of the program will:
development of mineral and fuels resources, or intending careers in
geoscience research and education.
• Understand what constitutes ethical behavior, as it applies to their
profession, the engineering workplace, in professional societies, and
Freshman
when completing class projects and taking examinations
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Program Requirements
CORE
Common Core
33.0
33.0
In order to achieve the program goals listed above, every student working
Sophomore
toward the Bachelor of Science Degree in Geological Engineering must
complete the following requirements:
lec
lab
sem.hrs
CORE
Sophomore Year
31.5
Degree Requirements (Geological Engineering)
31.5
Sophomore
Junior
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
GEGN203
ENGINEERING TERRAIN
2.0
2
GEOL309
STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY
3.0
3.0
4
ANALYSIS
AND TECTONICS
GEGN204
GEOLOGIC PRINCIPLES AND
2.0
2
GEOL321
MINERALOGY AND MINERAL
2.0
3.0
3
PROCESSES
CHARACTERIZATION
GEGN205
ADVANCED PHYSICAL
3.0
1
DCGN209
DIST CORE THERMO
3.0
3
GEOLOGY LABORATORY
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3.0
3
MATH213
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4.0
4
EGGN361
SOIL MECHANICS or MNGN
3.0
3
AND ENGINEERS III
321*
DCGN241
DIST CORE - STATICS
3.0
3
16.0
SYGN200
HUMAN SYSTEMS
3.0
3
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
GEGN307
PETROLOGY
2.0
3.0
3
15.5
GEGN317
GEOLOGIC FIELD METHODS
1.0
8.0
2
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
GEOL314
STRATIGRAPHY
3.0
3.0
4
EPIC264
EPICS II: GEOLOGY GIS
2.0
3.0
3
GEGN351
GEOLOGICAL FLUID
3.0
3
GEGN206
EARTH MATERIALS
2.0
3.0
3
MECHANICS
PHGN200
PHYSICS II-
3.5
3.0
4.5
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS GenEd Restricted
3.0
3.0
ELECTROMAGNETISM AND
Elective I
OPTICS

Colorado School of Mines 93
TECH
Tech Elective II*
3.0
3.0
Freshman
ELECT
lec
lab
sem.hrs
18.0
CORE
Common Core
33.0
Summer
lec
lab
sem.hrs
33.0
GEGN316
FIELD GEOLOGY
6.0
6
Sophomore
6.0
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Senior
CORE
Sophomore Year
31.5
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
31.5
GEGN
GEGN4xx Option Elective
3.0
3.0
4.0
Junior
ELECT
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
GEGN
GEGN4xx Option Elective
3.0
3.0
4.0
GEGN212
PETROGRAPHY FOR
1.0
3.0
2
ELECT
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERS
GEGN432
GEOLOGICAL DATA
1.0
6.0
3
GEOL309
STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY
3.0
3.0
4
MANAGEMENT
AND TECTONICS
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS GenEd Restricted
3.0
3.0
DCGN209
DIST CORE THERMO or
3.0
3
Elective II
EGGN 371
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3.0
3
17.0
EGGN361
SOIL MECHANICS
3.0
3
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
EGGN363
SOIL MECHANICS
1.0
1
GEGN
GEGN4xx Design Elective
2.0
3.0
3.0
LABORATORY
ELECT
16.0
GEGN
GEGN 4xx Design Elective
2.0
3.0
3.0
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
ELECT
GEGN317
GEOLOGIC FIELD METHODS
1.0
8.0
2
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS GenEd Restricted
3.0
3.0
GEGN473
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
3.0
3
Elective III
SITE INVESTIGATION
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
GEOL314
STRATIGRAPHY
3.0
3.0
4
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
GEGN351
GEOLOGICAL FLUID
3.0
3
15.0
MECHANICS
Total Hours: 136.5
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS GenEd Restricted
3.0
3.0
*
Technical Electives I & II: Either MNGN321 or EGGN361 is required
Elective I
as ONE of the technical electives. An additional technical elective
MNGN321
INTRODUCTION TO ROCK
2.0
3.0
3
must be selected from a department list of approved courses.
MECHANICS
The technical elective credits must total a minimum of 6 hours of
18.0
engineering topics with a minimum of 3 credit hours of engineering
Summer
lec
lab
sem.hrs
design.
GEGN316
FIELD GEOLOGY
6.0
6
Option Electives
6.0
Student must take TWO of the following four courses:
8.0
Senior
GEGN401
MINERAL DEPOSITS
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
GEGN438
PETROLEUM GEOLOGY
GEGN468
ENGINEERING GEOLOGY
3.0
3.0
4
GEGN467
GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING
AND GEOTECHNICS
GEGN468
ENGINEERING GEOLOGY AND GEOTECHNICS
GEGN467
GROUNDWATER
3.0
3.0
4
ENGINEERING
Design Electives
GEGN432
GEOLOGICAL DATA
1.0
6.0
3
Students must take TWO of the following design courses,
6.0
MANAGEMENT
corresponding in subject area to the Option Elective:
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS GenEd Restricted
3.0
3.0
GEGN403
MINERAL EXPLORATION DESIGN
Elective II
GEGN439
MULTIDISCIPLINARY PETROLEUM DESIGN
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
GEGN469
ENGINEERING GEOLOGY DESIGN
17.0
GEGN470
GROUND-WATER ENGINEERING DESIGN
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Environmental, Engineering Geology and
GEGN469
ENGINEERING GEOLOGY
3.0
3
Geotechnics, and Ground-Water Engineering
DESIGN
Concentration
GEGN470
GROUND-WATER
3.0
3
ENGINEERING DESIGN
Recommended for students intending careers in geotechnical
engineering, hydrogeology, or other environmental engineering careers.

94 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS GenEd Restricted
3.0
3.0
ESGN490
ENVIRONMENTAL LAW
3.0
Elective III
ESGN/
INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL
3
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
CHGN403
CHEMISTRY
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
GEGN499
INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING
1-6
15.0
GEOLOGY OR ENGINEERING
HYDROGEOLOGY
Total Hours: 136.5
GEGN475
APPLICATIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC
3.0
Students in the Environmental, Engineering Geology and Geotechnics,
INFORMATION SYSTEMS
and Ground-Water Engineering Concentration may further specialize
GEGN481
ADVANCED HYDROGEOLOGY
3.0
by utilizing their free elective courses to emphasize a specific specialty.
GEGN483
MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF
3.0
Suggested courses are presented below and should be selected in
GROUNDWATER SYSTEMS
consultation with the student’s advisor. The emphasis area is an informal
designation only and it will not appear on the transcript.
GEOL321
MINERALOGY AND MINERAL
3.0
CHARACTERIZATION
Engineering Geology and Geotechnics Emphasis
LAIS487
ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY
3.0
EGGN464
FOUNDATIONS
3.0
LAIS488
WATER POLITICS AND POLICY
3.0
GEGN475
APPLICATIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC
3.0
CSCI260
FORTRAN PROGRAMMING
2.0
INFORMATION SYSTEMS
CSCI261
PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS
3.0
EBGN321
ENGINEERING ECONOMICS
3.0
MATH332
LINEAR ALGEBRA
3.0
EGGN465
UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS
3.0
GEGN399
INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING
1-6
General CSM Minor/ASI requirements can be found here.
GEOLOGY OR ENGINEERING
HYDROGEOLOGY
Geological Engineering Minor and Area of
GEGN499
INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING
1-6
Special Interest
GEOLOGY OR ENGINEERING
To receive a minor or ASI, a student must take at least 12 (ASI) or
HYDROGEOLOGY
18 (minor) hours of a logical sequence of courses. This may include
GEGN307
PETROLOGY
3.0
SYGN101 (4 hours) and up to 4 hours at the 200-level.
GEOL321
MINERALOGY AND MINERAL
3.0
CHARACTERIZATION
CSCI261
PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS
3.0
Courses
MNGN404
TUNNELING
3.0
MNGN408
UNDERGROUND DESIGN AND
2.0
GEGN203. ENGINEERING TERRAIN ANALYSIS. 2.0 Hours.
CONSTRUCTION
(I) Analysis of landforms, geologic processes, principles of
geomorphology, mapping, air photo and map interpretation, and
MNGN410
EXCAVATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT
2.0
engineering uses of geologic information. Geomorphology of glacial,
MNGN445/545
ROCK SLOPE ENGINEERING
3.0
volcanic, arid, karst, and complex geological landscapes. Introduction
Water Engineering Emphasis
to weathering, soils, hillslopes, and drainage systems. Prerequisite:
SYGN101. Must be taken concurrently with GEGN204 and GEGN205 for
EBGN321
ENGINEERING ECONOMICS
3.0
GE majors. 2 hours lecture, 2 semester hours.
EGGN/
FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL
3
ESGN353
SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING I
GEGN204. GEOLOGIC PRINCIPLES AND PROCESSES. 2.0 Hours.
EGGN/
FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL
3
(I) Introduction to advanced concepts of physical and historical geology
ESGN354
SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING II
from a scientific perspective. Development of the geologic time scale,
relative time, and geochronology. Chemical composition and cycling of
EGGN465
UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS
3.0
elements in the Earth.
EGGN473
FLUID MECHANICS II
3.0
Plate tectonics and how tectonics influence sea-level history and
EGGN/
WASTEWATER ENGINEERING
3
sedimentation patterns. Evolution and the fossil record. Critical events
ESGN453
in Earth history with a focus on North America and Colorado geology.
EGGN/
WATER SUPPLY ENGINEERING
3
Prerequisite: SYGN101. Must be
ESGN454
taken concurrently with GEGN203 and GEGN205 for GE majors. 2 hours
ESGN401
FUNDAMENTALS OF ECOLOGY
3.0
lecture, 2 semester hours.
ESGN440
ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION: SOURCES,
3.0
CHARACTERISTICS, TRANSPORT AND FATE
ESGN/
SOLID AND HAZARDOUS WASTE
3
EGGN455
ENGINEERING
ESGN/
SCIENTIFIC BASIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL
3
EGGN456
REGULATIONS
ESGN/
SITE REMEDIATION ENGINEERING
3
EGGN457

Colorado School of Mines 95
GEGN205. ADVANCED PHYSICAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY. 1.0
GEGN317. GEOLOGIC FIELD METHODS. 2.0 Hours.
Hour.
(II) Methods and techniques of geologic field observations and
(I) Basic geologic mapping and data gathering skills, with special
interpretations. Lectures in field techniques and local geology. Laboratory
emphasis on air photos and topographic and geologic maps. Course will
and field project in diverse sedimentary, igneous, metamorphic,
include fieldwork in geomorphic regions of Colorado, with analysis of
structural, and surficial terrains using aerial photographs, topographic
landforms and geologic processes. Applications of geologic information
maps and compass and pace methods. Geologic cross sections maps,
to solve geologic engineering problems. Prerequisite: SYGN101. Must be
and reports. Weekend exercises required. Prerequisite: GEGN203,
taken concurrently with GEGN203 and
GEGN204, GEGN205, GEOL309 or GEOL308. Completion or concurrent
GEGN204 for GE majors. 3 hours laboratory, 1 semester hour.
enrollment in GEGN307 and GEOL314. 1 hour lecture, 8 hours field; 2
semester hours.
GEGN206. EARTH MATERIALS. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Introduction to Earth Materials, emphasizing the structure,
GEGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION. 1-3 Hour.
composition, formation, and behavior of minerals. Laboratories
(I, II, S) Supervised, full-time, engineering-related employment for a
emphasize the recognition, description, and engineering evaluation of
continuous
earth materials. Prerequisite: SYGN101. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3
six-month period (or its equivalent) in which specific educational
semester hours.
objectives are achieved. Prerequisite: Second semester sophomore
status and a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.00. 1 to 3
GEGN212. PETROGRAPHY FOR GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERS. 2.0
semester hours. Cooperative
Hours.
Education credit does not count toward graduation except under special
(I) Introduction to concepts of rock forming processes as a basis
conditions. Repeatable.
for rock classification. The course will teach practical skills allowing
identification of common rock types in hand specimen and in outcrop.
GEGN342. ENGINEERING GEOMORPHOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
Subsurface and nearsurface alteration and weathering processes will be
(I) Study of interrelationships between internal and external earth
covered, emphasizing recognition of secondary mineral products and the
processes, geologic materials, time, and resulting landforms on the
changes to the physical properties of these minerals in the rock masses.
Earth’s surface. Influences of geomorphic processes on design of natural
Prerequisites: GEGN206 or equivalent. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2
resource exploration programs and siting and design of geotechnical and
semester hours.
geohydrologic projects. Laboratory analysis of geomorphic and geologic
features utilizing maps, photo interpretation and field observations.
GEGN299. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING GEOLOGY OR
Prerequisite: SYGN101. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
GEGN351. GEOLOGICAL FLUID MECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
(II) Properties of fluids; Bernoulli’s energy equation, the momentum
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
and mass equations; laminar and turbulent flow in pipes, channels,
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
machinery, and earth materials; subcritical and supercritical flow in
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
channels; Darcy’s Law; the Coriolis effect and geostrophic flow in the
oceans and atmosphere; sediment transport. Prerequisite: DCGN241 or
GEGN307. PETROLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
permission of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(II) An introduction to igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic processes,
stressing the application of chemical and physical mechanisms to study
GEGN398. SEMINAR IN GEOLOGY OR GEOLOGICAL
the origin, occurrence, and association of rock types. Emphasis on the
ENGINEERING. 1-6 Hour.
megascopic and microscopic classification, description, and interpretation
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
of rocks. Analysis of the fabric and physical properties. Prerequisite:
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
GEOL321, DCGN209. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
GEGN316. FIELD GEOLOGY. 6.0 Hours.
(S) Six weeks of field work, stressing geology of the Southern Rocky
GEGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING GEOLOGY OR
Mountain Province. Measurement of stratigraphic sections. Mapping
ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY. 1-6 Hour.
of igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary terrain using air photos,
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
topographic maps, plane table, and other methods. Diversified individual
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
problems in petroleum geology, mining geology, engineering geology,
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
structural geology, and stratigraphy. Formal reports submitted on several
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
problems. Frequent evening lectures and discussion sessions. Field
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
trips emphasize regional geology as well as mining, petroleum, and
engineering projects. . Prerequisite: GEGN203, GEGN204, GEGN205,
GEGN206, GEGN212 or GEGN307, GEOL314, GEOL309, and
GEGN317. 6 semester hours (Summer Term).

96 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
GEGN401. MINERAL DEPOSITS. 4.0 Hours.
GEGN439. MULTIDISCIPLINARY PETROLEUM DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.
(I) Introductory presentation of magmatic, hydrothermal, and
(II) (WI) This is a multi-disciplinary design course that integrates
sedimentary metallic ore deposits. Chemical, petrologic, structural, and
fundamentals and design concepts in geology, geophysics, and
sedimentological
petroleum engineering. Students work in integrated teams consisting
processes that contribute to ore formation. Description of classic deposits
of students from each of the disciplines. Multiple open-ended design
representing individual deposit types. Review of exploration sequences.
problems in oil and gas exploration and field development, including
Laboratory consists of hand specimen study of host rock-ore mineral
the development of a prospect in an exploration play and a detailed
suites and mineral deposit evaluation problems. Prerequisite: DCGN209,
engineering field study are assigned. Several detailed written and oral
GEGN307, GEGN316, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours
presentations are made throughout the semester. Project economics
lab; 4 semester hours.
including risk analysis are an integral part of the course. Prerequisites:
GE Majors: GEOL309, GEOL314, GEGN438, and EPIC264; GP Majors:
GEGN403. MINERAL EXPLORATION DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.
GPGN302, GPGN303, and EPIC268; PE Majors: GEOL308, PEGN316
(II) (WI) Exploration project design: commodity selection, target selection,
and PEGN426. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
genetic models, alternative exploration approaches and associated
costs, exploration models, property acquisition, and preliminary
GEGN466. GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
economic evaluation. Lectures and laboratory exercises to simulate
(I) Theory of groundwater occurrence and flow. Relation of groundwater
the entire exploration sequence from inception and planning through
to surface; potential distribution and flow; theory of aquifer tests; water
implementation to discovery, with initial ore reserve calculations and
chemistry, water quality, and contaminant transport. Prerequisite:
preliminary economic evaluation. Prerequisite: GEGN401 and EPIC251.
mathematics through calculus and MATH225, GEOL309, GEOL315,
2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
and GEGN351,or EGGN351 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3
semester hours.
GEGN404. ORE MICROSCOPY. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Identification of ore minerals using reflected light microscopy, micro-
GEGN467. GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING. 4.0 Hours.
hardness,
(I) Theory of groundwater occurrence and flow. Relation of groundwater
and reflectivity techniques. Interpretation of common ore mineral textures,
to surface water; potential distribution and flow; theory of aquifer tests;
including those produced by magmatic segregation, open space filling,
water chemistry, water quality, and contaminant transport. Laboratory
replacement, exsolution, and recrystallization. Guided research on the
sessions on water budgets, water chemistry, properties of porous media,
ore mineralogy and ore textures of classical ore deposits. Prerequisite:
solutions to hydraulic flow problems, analytical and digital models, and
GEOL321, GEGN401, or consent of instructor. 6 hours lab; 3 semester
hydrogeologic interpretation. Prerequisite: mathematics through calculus
hours.
and MATH225, GEOL309, GEOL314 or GEOL315, and GEGN351, or
EGGN351 or consent of instructor. For GE Majors only. 3 hours lecture, 3
GEGN432. GEOLOGICAL DATA MANAGEMENT. 3.0 Hours.
hours lab; 4 semester hours.
(I) Techniques for managing and analyzing geological data, including
statistical analysis procedures and computer programming. Topics
GEGN468. ENGINEERING GEOLOGY AND GEOTECHNICS. 4.0
addressed include elementary probability, populations and distributions,
Hours.
estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of data sequences, mapping,
(I) Application of geology to evaluation of construction, mining, and
sampling and sample representativity, linear regression, and overview of
environmental projects such as dams, water ways, tunnels, highways,
univariate and multivariate statistical methods. Practical experience with
bridges, buildings, mine design, and land-based waste disposal facilities.
principles of software programming and statistical analysis for geological
Design projects including field, laboratory, and computer analysis are
applications via suppled software and data sets from geological case
an important part of the course. Prerequisite: MNGN321 and concurrent
histories. Prerequistes: Senior standing in Geological Engineering or
enrollment in EGGN361/EGGN363 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
permission of instructor. 1 hour lecture, 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 semester hours.
GEGN438. PETROLEUM GEOLOGY. 4.0 Hours.
GEGN469. ENGINEERING GEOLOGY DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.
(I) Source rocks, reservoir rocks, types of traps, temperature and
(II) (WI) This is a capstone design course that emphasizes realistic
pressure conditions of the reservoir, theories of origin and accumulation
engineering geologic/geotechnics projects. Lecture time is used to
of petroleum, geology of major petroleum fields and provinces of the
introduce projects and discussions of methods and procedures for
world, and methods of exploration for petroleum. Term report required.
project work. Several major projects will be assigned and one to two field
Laboratory consists of study of well log analysis, stratigraphic correlation,
trips will be required. Students work as individual investigators and in
production mapping, hydrodynamics and exploration exercises.
teams. Final written design reports and oral presentations are required.
Prerequisite: GEOL308 or GEOL309 and GEOL314 or GEOL315; and
Prerequisite: GEGN468 or equivalent and EPIC251. 2 hours lecture, 3
GEGN316 or GPGN486 or PEGN316. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4
hours lab; 3 semester hours.
semester hours.
GEGN470. GROUND-WATER ENGINEERING DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.
(II) (WI) Application of the principles of hydrogeology and ground-water
engineering to water supply, geotechnical, or water quality problems
involving the design of well fields, drilling programs, and/or pump tests.
Engineering reports,
complete with specifications, analysis, and results, will be required.
Prerequisite: GEGN467 or equivalent or consent of instructor and
EPIC264. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 97
GEGN473. GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING SITE INVESTIGATION. 3.0
GEOC407. ATMOSPHERE, WEATHER AND CLIMATE. 3.0 Hours.
Hours.
(II) An introduction to the Earth’s atmosphere and its role in weather
(II) Methods of field investigation, testing, and monitoring for geotechnical
patterns and long term climate. Provides basic understanding of origin
and hazardous waste sites, including: drilling and sampling methods,
and evolution of the atmosphere, Earth’s heat budget, global atmospheric
sample logging,
circulation and modern climatic zones. Long- and short-term climate
field testing methods, instrumentation, trench logging, foundation
change including paleoclimatology, the causes of glacial periods and
inspection, engineering stratigraphic column and engineering soils map
global warming, and the depletion of the ozone layer. Causes and effects
construction. Projects will include technical writing for investigations
of volcanic eruptions on climate, El Nino, acid rain, severe thunderstorms,
(reports, memos, proposals, workplans). Class will culminate in practice
tornadoes, hurricanes, and avalanches are also discussed. Microclimates
conducting simulated investigations (using a computer simulator). 3 hours
and weather patterns common in Colorado. Prerequisite: Completion of
lecture; 3 semester hours.
CSM freshman technical core, or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
hours. Offered alternate years.
GEGN475. APPLICATIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION
SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
GEOC408. INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY. 3.0 Hours.
(II) An introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and their
(II) An introduction to the scientific study of the oceans, including
applications to all areas of geology and geological engineering. Lecture
chemistry, physics, geology, biology, geophysics, and mineral resources
topics
of the marine environment. Lectures from pertinent disciplines are
include: principles of GIS, data structures, digital elevation models,
included. Recommended background: basic college courses in chemistry,
data input and verification, data analysis and spatial modeling, data
geology, mathematics, and physics. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
quality and error propagation, methods of GIS projects, as well as video
Offered alternate years.
presentations. Prerequisite:
SYGN101. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
GEOL102. INTRODUCTION TO GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING. 1.0
Hour.
GEGN481. ADVANCED HYDROGEOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Presentations by faculty members and outside professionals of case
(I) Lectures, assigned readings, and discussions concerning the theory,
studies to provide a comprehensive overview of the fields of Geology
measurement, and estimation of ground water parameters, fractured-
and Geological Engineering and the preparation necessary to pursue
rock flow, new or specialized methods of well hydraulics and pump tests,
careers in those fields. A short paper on an academic professional path
tracer methods, and well construction design. Design of well tests in
will be required. Prerequisite: SYGN101 or concurrent enrollment. 1 hour
variety of settings. Prerequisites: GEGN467 or consent of instructor. 3
lecture; 1 semester hour.
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
GEOL198. SEMINAR IN GEOLOGY OR GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING.
GEGN483. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF GROUNDWATER
1-6 Hour.
SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
(II) Lectures, assigned readings, and direct computer experience
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
concerning the fundamentals and applications of analytical and finite-
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
difference solutions to ground water flow problems as well as an
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
introduction to inverse modeling. Design of computer models to solve
ground water problems. Prerequisites: Familiarity with
GEOL199. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GEOLOGY. 1-6 Hour.
computers, mathematics through differential and integral calculus, and
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
GEGN467. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
GEGN497. SUMMER PROGRAMS. 15.0 Hours.
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
GEGN498. SEMINAR IN GEOLOGY OR GEOLOGICAL
ENGINEERING. 1-6 Hour.
GEOL308. INTRODUCTORY APPLIED STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY. 3.0
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
Hours.
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
(II) Nature and origin of structural features of Earth’s crust emphasizing
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
oil entrapment and control of ore deposition. Structural patterns and
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
associations are discussed in context of stress/strain and plate tectonic
theories, using examples of North American deformed belts. Lab and
GEGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING GEOLOGY OR
field projects in structural geometry, map air photo and cross section
ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY. 1-6 Hour.
interpretation, and structural analysis. Course required
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
of all PEGN and MNGN students. Prerequisite: SYGN101. 2 hours
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

98 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
GEOL309. STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY AND TECTONICS. 4.0 Hours.
GEOL399. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GEOLOGY. 1-6 Hour.
(I) (WI) Recognition, habitat, and origin of deformational structures
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
related to stresses and strains (rock mechanics and microstructures)
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
and modern tectonics. Structural development of the Appalachian
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
and Cordilleran systems. Comprehensive laboratory projects use
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
descriptive geometry, stereographic projection, structural contours,
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
map and air photo interpretation, structural cross section and structural
pattern analysis. Required of Geological and Geophysical Engineers.
GEOL410. PLANETARY GEOLOGY. 2.0 Hours.
Prerequisite: SYGN101, GEGN203, GEGN204, GEGN205 and
(II) Geology of the terrestrial planets and moons, specifically the Moon
GEGN206 or GPGN200. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
and Mars. Emphasis will be placed on the geomorphology, planetary
materials, geologic structure, geologic history, and natural resource
GEOL310. EARTH MATERIALS AND RESOURCES. 4.0 Hours.
potential of terrestrial planetary bodies. Lectures present the knowledge
(I) Introduction to Earth Materials, emphasizing the structure, formation,
of materials, geomorphic processes, and geologic history. Prerequisite:
distribution and engineering behavior of minerals, rocks and ores.
SYGN101. 2 hours lecture: 2 semester hours.
Laboratories emphasize the recognition, description and engineering
evaluation of natural materials. Lectures present the knowledge of natural
GEOL443. UNDERGRADUATE FIELD SEMINAR. 1-3 Hour.
materials, processes and resources necessary for mining engineering
Special advanced classroom and field programs emphasizing detailed
careers. Prerequisite: SYGN101. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab: 4 semester
study of some aspects of the geology of an area or region. Field studies
hours.
normally conducted away from the Golden campus. Classroom course
content dependent on
GEOL311. STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY FOR MINING ENGINEERS. 2.0
area of study. Consent of instructor and/or Department Head required.
Hours.
Fees assessed for field and living expenses and transportation. 1 to 3
(II) Nature and origin of structural features of Earth’s crust emphasizing
semester hours; may be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.
structural controls of ore deposits and analysis of structures related to
rock engineering and
GEOL470. APPLICATIONS OF SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING. 3.0
mining. Structural features and processes are related to stress/strain
Hours.
theory and rock mechanics principles. Lab and field projects include
(II) Students are introduced to geoscience applications of satellite
deformation experiments, geologic map, cross section, and orientation
remote sensing. Introductory lectures provide background on satellites,
data analysis of structural features including fractures, faults, folds, and
sensors, methodology, and diverse applications. One or more areas of
rock cleavages. Prerequisite: SYGN101. 2 semester hours combined
application are presented from a systems perspective. Guest lecturers
lecture and lab.
from academia, industry, and government agencies present case studies
focusing on applications, which vary from semester to semester. Students
GEOL314. STRATIGRAPHY. 4.0 Hours.
do independent term projects, under the supervision of a faculty member
(II) Lectures and laboratory and field exercises in concepts of stratigraphy
or guest lecturer, that are presented both written and orally at the end of
and biostratigraphy, facies associations in various depositional
the term. Prerequisites: PHGN200 and MATH225 or consent of instructor.
environments, sedimentary rock sequences and geometries in
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
sedimentary basins, and geohistory analysis of sedimentary basins. .
Prerequisite: SYGN101, GEGN203, GEGN204, GEGN205. 3 hours
GEOL497. SPECIAL SUMMER COURSE. 15.0 Hours.
lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
GEOL498. SEMINAR IN GEOLOGY OR GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING.
GEOL315. SEDIMENTOLOGY AND STRATIGRAPHY. 3.0 Hours.
1-6 Hour.
(I) Integrated lecture, laboratory and field exercises on the genesis of
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
sedimentary rocks as related to subsurface porosity and permeability
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
development and distribution for non-geology majors. Emphasis is placed
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
on siliciclastic systems of varying degrees of heterogeneity. Topics
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
include diagenesis, facies analysis, correlation techniques, and sequence
GEOL499. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GEOLOGY. 1-6 Hour.
and seismic stratigraphy. Application to hydrocarbon exploitation stressed
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
throughout the course. Required of all PEGN students. Prerequisite:
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
SYGN101, PEGN308, or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
lab; 3 semester hours.
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
GEOL321. MINERALOGY AND MINERAL CHARACTERIZATION. 3.0
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
Hours.
(I) Principles of mineralogy and mineral characterization. Crystallography
of naturally occurring materials. Principles of crystal chemistry.
Interrelationships among mineral structure, external shape, chemical
composition, and physical properties. Introduction to mineral stability.
Laboratories emphasize analytical methods, including X-ray diffraction,
scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy. Prerequisite:
SYGN101, CHGN122, GEGN206. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab: 3
semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 99
SYGN101. EARTH & ENV SYSTEMS. 4.0 Hours.
(I, II, S) Fundamental concepts concerning the nature, composition and
evolution of the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere of
the earth integrating the basic sciences of chemistry, physics, biology
and mathematics. Understanding of anthropological interactions with the
natural systems, and related discussions on cycling of energy and mass,
global warming, natural hazards, land use, mitigation of environmental
problems such as toxic waste disposal, exploitation and conservation
of energy, mineral and agricultural resources, proper use of water
resources, biodiversity and construction. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4
semester hours.
SYGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.

100 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
Geophysics
Baltimore, MD 21202-4012
Telephone: (410) 347-7700
http://geophysics.mines.edu
Geophysical Engineering undergraduates who may have an interest
Program Description
in professional registration as engineers are encouraged to take the
Engineer in Training (EIT)/Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam
Founded in 1926, the Department of Geophysics at the Colorado School
as seniors. The Geophysical Engineering Program has the following
of Mines is recognized and respected around the world for its programs
objectives and associated outcomes:
in applied geophysical research and education. With 20 active faculty
Program Objective 1: Graduates will be competent geophysical
and an average class size of 25, students receive individualized attention
engineers who are capable of independent and innovative problem
in a close-knit department. The mission of the geophysical engineering
solving.
program is to educate undergraduates in the application of geophysics
to help meet global needs for energy, water, food, minerals, and the
Program Objective 2: Graduates can design and execute experiments
mitigation of natural hazards by exploring and illuminating the dynamic
effectively with appropriate treatment of the resulting data.
processes of the earth, oceans, atmosphere and solar system.
Program Objective 3: Graduates will be competent in scientific
Geophysicists study the Earth’s interior through physical measurements
computing.
collected at the Earth’s surface, in boreholes, from aircraft, or from
Program Objective 4: Graduates will be effective communicators, both
satellites. Using a combination of mathematics, physics, geology,
orally and in writing.
chemistry, hydrology, and computer science, both geophysicists and
geophysical engineers analyze these measurements to infer properties
Program Objective 5: Graduates will exhibit good team skills, be able to
and processes within the Earth’s complex interior. Non-invasive imaging
lead and to follow effectively.
beneath the surface of Earth and other planets by geophysicists is
Student Outcomes (from ABET Criterion 3):
analogous to non-invasive imaging of the interior of the human body by
a. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and
medical specialists.
engineering.
The Earth supplies all materials needed by our society, serves as the
b. An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze
repository for used products, and provides a home to all its inhabitants.
and interpret data.
Geophysics and geophysical engineering have important roles to play
in the solution of challenging problems facing the inhabitants of this
c. An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired
planet, such as providing fresh water, food, and energy for Earth’s
needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental,
growing population, evaluating sites for underground construction and
social, political, ethical, health, safety, manufacturability, and
containment of hazardous waste, monitoring non-invasively the aging
sustainability.
infrastructures of developed nations, mitigating the threat of geohazards
d. An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams.
(earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, avalanches) to populated areas,
contributing to homeland security (including detection and removal of
e. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
unexploded ordnance and land mines), evaluating changes in climate
f. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
and managing humankind’s response to them, and exploring other
planets.
g. An ability to communicate effectively.
Energy companies and mining firms employ geophysicists to explore for
h. The broad education necessary to understand the impact of
hidden resources around the world. Engineering firms hire geophysical
engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal
engineers to assess the Earth’s near-surface properties when sites
context.
are chosen for large construction projects and waste-management
i. A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long
operations. Environmental organizations use geophysics to conduct
learning.
groundwater surveys and to track the flow of contaminants. On the global
j. A knowledge of contemporary issues.
scale, geophysicists employed by universities and government agencies
(such as the United States Geological Survey, NASA, and the National
k. An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools
Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration) try to understand such
necessary for engineering practice.
Earth processes as heat flow, gravitational, magnetic, electric, thermal,
and stress fields within the Earth’s interior. For the past decade, 100%
Program Specific Outcomes
of CSM’s geophysics graduates have found employment in their chosen
1. Expanded perspective of applied geophysics as a result of participating
field, with about 70% choosing to pursue graduate studies.
in employment or research.
2. An ability to analyze, quantitatively, the errors, limitations, and
Bachelor of Science Program in Geophysical
uncertainties in data.
Engineering
Geophysics Field Camp
The Colorado School of Mines offers one of only two undergraduate
Each summer, a base of field operations is set up for four weeks, usually
geophysical engineering programs in the entire United States accredited
in the mountains of Colorado for students who have completed their
by:
junior year. Students prepare geological maps and cross sections
the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for
and then use these as the basis for conducting seismic, gravimetric,
Engineering and Technology
magnetic, and electrical surveys. After acquiring these various
111 Market Place, Suite 1050
geophysical data-sets, the students process the data and develop an

Colorado School of Mines 101
interpretation that is consistent with all the information. In addition to
of international issues and different cultures. To satisfy all these
the required four-week program, students can also participate in other
requirements, every student who obtains a Bachelor’s Degree in
diverse field experiences. In recent years these have included cruises
Geophysical Engineering at CSM must complete the courses in the CSM
on seismic ships in the Gulf of Mexico, studies at an archeological site,
Core Curriculum plus the following, for a total of 133.5 semester hours.
investigations at an environmental site, a ground-penetrating radar
We strongly recommend students download the Department curriculum
survey on an active volcano in Hawaii, and a well-logging school offered
flowchart on its webpage, geophysics.mines.edu.
by Baker Atlas.
Degree Requirements (Geophysical
Study Abroad
Engineering)
The Department of Geophysics encourages its undergraduates to spend
Freshman
one or two semesters studying abroad. At some universities credits can
lec
lab
sem.hrs
be earned that substitute for course requirements in the geophysical
engineering program at CSM. Information on universities that have
CORE
Common Core
33.0
established formal exchange programs with CSM can be obtained
33.0
from either the Department of Geophysics or the Office of International
Sophomore
Programs.
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Combined BS/MS Program
GEGN203
ENGINEERING TERRAIN
2.0
3.0
2.0
Undergraduate students in the Geophysical Engineering program
ANALYSIS or 2041
who would like to continue directly into the Master of Science program
GEGN205
ADVANCED PHYSICAL
1
in Geophysics or Geophysical Engineering are allowed to fulfill part
GEOLOGY LABORATORY
of the requirements of their graduate degree by including up to six
GPGN200
INTRODUCTION TO
3.0
hours of specified course credits which also were used in fulfilling
GEOPHYSICS
the requirements of their undergraduate degree. Students interested
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3.0
3
to take advantage of this option should meet with their advisor or
MATH213
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4.0
4
department head as early as possible in their undergraduate program to
AND ENGINEERS III
determine which elective courses will be acceptable and advantageous
PHGN200
PHYSICS II-
3.5
3.0
4.5
for accelerating them through their combined BS/MS studies.
ELECTROMAGNETISM AND
Summer Jobs in Geophysics
OPTICS
In addition to the summer field camp experience, students are given
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
opportunities every summer throughout their undergraduate career to
18.0
work as summer interns within the industry, at CSM, or for government
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
agencies. Students have recently worked outdoors with geophysics crews
GPGN221
THEORY OF FIELDS I:
3.0
3
in various parts of the U.S., South America, and offshore in the Gulf of
STATIC FIELDS
Mexico.
CSCI261
PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS2
3.0
3
Undergraduate Research
EPIC268
EPIC II: FOR GEOPHYSICS
3.0
3
Students are encouraged to try their hand at research by working on a
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3.0
3
project with a faculty member either part-time during the semester or full-
SYGN200
HUMAN SYSTEMS
3.0
3
time during the summer.
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
The Cecil H. and Ida Green Graduate and
15.5
Professional Center
Junior
The lecture rooms, laboratories, and computer-aided instruction areas
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
of the Department of Geophysics are located in the Green Center.
GPGN303
INTRODUCTION TO
3.0
3.0
4
The department maintains equipment for conducting geophysical field
GRAVITY, MAGNETIC AND
measurements, including magnetometers, gravity meters, ground-
ELECTRICAL METHODS
penetrating radar, and instruments for recording seismic waves. Students
GPGN322
THEORY OF FIELDS II: TIME-
3.0
3
have access to the Department petrophysics laboratory for measuring
VARYING FIELDS
properties of porous rocks.
GPGN315
SUPPORTING GEOPHYSICAL
6.0
2
Curriculum
FIELD INVESTIGATIONS
MATH348
ADVANCED ENGINEERING
3.0
3
Geophysics is an applied and interdisciplinary science; students therefore
must have a strong foundation in physics, mathematics, geology and
MATHEMATICS or PHGN 3113
computer sciences. Superimposed on this foundation is a comprehensive
ELECT
Electives4
6.0
6.0
body of courses on the theory and practice of geophysical methods.
18.0
As geophysics and geophysical engineering involve the study and
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
exploration of the entire earth, our graduates have great opportunities
to work anywhere on, and even off, the planet. Therefore, emphasis is
GEOL308
INTRODUCTORY APPLIED
2.0
3.0
3
placed on electives in the humanities that give students an understanding
STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY5

102 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
GPGN320
ELEMENTS OF CONTINUUM
3.0
3
MECHANICS AND WAVE
General CSM Minor/ASI requirements can be found here.
PROPAGATION
Minor in Geophysics/Geophysical
GPGN302
INTRODUCTION TO
3.0
3.0
4
Engineering
ELECTROMAGNETIC AND
SEISMIC METHODS
Geophysics plays an important role in many aspects of civil engineering,
ELECT
petroleum engineering, mechanical engineering, and mining engineering,
Electives4
6.0
6.0
as well as mathematics, physics, geology, chemistry, hydrology, and
16.0
computer science. Given the natural connections between these various
Summer
lec
lab
sem.hrs
fields and geophysics, it may be of interest for students in other majors
GPGN486
GEOPHYSICS FIELD CAMP
4.0
4
to consider choosing to minor in geophysics, or to choose geophysics as
4.0
an area of specialization. The core of courses taken to satisfy the minor
requirement typically includes some of the following geophysics methods
Senior
courses.
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
GPGN404
DIGITAL SIGNAL ANALYSIS
3.0
3
GPGN200
INTRODUCTION TO GEOPHYSICS
4
GP ELECT
GPGN302
INTRODUCTION TO ELECTROMAGNETIC AND
4
GPGN Advanced Elective6
3.0
3.0
4.0
SEISMIC METHODS
GP ELECT
GPGN Advanced Elective6
3.0
3.0
4.0
GPGN303
INTRODUCTION TO GRAVITY, MAGNETIC AND
4
GPGN438
GEOPHYSICS PROJECT
3.0
ELECTRICAL METHODS
DESIGN or 439 (in Spring
GPGN404
DIGITAL SIGNAL ANALYSIS
3
Semester)7
GPGN409
INVERSION
3
ELECT
Electives4
3.0
3.0
GPGN432
FORMATION EVALUATION
4
17.0
GPGN470
APPLICATIONS OF SATELLITE REMOTE
3
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
SENSING
GPGN409
INVERSION
3.0
3
The remaining hours can be satisfied by a combination of other
GP ELECT
GPGN Advanced Elective6
3.0
3.0
geophysics courses, as well as courses in geology, mathematics, and
computer science depending on the student’s major. Students must
GEOL314
STRATIGRAPHY5
3.0
3.0
4
consult with the Department of Geophysics to have their sequence of
ELECT
Electives4
3.0
3.0
courses approved before embarking on a minor program.
13.0
Total Hours: 134.5
Courses
1
Students must take GEGN205 (1 credit hour) with either
GEGN203 or GEGN204 (2 credit hours).
GPGN200. INTRODUCTION TO GEOPHYSICS. 3.0 Hours.
2
Students should enroll in the Java section of CSCI261, although
(I) (WI) This is a discovery course designed to introduce sophomores
C++ is accepted.
to the science of geophysics in the context of the whole-earth system.
Students will explore the fundamental observations from which physical
3
Students should enroll in the special section of MATH348 for
and mathematical inferences can be made regarding the Earth’s origin,
Geophysics
structure, and processes. Examples of such observations are earthquake
majors.
records; geodetic and gravitational data, such as those recorded by
4
Electives must include at least 9 hours that meet LAIS core
satellites; magnetic measurements; and greenhouse gases in the
requirements. The Department of Geophysics encourages its
atmosphere. Learning will take place through the examination of selected
students to consider organizing their electives to form a Minor or an
topics that may vary from one semester to the next. Examples of such
Area of Special Interest (ASI). A guide suggesting various Minor and
topics are: earthquake seismology, geomagnetism, geodynamics, and
ASI programs can be obtained from the Department office.
climate change. 3 hours, lecture, 3 semester hours.
5
Students must take either GEOL308 or GEOL309, and either
GEOL314 or GEOL315.
GPGN221. THEORY OF FIELDS I: STATIC FIELDS. 3.0 Hours.
6
Students must take 11 credits of advanced GPGN elective courses
(II) Introduction to the theory of gravitational, magnetic, and electrical
at the 400- or 500-level.
fields encountered in geophysics. Emphasis on the mathematical and
physical foundations of the various phenomena and the similarities and
7
Students can take either GPGN438 or GPGN439 to satisfy the
differences in the various field properties. Physical laws governing the
senior design requirement. The multidisciplinary design course
behavior of the gravitational, electric, and magnetic fields. Systems
GPGN439, a 3 credit hour course offered only in Spring semester,
of equations of these fields. Boundary value problems. Uniqueness
is strongly recommended for students interested in petroleum
theorem. Influence of a medium on field behavior. Prerequisites:
exploration and production. Students interested in non-petroleum
PHGN200, MATH213, and concurrent enrollment in MATH225, or
applications of geophysics take GPGN438 for 3 credit hours, either
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
by enrolling for all 3 credit hours in one semester (Fall or Spring) or
by enrolling for a portion of the 3 hours in Fall and the remainder in
Spring.

Colorado School of Mines 103
GPGN302. INTRODUCTION TO ELECTROMAGNETIC AND SEISMIC
GPGN322. THEORY OF FIELDS II: TIME-VARYING FIELDS. 3.0
METHODS. 4.0 Hours.
Hours.
(II) (WI) This is an introductory study of electromagnetic and seismic
(I) Constant electric field. Coulomb’s law. System of equations of the
methods for imaging the Earth’s subsurface. The course begins with
constant electric field. Stationary electric field and the direct current in
the connection between geophysical measurements and subsurface
a conducting medium. Ohm’s law. Principle of charge conservation.
materials. It introduces basic concepts, mathematics, and physics of
Sources of electric field in a conducting medium. Electromotive force.
electromagnetic and seismic wave propagation, emphasizing similarities
Resistance. System of equations of the stationary electric field. The
with the equations and physics that underlie all geophysical methods.
magnetic field, caused by constant currents. Biot-Savart law. The
These methods are employed in geotechnical and environmental
electromagnetic induction. Faraday’s law. Prerequisite: GPGN221, or
engineering and resources exploration for base and precious metals,
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
industrial minerals, geothermal and hydrocarbons. The discussion of
each method includes the principles, instrumentation, procedures of
GPGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION. 1-3 Hour.
data acquisition, analysis, and interpretation. Prerequisites: PHGN200,
(I, II, S) Supervised, full-time, engineering-related employment for
MATH213, MATH225, and MATH348 or PHGN311, or consent of
a continuous six-month period (or its equivalent) in which specific
instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
educational objectives are achieved. Prerequisite: Second semester
sophomore status and a cumulative grade-point average of 2.00. 0 to
GPGN303. INTRODUCTION TO GRAVITY, MAGNETIC AND
3 semester hours. Cooperative Education credit does not count toward
ELECTRICAL METHODS. 4.0 Hours.
graduation except under special conditions.
(I) This is an introductory study of gravity, magnetic and electrical
methods for imaging the earth’s subsurface. The course begins
GPGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
with the connection between geophysical measurements and
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
subsurface materials. It introduces basic concepts, mathematics,
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
and physics of gravity, magnetic and electrical fields, emphasizing
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
emphasizing similarities with the equations and physics that underlie
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
all geophysical methods. These methods are employed in geotechnical
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
and environmental engineering and resources exploration for base and
GPGN404. DIGITAL SIGNAL ANALYSIS. 3.0 Hours.
precious metals, industrial minerals, geothermal and hydrocarbons. The
(I) The fundamentals of one-dimensional digital signal processing as
discussion of each method includes the principles, instrumentation, and
applied to geophysical investigations are studied. Students explore the
procedures of data acquisition, analysis, and interpretation. Prerequisites:
mathematical background and practical consequences of the sampling
PHGN200, MATH213, MATH225, and concurrent enrollment in
theorem, convolution, deconvolution, the Z and Fourier transforms,
MATH348 or PHGN311, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours
windows, and filters. Emphasis is placed on applying the knowledge
lab; 4 semester hours.
gained in lecture to exploring practical signal processing issues.
GPGN315. SUPPORTING GEOPHYSICAL FIELD INVESTIGATIONS.
This is done through homework and in-class practicum assignments
2.0 Hours.
requiring the programming and testing of algorithms discussed in lecture.
(I) Prior to conducting a geophysical investigation, geophysicists often
Prerequisites: MATH213, MATH225, and MATH348 or PHGN311, or
need input from related specialists such as geologists, surveyors, and
consent of instructor. Knowledge of a computer programming language is
land-men. Students are introduced to the issues that each of these
assumed.
specialists must address so that they may understand how each affects
2 hours lecture; 2 hours lab, 3 semester hours.
the design and outcome of geophysical investigations. Students learn to
GPGN409. INVERSION. 3.0 Hours.
use and understand the range of applicability of a variety of surveying
(II) The fundamentals of inverse problem theory as applied to geophysical
methods, learn the tools and techniques used in geological field mapping
investigation are studied. Students explore the fundamental concepts
and interpretation, and explore the logistical and permitting issues directly
of inversion in a Bayesian framework as well as practical methods
related to geophysical field investigations. 6 hours lab, 2 semester hours.
for solving discrete inverse problems. Topics studied include Monte
GPGN320. ELEMENTS OF CONTINUUM MECHANICS AND WAVE
Carlo methods, optimization criteria, convex optimization methods,
PROPAGATION. 3.0 Hours.
and error and resolution analysis. Weekly homework assignments
(II) Introduction to continuum mechanics and elastic wave propagation
addressing either theoretical or numerical problems through programming
with an emphasis on principles and results important in seismology and
assignments illustrate the concepts discussed in class. Prerequisites:
earth sciences in general. Topics include a brief overview of elementary
MATH213, MATH225, GPGN404 and MATH348 or PHGN311, or
mechanics, stress and strain, Hooke’s law, notions of geostatic pressure
consent of instructor. Knowledge of a programming language is
and isostacy, fluid flow and
assumed. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
Navier-stokes equation. Basic discussion of the wave equation for
GPGN411. ADVANCED GRAVITY AND MAGNETIC METHODS. 4.0
elastic media, plane wave and their reflection/transmission at interfaces.
Hours.
Prerequisites: MATH213, PHGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(I) Instrumentation for land surface, borehole, sea floor, sea surface, and
airborne operations. Reduction of observed gravity and magnetic values.
Theory of potential
field effects of geologic distributions. Methods and limitations of
interpretation. Prerequisite: GPGN303, or consent of instructor. 3 hours
lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

104 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
GPGN419. WELL LOG ANALYSIS AND FORMATION EVALUATION.
GPGN439. GEOPHYSICS PROJECT DESIGN / MULTIDISCIPLINARY
3.0 Hours.
PETROLEUM DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.
(I) The basics of core analysis and the principles of all common borehole
(II) (WI) This is a multi-disciplinary design course that integrates
instruments are reviewed. The course shows (computer) interpretation
fundamentals and design concepts in geology, geophysics, and
methods
petroleum engineering. Students work in integrated teams consisting
that combine the measurements of various borehole instruments to
of students from each of the disciplines. Multiple open-ended design
determine rock properties such as porosity, permeability, hydrocarbon
problems in oil and gas exploration and field development, including
saturation, water salinity, ore grade, ash content, mechanical strength,
the development of a prospect in an exploration play and a detailed
and acoustic velocity. The impact of these parameters on reserves
engineering field study are assigned. Several detailed written and oral
estimates of hydrocarbon reservoirs and mineral accumulations are
presentations are made throughout the semester. Project economics
demonstrated. In spring semesters, vertical seismic profiling, single well
including risk analysis are an integral part of the course. Prerequisites:
and cross-well seismic are reviewed. In the fall semester,
GE Majors: GEOL309, GEOL314, GEGN438, and EPIC264; GP Majors:
topics like formation testing, and cased hole logging are covered.
GPGN302, GPGN303, and EPIC268; PE Majors: GEOL308, PEGN316
Prerequisites: MATH225, MATH348 or PHGN311, GPGN302 and
and PEGN426. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
GPGN303. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
GPGN461. SEISMIC DATA PROCESSING I. 4.0 Hours.
GPGN420. ADVANCED ELECTRICAL AND ELECTROMAGNETIC
(I) This course covers the basic processing steps required to create
METHODS. 4.0 Hours.
images of the earth using 2-D and 3-D reflection seismic data. Topics
(I) In-depth study of the application of electrical and electromagnetic
include data organization and domains, signal processing to enhance
methods to
temporal and spatial resolution, identification and suppression techniques
crustal studies, minerals exploration, oil and gas exploration, and
of incoherent and coherent noises, velocity analysis, velocity conversion,
groundwater. Laboratory work with scale and mathematical models
near-surface statics, datuming, common-midpoint stacking, imaging
coupled with field work over areas of known geology. Prerequisite:
principles and methods used for post-stack and prestack time and depth
GPGN302 and GPGN303, or consent of
imaging, migration-velocity analysis and post-imaging enhancement
instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
techniques. Examples from field data are extensively used. A three-
hour lab introduces the student to hands-on seismic data processing
GPGN432. FORMATION EVALUATION. 4.0 Hours.
using Seismic Unix. The final exam consists of a presentation of the data
(II) The basics of core analysis and the principles of all common borehole
processing a 2-D seismic line. Prerequisites: GPGN302 and GEOL308.
instruments are reviewed. The course teaches interpretation methods
Co-requisites: GPGN404. 3 hour lecture, 3 hour lab; 4 semester hours.
that combine the measurements of various borehole instruments to
determine rock properties such as porosity, permeability, hydrocarbon
GPGN470. APPLICATIONS OF SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING. 3.0
saturation, water salinity, ore grade and ash content. The impact of these
Hours.
parameters on reserve estimates of hydrocarbon reservoirs and mineral
(II) An introduction to geoscience applications of satellite remote sensing
accumulations is demonstrated. Geophysical topics such as vertical
of the Earth and planets. The lectures provide background on satellites,
seismic profiling, single well and cross-well seismic are emphasized in
sensors,
this course, while formation testing, and cased hole logging are covered
methodology, and diverse applications. Topics include visible, near
in GPGN419/PEGN419 presented in the fall. The laboratory provides on-
infrared, and thermal infrared passive sensing, active microwave and
line course material and hands-on computer log evaluation exercises.
radio sensing, and geodetic remote sensing. Lectures and labs involve
Prerequisites: MATH225, MATH348 or PHGN311, GPGN302, and
use of data from a variety
GPGN303. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours. Only one of
of instruments, as several applications to problems in the Earth and
the two courses GPGN432 and
planetary sciences are presented. Students will complete independent
GPGN419/PEGN419 can be taken for credit.
term projects that are presented both written and orally at the end of the
term. Prerequisites: PHGN200 and MATH225 or consent of instructor. 2
GPGN438. GEOPHYSICS PROJECT DESIGN. 1-3 Hour.
hours lecture, 2 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
(I, II) (WI) Complementary design course for geophysics restricted
elective course(s). Application of engineering design principles to
GPGN475. PLANETARY GEOPHYSICS. 3.0 Hours.
geophysics through advanced work, individual in character, leading to
(I) Of the solid planets and moons in our Solar System, no two bodies
an engineering report or senior thesis and oral presentation thereof.
are exactly alike. This class will provide an overview of the observed
Choice of design project is to be arranged between student and individual
properties of the planets and moons, cover the basic physical processes
faculty member who will serve as an advisor, subject to department head
that govern their evolution, and then investigate how the planets
approval. Prerequisites: GPGN302 and GPGN303 and completion of or
differ and why. The overarching goals are to develop a quantitative
concurrent enrollment in geophysics method courses in the general topic
understanding of the processes that drive the evolution of planetary
area of the project design. Credit variable, 1 to 3 hours. Repeatable for
surfaces and interiors, and to develop a deeper understanding of
credit up to a maximum of 3 hours.
the Earth by placing it in the broader context of the Solar System.
Prerequisites: PHGN100, MATH225, and GEGN205 or GEOL410. Senior
or graduate standing recommended. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 105
GPGN486. GEOPHYSICS FIELD CAMP. 4-6 Hour.
(S) Introduction to geological and geophysical field methods. The
program
includes exercises in geological surveying, stratigraphic section
measurements, geological mapping, and interpretation of geological
observations. Students conduct geophysical surveys related to the
acquisition of seismic, gravity, magnetic, and electrical observations.
Students participate in designing the appropriate geophysical surveys,
acquiring the observations, reducing the observations, and interpreting
these observations in the context of the geological model defined
from the geological surveys. Prerequisites: GEOL308 or GEOL309,
GPGN302, GPGN303, and GPGN315 or consent of instructor.
Repeatable to a maximum of 6 hours.
GPGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN GEOPHYSICS. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
GPGN499. GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

106 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
Liberal Arts and International
Junior
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Studies
LAIS2xx or
200- or 300-level Restricted
3.0
3xx
H&SS Elective
http://lais.mines.edu/
3.0
Program Description
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
As the 21st century unfolds, individuals, communities, and nations face
LAIS2xx or
200- or 300-level Restricted
3.0
major challenges in energy, natural resources, and the environment.
3xx
H&SS Elective
While these challenges demand practical ingenuity from engineers
3.0
and applied scientists, solutions must also take into account social,
Senior
political, economic, cultural, ethical, and global contexts. CSM students,
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
as citizens and future professionals, confront a rapidly changing society
that demands core technical skills complemented by flexible intelligence,
LAIS 4xx
400-level Restricted H&SS
3.0
original thought, and cultural sensitivity.
Elective
3.0
Courses in Liberal Arts and International Studies (LAIS) expand students’
professional and personal capacities by providing opportunities to
Total Hours: 19.0
explore the humanities, social sciences, and fine arts. Our curricula
Undergraduate Minors
encourage the development of critical thinking skills that will help students
make more informed choices as national and world citizens - promoting
At the undergraduate level, LAIS offers minors in Literature, Society, and
more complex understandings of justice, equality, culture, history,
the Environment; International Political Economy; Science, Technology,
development, and sustainability. Students study ethical reasoning,
Engineering, and Policy; Humanitarian Studies; and an Individualized
compare and contrast different economies and cultures, develop
Undergraduate minor. See below for details. LAIS also is the home for
arguments from data, and interrogate globalization. LAIS courses also
the minor in the McBride Honors Program in Public Affairs.
foster creativity by offering opportunities for self-discovery. Students
Graduate Degree and Programs
conduct literary analyses, improve communication skills, play music, learn
media theory, and write poetry. These experiences foster intellectual
At the graduate level, LAIS offers a 36-hour degree, a Master of
agility, personal maturity, and respect for the complexity of our world.
International Political Economy of Resources (MIPER). It also offers
Graduate Certificates and Graduate minors in International Political
Required Undergraduate Core Courses
Economy and Science and Technology Policy. See the Graduate Bulletin
Two of three required undergraduate core courses in the Humanities and
for details.
Social Sciences are delivered by LAIS, namely, LAIS100, Nature and
Hennebach Program in the Humanities
Human Values; and SYGN200, Human Systems. The third HSS core
course, EBGN201, Principles of Economics, is delivered by the Division
The Hennebach Program in the Humanities, supported by a major
of Economics & Business.
endowment from Ralph Hennebach (CSM Class of 1941), sponsors a
regular series of Visiting Professors and the general enhancement of
Undergraduate Distributed Humanities and
the Humanities on campus. Recent visiting professors have included
Social Sciences Requirement
scholars in Classics, Creative Writing, Environmental Studies, Ethics,
History, Literature, Philosophy, and Social Theory as well as the
Beyond the core, LAIS offers the majority of the courses that meet
interdisciplinary fields of Environmental Policy, and Science, Technology,
the 9 credit-hour Distributed Humanities and Social Science (DHSS)
and Society Studies. The Program is dedicated to enriching the lives of
requirement. The Division of Economic and Business also offers courses
both students and faculty through teaching and research, with visiting
that may be used to meet the DHSS requirement.
scholars offering courses, giving lectures, conducting workshops,
Freshman
and collaborating on projects. In addition, the Hennebach Program is
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
exploring opportunities for meeting the needs of Undergraduate students
LAIS100
NATURE AND HUMAN
4
who would especially benefit from more focused study in the Humanities
VALUES
that would appropriately complement technical degree curricula.
4.0
Writing Center
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
The LAIS Division operates the LAIS Writing Center, which provides
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3
students with instruction tailored to their individual writing problems
3.0
(including non-native speakers of English). It also provides faculty with
Sophomore
support for courses associated with the Writing Across the Curriculum
program. Faculty and staff are welcome to make use of the Writing
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Center’s expertise for writing projects and problems. The Writing Center
SYGN200
HUMAN SYSTEMS
3
is located on the 3rd floor of Stratton Hall.
3.0
Communication Center
The Communication Center, like the Writing Center, serves students and
faculty by offering individual instruction in oral presentations.

Colorado School of Mines 107
Program Educational Objectives
B. Some EBGN498 courses as determined on a case-by-case
basis will satisfy the rquirement. Consult EBGN in any given
In addition to contributing toward achieving the educational objectives
semester for EBGN498 courses that satisfy the requirement.
described in the CSM Graduate Profile and the ABET Accreditation
Criteria, the coursework in the Division of Liberal Arts and International
3. The other two courses may be midlevel courses, i.e., 200 or 300
Studies is designed to help CSM develop in students the ability to engage
level classes. The only exception to this rule are Foreign Language
in life-long learning and recognize the value of doing so by acquiring the
courses (see below).
broad education necessary to:
4. A maximum of two Foreign Language courses (LIFL) may be
1. Understand the impact of engineering solutions in contemporary,
applied toward satisfying the DHSS requirement. LIFL 498 or 499
global, international, societal, political, and ethical contexts;
may not be used to satisfy the 400-level course requirement.
2. Understand the role of Humanities and Social Sciences in
5. Music (LIMU) courses may not be used to meet the DHSS
identifying, formulating, and solving engineering problems;
requirement. They may be used for Free Elective credit only.
3. Prepare to live and work in a complex world;
A maximum of 3 semester hours of concert band chorus,
physical education, athletics, or other activity credit combined
4. Understand the meaning and implications of “stewardship of the
may be used toward free elective credit in a degree granting
Earth”; and
program.
5. Communicate effectively in writing and orally.
6. Single majors in Economics may not use Economics courses
Curriculum
to meet the DHSS requirement. Economics majors must meet
this requirement with courses from the Division of Liberal Arts
Key to courses offered by the LAIS Division:
and International Studies, as per the above restrictions and
Course Code
Course Title
requirements. Students other than single majors in Economics
may take up to 6 semester hours (2 courses) of approved EBGN
LAIS
Humanities and Social Sciences
courses, listed below, to satisfy the DHSS requirement.
LIFL
Foreign Language
7. During Pre-Registration each semester, only students with senior
LIMU
Music
standing or instructor’s permission are initially allowed to register
SYGN
Systems
for 400-level LAIS courses. If 400-level courses do not fill up during
CSM students in all majors must take 19 credit-hours in Humanities
Pre-Registration or soon thereafter, the Division Director may elect
and Social Sciences, ranging from freshman through senior levels of
to open course registration to sophomores and juniors who have
coursework. These courses are housed in the Division of Liberal Arts and
met the LAIS100 pre-requisite and SYGN200 co-requisite for 400-
International Studies and in the Division of Economics and Business.
level courses.
8. Except for foreign languages, NO AP or IB credit can be used to
Required Core Courses
meet the General Education Restricted Elective requirements.
1. All Undergraduate students are required to take the following
AP/IB credits will be applied as free electives.
two core courses from the Division of Liberal Arts & International
Studies:
List of LAIS and EB Courses Satisfying the
A. LAIS100 Nature and Human Values 4 semester hours
DHSS Requirement
B. SYGN200 Human Systems 3 semester hours
EBGN301
INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS
3.0
EBGN302
INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS
3.0
2. All Undergraduate students are also required to take EBGN201
Principles of Economics (3 semester hours) from the Division of
EBGN310
ENVIRONMENTAL AND RESOURCE
3.0
Economics and Business.
ECONOMICS
3. Students in the McBride Honors Program must take LAIS100,
EBGN320
ECONOMICS AND TECHNOLOGY
3.0
Nature and Human Values and EBGN201. Please see the McBride
EBGN330
ENERGY ECONOMICS
3.0
Honors Program web site for further information.
EBGN340
ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY
3.0
Distributed Humanities and Social Sciences
EBGN342
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
3.0
Requirement
EBGN437
REGIONAL ECONOMICS
3.0
EBGN441
INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS
3.0
Beyond the core, all Undergraduate students must take an additional
EBGN443
PUBLIC ECONOMICS
3.0
three courses (9 semester hours) from the list below. The following
EBGN470
ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS
3.0
restrictions apply to these three courses:
LAIS220
INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY
3.0
1. At least one of the three courses must be taken from the Division
LAIS221
INTRODUCTION TO RELIGIONS
3.0
of Liberal Arts and International Studies.
LAIS286
INTRODUCTION TO GOVERNMENT AND
3.0
2. At least one of the three courses must be a 400-level course.
POLITICS
In any given semester, either LAIS or EB may offer 400-level
Special Topics courses that will be numbered as either LAIS498 or
LAIS298
SPECIAL TOPICS
1-6
EBGN498. Even though no Special Topics courses appear in the
LAIS300
CREATIVE WRITING: FICTION
3.0
list below, these courses may be used to fulfill the H&SS General
LAIS301
CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY I
3.0
Education restricted electives requirement as follows:
LAIS305
AMERICAN LITERATURE: COLONIAL PERIOD
3.0
A. All courses numbered LAIS498 will satisfy the requirement.
TO THE PRESENT

108 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
LAIS307
EXPLORATIONS IN COMPARATIVE
3.0
LAIS446
GLOBALIZATION
3.0
LITERATURE
LAIS448
GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES
3.0
LAIS309
LITERATURE AND SOCIETY
3.0
LAIS450
POLITICAL RISK ASSESSMENT
3.0
LAIS310
MODERN EUROPEAN LITERATURE
1-3
LAIS452
CORRUPTION AND DEVEL OPMENT
3.0
LAIS311
BRITISH LITERATURE: MEDIEVAL TO
3.0
LAIS453
ETHNIC CONFLICT IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE 3.0
MODERN
LAIS456
POWER AND POLITICS IN EURASIA
3.0
LAIS315
MUSICAL TRADITIONS OF THE WESTERN
3.0
LAIS457
INTRODUCTION TO CONFLICT MANAGEMENT 3.0
WORLD
LAIS460
GLOBAL GEOPOLITICS
3.0
LAIS320
ETHICS
3.0
LAIS475
ENGINEERING CULTURES IN THE
3.0
LAIS322
LOGIC
3.0
DEVELOPING WORLD
LAIS323
INTRODUCTION TO SCIENCE
3.0
LAIS477
ENGINEERING AND SUSTAINABLE
3.0
COMMUNICATION
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
LAIS325
CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
3.0
LAIS485
CONSTITUTIONAL LAW AND POLITICS
3.0
LAIS335
INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY OF
3.0
LAIS486
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY
3.0
LATIN AMERICA
LAIS487
ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY
3.0
LAIS337
INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY OF
3.0
LAIS488
WATER POLITICS AND POLICY
3.0
ASIA
LAIS489
NUCLEAR POWER AND PUBLIC POLICY
3.0
LAIS339
INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY OF
3.0
THE MIDDLE EAST
LAIS490
ENERGY AND SOCIETY
3.0
LAIS341
INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY OF
3.0
LAIS498
SPECIAL TOPICS
1-6
AFRICA
LIFL113
SPANISH I
3.0
LAIS344
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
3.0
LIFL123
SPANISH II
3.0
LAIS345
INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY
3.0
LIFL213
SPANISH III
3.0
LAIS365
HISTORY OF WAR
3.0
LIFL114
ARABIC I
3.0
LAIS370
HISTORY OF SCIENCE
3.0
LIFL124
ARABIC II
3.0
LAIS371
HISTORY OF TECHNOLOGY
3.0
LIFL214
ARABIC III
3.0
LAIS375
ENGINEERING CULTURES
3.0
LIFL115
GERMAN I
3.0
LAIS398
SPECIAL TOPICS
1-6
LIFL125
GERMAN II
3.0
LAIS401
CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY II
3.0
LIFL215
GERMAN III
3.0
LAIS402
WRITING PROPOSALS FOR A BETTER WORLD 3.0
LIFLx98
Special Topics
LAIS404
WOMEN, LITERATURE, AND SOCIETY
3.0
LAIS406
THE LITERATURE OF WAR AND
3.0
General CSM Minor/ASI requirements can be found here.
REMEMBRANCE
Minor Programs
LAIS407
SCIENCE IN LITERATURE
3.0
LAIS408
LIFE STORIES
3.0
The Division of Liberal Arts and International Studies offers several minor
programs. Students who elect to pursue a minor usually will satisfy the
LAIS409
SHAKESPEAREAN DRAMA
3.0
DHSS requirements; however, the Music Technology ASI will not satisfy
LAIS410
CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES ON 20TH CENTURY 3.0
these requirements. Students will need to use their free elective hours to
LITERATURE
complete a minor.
LAIS411
LITERATURES OF THE AFRICAN WORLD
3.0
A minor requires a minimum of 18 credit-hours; an area of special interest
LAIS412
LITERATURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT
3.0
(ASI) requires a minimum of 12 credit-hours. No more than half the
LAIS415
MASS MEDIA STUDIES
3.0
credits to be applied towards an LAIS minor or ASI may be transfer
LAIS416
FILM STUDIES
3.0
credits. The LAIS Undergraduate Advisor must approve all transfer
LAIS418
NARRATING THE NATION
3.0
credits that will be used for an LAIS minor or ASI.
LAIS419
MEDIA AND THE ENVIRONMENT
3.0
Prior to the completion of the sophomore year, a student wishing to
LAIS421
ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY AND POLICY 3.0
declare an LAIS Minor must fill out an LAIS Minor form (available in the
LAIS423
ADVANCED SCIENCE COMMUNICATION
3.0
LAIS Office) and obtain approval signatures from the appropriate minor
LAIS430
CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
3.0
advisor in LAIS and from the LAIS Director. The student must also fill out
a Minor/Area of Special Interest Declaration (available in the Registrar’s
LAIS431
RELIGION & SECURITY
3.0
Office) and obtain approval signatures from the student’s CSM advisor,
LAIS435
LATIN AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT
3.0
from the Head or Director of the student’s major department or division,
LAIS437
ASIAN DEVELOPMENT
3.0
and from the LAIS Director. Students should consult the listed advisors
LAIS439
MIDDLE EAST DEVELOPMENT
3.0
for the specific requirements of each minor.
LAIS440
WAR AND PEACE IN THE MIDDLE EAST
3.0
The six minors or ASIs available and their advisors are:
LAIS441
AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT
3.0
LAIS442
NATURAL RESOURCES AND WAR IN AFRICA
3.0

Colorado School of Mines 109
Literature, Society, and the Environment
wish to investigate the 28-credit minor in Humanitarian Engineering
Minor and ASI
offered in cooperation with the Division of Engineering.
Program Advisors: Prof. Tina Gianquitto and Prof. Jay Straker. The
Individualized Undergraduate Minor
Literature, Society, and the Environment Minor and ASI are designed
Program Advisor: Prof. Sandy Woodson. Students declaring an
for students with a passion for literature, and an interest in exploring
Undergraduate Individual Minor in LAIS must choose 18 restricted
relationships between literary traditions and the broader social and
elective hours in LAIS in accordance with a coherent rationale reflecting
environmental processes that have helped inspire and shape them.
some explicit focus of study that the student wishes to pursue. A student
The minor’s inter-disciplinary emphasis creates unique opportunities
desiring this minor must design it in consultation with a member of the
for students to forge connections between literary studies and diverse
LAIS faculty who approves the rationale and the choice of courses, eg.,
fields of inquiry, spanning the humanities and qualitative and quantitative
pre-law or pre-med courses.
sciences. In the process of acquiring the minor, students will develop
forms of intellectual creativity and sensitivity to social and environmental
Area of Special Interest in Music Technology
dynamics increasingly expected of twenty-first century scientists and
Program Advisor: Prof. Bob Klimek. The Area of Special Interest in Music
engineers.
Technology is comprised of a sequence of courses that allows students
International Political Economy Minor and
to combine interests and abilities in both the science and theory of music
production. Completion of this ASI will train students in the technical
ASI
aspects of the music recording industry, including sound and video
Program Advisor: Prof. James Jesudason. This minor and ASI are
recording, sound effects, and software design.
ideal for students anticipating careers in the earth resources industries.
The Guy T. McBride, Jr. Honors Program in
The International Political Economy Program at CSM was the first
such program in the U.S. designed with the engineering and applied
Public Affairs
science student in mind, and it remains one of the very few international
Program Director: Prof. Kenneth Osgood. As of Fall 2011, the curriculum
engineering programs with this focus. International Political Economy is
of the McBride Honors Program in Public Affairs has been modified
the study of the interplay among politics, the economy, and culture. In
for all incoming students. Continuing students will follow their existing
today’s global economy, international engineering and applied science
curriculum. The new Program offers a 21 semester-hour honors minor
decisions are fundamentally political decisions made by sovereign
consisting of seminars, courses, and off-campus activities that has the
nations. Therefore, International Political Economy theories and models
primary goal of providing a select number of students the opportunity
are often used in evaluating and implementing engineering and science
to cross the boundaries of their technical expertise into the ethical,
projects. Project evaluations and feasibilities now involve the application
cultural, socio-political, and environmental dimensions of human life.
of such IPE methods as political risk assessment and mitigation. The IPE
Students will develop their skills in communication, critical thinking, and
minor is also a gateway to the Graduate Program in International Political
leadership through seminar style classes that explore diverse aspects
Economy.
of the human experience. Themes, approaches, and perspectives from
Science, Technology, Engineering, and
the humanities and the social sciences are integrated with science
and engineering perspectives to develop in students habits of thought
Policy Minor and ASI
necessary for a comprehensive understanding of societal and cultural
Program Advisor: Prof. Jason Delborne. The Science, Technology,
issues that enhance critical thinking, social responsibility, and enlightened
Engineering, and Policy Minor and ASI focus on science, technology,
leadership. Please see the McBride Honors Program entry in the Bulletin
and engineering in the societal and policy context: how STE influence
or their website for further information.
society, politics, and policy, and how society, politics, and policy influence
STE. Courses provide historical, social scientific, ethical, and policy
approaches to issues that inevitably confront professional applied
Courses
scientists, engineers, managers, and administrators in both public
and private sectors. Such issues concern, for example, professional
LAIS100. NATURE AND HUMAN VALUES. 4.0 Hours.
ethical responsibilities, intellectual property rights, regulatory regimes,
Nature and Human Values will focus on diverse views and critical
assessments of societal impacts, science policy implementation, and the
questions concerning traditional and contemporary issues linking the
roles of technical innovation in economic development or international
quality of human life and Nature, and their interdependence. The course
competitiveness. LAIS486 Science and Technology Policy is required.
will examine various disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches
Students work with the STEP Advisor to tailor a sequence of other
regarding two major questions: 1) How has Nature affected the quality
courses appropriate to their background and interests.
of human life and the formulation of human values and ethics? (2) How
have human actions, values, and ethics affected Nature? These issues
Humanitarian Studies Minor and ASI
will use cases and examples taken from across time and cultures.
Program Advisor: Prof. Sandy Woodson. The Humanitarian Studies Minor
Themes will include but are not limited to population, natural resources,
and ASI focus on the intersection of science, technology, and engineering
stewardship of the Earth, and the future of human society. This is
in humanitarian projects. Scientific, technological, and engineering
a writing-intensive course that will provide instruction and practice
oriented humanitarian projects are intended to help marginalized
in expository writing, using the disciplines and perspectives of the
communities meet basic human needs (such as water, food, and shelter)
Humanities and Social Sciences. 4 hours lecture/seminar; 4 semester
when these are missing or inadequate. LAIS320 Ethics is required.
hours.
Other HS courses are offered through LAIS along with selected technical
electives by other academic units across campus. Students may also

110 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
LAIS101. SHORT FORM NATURE AND HUMAN VALUES. 2.0 Hours.
LAIS298. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
For transfer students with a minimum of six strong composition and
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
related transfer credits, this course will, with LAIS undergraduate advisory
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
permission, complete the LAIS100 Nature and Human and Value
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
requirement. Prerequisite:
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
two transfer college composition courses. 2 hours lecture/discussion; 2
semester hours.
LAIS299. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
LAIS198. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
LAIS300. CREATIVE WRITING: FICTION. 3.0 Hours.
LAIS199. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
Students will write weekly exercises and read their work for the pleasure
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
and edification of the class. The midterm in this course will be the
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
production of a short story. The final will consist of a completed, revised
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
short story. The best of these works may be printed in a future collection.
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
LAIS220. INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY. 3.0 Hours.
LAIS301. CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY I. 3.0 Hours.
A general introduction to philosophy that explores historical and analytic
This course focuses on reading and writing poetry. Students will learn
traditions. Historical exploration may compare and contrast ancient and
many different poetic forms to compliment prosody, craft, and technique.
modern, rationalist and empiricist, European and Asian approaches to
Aesthetic preferences will be developed as the class reads, discusses,
philosophy. Analytic exploration
and models some of the great American poets. Weekly exercises reflect
may consider such basic problems as the distinction between illusion and
specific poetic tools, encourage
reality, the one and the many, the structure of knowledge, the existence
the writing of literary poetry, and stimulate the development of the
of God, the nature of mind or self. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or
student’s craft. The purpose of the course is to experience the literature
co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 credit hours.
and its place in a multicultural society, while students “try on” various
styles and contexts in order to develop their own voice. Prerequisite:
LAIS221. INTRODUCTION TO RELIGIONS. 3.0 Hours.
LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3
This course has two focuses. We will look at selected religions
semester hours.
emphasizing
their popular, institutional, and contemplative forms; these will be four
LAIS305. AMERICAN LITERATURE: COLONIAL PERIOD TO THE
or five of the most common religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism,
PRESENT. 3.0 Hours.
Christianity, and/or Islam. The second point of the course focuses on
This course offers an overview of American literature from the colonial
how the Humanities and Social Sciences work. We will use methods
period to the present. The texts of the class provide a context for
from various disciplines to study religion-history of religions and religious
examining the traditions
thought, sociology, anthropology and ethnography, art history, study
that shape the American nation as a physical, cultural and historical
of myth, philosophy, analysis of religious texts and artifacts (both
space. As we read, we will focus on the relationships between
contemporary and historical), analysis of material culture and the role it
community, landscape, history, and language in the American
plays in religion, and other disciplines and methodologies. We will look at
imagination. We will concentrate specifically on conceptions of the nation
the question of objectivity; is it possible to be objective? We will approach
and national identity in relation to race, gender, and class difference.
this
Authors may include: Rowlandson, Brown, Apess, Hawthorne, Douglass,
methodological question using the concept “standpoint.” For selected
Melville, Whitman, James, Stein, Eliot, Hemingway, Silko, and Auster.
readings, films, and your own writings, we will analyze what the
Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
“standpoint” is. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
lecture; 3 semester hours.
SYGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
hours.
LAIS307. EXPLORATIONS IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE. 3.0
Hours.
LAIS286. INTRODUCTION TO GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS. 3.0
This course examines major figures and themes in the modern literatures
Hours.
of Africa, the Caribbean, and Latin America. Reading, discussion and
Introduction to Government and Politics is a beginning- level course
writing will focus on fiction and poetry representing Francophone, Arabic,
intended to familiarize students with the study of politics across societies.
and Hispanophone traditions within these world regions. Engaging
The method is comparative in that it approaches the task of studying the
these texts will foster understanding of some of the pivotal philosophical,
world’s different political systems by contrasting and comparing them
political, and aesthetic debates that have informed cultural practices
along different dimensions, and by seeking generalizations about them.
in diverse colonial territories and nation-states. Thematic and stylistic
The class focuses on cases, topics, and methodologies in American and
concerns will include imperialism, nationalism,
comparative politics. No background in political science is required or
existentialism, Orientalism, negritude, and social and magical realisms.
expected. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200.
Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
lecture; 3 semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 111
LAIS309. LITERATURE AND SOCIETY. 3.0 Hours.
LAIS323. INTRODUCTION TO SCIENCE COMMUNICATION. 3.0
Before the emergence of sociology as a distinct field of study, literary
Hours.
artists had long been investigating the seemingly infinite complexity of
This course will explore the relationship between science and the public
human societies, seeking to comprehend the forces shaping collective
through an examination of science writing and communication on current
identities, socio-cultural transformations, technological innovations, and
events. Students will study various forms of science communication,
political conflicts. Designed to enrich recognition and understanding of
including essays, blogs, news segments, media clips, and radio programs
the complex interplay of artistic creativity and social inquiry over time, this
in order to understand the ways in which science is communicated
course compares influential literary and social-scientific responses to the
beyond the lab or university and into the public consciousness. Science
Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, and other dynamic junctures
writing often explores the human condition, reflects on hopes and worries
integral to the forging of "modernity" and the volatile world we inhabit
about technology, and informs our collective knowledge about the world.
today. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3
Students will discuss the implications of this kind of communication,
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
analyze breakdowns in communication through case studies, and write
for peer and popular audiences, including turning a lab report into a
LAIS310. MODERN EUROPEAN LITERATURE. 1-3 Hour.
short feature article and writing a science essay. Prerequisites: LAIS100
This course will introduce students to some of the major figures and
or LAIS101, and pre- or co-requisite of SYGN2003 hours lecture; 3
generative themes of post-Enlightenment European and British literature.
semester hours.
Reading, discussion, and writing will focus on fiction, poetry, drama, and
critical essays representing
LAIS324. AUDIO/ACOUSTICAL ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE. 3.0
British, French, Germanic, Italian, Czech, and Russian cultural traditions.
Hours.
Engaging these texts will foster understanding of some of the pivotal
(I) Audio/acoustical engineering and science teaches concepts
philosophical, political, and aesthetic movements and debates that have
surrounding the production, transmission, manipulation and reception
shaped modern European society and culture. Thematic concerns will
of audible sound. These factors play a role in many diverse areas
include the French Enlightenment and its legacies, imperialism within and
such as the design of modern music technology products, recording
beyond Europe, comparative totalitarianisms, the
studios and loudspeakers, civil engineering and building design, and
rise of psychoanalytic theory and existentialism, and modernist and
industrial safety. This course will explore and concepts of this field and
postmodern perspectives on the arts. Prerequisite: LAIS100, prerequisite
the physics/mechanics that are involved, as well as aesthetic impacts
or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
related to the subject matter. Discussion of human anatomy and psycho
acoustic phenomena are also presented. 3 hours lecture; 3 credit hours.
LAIS311. BRITISH LITERATURE: MEDIEVAL TO MODERN. 3.0
Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
Hours.
This course surveys British literature from the Middle Ages to early
LAIS325. CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
modernists in light of major developments in scientific thought. It
A study of the social behavior and cultural devel opment of humans.
considers topics such as medieval medicine and astrology in The
Prerequisite:
Canterbury Tales, reflections of Copernicus’ new astronomy in
LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3
Shakespearean tragedy and John Donne’s poetry, the tumultuous career
semester hours.
of Newtonian physics across the Enlightenment and Romanticism, the
struggle with Darwinian evolution in Victorian literature, and
LAIS326. MUSIC THEORY. 3.0 Hours.
early 20th century reactions to anthropology and psychoanalysis. Pre-
(I) The course begins with the fundamentals of music theory and moves
requisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
into more complex applications. Music of the common practice period
lecture; 3 semester hours.
(18th century) and beyond is considered. Aural and visual recognition
of harmonic material is emphasized. 3 hours lecture; 3 credit hours.
LAIS315. MUSICAL TRADITIONS OF THE WESTERN WORLD. 3.0
Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200.
Hours.
An introduction to music of the Western world from its beginnings to the
LAIS327. MUSIC TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
present. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3
(I, II) An introduction to the physics of music and sound. The history
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
of music technology from wax tubes to synthesizers. Construction of
instruments
LAIS320. ETHICS. 3.0 Hours.
and studio. 3 hours lecture. 3 semester hours. Prerequisite: LAIS 100;
A general introduction to ethics that explores its analytic and historical
Pre-or Co-requisite: SYGN200.
traditions. Reference will commonly be made to one or more significant
texts by such moral philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Thomas
LAIS328. BASIC MUSIC COMPOSITION AND ARRANGING. 1.0 Hour.
Aquinas, Kant, John Stuart Mill, and others. Prerequisite: LAIS100.
(I) This course begins with the fundamentals of music composition
Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
and works towards basic vocal and instrumental arrangement skills.
hours.
Upon completion of this course the student should: 1) Demonstrate
basic knowledge of (music) compositional techniques; 2) Demonstrate
LAIS322. LOGIC. 3.0 Hours.
primary concepts of vocal and instrumental ensemble arrangement;
A general introduction to logic that explores its analytic and historical
3) Demonstrate an ability to use notational software and Midi station
traditions. Coverage will commonly consider informal and formal fallacies,
hardware. 1 semester hour; repeatable for credit. Pre-requisite: LAIS100;
syllogistic logic, sentential logic, and elementary quantification theory.
Pre-or Co-requisite: SYGN200.
Reference will commonly be made to the work of such logical theorists as
Aristotle, Frege, Russell and Whitehead, Quine, and others. Prerequisite:
LAIS100. Co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

112 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
LAIS330. MUSIC TECHNOLOGY CAPSTONE. 3.0 Hours.
LAIS365. HISTORY OF WAR. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Project-based course designed to develop practical technological
History of War looks at war primarily as a significant human activity in
and communication skills for direct application to the music recording. 3
the history of the Western World since the times of Greece and Rome
credit hours. Prerequisites: LAIS100, 324, 326, and 327. Prerequisite or
to the present. The causes, strategies, results, and costs of various
corequisite: SYGN200.
wars will be covered, with considerable focus on important military and
political leaders as well as on noted historians and theoreticians. The
LAIS335. INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY OF LATIN
course is primarily a lecture course with possible group and individual
AMERICA. 3.0 Hours.
presentations as class size permits. Tests will be both objective and
A broad survey of the interrelationship between the state and economy
essay types. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite:
in Latin America as seen through an examination of critical contemporary
SYGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and historical
issues that shape polity, economy, and society. Special emphasis will be
LAIS370. HISTORY OF SCIENCE. 3.0 Hours.
given to the dynamics of interstate relationships between the developed
An introduction to the social history of science, exploring significant
North and the developing South. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or
people, theories, and social practices in science, with special attention to
co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
the histories of physics, chemistry, earth sciences, ecology, and biology.
Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite SYGN200. 3 hours
LAIS337. INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY OF ASIA. 3.0
lecture; 3 semester hours.
Hours.
A broad survey of the interrelationship between the state and economy
LAIS371. HISTORY OF TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
in East and Southeast Asia as seen through an examination of critical
A survey of the history of technology in the modern period (from roughly
contemporary and historical issues that shape polity, economy, and
1700 to the present), exploring the role technology has played in the
society. Special emphasis will be given to the dynamics of interstate
political and social history of countries around the world. Prerequisite:
relationships between the developed North and the developing South.
LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite SYGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3
Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite:
semester hours.
SYGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
LAIS375. ENGINEERING CULTURES. 3.0 Hours.
LAIS339. INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY OF THE MIDDLE
This course seeks to improve students’ abilities to understand and assess
EAST. 3.0 Hours.
engineering problem solving from different cultural, political, and historical
A broad survey of the interrelationships between the state and market in
perspectives. An exploration, by comparison and contrast, of engineering
the Middle East as seen through an examination of critical contemporary
cultures in such settings as 20th century United States, Japan, former
and historical
Soviet Union and presentday Russia, Europe, Southeast Asia, and Latin
issues that shape polity, economy, and society. Special emphasis will be
America. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3
given to the dynamics between the developed North and the developing
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
South. Prerequisite:
LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3
LAIS398. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
semester hours.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
LAIS341. INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY OF AFRICA. 3.0
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
A broad survey of the interrelationships between the state and market
in Africa as seen through an examination of critical contem porary
LAIS399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
and historical issues that shape polity, economy, and society. Special
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
emphasis will be given to the dynamics between the developed North and
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
the developing South. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite:
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
SYGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
LAIS344. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS. 3.0 Hours.
This course surveys major topics and theories of international relations.
LAIS401. CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY II. 3.0 Hours.
Students will evaluate diverse perspectives and examine a variety of
This course is a continuation of LAIS301 for those interested in
topics including war and peace, economic globalization, human rights
developing their poetry writing further. It focuses on reading and writing
and international law, international environmental issues, and the role of
poetry. Students will learn many different poetic forms to compliment
the US as the current superpower. Prerequisite: LAIS 100. Prerequisite or
prosody, craft, and technique. Aesthetic
co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
preferences will be developed as the class reads, discusses, and models
some of the great American poets. Weekly exercises reflect specific
LAIS345. INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY. 3.0 Hours.
poetic tools, encourage the writing of literary poetry, and simulate the
International Political Economy is a study of contentious and harmonious
development of the student’s
relationships between the state and the market on the nation-state
craft. The purpose of the course is to experience the literature and its
level, between individual states and their markets on the regional level,
place in a multicultural society, while students “try on” various styles and
and between region-states and region-markets on the global level.
contexts in order to develop their own voice. Prerequisite: LAIS100 and
Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
LAIS301. Prerequisite or
lecture; 3 semester hours.
co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 113
LAIS402. WRITING PROPOSALS FOR A BETTER WORLD. 3.0 Hours.
LAIS409. SHAKESPEAREAN DRAMA. 3.0 Hours.
This course develops the student’s writing and higher-order thinking
Shakespeare, the most well known writer in English and perhaps the
skills and helps meet the needs of underserved populations, particularly
world, deals with universal themes and the ultimate nature of what it is
via funding proposals written for nonprofit organizations. Prerequisite:
to be a human being. His plays are staged, filmed, and read around the
LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3
globe, even after 400 years. This seminar will explore why Shakespeare’s
semester hours.
plays and characters have such lasting power and meaning to humanity.
The seminar will combine class discussion, lecture, and video. Grades
LAIS404. WOMEN, LITERATURE, AND SOCIETY. 3.0 Hours.
will be based on participation, response essays, and a final essay.
This reading and writing intensive course examines the role that women
Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
writers have played in a range of literary traditions. Far from residing
seminar; 3 semester hours.
in the margins of key national debates, women writers have actively
contributed their voices to demands for social, racial, economic, and
LAIS410. CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES ON 20TH CENTURY
artistic equality. We will examine the writing produced by women from
LITERATURE. 3.0 Hours.
a diversity of racial, ethnic, and social backgrounds, as we examine the
This course introduces students to texts and cultural productions of the
ways in which women writers respond to the various pressures placed on
20th Century literature. We will examine a diverse collection of materials,
them as artists and activists. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-
including novels and short stories, poems, plays, films, painting, and
requisite SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
sculpture. Science, technology, violence, history, identity, language all
come under the careful scrutiny of the authors we will discuss in this
LAIS406. THE LITERATURE OF WAR AND REMEMBRANCE. 3.0
course, which may include Conrad,
Hours.
Fanon, Achebe, Eliot, Kafka, Barnes, Camus, Borges, and Marquez,
In "The Literature of War and Remembrance," students survey poetry,
among others. We will also screen films that comment upon the fragility
prose, and film ranging from classicial to contemporary war literature. The
of individual identity in the face of modern technology. Prerequisite:
course considers literary depictions of the individual and society in war
LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3
and its aftermath. Critical reading and writing skills are demonstrated in
semester hours.
creative presentations and analytical essays. Students will investigate
war literature and commemorative art inspired by
LAIS411. LITERATURES OF THE AFRICAN WORLD. 3.0 Hours.
recent world conflicts, and place a contemporary work into the thematic
This course examines wide-ranging writers’ depictions of collective
structure of the course. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Co-requisite: SYGN200. 3
transformations and conflicts integral to the making and remaking of
hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
African and Afro-diasporic communities worldwide. Fiction, poetry, and
essays representing diverse linguistic, aesthetic, and philosophical
LAIS407. SCIENCE IN LITERATURE. 3.0 Hours.
traditions will constitute the bulk of the reading. Alongside their intrinsic
Science fiction often serves as a cautionary tale that deals with the darker
expressive values, these texts illuminate religious and popular cultural
side of
practices important to social groups throughout much of sub-Saharan
humanity’s desires in order to find a better understanding of who we are
Africa, the Caribbean, Latin America, and the United States. Primary
and what we hope to become. This class examines scientific and social
socio-historical themes may include the slave trade, plantation cultures,
progress as it is imagined by some of the greatest authors of the genre.
generational consciousness, ethnicity, gender relations, urbanization, and
We will examine the current events that may have influenced the writing
collective
and position our lens to the scientific and technological breakthroughs,
violence. Prerequisite: LAIS 100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN 200.
as well as the social, cultural, and political state of the world at the time
3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
of our readings. This course focuses on classic science fiction from the
late 1800’s to the present which may include: Jules Verne, H.G. Wells,
LAIS412. LITERATURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT. 3.0 Hours.
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Jack Williamson, Isaac Asimov, Robert Heinlein,
This reading and writing intensive course investigates the human
Alfred Bester, Philip Jose Farmer, Marion Zimmer Bradley, Ray Bradbury,
connection to the environment in a broad range of literary materials.
Philip K. Dick, William Gibson, Arthur C. Clarke, Ursula K. LeGuin and
Discussions focus on the role of place - of landscape as physical, cultural,
Mary Doria Russell, among others. Prerequisite: LAIS100, Co-requisite:
moral, historical space - and on
SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
the relationship between landscape and community, history, and
language in the environmental imagination. Readings include texts that
LAIS408. LIFE STORIES. 3.0 Hours.
celebrate the natural world, those that indict the careless use of land and
Using texts by published authors and members of the class, we will
resources, and those that predict
explore the pleasures and challenges of creating and interpreting
and depict the consequences of that carelessness. Additionally, we
narratives based on "real life." The class will consider critical theories
investigate philosophical, legal, and policy frameworks that shape
about the relationship between the self and the stories we tell.
approaches to environmental issues. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite
Prerequisite: LAIS100. Pre-requisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
or co-requesite SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
seminar; 3 semester hours.

114 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
LAIS415. MASS MEDIA STUDIES. 3.0 Hours.
LAIS421. ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY AND POLICY. 3.0 Hours.
This introduction to mass media studies is designed to help students
A critical examination of environmental ethics and the philosophical
become more
theories
active interpreters of mass media messages, primarily those that
on which they depend. Topics may include preservation/conservation,
emanate from television, radio, the Internet, sound recordings (music),
animal welfare, deep ecology, the land ethic, eco-feminism,
and motions pictures (film, documentary, etc.). Taking a broad rhetorical
environmental justice, sustainability, or non-western approaches. This
and sociological perspective,
class may also include analyses of select, contemporary environmental
the course examines a range of mass media topics and issues. Students
issues. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3
should complete this course with enhanced rhetorical and sociological
hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
understandings of how media shapes individuals, societies, and cultures
as well as how those groups
LAIS423. ADVANCED SCIENCE COMMUNICATION. 3.0 Hours.
shape the media. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
This course will examine historical and contemporary case studies in
SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
which science communication (or miscommunication) played key roles in
shaping policy outcomes and/or public perceptions. Examples of cases
LAIS416. FILM STUDIES. 3.0 Hours.
might include the recent controversies over hacked climate science
This course introduces students to the basics of film history, form, and
emails, nuclear power plant siting controversies, or discussions of
criticism. Students will be exposed to a variety of film forms, including
ethics in classic environmental cases, such as the Dioxin pollution case.
documentary,
Students will study, analyze, and write about science communication and
narrative, and formalist films, and will be encouraged to discuss and
policy theories related to scientific uncertainty; the role of the scientist
write about these forms using critical film language. Students will have
as communicator; and media ethics. Students will also be exposed to
an opportunity to work on their own film projects and to conduct research
a number of strategies for managing their encounters with the media,
into the relationship between films and their historical, cultural, and
as well as tools for assessing their communication responsibilities and
ideological origins. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite:
capacites. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
LAIS424. RHETORIC, ENERGY AND PUBLIC POLICY. 3.0 Hours.
LAIS418. NARRATING THE NATION. 3.0 Hours.
(I) This course will examine the ways in which rhetoric shapes public
The novel, nationalism, and the modern nation-state share the same
policy debates on energy. Students will learn how contemporary
eighteenthand
rhetorical and public policy theory illuminates debates that can affect
nineteenth-century roots. Relationships between the works of novelists,
environmental, economic and/or socio-cultural aspects of energy
local nationalisms, and state politics have, however, always been volatile.
use, transportation and production. 3 hour seminar; 3 credit hours.
These tensions have assumed particularly dramatic expressive and
Prerequisite: LAIS 100; Pre-or Co-requisite: SYGN200.
political forms in Latin America and postcolonial South Asia and Africa.
This course examines the inspirations, stakes, and ramifications of
LAIS430. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY. 3.0 Hours.
celebrated novelists’ explorations of the conflicted and fragmentary
Businesses are largely responsible for creating the wealth upon which the
character their own and/or neighboring nationstates.
well-being of society depends. As they create that wealth, their actions
Beyond their intrinsic literary values, these texts illuminate distinctive
impact society, which is composed of a wide variety of stakeholders. In
religious, ritual, and popular cultural practices that have shaped collective
turn, society shapes the rules and expectations by which businesses
imaginings of the nation, as well as oscillations in nationalist sentiment
must navigate their internal and external environments. This interaction
across specific regions and historical junctures. Studies in relevant visual
between corporations and society (in its broadest sense) is the concern
media -films, paintings, and telenovelas - will further our comparative
of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). This course explores the
inquiry into the relationships between artistic narrative and critical
dimensions of that interaction from a multi-stakeholder perspective using
perspectives on "the nation." Alongside the focal literary and visual texts,
case studies, guest speakers and field work. Prerequisite: LAIS100.
the course will address major historians’ and social theorists’ accounts of
Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester
the origins, spread, and varied careers of nationalist thought and practice
hours.
across our modern world. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-
LAIS431. RELIGION & SECURITY. 3.0 Hours.
requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
This course introduces students to the central topics in religion and
LAIS419. MEDIA AND THE ENVIRONMENT. 3.0 Hours.
society. It defines civil society in 21st century contexts and connects
This course explores the ways that messages about the environment and
this definition with leading debates about the relationship of religion
environmentalism are communicated in the mass media, fine arts, and
and security. IT creates an understanding of diverse religious traditions
popular culture. The course will introduce students to key readings in
from the perspective of how they view security. Prerequisite: LAIS 100.
environmental communication, media studies, and cultural studies in
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN 200. 3 hours lecture and descission; 3
order to understand the many ways in which the images, messages,
semester hours.
and politics of environmentalism and the natural world are constructed.
Students will analyze their role as science communicators and will
participate in the creation of communication projects related to
environmental research on campus or beyond. Prerequisite: LAIS100.
Prerequisite or co-requisite SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester
hours.

Colorado School of Mines 115
LAIS435. LATIN AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Hours.
LAIS442. NATURAL RESOURCES AND WAR IN AFRICA. 3.0 Hours.
A seminar designed to explore the political economy of current and
Africa possesses abundant natural resources yet suffers civil wars and
recent past development strategies, models, efforts, and issues in
international conflicts based on access to resource revenues. The course
Latin America, one of the most dynamic regions of the world today.
examines the distinctive history of Africa, the impact of the resource
Development is understood to be a nonlinear, complex set of processes
curse, mismanagement
involving political, economic, social, cultural, and environmental factors
of government and corruption, and specific cases of unrest and war in
whose ultimate goal is to improve the quality of life for individuals. The
Africa. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3
role of both the state and the market in development processes
hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
will be examined. Topics to be covered will vary as changing realities
dictate but will be drawn from such subjects as inequality of income
LAIS446. GLOBALIZATION. 3.0 Hours.
distribution; the role of education and health care; region-markets; the
This international political economy seminar is an historical and
impact of globalization, institution-
contemporary analysis of globalization processes examined through
building, corporate-community-state interfaces, neoliberalism,
selected issues of world affairs of political, economic, military, and
privatization, democracy, and public policy formulation as it relates to
diplomatic significance. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-
development goals. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite:
requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
LAIS448. GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES. 3.0 Hours.
LAIS437. ASIAN DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Hours.
Critical examination of interactions between development and the
This international political economy seminar deals with the historical
environment
development
and the human dimensions of global change; social, cpolitical, economic,
of Asia Pacific from agrarian to post-industrial eras; its economic, political,
and cultural responses to the management and preservation of natural
and cultural transformation since World War II, contemporary security
resources and
issues that both divide and unite the region; and globalization processes
ecosystems on a global scale. Exploration of the meaning and
that encourage Asia Pacific to forge a single trading bloc. Prerequisite:
implications of “Stewardship of the Earth” and “Sustainable
LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3
Development.” Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
semester hours.
SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
LAIS439. MIDDLE EAST DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Hours.
LAIS450. POLITICAL RISK ASSESSMENT. 3.0 Hours.
This internationa political economy seminar analyzes economic, political
This course will review the existing methodologies and techniques of risk
and social dynamics that affect the progress and direction of states,
assessment in both country-specific and global environments. It will also
markets, and peoples of the region. It examines the development of
seek to design better ways of assessing and evaluating risk factors for
the Middle East from agrarian to post-industrial societies; economic,
business and public diplomacy in the increasingly globalized context of
political and cultural transformations since World War II; contemporary
economy and politics wherein the role of the state is being challenged
security issues that both divide and unite the region; and the effects of
and redefined. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite:
globalization processes on economies and societies in the Middle East.
SYGN200. Prerequisite: At least one IPE 300- or 400-level course and
Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
permission of instructor. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
seminar; 3 semester hours.
LAIS451. POLITICAL RISK ASSESSMENT RESEARCH SEMINAR. 1.0
LAIS440. WAR AND PEACE IN THE MIDDLE EAST. 3.0 Hours.
Hour.
This course introduces students to theories of war and then discusses a
This international political economy seminar must be taken concurrently
select number of historical wars and contemporary ones. It also analyzes
with LAIS450, Political Risk Assessment. Its purpose is to acquaint the
efforts at peace-making efforts and why some fail and others succeed.
student with empirical research methods and sources appropriate to
The global consequences of war and peace in the Middle East will be
conducting a political risk assessment study, and to hone the students’
explored in terms of oil supply and of other geostrategic interests that
analytical abilities. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or corequisite:
America has in that region. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-
SYGN200. Concurrent enrollment in LAIS450.
requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
1 hour seminar; 1 semester hour.
LAIS441. AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Hours.
LAIS452. CORRUPTION AND DEVEL OPMENT. 3.0 Hours.
This course provides a broad overview of the political economy of Africa.
This course addresses the problem of corruption and its impact on
Its
development. Readings are multi disciplinary and include policy studies,
goal is to give students an understanding of the possibilities of African
economics, and political science. Students will acquire an understanding
development and the impediments that currently block its economic
of what constitutes corruption,
growth. Despite substantial natural resources, mineral reserves, and
how it negatively affects development, and what they, as engineers in
human capital, most African countries remain mired in poverty. The
a variety of professional circumstances, might do in circumstances in
struggles that have arisen on the continent have fostered thinking about
which bribe paying or bribe taking might occur. Prerequisite: LAIS100.
the curse of natural resources where countries with oil or diamonds
Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester
are beset with political instability and warfare. Readings give first
hours.
an introduction to the continent followed by a focus on the specific
issues that confront African development today. Prerequisite: LAIS100.
Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester
hours.

116 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
LAIS453. ETHNIC CONFLICT IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE. 3.0 Hours.
LAIS475. ENGINEERING CULTURES IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD.
Many scholars used to believe that with modernization, racial, religious,
3.0 Hours.
and cultural antagonisms would weaken as individuals developed more
An investigation and assessment of engineering problem-solving in the
rational outlooks and gave primacy to their economic concerns. Yet, with
developing world using historical and cultural cases. Countries to be
the waning of global ideological conflict of the left-right nature, conflict
included range across Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Prerequisite:
based on cultural and "civilization" differences have come to the fore
LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3
in both developing and developed countries. This course will examine
semester hours.
ethnic conflict, broadly conceived, in a variety of contexts. Case studies
will include the civil war in Yugoslavia, the LA riots, the antagonism
LAIS477. ENGINEERING AND SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY
between the Chinese and "indigenous’ groups in Southeast, the so-
DEVELOPMENT. 3.0 Hours.
called war between the West and Islam, and ethnic relations in the
This course is an introduction to the relationship between engineering
U.S. We will consider ethnic contention in both institutionalized, political
and sustainable community development (SCD) from historical, political,
processes, such as the politics of affirmative action, as well as in non-
ethical, cultural, and practical perspectives. Students will study and
institutionalized, extra-legal settings,
analyze different dimensions of sustainability, community, and "helping,"
such as ethnic riots, pogroms, and genocide. We will end by asking what
and the role that engineering might play in them. Also students will
can be done to mitigate ethnic conflict and what might be the future of
critically explore strengths and limitations of dominant methods in
ethnic group identification. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-
engineering problem solving and design for working in SCD. Through
requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
case-studies, students will learn to analyze and evaluate projects in SCD
and develop criteria for their evaluation. Prerequisite: LAIS100.
LAIS456. POWER AND POLITICS IN EURASIA. 3.0 Hours.
Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN 200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester
This seminar covers the major internal and international issues
hours.
confronting the fifteen states that once comprised the Soviet Union. After
an overview of the USSR and its collapse in 1991, the course explores
LAIS478. ENGINEERING AND SOCIAL JUSTICE. 3.0 Hours.
subsequent economic and security
(II) This course offers students the opportunity to explore the
dilemmas facing the "new" nations of Eurasia. Special attention will
relationships between engineering and social justice. The course
be paid to oil, natural gas, and other energy sectors in the region.
begins with students’ exploration of their own social locations, alliances
Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
and resistances to social justice through critical engagement of
seminar; 3 semester hours.
interdisciplinary readings that challenge engineering mindsets. Then the
course helps students to understand what constitutes social justice in
LAIS457. INTRODUCTION TO CONFLICT MANAGEMENT. 3.0 Hours.
different areas of social life and the role that engineers and engineering
This course introduces students to central topics in conflict management.
might play in these. Finally, the course gives students an understanding
It assesses the causes of contemporary conflicts with an initial focus on
of why and how engineering has been aligned and/or divergent from
weak states, armed insurgencies, and ethnic conflict. It then examines
social justice issues and causes. 3 hours lecture and discussion; 3
a range of peace-building efforts, and strategies for reconstructing
semester hours. Prerequisite: LAIS100; pre- or co-requisite: SYGN 200.
post-conflict states. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite:
SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
LAIS485. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW AND POLITICS. 3.0 Hours.
This course presents a comprehensive survey of the U.S. Constitution
LAIS459. INTERNATIONAL FIELD PRACTICUM. 3.0 Hours.
with special attention devoted to the first ten Amendments, also known as
For students who go abroad for an on-site practicum involving their
the Bill of Rights. Since the Constitution is primarily a legal document, the
technical field as practiced in another country and culture; required
class will adopt a legal approach to constitutional interpretation. However,
course for students pursuing a certificate in International Political
as the historical and political context of constitutional interpretation is
Economy; all arrangements for this
inseparable from the legal analysis, these
course are to be supervised and approved by the advisor of the
areas will also be covered. Significant current developments in
International Political Economy minor program. Prerequisite: LAIS100.
constitutional jurisprudence will also be examined. The first part of the
Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester
course deals with Articles I through III of the Constitution, which specify
hours.
the division of national governmental power among the executive,
legislative, and judicial branches of government. Additionally, the federal
LAIS460. GLOBAL GEOPOLITICS. 3.0 Hours.
nature of the American governmental system, in which governmental
This seminar examines geopolitical competition between great and
authority is apportioned between the national government and the
aspiring powers for influence, control over land and natural resources,
state governments, will be studied. The second part of the course
critical geo-strategic trade routes, or even infrastructure. Using empirical
examines the individual rights specifically protected by the amendments
evidence from case studies, students develop a deeper understanding of
to the Constitution, principally the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth, and
the interconnections between the
Fourteenth Amendments. Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-
political, economic, social, cultural and geographic dimensions of foreign
requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
policies, as well as issues of war and peace.Prerequisite: LAIS100 or
LAIS101. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3
LAIS486. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY. 3.0 Hours.
credit hours.
An examination of current issues relating to science and technology
policy in the United States and, as appropriate, in other countries.
Prerequisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours
seminar; 3 semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 117
LAIS487. ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY. 3.0 Hours.
LIFL115. GERMAN I. 3.0 Hours.
Seminar on environmental policies and the political and governmental
Fundamentals of spoken and written German with an emphasis on
processes that produce them. Group discussion and independent
vocabulary, idiomatic expressions of daily conversation, and German
research on specific environmental issues. Primary but not exclusive
culture. 3 semester
focus on the U.S. Prerequisite:
hours.
LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours seminar; 3
semester hours.
LIFL123. SPANISH II. 3.0 Hours.
Continuation of Spanish I with an emphasis on acquiring conversational
LAIS488. WATER POLITICS AND POLICY. 3.0 Hours.
skills as well as further study of grammar, vocabulary, and Spanish
Seminar on water policies and the political and governmental processes
American culture.
that produce them, as an exemplar of natural resource politics and policy
3 semester hours.
in general. Group discussion and independent research on specific
politics and policy issues. Primary but not exclusive focus on the U.S.
LIFL124. ARABIC II. 3.0 Hours.
Pre requisite: LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requi site: SYGN200. 3 hours
Continuation of Arabic I with an emphasis on acquiring conversational
seminar; 3 semester hours.
skills as well as further study of grammar, vocabulary, and culture of
Arabic speaking societies. 3 semester hours.
LAIS489. NUCLEAR POWER AND PUBLIC POLICY. 3.0 Hours.
A general introduction to research and practice concerning policies
LIFL125. GERMAN II. 3.0 Hours.
and practices relevant to the development and management of nuclear
Continuation of German I with an emphasis on acquiring conversational
power. Prerequisite: LAIS 100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3
skills as well as further study of grammar, vocabulary, and German
hours seminar; 3 semester
culture. 3 semester hours.
hours.
LIFL198. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
LAIS490. ENERGY AND SOCIETY. 3.0 Hours.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
(I,II) An interdisciplinary capstone seminar that explores a spectrum of
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
approaches
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
to the understanding, planning, and implementation of energy production
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
and use, including those typical of diverse private and public (national
LIFL199. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
and international) corporations, organizations, states, and agencies.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
Aspects of global energy policy that may be considered include the
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
historical, social, cultural, economic, ethical, political, and environmental
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
aspects of energy together with comparative methodologies and
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
assessments of diverse forms of energy development
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
as these affect particular communities and societies. Prerequisite:
LAIS100. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SYGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3
LIFL213. SPANISH III. 3.0 Hours.
semester hours.
Emphasis on furthering conversational skills and a continuing study of
grammar, vocabulary, and Spanish American culture. 3 semester hours.
LAIS498. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
LIFL214. ARABIC III. 3.0 Hours.
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
Emphasis on furthering conversational skills and a continuing study
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
of grammar, vocabulary, and culture of Arabic-speaking societies. 3
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
semester hours.
LAIS499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
LIFL215. GERMAN III. 3.0 Hours.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
Emphasis on furthering conversational skills and a con tinuing study of
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
grammar, vocabulary, and German culture. 3 semester hours.
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
LIFL299. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 6.0 Hours.
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
LIFL113. SPANISH I. 3.0 Hours.
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
Fundamentals of spoken and written Spanish with an emphasis on
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
vocabulary, idiomatic expressions of daily conversation, and Spanish
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
American culture. 3
semester hours.
LIFL398. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
LIFL114. ARABIC I. 3.0 Hours.
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
Fundamentals of spoken and written Arabic with an emphasis on
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
vocabulary, idiomatic expressions of daily conversation, and culture of
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
Arabic-speaking
societies. 3 semester hours.

118 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
LIFL399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
LIMU201. BAND. 1.0 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
Study, rehearsal, and performance of concert, marching and stage
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
repertory. Emphasis on fundamentals of rhythm, intonation, embouchure,
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour. Not repeatable using
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
to a degree above.
LIFL499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
LIMU202. BAND. 1.0 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
Study, rehearsal, and performance of concert, marching and stage
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
repertory. Emphasis on fundamentals of rhythm, intonation, embouchure,
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour. Not repeatable using
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
to a degree above.
LIMU101. BAND. 1.0 Hour.
LIMU211. CHORUS. 1.0 Hour.
Study, rehearsal, and performance of concert, marching and stage
Study, rehearsal, and performance of choral music of the classical,
repertory. Emphasis on fundamentals of rhythm, intonation, embouchure,
romantic, and modern periods with special emphasis on principles of
and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour. Not repeatable using
diction, rhythm, intonation, phrasing, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1
same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable
semester hour. Not repeatable
to a degree above.
using same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours
applicable to a degree above.
LIMU102. BAND. 1.0 Hour.
Study, rehearsal, and performance of concert, marching and stage
LIMU212. CHORUS. 1.0 Hour.
repertory. Emphasis on fundamentals of rhythm, intonation, embouchure,
Study, rehearsal, and performance of choral music of the classical,
and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour. Not repeatable using
romantic, and modern periods with special emphasis on principles of
same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable
diction, rhythm, intonation, phrasing, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1
to a degree above.
semester hour. Not repeatable
using same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours
LIMU111. CHORUS. 1.0 Hour.
applicable to a degree above.
Study, rehearsal, and performance of choral music of the classical,
romantic, and modern periods with special emphasis on principles of
LIMU299. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
diction, rhythm, intonation, phrasing, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
semester hour. Not repeatable
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
using same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
applicable to a degree above.
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
LIMU112. CHORUS. 1.0 Hour.
Study, rehearsal, and performance of choral music of the classical,
LIMU301. BAND. 1.0 Hour.
romantic, and modern periods with special emphasis on principles of
Study, rehearsal, and performance of concert, marching and stage
diction, rhythm, intonation, phrasing, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1
repertory. Emphasis on fundamentals of rhythm, intonation, embouchure,
semester hour. Not repeatable
and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour. Not repeatable using
using same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours
same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable
applicable to a degree above.
to a degree above.
LIMU189. INDIVIDUAL INSTRUMENTAL OR VOCAL MUSIC
LIMU302. BAND. 1.0 Hour.
INSTRUCTION. 1.0 Hour.
Study, rehearsal, and performance of concert, marching and stage
(I, II) The course affords the student an opportunity to study privately
repertory. Emphasis on fundamentals of rhythm, intonation, embouchure,
with CSM music faculty on a wide range of instruments including guitar,
and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour. Not repeatable using
piano, bass guitar, voice, saxophone, flute, drums and world instruments.
same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable
Students will be required to practice regularly and demonstrate
to a degree above.
proficiency on their instrument/voice. Topics of this class will include
performance etiquette, musicianship, musical styles, stylistic vocabulary,
LIMU311. CHORUS. 1.0 Hour.
foreign language and basic music theory. 1 credit hour.
Study, rehearsal, and performance of choral music of the classical,
romantic, and modern periods with special emphasis on principles of
LIMU198. SPECIAL TOPICS. 6.0 Hours.
diction, rhythm, intonation, phrasing, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
semester hour. Not repeatable
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
using same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
applicable to a degree above.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.

Colorado School of Mines 119
LIMU312. CHORUS. 1.0 Hour.
LIMU412. CHORUS. 1.0 Hour.
Study, rehearsal, and performance of choral music of the classical,
Study, rehearsal, and performance of choral music of the classical,
romantic, and modern periods with special emphasis on principles of
romantic, and modern periods with special emphasis on principles of
diction, rhythm, intonation, phrasing, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1
diction, rhythm, intonation, phrasing, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1
semester hour. Not repeatable
semester hour. Not repeatable
using same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours
using same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours
applicable to a degree above.
applicable to a degree above.
LIMU340. MUSIC THEORY. 3.0 Hours.
LIMU421. JAZZ ENSEMBLE/PEP BAND - FALL. 1.0 Hour.
The course begins with the fundamentals of music theory and moves into
FALL The Jazz Ensemble provides an opportunity for students to
their more complex applications. Music of the common practice period is
participate in a musical ensemble in the jazz big band format. Jazz music
considered. Aural and visual recognition of harmonic materials covered
is a unique American art form. The big band jazz format is an exciting
is emphasized. Prerequisite: LAIS315 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
way for students to experience the power, grace and beauty of this
lecture; 3 semester hours.
art form and music in general. The class will consist of regular weekly
rehearsals and one or more concert performance (s). 1 semester hour.
LIMU341. BASIC MUSIC OMPOSITION AND ARRANGING. 1.0 Hour.
Repeatable for credit. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable to
This course begins with the fundamentals of music composition and
a degree above.
works towards basic vocal and instrumental arrangement skills. Upon
completion of this course the student should: 1) demonstrate basic
LIMU422. JAZZ ENSEMBLE/PEP BAND - SPRING. 1.0 Hour.
knowledge of (music_ compositional techniques; 2) demonstrate
SPRING The Jazz Ensemble provides an opportunity for students to
primary concepts of vocal and instrumental ensemble arrangement; 3)
participate
demonstrate an ability to use notational software and Midi station
in a musical ensemble in the jazz big band format. Jazz music is a
hardware. Prerequisite; LIMU340 or permission of instructor. 1 hour
unique American art form. The big band jazz format is an exciting way for
lecture; 1 semester hour.
students to experience the power, grace and beauty of this art form and
music in general. The
LIMU350. MUSIC TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
class will consist of regular weekly rehearsals and one or more concert
An introduction to the physics of music and sound. The history of music
performance(s). 1 semester hour. Repeatable for credit. See rules limiting
technology
the number of hours applicable to a degree above.
from wax tubes to synthesizers. Construction of instruments and studio. 3
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
LIMU423. JAZZ LAB. 1.0 Hour.
The Jazz Lab provides an opportunity for students to participate in a
LIMU398. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
musical ensemble in the jazz combo format. Jazz music is a unique
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
American art form.
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
The jazz combo format is an exciting way for students to experience the
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
joy and sense of achievement of performing this great American music
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
form. The class will consist of regular weekly rehearsals and one or more
concert performance(s).
LIMU401. BAND. 1.0 Hour.
1 semester hour. Repeatable for credit. See rules limiting the number of
Study, rehearsal, and performance of concert, marching and stage
hours applicable to a degree above.
repertory. Emphasis on fundamentals of rhythm, intonation, embouchure,
and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour. Not repeatable using
LIMU450. MUSIC TECHNOLOGY CAPSTONE COURSE. 3.0 Hours.
same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable
Project-based course designed to develop practical technological
to a degree above.
and communication skills for direct application to the music recording.
Prerequisite: LIMU340 and LIMU350. 3 hours seminar; 3 semester hours.
LIMU402. BAND. 1.0 Hour.
Study, rehearsal, and performance of concert, marching and stage
LIMU498. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
repertory. Emphasis on fundamentals of rhythm, intonation, embouchure,
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1 semester hour. Not repeatable using
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours applicable
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
to a degree above.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
LIMU411. CHORUS. 1.0 Hour.
Study, rehearsal, and performance of choral music of the classical,
romantic, and modern periods with special emphasis on principles of
diction, rhythm, intonation, phrasing, and ensemble. 2 hours rehearsal; 1
semester hour. Not repeatable
using same course number. See rules limiting the number of hours
applicable to a degree above.

120 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
SYGN200. HUMAN SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
(I, II) This course in the CSM core curriculum articulates with LAIS100:
Nature and Human Values and with the other systems courses. Human
Systems is an interdisciplinary historical examination of key systems
created by humans - namely, political, economic,
social, and cultural institutions - as they have evolved worldwide from
the inception of the modern era (ca. 1500) to the present. This course
embodies an elaboration of these human systems as introduced in their
environmental context in Nature and Human Values and will reference
themes and issues explored therein. It also demonstrates the cross-
disciplinary applicability of the “systems” concept. Assignments will give
students continued practice in writing. Prerequisite: LAIS100. 3 semester
hours.

Colorado School of Mines 121
Mining Engineering
• The importance of self-confidence, conviction, and compassion, and
• The skills critical to leadership and supervision.
Program Description
Put simply, our vision for the Mining Engineering Department is to
Mining engineering is a broad profession, which embraces all required
be internationally recognized as the World’s premiere center for
activities to facilitate the recovery of valuable minerals and products
education and applied research in the diverse fields of mining and
from the earth’s crust for the benefit of humanity. It is one of the oldest
underground construction and tunneling. This vision spans across
engineering professions, which continues to grow in importance. It
numerous interdisciplinary areas of study. Through collaborations with
has often been said: “If it was not grown in the field or fished out of the
other CSM departments, academic institutions, government agencies,
water, then it must have been mined.” An adequate supply of mineral
and industry, we are committed to expanding the international reputation
products at competitive prices is the life-blood of the continuing growth
of the Department for excellence in education, research, industry service,
of industrialized nations and the foundation of the progress for the
and community outreach.
developing countries.
The Mining Engineering Department’s program objectives are:
The function of the mining engineer is to apply knowledge of pertinent
1. Have knowledge of, and skills in, engineering fundamentals to
scientific theory, engineering fundamentals, and improved technology
solve complex and open-ended mining and earth systems-related
to recover natural resources. Mining is a world-wide activity involving
problems.
the extraction of non-metallics, metal ores of all kinds, and solid fuel and
2. Demonstrate teamwork and leadership skills relevant to their
energy sources such as coal and nuclear materials. In addition to mineral
chosen profession.
extraction, the skills of mining engineers are also needed in a variety
of fields where the earth’s crust is utilized, such as the underground
3. Several years after leaving CSM, our graduates will achieve
construction industry. The construction industry, with its requirements of
professional growth.
developing earth (rock) systems, tunnels and underground chambers,
The program leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in Mining
and the hazardous waste disposal industry are examples of such
Engineering is accredited by:
applications. These are expanding needs, with a shortage of competent
people; the mining engineer is well qualified to meet these needs.
The Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for
Engineering and Technology
The importance of ecological and environmental planning is recognized
111 Market Place, Suite 1050
and given significant attention in all aspects of the mining engineering
Baltimore, MD 21202-4012
curriculum.
Telephone (410) 347-7700
CSM mining engineering students study the principles and techniques
of mineral exploration, and underground and surface mining operations,
Program Educational Objectives (Bachelor of
as well as, mineral processing technologies. Studies include rock
mechanics, rock fragmentation, plant and mine design, mine ventilation,
Science in Mining Engineering)
surveying, valuation, industrial hygiene, mineral law, mine safety,
In addition to contributing toward achieving the educational objectives
computing, mineral processing, solution mining and operations research.
described in the CSM Graduate profile and the ABET Accreditation
Throughout the mining engineering curriculum, a constant effort is
Criteria, the educational objectives which the Mining Engineering
made to maintain a balance between theoretical principles and their
Department aspires to accomplish can be seen in the attributes of our
engineering applications. The mining engineering graduate is qualified for
graduates. The graduate is equipped with:
positions in engineering, supervision, and research.
• A sound knowledge in the required basic sciences and engineering
The Department recognizes the high expectations that industry has
fundamentals;
for our graduates as well as the responsibility we have to prepare
• Knowledge and experience in the application of engineering principles
our students for successful professional careers. To be successful, it
to the exploitation of earth’s resources and construction of earth (rock)
is imperative that mining graduates possess an ever-growing set of
systems in an engineering systems orientation and setting;
technical skills, knowledge, and expertise. Beyond the technical aspects
• Ability to solve complex mining and earth systems related problems;
of basic sciences, engineering fundamentals, and problem-solving,
mining engineering graduates must also acquire a host of other skills
• Capability for team work and decision making;
which are essential in today’s global economy.
• Appreciation of the global role of minerals in the changing world;
These include:
• Desire for continuing education, intellectual and professional
development, analysis and creativity;
• The ability to work in interdisciplinary teams and communicate
• Self confidence and articulation, with high professional and ethical
effectively to different types of audiences,
standards.
• An appreciation of the social, political, and economic realities of
different cultures, countries, and indigenous peoples,
Curriculum
• An understanding of the global role mineral extraction and resource
The mining engineering curriculum is devised to facilitate the widest
development have on local, regional, and international levels,
employability of CSM graduates. The curriculum is based on scientific
• The desire for continuing and life-long education, intellectual and
engineering and geologic fundamentals and the application of these
professional development, analysis, and creativity,
fundamentals to design and operate mines and to create structures in
• The need to maintain high professional and ethical standards,
rock and prepare mine products for the market. To achieve this goal, the
curriculum is designed to ensure that the graduates:

122 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
• become broad based mining engineers who can tackle the problems
GEOL310
EARTH MATERIALS AND
4.0
4
of both hard and soft rock mining, regardless of whether the mineral
RESOURCES
deposit requires surface or underground methods of extraction,
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
• have an opportunity, through elective courses, to specialize in one or
18.0
more aspects of the mining engineering profession,
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
• are interested in an academic or research career, or wish to pursue
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective I
3.0
3.0
employment in related fields, have a sufficiently sound scientific and
EGGN281
INTRODUCTION TO
3
engineering foundation to do so effectively.
ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS,
This purpose permeates both the lower and upper division courses.
ELECTRONICS AND POWER
Another important aspect of the curriculum is the development of the
MNGN314
UNDERGROUND MINE
3.0
3
students’ capabilities to be team members, with the added objective of
DESIGN
preparing them for leadership in their professional life. The curriculum
MNGN316
COAL MINING METHODS
2.0
3.0
3
focuses on the application of engineering principles to solving problems,
GEOL311
STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY
2.0
2
in short, engineering design in an earth systems approach.
FOR MINING ENGINEERS
Degree Requirements (Mining Engineering)
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
Freshman
17.0
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Senior
CORE
Common Core
33.0
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
33.0
MNGN414
MINE PLANT DESIGN
2.0
3.0
3
Sophomore
MNGN408
UNDERGROUND DESIGN
2.0
2
AND CONSTRUCTION
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
MNGN428
MINING ENGINEERING
3.0
1
MATH213
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4.0
4
EVALUATION AND DESIGN
AND ENGINEERS III
REPORT I
PHGN200
PHYSICS II-
3.5
3.0
4.5
MNGN438
GEOSTATISTICS
2.0
3.0
3
ELECTROMAGNETISM AND
OPTICS
MNGN322/
INTRODUCTION TO
3.0
2.0
3
MINERAL PROCESSING AND
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3.0
3
LABORATORY
DCGN241
DIST CORE - STATICS
3.0
3
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective II
3.0
3.0
EPIC251
DESIGN (EPICS) II
2.0
3.0
3
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
18.0
18.0
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
MNGN429
MINING ENGINEERING
3.0
2
EGGN351
FLUID MECHANICS
3.0
3
EVALUATION AND DESIGN
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3.0
3
REPORT II
MNGN210
INTRODUCTORY MINING
3.0
3
MNGN433
MINE SYSTEMS ANALYSIS I
3.0
3
SYGN200
HUMAN SYSTEMS
3.0
3
MNGN427
MINE VALUATION
2.0
2
MNGN317
DYNAMICS FOR MINING
1.0
1
MNGN424
MINE VENTILATION
2.0
3.0
3
ENGINEERS
MNGN410
EXCAVATION PROJECT
2.0
2
EGGN320
MECHANICS OF MATERIALS
3.0
3
MANAGEMENT
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective III
3.0
3.0
16.5
15.0
Summer
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Total Hours: 139.5
MNGN308
MINE SAFETY
1.0
1
MNGN300
SUMMER FIELD SESSION
3.0
3
General CSM Minor/ASI requirements can be found here.
4.0
Junior
Minor Programs
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
The Mining Engineering Department offers two minor programs; the
EGGN371
THERMODYNAMICS I
3.0
3
traditional mining engineering program for non-mining majors and in
explosive engineering.
MNGN309
MINING ENGINEERING
8.0
2
LABORATORY
Mining Engineering Minor
MNGN312
SURFACE MINE DESIGN
2.0
3.0
3
The minor program in mining engineering requires students to take:
MNGN321
INTRODUCTION TO ROCK
2.0
3.0
3
MECHANICS
MNGN210
INTRODUCTORY MINING
3.0
Select two of the following:
6.0

Colorado School of Mines 123
MNGN312
SURFACE MINE DESIGN
MNGN404
TUNNELING
MNGN314
UNDERGROUND MINE DESIGN
MNGN405
ROCK MECHANICS IN MINING
MNGN316
COAL MINING METHODS
MNGN406
DESIGN AND SUPPORT OF UNDERGROUND
Other courses from mining engineering
9.0
EXCAVATIONS
Total Hours
18.0
MNGN408
UNDERGROUND DESIGN AND
CONSTRUCTION
The list of available courses can be found in the mining engineering
Total Hours
11.0
department office.
Area of Specialization in mining engineering (12 credit hours of course
work) is also available and should be discussed with a faculty member
in the mining engineering department and approved by the Department
Courses
Head.
DCGN241. DIST CORE - STATICS. 3.0 Hours.
Explosive Engineering Minor
Forces, moments, couples, equilibrium, centroids and second moments
of areas, volumes
Program Advisor: Dr. Vilem Petr
and masses, hydrostatics, friction, virtual work. Applications of vector
There are very few academic explosive engineering programs world
algebra to structures. Prerequisite: PHGN100 and credit or concurrent
wide. In fact, Colorado School of Mines is the only educational institution
enrollment in MATH112. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
that offers an explosive engineering minor program in the U.S.A.
MNGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MINING ENGINEERING. 1-6 Hour.
Developed in the CSM tradition of combining academic education
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
with hands-on experience, this minor program will prepare students
interests of instructor(s) and student( s). Usually the course is offered
for new and developing applications involving the use of explosives in
only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit
the mining and materials engineering, underground construction, oil
hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.
and gas operations, demolition, homeland security, military, forensic
investigations, manufacturing and material synthesis.
MNGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
With the proper program development of courses and basic knowledge
(I, II) (WI) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by
in explosive engineering, students enrolled in this program will discover
a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
and gain insight into the exciting industrial applications of explosives,
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
selection of explosives, and the correct and safe use of the energetic
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
materials. With the help of the program advisor, the students will design
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
and select the proper course sequence and complete a hands-on
research project under the supervision of a faculty advisor.
MNGN210. INTRODUCTORY MINING. 3.0 Hours.
(I, II) Survey of mining and mining economics. Topics include mining law,
Explosive Engineering Area of Special
exploration and sampling, reserve estimation, project evaluation, basic
Interest (ASI)
unit operations including drilling, blasting, loading and hauling, support,
shaft sinking and an introduction to surface and underground mining
Program Advisor: Dr. Vilem Petr
methods. Prerequisite: None. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
A total of 12 credit hours are needed to complete the Area of Special
Interest in Explosive Engineering Program. This is the preferred route
MNGN222. INTRODUCTION TO EXPLOSIVES ENGINEERING. 3.0
for students that would like to specialize in explosive engineering.
Hours.
The first three (required) courses will provide the students with basic
A basic introduction to explosive engineering and applied explosive
knowledge in explosive engineering. And the forth course will provide
science for students that recently completed their freshman or sophomore
the students with mining application such for surface, underground or
years at CSM. Topics covered will include safety and explosive
underground construction. No more than 3 credit hours used for the ASI
regulations, chemistry of explosives, explosives physics, and detonation
may be required for the degree-granting program in which the student is
properties. The course features a significant practical learning component
graduating.
with several sessions held at the Explosives Research Laboratory in
Idaho Springs. Students completing this course will be well prepared
Required of All Students
for more advanced work in MNGN 333 and MNGN 444. Prerequisites:
MNGN429
MINING ENGINEERING EVALUATION AND
2
PHGN100, MATH111, MATH112, CHGN121, and CHGN122. 3 hours
DESIGN REPORT II
lecture, 3 semester hours.
MNGN407
ROCK FRAGMENTATION
3.0
MNGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MINING ENGINEERING. 6.0 Hours.
MNGN444
EXPLOSIVES ENGINEERING II
3.0
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
Select at least one of the following:
3.0
interests of instructor(s) and student( s). Usually the course is offered
MNGN210
INTRODUCTORY MINING
only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit
MNGN308
MINE SAFETY
hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.
MNGN309
MINING ENGINEERING LABORATORY
MNGN312
SURFACE MINE DESIGN
MNGN314
UNDERGROUND MINE DESIGN
MNGN316
COAL MINING METHODS
MNGN321
INTRODUCTION TO ROCK MECHANICS

124 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
MNGN300. SUMMER FIELD SESSION. 3.0 Hours.
MNGN321. INTRODUCTION TO ROCK MECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.
(S) Classroom and field instructions in the theory and practice of surface
Physical properties of rock, and fundamentals of rock substance and rock
and underground mine surveying. Introduction to the application of
mass response to applied loads. Principles of elastic analysis and stress-
various computer-aided mine design software packages incorporated in
strain relationships. Elementary principles of the theoretical and applied
upper division mining courses. Prerequisite: completion of sophomore
design of underground openings and pit slopes. Emphasis on practical
year; Duration: first three weeks of summer term; 3 semester hours.
applied aspects. Prerequisite: DCGN241 or MNGN317. 2 hours lecture, 3
hours lab; 3 semester hours.
MNGN308. MINE SAFETY. 1.0 Hour.
(I) Causes and prevention of accidents. Mine safety regulations. Mine
MNGN322. INTRODUCTION TO MINERAL PROCESSING AND
rescue training. Safety management and organization. Prerequisite:
LABORATORY. 3.0 Hours.
MNGN210. 1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour. Taken as the first week of
(I) Principles and practice of crushing, grinding, size classification;
summer session.
mineral
concentration technologies including magnetic and electrostatic
MNGN309. MINING ENGINEERING LABORATORY. 2.0 Hours.
separation, gravity separation, and flotation. Sedimentation, thickening,
(I, II) Training in practical mine labor functions including: operation
filtration and product drying as well as tailings disposal technologies
of jackleg drills, jumbo drills, muckers, and LHD machines. Training
are included. The course is open to all CSM students. Prerequisite:
stresses safe operation of equipment and safe handling of explosives.
PHGN200/PHGN210, MATH213/MATH223. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab;
Introduction to front-line management techniques. Prerequisite:
3 semester hours.
MNGN210, MNGN308 or consent of instructor. 2 semester hours.
MNGN333. EXPLOSIVES ENGINEERING I. 3.0 Hours.
MNGN312. SURFACE MINE DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.
This course gives students in engineering and applied sciences the
(I) (WI) Analysis of elements of surface mine operation and design of
opportunity to examine and develop a fundamental knowledge including
surface
terminology and understanding of explosives science and engineering
mining system components with emphasis on minimization of adverse
concepts. Student learning will be demonstrated by assignments,
environmental impact and maximization of efficient use of mineral
quizzes, and exams. Learning assistance
resources. Ore estimates, unit operations, equipment selection, final
will come in the form of multidisciplinary lectures complemented by a
pit determinations, short- and longrange planning, road layouts, dump
few experts’ lectures from government, industry and the explosives
planning, and cost estimation. Prerequisite: MNGN210 and MNGN300. 2
engineering community. Prerequisites: none. 3 semester hours.
hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
MNGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION. 3.0 Hours.
MNGN314. UNDERGROUND MINE DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.
(I, II, S) Supervised, full-time, engineering-related employment for a
(II) Selection, design, and development of most suitable underground
continuous
mining methods based upon the physical and the geological properties
six-month period (or its equivalent) in which specific educational
of mineral deposits (metallics and nonmetallics), conservation
objectives are achieved. Prerequisite: Second semester sophomore
considerations, and associated environmental impacts. Reserve
status and a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.00. 0 to 3
estimates, development and production planning, engineering drawings
semester hours. Cooperative Education credit does not count toward
for development and extraction, underground haulage systems, and
graduation except under special conditions.
cost estimates. Prerequisite: MNGN210. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3
semester hours.
MNGN350. INTRODUCTION TO GEOTHERMAL ENERGY. 3.0 Hours.
Geothermal energy resources and their utilization, based on geoscience
MNGN316. COAL MINING METHODS. 3.0 Hours.
and engineering perspectives. Geoscience topics include world wide
(II) (WI) Devoted to surface and underground coal mining methods and
occurrences of resources and their classification, heat and mass
design.
transfer, geothermal reservoirs, hydrothermal geochemistry, exploration
The surface mining portion emphasizes area-mining methods, including
methods, and resource assessment. Engineering topics include
pertinent design-related regulations, and overburden removal systems.
thermodynamics of water, power cycles, electricity generation, drilling and
Pit layout, sequencing, overburden equipment selection and cost
well measurements, reservoir-surface engineering, and direct utilization.
estimation are presented. The underground mining portion emphasizes
Economic and environmental considerations and case studies are also
general mine layout; detailed layout of continuous, conventional, longwall,
presented. Prerequisites: ENGY200. 3 credit hours.
and shortwall sections. General cost and manning requirements; and
production analysis. Federal and state health and safety regulations are
MNGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MINING ENGINEERING. 1-6 Hour.
included in all aspects of mine layout. Prerequisite: MNGN210. 2 hours
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
lecture, 3 hours lab, 3 semester hours.
interests of instructor(s) and student( s). Usually the course is offered
only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit
MNGN317. DYNAMICS FOR MINING ENGINEERS. 1.0 Hour.
hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.
(II) For mining engineering majors only. Absolute and relative motions,
kinetics, work-energy, impulse-momentum and angular impulse-
MNGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
momentum. Prerequisite: MATH213/MATH223, DCGN241. 1 hour
(I, II) (WI) ) Individual research or special problem projects supervised
lecture; 1 semester hour.
by a faculty member. When a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, method of assessment, and credit hours, it must be
approved by the Department Head. Prerequisite: "Independent Study"
form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1
to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

Colorado School of Mines 125
MNGN404. TUNNELING. 3.0 Hours.
MNGN414. MINE PLANT DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.
(I) Modern tunneling techniques. Emphasis on evaluation of ground
(I) Analysis of mine plant elements with emphasis on design. Materials
conditions, estimation of support requirements, methods of tunnel driving
handling,
and boring, design systems and equipment, and safety. Prerequisite:
dewatering, hoisting, belt conveyor and other material handling
none. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
systems for underground mines. Prerequisite: MNGN312, MNGN314 or
Instructor’s consent. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hour.
MNGN405. ROCK MECHANICS IN MINING. 3.0 Hours.
(I) The course deals with the rock mechanics aspect of design of mine
MNGN418. ADVANCED ROCK MECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.
layouts developed in both underground and surface. Underground mining
Analytical and numerical modeling analysis of stresses and
sections include design of coal and hard rock pillars, mine layout design
displacements
for tabular and massive ore
induced around engineering excavations in rock. In-situ stress.
bodies, assessment of caving characteristics or ore bodies, performance
Rock failure criteria. Complete load deformation behavior of rocks.
and application of backfill, and phenomenon of rock burst and its
Measurement and monitoring techniques in rock mechanics. Principles
alleviation. Surface mining portion covers rock mass characterization,
of design of excavation in rocks. Analytical, numerical modeling and
failure modes of slopes excavated in rock masses, probabilistic and
empirical design methods. Probabilistic and deterministic approaches
deterministic approaches to design of slopes, and remedial measures
to rock engineering designs. Excavation design examples for shafts,
for slope stability problems. Prerequisite: MN321 or equivalent. 3 hours
tunnels, large chambers and mine pillars. Seismic loading of
lecture; 3 semester hour.
structures in rock. Phenomenon of rock burst and its alleviation.
Prerequisite: MNGN321 or Instructor’s consent. 3 hours lecture; 3
MNGN406. DESIGN AND SUPPORT OF UNDERGROUND
semester hours.
EXCAVATIONS. 3.0 Hours.
Design of underground excavations and support. Analysis of stress
MNGN421. DESIGN OF UNDERGROUND EXCAVATIONS. 3.0 Hours.
and rock mass deformations around excavations using analytical and
(II) Design of underground openings in competent and broken ground
numerical methods. Collections, preparation, and evaluation of in situ and
using rock mechanics principles. Rock bolting design and other ground
laboratory data for excavation design. Use of rock mass rating systems
support methods. Coal, evaporite, metallic and nonmetallic deposits
for site characterization and excavation design. Study of support types
included. Prerequisite: MNGN321, concurrent enrollment or Instructor’s
and selection of support for underground excavations. Use of numerical
consent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
models for design of shafts, tunnels
and large chambers. Prerequisite: Instructor’s consent. 3 hours lecture; 3
MNGN422. FLOTATION. 2.0 Hours.
semester hours. Offered in odd years.
Science and engineering governing the practice of mineral concentration
by flotation. Interfacial phenomena, flotation reagents, mineral-reagent
MNGN407. ROCK FRAGMENTATION. 3.0 Hours.
interactions, and zeta-potential are covered. Flotation circuit design and
(II) Theory and application of rock drilling, rock boring, explosives,
evaluation as well as tailings handling are also covered. The course also
blasting,
includes laboratory demonstrations of some fundamental concepts. 3
and mechanical rock breakage. Design of blasting rounds, applications to
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
surface and underground excavation. Prerequisite: DCGN241, concurrent
enrollment or Instructor’s consent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MNGN423. FLOTATION LABORATORY. 1.0 Hour.
(I) Experiments to accompany the lectures in MNGN422. Co-requisite:
MNGN408. UNDERGROUND DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION. 2.0
MNGN421 or Instructor’s consent.. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
Hours.
(I) Soil and rock engineering applied to underground civil works.
MNGN424. MINE VENTILATION. 3.0 Hours.
Tunneling and the construction of underground openings for power
(II) Fundamentals of mine ventilation, including control of gas, dust,
facilities, water conveyance, transportation, and waste disposal;
temperature,
design, excavation and support of underground openings. Emphasis on
and humidity; ventilation network analysis and design of systems.
consulting practice, case studies, geotechnical design, and construction
Prerequisite: EGGN351, EGGN371 and MNGN314 or Instructor’s
methods. Prerequisite: EGGN361 OR MNGN321, or Instructor’s consent.
consent. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
2 hours of lecture; 2 semester hours.
MNGN427. MINE VALUATION. 2.0 Hours.
MNGN410. EXCAVATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT. 2.0 Hours.
(II) Course emphasis is on the business aspects of mining. Topics include
(II) Successful implementation and management of surface and
time valuation of money and interest formulas, cash flow, investment
underground construction projects, preparation of contract documents,
criteria, tax considerations, risk and sensitivity analysis, escalation and
project bidding and estimating, contract awarding and notice to proceed,
inflation and cost of capital. Calculation procedures are illustrated by case
value engineering, risk management, construction management
studies. Computer programs are used. Prerequisite: Senior in Mining,
and dispute resolution, evaluation of differing site conditions claims.
graduate status or Instructor’s consent. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester
Prerequisite: MNGN210 or Instructor’s consent, 2-hour lecture, 2
hours.
semester hours.

126 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
MNGN428. MINING ENGINEERING EVALUATION AND DESIGN
MNGN438. GEOSTATISTICS. 3.0 Hours.
REPORT I. 1.0 Hour.
(I) Introduction to elementary probability theory and its applications in
(I) (WI) Preparation of phase I engineering report based on coordination
engineering
of all previous work. Includes mineral deposit selection, geologic
and sciences; discrete and continuous probability distributions; parameter
description, mining method selection, ore reserve determination, and
estimation; hypothesis testing; linear regression; spatial correlations
permit process outline. Emphasis is on detailed mine design and
and geostatistics with emphasis on applications in earth sciences and
cost analysis evaluation in preparation for MNGN429. Prerequisites:
engineering. Prerequisites: MATH112. 2 hours of lecture and 3 hours of
MNGN210: MNGN300, MNGN308, MNGN312, MNGN314, MNGN309,
lab. 3 semester hours.
MNGN321, MNGN316, GEOL310, GEOL311. Concurrent: MNGN438. 3
hours lab; 1 semester hour.
MNGN440. EQUIPMENT REPLACEMENT ANALYSIS. 2.0 Hours.
(I) Introduction to the fundamentals of classical equipment replacement
MNGN429. MINING ENGINEERING EVALUATION AND DESIGN
theory. Emphasis on new, practical approaches to equipment
REPORT II. 2.0 Hours.
replacement decision making. Topics include: operating and maintenance
(II) (WI) Preparation of formal engineering report based on all course
costs, obsolescence factors, technological changes, salvage, capital
work in the mining option. Emphasis is on mine design, equipment
investments, minimal average annual costs, optimum economic life,
selection, production scheduling, evaluation and cost analysis.
infinite and finite planning horizons, replacement cycles, replacement
Prerequisite: MNGN428, MNGN210: MNGN300, MNGN308, MNGN312,
vs. expansion, maximization of returns from equipment replacement
MNGN314, MNGN309, MNGN321, MNGN316, GEOL310, GEOL311,
expenditures. Prerequisite: MNGN427, senior or graduate status. 2 hours
MNGN438, MNGN414; Concurrent: MNGN322/MNGN323, MNGN427,
lecture; 2 semester hours.
MNGN433. 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
MNGN444. EXPLOSIVES ENGINEERING II. 3.0 Hours.
MNGN431. MINING AND METALLURGICAL ENVIRONMENT. 3.0
This course gives students in engineering and applied sciences the
Hours.
opportunity
This course covers studies of the interface between mining and
to acquire the fundamental concepts of explosives engineering and
metallurgical process engineering and environmental engineering areas.
science applications as they apply to industry and real life examples.
Wastes, effluents and their point sources in mining and metallurgical
Students will expand upon their MNGN333 knowledge and develop
processes such as mineral concentration, value extraction and process
a more advanced knowledge base including an understanding of the
metallurgy are studied in context. Fundamentals of unit operations
subject as it applies to their specific project interests. Assignments,
and unit processes with those applicable to waste and effluent control,
quizzes, concept modeling and their project development and
disposal and materials recycling are covered. Engineering design and
presentation will demonstrate student’s progress. Prerequisite: none. 3
engineering cost components are also included for some examples
hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
chosen. The ratio of fundamentals applications coverage is about 1:1.
Prerequisite: Instructor’s consent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MNGN445. ROCK SLOPE ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
Introduction to the analysis and design of slopes excavated in rock.
MNGN433. MINE SYSTEMS ANALYSIS I. 3.0 Hours.
Rock mass classification and strength determinations, geological
(II) Application of statistics, systems analysis, and operations research
structural parameters, properties of fracture sets, data collection
techniques to mineral industry problems. Laboratory work using computer
techniques, hydrological factors, methods of analysis of slope stability,
techniques to improve efficiency of mining operations. Prerequisite:
wedge intersections, monitoring and maintenance of final pit slopes,
Senior or graduate status. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
classification of slides. Deterministic and probabilistic approaches in
slope design. Remedial measures. Laboratory and field exercise in slope
MNGN434. PROCESS ANALYSIS. 1.0 Hour.
design. Collection of data and specimens in the field for deterring
Projects to accompany the lectures in MNGN422. Prerequisite:
physical properties required for slope design. Application of numerical
MNGN422 or Instructor’s consent. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
modeling and analytical techniques to slope stability determinations for
hard rock and soft rock environments. Prerequisite: Instructor’s consent.
MNGN436. UNDERGROUND COAL MINE DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.
3 hours lecture. 3 semester hours.
(II) Design of an underground coal mine based on an actual coal reserve.
This course shall utilize all previous course material in the actual design
MNGN452. SOLUTION MINING AND PROCESSING OF ORES. 3.0
of an underground coal mine. Ventilation, materials handling, electrical
Hours.
transmission and distribution, fluid mechanics, equipment selection and
(II) Theory and application of advanced methods of extracting and
application, mine plant design. Information from all basic mining survey
processing of minerals, underground or in situ, to recover solutions and
courses will be used. Prerequisite: MNGN316, MNGN321, MNGN414,
concentrates of value-materials, by minimization of the traditional surface
EGGN329 and MNGN381 or MNGN384. Concurrent enrollment with the
processing and disposal of tailings to minimize environmental impacts.
Instructor’s consent permitted. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester
Prerequisite: Senior or graduate status; Instructor’s consent. 3 hours
hours.
lecture, 3 semester hours. Offered in spring.

Colorado School of Mines 127
MNGN460. INDUSTRIAL MINERALS PRODUCTION. 3.0 Hours.
(II) This course describes the engineering principles and practices
associated with quarry mining operations related to the cement and
aggregates industries. The course will cover resource definition, quarry
planning and design, extraction, and processing of material for cement
and aggregate production. Permitting issues and reclamation, particle
sizing and environmental practices, will be studied in depth. Prerequisite:
MNGN312, MNGN322, MNGN323, or Instructor’s consent. 3 hours
lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered in spring.
MNGN482. MINE MANAGEMENT. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Basic principles of successful mine management including supervision
skills,
administrative policies, industrial and human relations, improvement
engineering, risk management, conflict resolution and external affairs.
Prerequisite: Senior or graduate status or Instructor’s consent. 2 hours
lecture and 1 hour case study
presentation / discussion per week; 3 semester hours.
MNGN490. ENERGY AND SOCIETY. 3.0 Hours.
(II). A transdisciplinary capstone seminar that explores a spectrum of
approaches to the understanding, planning, and implementation of
energy production and use, including those typical of diverse private and
public (national and international) corporations, organizations, states, and
agencies. Aspects of global energy policy
that may be considered include the historical, social, cultural, economic,
ethical, political, and environmental aspects of energy together with
comparative methodologies and assessments of diverse forms of energy
development. Prerequisites: ENGY330/EBGN330 and one of either
ENGY310, ENGY320, or ENGY340; or consent of instructor. 3 hours
lecture/seminar; 3 semester hours.
MNGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MINING ENGINEERING. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
interests of instructor(s) and student( s). Usually the course is offered
only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit
hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.
MNGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) (WI) Individual research or special problem projects supervised
by a faculty member. When a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, method of assessment, and credit hours, it must be
approved by the Department Head. Prerequisite: "Independent Study"
form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1
to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

128 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
Petroleum Engineering
Computer Laboratory
This computer laboratory is available for general use and classroom
Program Description
instruction. It is continuously open for student use. Software includes
The primary objectives of petroleum engineering are the safe and
more than $5.0 million in donated industry software used by oil and gas
environmentally sound exploration, evaluation, development, and
companies and research labs around the world.
recovery of oil, gas, geothermal, and other fluids in the earth. Skills in this
Drilling Simulator Laboratory
branch of engineering are needed to meet the world’s ever-increasing
demand for hydrocarbon fuel, thermal energy, and waste and pollution
Rare on university campuses, this lab contains a computer controlled,
management.
full-scale, drilling rig simulator. It includes drilling controls that can be
used to simulate onshore and offshore drilling operations and well control
Graduates of our program are in great demand in private industry, as
situations. This lab also has three small scale drilling rig simulators,
evidenced by the strong job market and high salaries. The petroleum
identical to those used in industrial well control training facilities.
industry offers a wide range of employment opportunities for Petroleum
Engineering students during summer breaks and after graduation.
Reservoir Characterization Laboratory
Exciting experiences range from field work in drilling and producing oil
Rock properties are measured that affect economic development
and gas fields to office jobs in small towns or large cities. Worldwide
of reservoir resources of oil and gas. Measured properties include
travel and overseas assignments are available for interested students.
permeability, porosity, and relative permeability. "Hands on" experiences
One of our objectives in the Petroleum Engineering Department is to
with simple and sophisticated equipment are provided.
prepare students to succeed in an energy industry that is evolving into an
Drilling Fluids Laboratory
industry working with many energy sources. Besides developing technical
competence in petroleum engineering, you will learn how your education
Modern equipment found on drilling rigs world-wide enables students to
can help you contribute to the development of alternative energy sources
evaluate and design fluid systems required in drilling operations.
such as geothermal. In addition to exciting careers in the petroleum
Fluids Characterization Laboratory
industry, many petroleum engineering graduates find rewarding careers
in the environmental arena, law, medicine, business, and many other
A variety of properties of fluids from oil and gas reservoirs are measured
walks of life.
for realistic conditions of elevated temperature and pressure. This
laboratory accentuates principles studied in lectures.
The department offers semester-abroad opportunities through formal
exchange programs with the Petroleum Engineering Department
Petroleum Engineering Summer Sessions
at the Montanuniversität Leoben in Austria, Technical University in
Two summer sessions, one after the completion of the sophomore year
Delft, Holland, the University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia, and
and one after the junior year, are important parts of the educational
the Petroleum Institute in Abu Dhabi, UAE. Qualified undergraduate
experience. The first is a two-week session designed to introduce the
and graduate students from each school can attend the other for one
student to the petroleum industry. Various career opportunities are
semester and receive full transfer credit back at the home university.
highlighted as well as showing petroleum field and office operations and
Graduate courses emphasize the research aspects of the profession,
geology. In addition, students are indoctrinated in health, safety, and
as well as advanced engineering applications. Qualified students may
environmental awareness. Petroleum Engineering, a truly unique and
continue their education and earn a Master of Science, Master of
exciting engineering discipline, can be experienced by visiting petroleum
Engineering, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees.
operations. Historically, the areas visited have included Europe, Alaska,
Canada, the U.S. Gulf Coast, California, the Midcontinent, the Northeast
To facilitate classroom instruction and the learning experience, the
US, and the Rocky Mountain Region.
Petroleum Engineering faculty recommend that all petroleum engineering
students have notebook computers. Recommended specifications for
The second two-week session, after the junior year, is an in-depth study
the computer can be obtained from the CSM Academic Computing &
of the Rangely Oil Field and surrounding geology in Western Colorado.
Networking web site.
The Rangely Oil Field is the largest oil field in the Rocky Mountain
region and has undergone primary, secondary, and enhanced recovery
The Petroleum Engineering Department encourages student involvement
processes. Field work in the area provide the setting for understanding
with the Society of Petroleum Engineers, the American Association of
the complexity of geologic systems and the environmental and safety
Drilling Engineers, and the American Rock Mechanics Association. The
issues in the context of reservoir development and management.
department provides some financial support for students attending the
annual technical conferences for these professional societies.
Other Opportunities
In the fall of 2012, the new Petroleum Engineering building, Marquez
It is recommended that all students considering majoring or minoring
(pronounced Marcus) Hall, was opened. The new home for the Petroleum
in Petroleum Engineering sign up for the elective course PEGN102,
Engineering Department is a prominent campus landmark, showcasing
Introduction to the Petroleum Industry in the spring semester. Also,
Mines’ longstanding strengths in its core focus areas and our commitment
seniors may take 500-level graduate courses that include topics such
to staying at the forefront of innovation. The new building is designed
as drilling, reservoir, and production engineering; reservoir simulation
using aggressive energy saving strategies and will be LEED certified.
and characterization, and economics and risk analysis with instructor
Marquez Hall is the first building on the Colorado School of Mines
concurrence (see the CSM Graduate Bulletin (bulletin.mines.edu/
Campus that is funded entirely by donations.
graduate/thegraduateschool) for course offerings).
New laboratory and computer equipment added to Marquez Hall include:

Colorado School of Mines 129
Program Educational Objectives (Bachelor of
• An understanding of ethical, social, environmental, and professional
Science in Petroleum Engineering)
responsibilities as demonstrated by following established department
and Colorado School of Mines honor codes, integrating ethical and
The Petroleum Engineering Department is accredited by the Engineering
environmental issues into real world problems, and developing an
Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and
awareness of health and safety issues.
Technology, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012,
• And by developing multidisciplinary team skills, as demonstrated by
telephone (410) 347-7700.
the ability to integrate information and data from multiple sources and
The Mission of the Petroleum Engineering Program continues to evolve
to enhance critical team skills sets.
over time in response to the needs of the graduates and industry; in
These program objectives and student outcomes can be found on the
concert with the Colorado School of Mines Institutional Mission Statement
Petroleum Engineering Department’s website under the Colorado School
and the Profile of the Future Graduate; and in recognition of accreditation
of Mines website. These are also found publicly posted in the ABET
requirements specified by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of
bulletin board outside the department offices.
the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. The Mission of
the Petroleum Engineering Program is:
Curriculum
To educate engineers for the worldwide petroleum industry
All disciplines within petroleum engineering are covered to great depth
at the undergraduate and graduate levels, perform research
at the undergraduate and graduate levels, both in the classroom
that enhances the state-of-the-art in petroleum technology,
and laboratory instruction, and in research. Specific areas include
and to serve the industry and public good through professional
fundamental fluid and rock behavior, drilling, formation evaluation,
societies and public service. This mission is achieved through
well completions and stimulation, well testing, production operations
proactive leadership in providing a solid foundation for both the
and artificial lift, reservoir engineering, supplemental and enhanced oil
undergraduate and graduate programs. Students are well prepared
recovery, economic evaluation of petroleum projects, environmental and
for life-long learning, an international and diverse career, further
safety issues, and the computer simulation of most of these topics.
education, and public service. The program emphasizes integrated
The Petroleum Engineering student studies mathematics, computer
and multi-disciplinary teamwork in classroom instruction and in
science, chemistry, physics, general engineering, geology, the
research, and actively pursues interdisciplinary activities with many
humanities, technical communication (including researching subjects,
other CSM departments, particularly the Earth Science/Engineering
report writing, oral presentations, and listening skills), and environmental
programs.
topics. A unique aspect is the breadth and depth of the total program
As part of the that process, the faculty of the department has objectives
structured in a manner that prepares each graduate for a successful
that they want to see their alumni accomplish within three to five years
career from the standpoints of technical competence, managerial abilities,
from graduation. Therefore, the Petroleum Engineering Department’s
and multidisciplinary experiences. The needs for continued learning and
faculty has affirmed the following Program Educational Objectives as
professionalism are stressed.
follows:
The strength of the program comes from the high quality of students
• Our Alumni will practice their professions in an ethical, social, and
and professors. The faculty has expertise in teaching and research in
environmentally responsible manner.
all the major areas of petroleum engineering listed above. Additionally,
• Our Alumni will serve society and individuals through professional
the faculty members have significant industrial backgrounds that lead
societies, educational institutions, and governmental organizations.
to meaningful design experiences for the students. Engineering design
• Our Alumni will have a high-level competency in engineering principles
is taught throughout the curriculum including a senior design course
and practices.
on applying the learned skills to real world reservoir development and
management problems. The senior design course is truly multidisciplinary
• Our Alumni will pursue successful and diverse professional careers, or
with students and professors from the Petroleum Engineering,
will continue education in the US or abroad.
Geophysics, and Geology and Geological Engineering departments.
• Our Alumni will work on multidisciplinary teams across multitude of
cultures.
As of August 2012 the program has new facilities and equipment for
laboratory instruction and experimental research. To maintain leadership
• Our Alumni will be effective communicators.
in future petroleum engineering technology, decision making, and
To accomplish these objectives, the Petroleum Engineering program has,
management, computers are incorporated into every part of the program,
in addition to the school’s Graduate Profile and the overall objectives,
from undergraduate instruction through graduate student and faculty
certain student objectives particular to the Department. These include:
research.
• A broad education, based on science, technology, engineering,
The department is close to oil and gas field operations, petroleum
and mathematics basics, effective communication skills, the skills
companies, research laboratories, and geologic out-crops of nearby
necessary for diverse and international professional career, and the
producing formations. There are many opportunities for short field trips
recognition of need and ability to engage in lifelong learning.
and for summer and part-time employment in the oil and gas industry.
• A solid foundation in engineering principles and practices, based
Degree Requirements (Petroleum
upon the Society of Petroleum Engineer’s ABET Guidelines, a strong
petroleum engineering department faculty with diverse backgrounds,
Engineering)
and various technical seminars, field trips, and our field sessions.
Freshman
• Applying problem solving skills, as demonstrated by designing and
lec
lab
sem.hrs
conducting experiments, analyzing and interpreting data, developing
Common Core
33.0
problem solving skills in engineering practice by working real world
33.0
problems.

130 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
Sophomore
Senior
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3.0
3
PEGN481
PETROLEUM SEMINAR
2.0
2
EPIC251
DESIGN (EPICS) II or 268
3.0
3
PEGN423
PETROLEUM RESERVOIR
3.0
3
DCGN241
DIST CORE - STATICS
3.0
3
ENGINEERING I
MATH213
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4.0
4
PEGN413
GAS MEASUREMENT AND
6.0
2
AND ENGINEERS III
FORMATION EVALUATION
LAB
PHGN200
PHYSICS II-
3.5
3.0
4.5
ELECTROMAGNETISM AND
PEGN414
WELL TEST ANALYSIS AND
3.0
3
OPTICS
DESIGN
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
PEGN422
ECONOMICS AND
3.0
3
EVALUATION OF OIL AND
18.0
GAS PROJECTS
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
DCGN209
DIST CORE THERMO
3.0
3
16.0
EGGN320
MECHANICS OF MATERIALS
3.0
3
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
PEGN251
FLUID MECHANICS
3.0
3
PEGN424
PETROLEUM RESERVOIR
3.0
3
PEGN308
RESERVOIR ROCK
2.0
3.0
3
ENGINEERING II
PROPERTIES
PEGN426
WELL COMPLETIONS AND
3.0
3
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3.0
3
STIMULATION
SYGN200
HUMAN SYSTEMS
3.0
3
PEGN439
MULTIDISCIPLINARY
2.0
3.0
3
18.0
PETROLEUM DESIGN
Summer
lec
lab
sem.hrs
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective III
3.0
3.0
PEGN315
SUMMER FIELD SESSION I
2.0
2
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
2.0
15.0
Junior
Total Hours: 139.5
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Five Year Combined Baccalaureate and
GEOL315
SEDIMENTOLOGY AND
2.0
3.0
3
STRATIGRAPHY
Masters Degree
PEGN305
COMPUTATIONAL
2.0
2
The Petroleum Engineering Department offers the opportunity to begin
METHODS IN PETROLEUM
work on a Master of Engineering or Master of Science Degree while
ENGINEERING
completing the requirements for the Bachelor’s Degree. These degrees
PEGN310
RESERVOIR FLUID
2.0
2
are of special interest to those planning on studying abroad or wanting to
PROPERTIES
get a head start on graduate education. These combined programs are
PEGN311
DRILLING ENGINEERING
3.0
3.0
4
individualized and a plan of study should be discussed with the student’s
academic advisor any time after the Sophomore year.
PEGN419
WELL LOG ANALYSIS AND
2.0
3.0
3
FORMATION EVALUATION
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective I
3.0
3.0
General CSM Minor/ASI requirements can be found here.
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
17.5
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Courses
GEOL308
INTRODUCTORY APPLIED
2.0
3.0
3
PEGN102. INTRODUCTION TO PETROLEUM INDUSTRY. 3.0 Hours.
STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY
(II) A survey of the elements comprising the petroleum industry-
PEGN438
GEOSTATISTICS
2.0
3.0
3
exploration, development, processing, transportation, distribution,
PEGN361
COMPLETION ENGINEERING
3.0
3
engineering ethics and professionalism. This elective course is
recommended for all PE majors, minors,
PEGN411
MECHANICS OF PETROLEUM
3.0
3
and other interested students. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PRODUCTION
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective II
3.0
3.0
PEGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PETROLEUM ENGINEERING. 1-6
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
Hour.
18.0
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
Summer
lec
lab
sem.hrs
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
PEGN316
SUMMER FIELD SESSION II
2.0
2
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
2.0

Colorado School of Mines 131
PEGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
PEGN311. DRILLING ENGINEERING. 4.0 Hours.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
(I) Study of drilling operations, fluid design, hydraulics, drilling contracts,
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
rig selection, rotary system, well control, bit selection, drill string design,
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
directional drilling, and casing seat selection. Prerequisites: PEGN251,
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
PEGN315, DCGN241. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
PEGN315. SUMMER FIELD SESSION I. 2.0 Hours.
PEGN251. FLUID MECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.
(S) This twoweek course taken after the completion of the sophomore
(II) Fundamental course in engineering fluid flow introducing flow in
year is designed to introduce the student to oil and gas field and other
pipelines, surface facilities and oil and gas wells. Theory and application
engineering operations. Engineering design problems are integrated
of incompressible and compressible flow, fluid statics, dimensional
throughout the two-week session. On-site visits to various oil field
analysis, laminar and turbulent flow, Newtonian and non-Newtonian
operations in the past included the Rocky Mountain region, the U.S. Gulf
fluids, and two-phase flow. Lecture format
Coast, California, Alaska, Canada and Europe. Topics covered include
with demonstrations and practical problem solving, coordinated with
drilling, completions, stimulations, surface facilities, production, artificial
PEGN308. Students cannot receive credit for both PEGN251 Fluid
lift, reservoir, geology and geophysics. Also included are environmental
Mechanics and EGGN351 Fluid Mechanics. Prerequisite: MATH213. Co-
and safety issues as related to the petroleum industry. Prerequisite:
requisites: PEGN308, DCGN209, DCGN241. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
PEGN308. 2 semester hours.
hours.
PEGN316. SUMMER FIELD SESSION II. 2.0 Hours.
PEGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PETROLEUM ENGINEERING. 1-6
(S) This twoweek course is taken after the completion of the junior
Hour.
year. Emphasis is placed on the multidisciplinary nature of reservoir
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
management. Field trips in the area provide the opportunity to study
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
eolian, fluvial, lacustrine, near shore, and
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
marine depositional systems. These field trips provide the setting for
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
understanding the complexity of each system in the context of reservoir
development and management. Petroleum systems including the source,
PEGN299. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
maturity, and trapping of hydrocarbons are studied in the context of
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
petroleum exploration and development. Geologic methods incorporating
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
both surface and subsurface data are used extensively. Prerequisites:
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
PEGN315, PEGN411, PEGN419, GEOL308,
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
and GEOL315. 2 semester hours.
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
PEGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION. 3.0 Hours.
PEGN305. COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN PETROLEUM
(I, II, S) Supervised, full-time, engineering-related employment for a
ENGINEERING. 2.0 Hours.
continuous
(I) This course is an introduction to computers and computer
six-month period (or its equivalent) in which specific educational
programming applied to petroleum engineering. Emphasis will be on
objectives are achieved. Prerequisite: Second semester sophomore
learning Visual Basic programming techniques to solve engineering
status and a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.00. 0 to 3
problems. A toolbox of fluid property and numerical techniques will be
semester hours. Cooperative Education credit does not count toward
developed. Prerequisite: MATH213. Co-Requisite:
graduation except under special conditions.
PEGN310. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
PEGN350. SUSTAINABLE ENERGY SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
PEGN308. RESERVOIR ROCK PROPERTIES. 3.0 Hours.
(I or II) A sustainable energy system is a system that lets us meet present
(II) (WI) Intro duction to basic reservoir rock properties and their
energy needs while preserving the ability of future generations to meet
measurements.
their needs. Sustainable Energy Systems introduces undergraduate
Topics covered include: porosity, saturations, volumetric equations, land
students to sustainable energy systems that will be available in the 21st
descriptions, trapping mechanism, pressure and temperature gradients,
century. The course focuses on sustainable energy sources, especially
abnormally pressured reservoirs. Darcy’s law for linear horizontal and
renewable energy sources and nuclear energy (e.g., fusion). Students
tilted flow,
are introduced to the existing energy infrastructure, become familiar
radial flow for single phase liquids and gases, multiphase flow (relative
with finite energy sources, and learn from a study of energy supply and
permeability). Capillary pressure and formation compressibility are also
demand that sustainable energy systems are needed. The ability to
discussed. This course is designated as a writing intensive course (WI).
improve energy use efficiency and the impact of energy sources on the
Co-requisites: DCGN241, PEGN251. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3
environment are discussed. Examples of sustainable energy systems and
semester hours.
their applicability to different energy sectors are presented. The course
is recommended for students who plan to enter the energy industry or
PEGN310. RESERVOIR FLUID PROPERTIES. 2.0 Hours.
students who would like an introduction to sustainable energy systems.
(I) Properties of fluids encountered in petroleum engineering. Phase
Prerequisites: EPIC 151 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
behavior, density, viscosity, interfacial tension, and composition of oil,
semester hours.
gas, and brine systems. Interpreting lab data for engineering applications.
Flash calculations with k-values and equation of state. Introduction to
reservoir simulation software. Prerequisites: DCGN209 and PEGN308. 2
hours lecture; 2 semester hours.

132 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
PEGN361. COMPLETION ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
PEGN422. ECONOMICS AND EVALUATION OF OIL AND GAS
(II) (WI) This class is a continuation from drilling in PEGN311 into
PROJECTS. 3.0 Hours.
completion
(I) Project economics for oil and gas projects under conditions of certainty
operations. Topics include casing design, cement planning, completion
and uncertainty. Topics include time value of money concepts, discount
techniques and equipment, tubing design, wellhead selection, and sand
rate assumptions, measures of project profitability, costs, taxes, expected
control, and perforation
value concept, decision trees, gambler’s ruin, and Monte Carlo simulation
procedures. This course is designed as a writing intensive course (WI).
techniques. Prerequisite: PEGN438/MNGN438. 3 hours lecture; 3
Prerequisite: PEGN311, EGGN320, and EPIC251. 3 hours lecture; 3
semester hours.
semester hours.
PEGN423. PETROLEUM RESERVOIR ENGINEERING I. 3.0 Hours.
PEGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PETROLEUM ENGINEERING. 1-6
(I) Data requirements for reservoir engineering studies. Material balance
Hour.
calculations for normal gas, retrograde gas condensate, solution-gas
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
and gas-cap reservoirs with or without water drive. Primary reservoir
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
performance. Forecasting
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
future recoveries by incremental material balance. Prerequisites:
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
PEGN316, PEGN419 and MATH225 (MATH225 only for non PE majors).
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PEGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
PEGN424. PETROLEUM RESERVOIR ENGINEERING II. 3.0 Hours.
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
(II) Reservoir engineering aspects of supplemental recovery processes.
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
Introduction to liquid-liquid displacement processes, gas-liquid
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
displacement processes, and thermal recovery processes. Introduction to
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
numerical reservoir
simula tion, history matching and forecasting. Prerequisite: PEGN423. 3
PEGN411. MECHANICS OF PETROLEUM PRODUCTION. 3.0 Hours.
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(II) Nodal analysis for pipe and formation deliverability including single
and multiphase flow. Natural flow and design of artificial lift methods
PEGN426. WELL COMPLETIONS AND STIMULATION. 3.0 Hours.
including gas lift, sucker rod pumps, electrical submersible pumps, and
(II) Completion parameters; design for well conditions. Skin damage
hydraulic pumps. Prerequisites: PEGN 251, PEGN308, PEGN310, and
associated with completions and well productivity. Fluid types and
PEGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
properties;characterizations of compatibilities. Stimulation techniques;
acidizing and fracturing. Selection of proppants and fluids; types,
PEGN413. GAS MEASUREMENT AND FORMATION EVALUATION
placement and compatibilities. Estimation of rates, volumes and fracture
LAB. 2.0 Hours.
dimensions. Reservoir considerations in fracture propagation and design.
(I) (WI) This lab investigates the properties of a gas such as vapor
Prerequisite: PEGN361 and PEGN411. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
pressure, dew point pressure, and field methods of measuring gas
hours.
volumes. The application of well logging and formation evaluation
concepts are also investigated. This course is designated as a writing
PEGN428. ADVANCED DRILLING ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
intensive course (WI). Prerequisites: PEGN308 and PEGN310.
(II) Rotary drilling systems with emphasis on design of drilling programs,
Corequisite: PEGN423. 6 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
directional and horizontal well planning. This elective course is
recommended for petroleum engineering majors interested in drilling.
PEGN414. WELL TEST ANALYSIS AND DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.
Prerequisite: PEGN311, PEGN361. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(I) Solution to the diffusivity equation. Transient well testing: build-
up, drawdown, multi-rate test analysis for oil and gas. Flow tests and
PEGN438. GEOSTATISTICS. 3.0 Hours.
well deliverabilities. Type curve analysis. Super position, active and
(I & II) Introduction to elementary probability theory and its applications in
interference tests. Well test design. Prerequisites: MATH225 and
engineering and sciences; discrete and continuous probability
PEGN419. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
distributions; parameter estimation; hypothesis testing; linear regression;
spatial correlations and geostatistics with emphasis on applications in
PEGN419. WELL LOG ANALYSIS AND FORMATION EVALUATION.
earth sciences and engineering.
3.0 Hours.
Prerequisites: MATH112. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
(I) An introduction to well logging methods, including the relationship
between measured properties and reservoir properties. Analysis of log
suites for reservoir size and content. Graphical and analytical methods
will be developed to allow the student to better visualize the reservoir, its
contents, and its potential for production. Use of the computer as a tool
to handle data, create graphs and log traces, and make computations of
reservoir parameters is required. Prerequisite: PEGN308, GPGN302 and
GPGN303. Co-requisites: PEGN310, GEOL315. 2 hours
lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 133
PEGN439. MULTIDISCIPLINARY PETROLEUM DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.
(II) (WI) This is a multi-disciplinary design course that integrates
fundamentals and design concepts in geology, geophysics, and
petroleum engineering. Students work in integrated teams consisting
of students from each of the disciplines. Multiple open-ended design
problems in oil and gas exploration and field development, including
the development of a prospect in an exploration play and a detailed
engineering field study are assigned. Several detailed written and oral
presentations are made throughout the semester. Project economics
including risk analysis are an integral part of the course. Prerequisites:
GE Majors: GEOL309, GEOL314, GEGN438, and EPIC264; GP Majors:
GPGN302, GPGN303, and EPIC268; PE Majors: GEOL308, PEGN316
and PEGN426. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
PEGN450. ENERGY ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
(I or II) Energy Engineering is an overview of energy sources that will be
available for use in the 21st century. After discussing the history of
energy and its contribution to society, we survey the science and
technology of energy, including geothermal energy, fossil energy, solar
energy, nuclear energy, wind energy, hydro energy, bio energy, energy
and the environment, energy and economics, the hydrogen economy,
and energy forecasts. This broad background will give you additional
flexibility during your career and help you thrive in an energy industry
that is evolving from an industry dominated by fossil fuels to an industry
working with many energy sources. Prerequisite: MATH213, PHGN200. 3
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PEGN481. PETROLEUM SEMINAR. 2.0 Hours.
(I) (WI) Written and oral presentations by each student on current energy
topics.
This course is designated as a writing intensive course (WI). Prerequisite:
Consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
PEGN490. RESERVOIR GEOMECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.
(I) The course provides an introduction to fundamental rock mechanics
and aims to emphasize their role in oil and gas exploration, drilling,
completion and production engineering operations. Deformation as
a function of stress, elastic moduli, in situ stress, stress magnitude
and orientation, pore pressure, strength and fracture gradient, rock
characteristic from field data (seismic, logging, drilling, production),
integrated wellbore stability analysis, depletion and drilling induced
fractures, compaction and associated changes in rock properties,
hydraulic fracturing and fracture stability are among the topics to be
covered. Pre-requisites: EGGN320. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab, 3
semester hours.
PEGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PETROLEUM ENGINEERING. 1-6
Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
PEGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

134 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
Chemical and Biological
chemical unit operations. Our honors undergraduate research program
is open to highly qualified students and provides our undergraduates
Engineering
with the opportunity to carry out independent research or to join a
graduate research team. This program has been highly successful and
http://chemeng.mines.edu
our undergraduate chemical engineering and chemical and biochemical
Program Description
engineering students have won several national competitions and
awards based on research conducted while pursuing their baccalaureate
The Chemical and Biological Engineering Department
degrees. We also have a cooperative (Co-Op) education program in
(bulletin.mines.edu/undergraduate/programs/appliedscieng/
which students can earn course credit while gaining work experience in
chemicalandbiologicalengineering/http://chemeng.mines.edu) offers two
industry.
different degrees:
Programs leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemical
• Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering and
Engineering and to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemical and
• Bachelor of Science in Chemical and Biochemical Engineering.
Biochemical Engineering are both accredited by:
Generally, the fields of chemical and biochemical engineering are
The Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for
extremely broad, and encompass all technologies and industries
Engineering and Technology (ABET)
where chemical processing is utilized in any form. Students with
111 Market Place, Suite 1050
baccalaureate (BS) Chemical Engineering or Chemical and Biochemical
Baltimore, MD 21202-4012
Engineering degrees from CSM can find employment in many diverse
telephone (410) 347-7700
fields, including: advanced materials synthesis and processing, product
and process research and development, food and pharmaceutical
Program Educational Objectives (Bachelor
processing and synthesis, biochemical and biomedical materials and
of Science in Chemical Engineering and
products, microelectronics manufacturing, petroleum and petrochemical
processing, and process and product design. A student seeking the
Bachelor of Science in Chemical and
degree of BS in Chemical and Biochemical Engineering graduates as a
Biochemical Engineering)
fully-qualified Chemical Engineer with additional training in bioprocessing
In addition to contributing toward achieving the educational objectives
technologies that are of interest in renewable energy and other emerging
described in the CSM Graduate Profile and the ABET Accreditation
fields.
Criteria, the Chemical and Biological Engineering Department at CSM
The practice of chemical engineering draws from the fundamentals
has established 3 program educational objectives for all of its graduates
of biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics. Accordingly,
and one additional objective specifically for its chemical and biochemical
undergraduate students must initially complete a program of study
engineering graduates. Our graduates within 3 to 5 years of completing
that stresses these basic fields of science. Chemical engineering
their degree will:
coursework blends these four disciplines into a series of engineering
• be in graduate school or in the workforce utilizing their education in
fundamentals relating to how materials are produced and processed
chemical engineering fundamentals
both in the laboratory and in large industrial-scale facilities. Courses
such as fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, thermodynamics,
• be applying their knowledge of and skills in engineering fundamentals
reaction kinetics, and chemical process control are at the heart of the
in conventional areas of chemical engineering and in contemporary
chemical engineering curriculum at CSM. In addition, it is becoming
and growing fields
increasingly important for engineers to understand how biological and
• have demonstrated both their commitment to continuing to develop
microscopic, molecular-level properties can influence the macroscopic
personally and professionally and an appreciation for the ethical and
behavior of materials, biological, and chemical systems. This somewhat
social responsibilities associated with being an engineer and a world
unique focus is first introduced at CSM through the physical and organic
citizen
chemistry sequences, and the theme is continued and developed within
Additionally, our Chemical and Biochemical Engineering graduates within
the chemical engineering curriculum via material and projects introduced
3 to 5 years of completing their degree will be applying their knowledge of
in advanced courses. Our undergraduate program at CSM is exemplified
and skills in biochemical engineering fundamentals.
by intensive integration of computer-aided simulation and computer-
aided process modeling in the curriculum and by our unique approach to
Combined Baccalaureate/Masters Degree
teaching of the unit operations laboratory sequence. The unit operations
Program
lab course is offered only in the summer as a 6-week intensive session.
Here, the fundamentals of heat, mass, and momentum transfer and
The Chemical and Biological Engineering Department offers the
applied thermodynamics are reviewed in a practical, applications-
opportunity to begin work on a Master of Science (with or without
oriented setting. The important skills of teamwork, critical thinking, time
thesis) degree while completing the requirements of the BS degree.
management, and oral and written technical communications skills are
These combined BS/MS degrees are designed to allow undergraduates
also stressed in this course.
engaged in research, or simply interested in furthering their studies
beyond a BS degree, to apply their experience and interest to an
Facilities for the study of chemical engineering or chemical and
advanced degree. Students may take graduate courses while completing
biochemical engineering at the Colorado School of Mines are among the
their undergraduate degrees and count them towards their graduate
best in the nation. Our modern in-house computer laboratory supports
degree. The requirements for the MS degree consist of the four core
nearly 60 workstations for students to use in completing their assigned
graduate courses:
coursework. In addition, specialized undergraduate laboratory facilities
exist for studying polymer properties, measuring reaction kinetics,
characterizing transport phenomena, and for studying several typical

Colorado School of Mines 135
CHEN509
ADVANCED CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
3
C. Elective Tracks
THERMODYNAMICS
Whereas Chemical and Biochemical Engineering majors have specific
CHEN516
TRANSPORT PHENOMENA
3
additional required courses to give them the biochemical engineering
CHEN518
REACTION KINETICS AND CATALYSIS
3
training they need, Chemical Engineering majors have technical electives
CHEN568
INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
3
credit requirements that may be fulfilled with several different courses.
RESEARCH
Students may elect to structure their electives into:
Additional credits
18.0
Formal Minor program of study
18.0
Total Hours
30.0
Area of Special Interest
12.0
It is expected that a student would be able to complete both degrees in 5
Specialty Track
9.0
to 5 1/2 years. To take advantage of the combined program, students are
Minors and ASIs can be developed by the student in a variety of different
encouraged to engage in research and take some graduate coursework
areas and programs as approved by the student’s advisor and the heads
during their senior year. The application process and requirements
of the relevant sponsoring academic programs. Some examples of
are identical to our normal MS degree programs. Applications may be
Specialty Tracks for Chemical Engineering majors include:
completed online and require 3 letters of recommendation, a statement
of purpose, and completion of the graduate record exam (GRE). For
• Microelectronics
students who intend to begin the BS/MS program in Fall, applications are
• Bioengineering and Life Sciences
due by April 1st. The deadline is November 1st for students intending to
• Polymers and Materials
enroll in the Spring semester. Students must have a GPA greater than
• Molecular Modeling
3.0 to be considered for the program. Interested students are encouraged
• Environmental
to get more information from their advisor and/or the current faculty
member in charge of Graduate Affairs.
• Energy
• Business and Economics
Curriculum
Details on recommended courses for Specialty Tracks can be obtained
The chemical engineering and chemical and biochemical engineering
from the student’s academic advisor. Alternatively, students may opt to
curricula are structured according to the goals outlined above.
take an assorted combination of approved courses on diverse topics to
Accordingly, the programs of study are organized to include 3 semesters
fulfill their technical electives credits.
of science and general engineering fundamentals followed by 5
semesters of chemical/biochemical engineering fundamentals and
Requirements (Chemical Engineering)
applications. An optional ‘track’ system exists, which allows students
majoring in chemical engineering to structure their electives credits into
Freshman
one of several specialty application areas. Courses may be categorized
lec
lab
sem.hrs
according to the following general system.
Common Core*
33.0
A. Chemical/Chemical and Biochemical
33.0
Engineering Fundamentals
Sophomore
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
The following courses represent the basic knowledge component of the
chemical engineering curriculum at CSM.
MATH213
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4.0
4
AND ENGINEERS III
CHEN201
MATERIAL AND ENERGY BALANCES
3.0
PHGN200
PHYSICS II-
3.5
3.0
4.5
CHEN307
FLUID MECHANICS
3.0
ELECTROMAGNETISM AND
CHEN308
HEAT TRANSFER
3.0
OPTICS
CHEN357
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS 3.0
DCGN210
INTRO TO ENG
3.0
3
CHEN375
MASS TRANSFER
3.0
THERMODYNAMICS
CHEN430
TRANSPORT PHENOMENA
3.0
CHGN221
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I
3.0
3
CHGN223
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I
3.0
1
B. Chemical/Chemical and Biochemical
LABORATORY
Engineering Applications
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
The following courses are applications-oriented courses that build on the
16.0
student’s basic knowledge of science and engineering fundamentals:
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
CHEN312
UNIT OPERATIONS LABORATORY
3.0
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3.0
3
CHEN418
KINETICS AND REACTION ENGINEERING
3.0
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3.0
3
CHEN403
PROCESS DYNAMICS AND CONTROL
3.0
CHEN201
MATERIAL AND ENERGY
3.0
3
BALANCES
CHEN402
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN
3.0
CHEN202
CHEMICAL PROCESS
1.0
1
CHEN460
BIOCHEMICAL PROCESS ENGINEERING
3.0
PRINCIPLES LABORATORY
Chemical Engineering Technical Electives
CHGN222
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II
3.0
3

136 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
EPIC266
EPICS II: CHEMICAL
3.0
3
*
Chemical Engineering students take the common core with
PROCESSES**
Biological and Environmental Systems (BELS101) rather than Earth
and Environmental Systems (SYGN101).
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
**
Certain other EPIC2xx courses can be substituted for EPIC266 with
16.5
approval of the department head or assistant department head.
Junior
*** Six of the electives credits must be CHEN courses, at least 3 of
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
which must be at the 400 level.
CHGN351
PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A
3.0
3.0
4
**** An additional 3 of the electives credits must be either CHGN or
MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVE I
CHEN credits.
CHEN307
FLUID MECHANICS
3.0
3
CHEN357
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
3.0
3
Requirements (Chemical and Biochemical
THERMODYNAMICS
Engineering)
SYGN200
HUMAN SYSTEMS
3.0
3
Freshman
CHEN
Chemical Engineering
3.0
3.0
lec
lab
sem.hrs
ELECT
Elective***
Common Core*
33.0
16.0
33.0
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Sophomore
CHEN358
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
3.0
1
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
THERMODYNAMICS
MATH213
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4.0
4
LABORATORY
AND ENGINEERS III
CHEN375
MASS TRANSFER
3.0
3
PHGN200
PHYSICS II-
3.5
3.0
4.5
CHEN308
HEAT TRANSFER
3.0
3
ELECTROMAGNETISM AND
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective I
3.0
3.0
OPTICS
CHEN
400-LEVEL Chemical
3.0
3.0
DCGN210
INTRO TO ENG
3.0
3
ELECT
Engineering Elective(s)***
THERMODYNAMICS
CHGN/
Chemistry or Chemical
3.0
3.0
CHGN221
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I
3.0
3
CHEN
Engineering Elective****
CHGN223
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I
3.0
1
ELECT
LABORATORY
16.0
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
Summer
lec
lab
sem.hrs
16.0
CHEN312/313UNIT OPERATIONS
6.0
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
LABORATORY
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3.0
3
6.0
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3.0
3
Senior
CHEN201
MATERIAL AND ENERGY
3.0
3
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
BALANCES
CHEN418
KINETICS AND REACTION
3.0
3
CHEN202
CHEMICAL PROCESS
1.0
1
ENGINEERING
PRINCIPLES LABORATORY
CHEN430
TRANSPORT PHENOMENA
3.0
3
CHGN222
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II
3.0
3
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective II
3.0
3.0
EPIC265
EPIC II: BIOCHEMICAL
3.0
3
FREE
FREE ELECTIVE***
7.0
7.0
PROCESSES
16.0
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
16.5
CHEN402
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
3.0
3
Junior
DESIGN
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
CHEN403
PROCESS DYNAMICS AND
3.0
3
CHGN351
PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A
3.0
3.0
4
CONTROL
MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVE I
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective III
3.0
3.0
CHEN307
FLUID MECHANICS
3.0
3
CHEN421
ENGINEERING ECONOMICS
3.0
3
CHEN357
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
3.0
3
FREE
THERMODYNAMICS
FREE ELECTIVE***
3.0
3.0
ELECT
SYGN200
HUMAN SYSTEMS
3.0
3
15.0
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
Total Hours: 134.5
16.0
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
CHGN428
BIOCHEMISTRY
3.0
3

Colorado School of Mines 137
CHEN358
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
3.0
1
Courses
THERMODYNAMICS
BELS101. BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS. 4.0
LABORATORY
Hours.
CHEN375
MASS TRANSFER
3.0
3
(I,II) This course presents the basic principles and properties of biological
CHEN308
HEAT TRANSFER
3.0
3
and environmental systems. It considers the chemistry of life and the
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective I
3.0
3.0
structure and function of cells and organisms. Concepts related to
CHGN462
MICROBIOLOGY AND THE
3.0
3
physiology, energetics, and genetics are introduced. The fundamentals
ENVIRONMENT
of environmental science are presented and we consider how organisms
interact with each other and with their environment
16.0
and discuss the possibilities and problems of these interactions. Basic
Summer
lec
lab
sem.hrs
engineering principles of thermodynamics, kinetics, mass balance,
CHEN312/313UNIT OPERATIONS
6.0
transport phenomena and material science are presented and applied to
LABORATORY
biological systems. 4 semester hours.
6.0
BELS198. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
Senior
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
CHEN418
KINETICS AND REACTION
3.0
3
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
ENGINEERING
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
CHEN430
TRANSPORT PHENOMENA
3.0
3
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective II
3.0
3.0
BELS301. GENERAL BIOLOGY I. 3.0 Hours.
(I, II) This is the first semester of an introductory course in Biology.
CHEN460
BIOCHEMICAL PROCESS
3.0
3
Emphasis is
ENGINEERING
placed on the methods of science; structural, molecular, and energetic
CHEN461
BIOCHEMICAL PROCESS
3.0
1
basis of cellular activities; genetic variability and evolution; diversity
ENGINEERING LABORATORY
and life processes in plants and animals; and, principles of ecology.
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
Prerequisite: None. 3 hours lecture;
16.0
3 hours semester hours.
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
BELS303. GENERAL BIOLOGY II. 3.0 Hours.
CHEN402
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
3.0
3
(I, II) This is the continuation of General Biology I. Emphasis is placed
DESIGN
on an examination of organisms as the products of evolution. The
CHEN403
PROCESS DYNAMICS AND
3.0
3
diversity of life forms will be explored. Special attention will be given to
CONTROL
the vertebrate body (organs, tissues, and systems) and how it functions.
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective III
3.0
3.0
Prerequisite: General Biology I, or
CHEN421
ENGINEERING ECONOMICS
3.0
3
equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
BELS311. GENERAL BIOLOGY I LABORATORY. 1.0 Hour.
15.0
(I, II) This Course provides students with laboratory exer cises that
Total Hours: 134.5
complement lectures given in BELS301, the first semester introductory
course in Biology. Emphasis is placed on the methods of science;
*
Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Students take the common
structural, molecular, and energetic
core with Biological and Environmental Systems (BELS101) rather
basis of cellular activities; genetic variability and evolution; diversity
than Earth and Environmental Systems (SYGN101).
and life processes in plants and animals; and, principles of ecology.
Co-requisite or Prerequisite: EGGN/BELS301 or equivalent. 3 hours
General CSM Minor/ASI requirements can be found here.
laboratory; 1 semester
hour.
BELS313. GENERAL BIOLOGY II LABORATORY. 1.0 Hour.
(I, II) This Course provides students with laboratory exercises that
complement lectures given in BELS303, the second semester
introductory course in Biology. Emphasis is placed on an examination of
organisms as the products of evolution. The diversity of life forms will be
explored. Special attention will be given to the vertebrate body (organs,
tissues and systems) and how it functions. Co-requisite or Prerequisite:
BELS303 or equivalent. 3 hours laboratory; 1 semester hour.

138 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
BELS320. INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS. 3.0 Hours.
BELS399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
A general introduction to ethics that explores its analytic and historical
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
traditions. Reference will commonly be made to one or more significant
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
texts by such moral philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Thomas
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
Aquinas, Kant, John Stuart
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
Mill, and others. Prerequisite or corequisite: SYGN200. 3 hours lecture/
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
discussion; 3 semester hours.
BELS402. CELL BIOLOGY AND PHYSI OLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
BELS321. INTRO TO GENETICS. 4.0 Hours.
(II) An introduction to the morphological, biochemical, and biophysical
(II) A study of the mechanisms by which biological information is
properties of cells and their significance in the life processes.
encoded, stored,
Prerequisite: General Biology I, or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
and transmitted, including Mendelian genetics, molecular genetics,
hours.
chromosome structure and rearrangement, cytogenetics, and population
genetics. Prerequisite: General biology I or equivalent. 3 hours lecture + 3
BELS404. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
hours laboratory; 4 semester
(II) This course will cover the basics of human anatomy and physiology of
hours.
the
cardiovascular system and blood, the immune system, the respiratory
BELS325. INTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 3.0
system, the
Hours.
digestive system, the endocrine system, the urinary system and the
(I) The application of mechanical engineering principles and techniques
reproductive
to the human body presents many unique challenges. The discipline of
system. We will discuss the gross and microscopic anatomy and the
Biomedical Engineering (more specifically, Biomechanical Engineering)
physiology of
has evolved over the past 50 years to address these challenges.
these major systems. Where possible, we will integrate discussions of
Biomechanical Engineering includes such areas as biomechanics,
disease
biomaterials, bioinstrumentation, medical imaging, and rehabilitation.
processes and introduce biomedical engineering concepts and problems.
This course is intended to provide an introduction to, and overview
Prerequisite: General Biology I or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
of, Biomechanical Engineering and to prepare the student for more
semester hours.
advanced Biomechanical coursework. At the end of the semester,
students should have a working knowledge of the special considerations
BELS405. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY LAB. 1.0 Hour.
necessary to apply various mechanical engineering principles to the
(II) In this course we explore the basic concepts of human anatomy
human body. Prerequisites: EGGN320, PHGN200. Co-requisites:
and physiology using simulations of the physiology and a virtual human
EGGN315. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
dissector program. These are supplemented as needed with animations,
pictures and movies of cadaver dissection to provide the student with
BELS333. INTRODUCTION TO BIOPHYSICS. 3.0 Hours.
a practical experience discovering principles and structures associated
This course is designed to show the application of physics to biology. It
with the anatomy and physiology. Corequisite: BELS404. 3 lab hours, 1
will assess the relationships between sequence structure and function
semester hour.
in complex biological networks and the interfaces between physics,
chemistry, biology and medicine.
BELS406. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY: BONE, MUSCLE, AND
Topics include: biological membranes, biological mechanics and
BRAIN. 3.0 Hours.
movement, neural networks, medical imaging basics including
(I) This course will cover the basics of human anatomy and physiology
optical methods, MRI, isotopic tracers and CT, biomagnetism and
of the tissues, skeletal system, muscular system, central nervous
pharmacokinetics. Prerequisites: PHGN200 and BELS301, or permission
system and peripheral nervous system. We will discuss the gross and
of the instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
microscopic anatomy and the physiology of these major systems.
Where possible, we will integrate discussions of disease processes and
BELS350. HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1-3 Hour.
introduce biomedical engineering concepts and problems. Prerequisite:
Scholarly research of an independent nature. Prerequisite: junior
General Biology I or consent of instructor. 3 hour lecture; 3 semester
standing, consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
hours.
BELS351. HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1-3 Hour.
BELS407. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY: BONE, MUSCLE, AND
Scholarly research of an independent nature. Prerequisite: junior
BRAIN LABORATORY. 1.0 Hour.
standing, consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
(I) In this course we explore the basic concepts of human anatomy and
physiology of the tissue types, skeletal system, muscular system, and
BELS398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOENGINEERING AND LIFE
nervous system using anatomical models and medical tissue microscope
SCIENCES. 1-6 Hour.
slides. These are supplemented as needed with pictures, chalk talks,
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
handouts, ultrasound for muscle and skeleton, and EEG recording of
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
brain waves to provide the student with a practical experience discovering
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
principles and structures associated with the anatomy and physiology
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
and to reinforce the material from the lecture course. Prerequisite:
General Biology 1 [BELS301] or approval of the instructor. Co-requisites:
must either have taken or currently taking Anatomy and Physiology BMB
[BELS406]. 3 hour lab; 1 semester hour.

Colorado School of Mines 139
BELS415. POLYMER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
BELS450. HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1-3 Hour.
Chemistry and thermodynamics of polymers and polymer solutions.
Scholarly research of an independent nature. Prerequisite: senior
Reaction engineering of polymerization. Characterization techniques
standing, consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
based on solution properties. Materials science of polymers in varying
physical states. Processing
BELS451. HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1-3 Hour.
operations for polymeric materials and use in separations. Prerequisite:
Scholarly research of an independent nature. Prerequisite: senior
CHGN211, MATH225, ChEN357, or consent of instructor. 3 hours
standing, consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
BELS453. WASTEWATER ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
BELS425. MUSCULOSKELETAL BIOMECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.
(I) The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the fundamental
(II) This course is intended to provide mechanical engineering students
phenomena involved in wastewater treatment processes (theory) and
with a second course in musculoskeletal biomechanics. At the end of the
the engineering approaches used in designing such processes (design).
semester, students should have in-depth knowledge and understanding
This course will focus on the physical, chemical and biological processes
necessary to apply mechanical engineering principles such as statics,
applied to liquid wastes of municipal origin. Treatment objectives will be
dynamics, and mechanics of materials to the human body. The course
discussed as the driving force for wastewater treatment. Prerequisite:
will focus on the biomechanics of injury since understanding injury
ESGN353 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
will require developing an understanding of normal biomechanics.
BELS454. APPLIED BIOINFORMATICS. 3.0 Hours.
Prerequisite: EGGN315, EGGN320, EGGN325/BELS325, or instructor
(II) In this course we will discuss the concepts and tools of bioinformatics.
permission. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
The molecular biology of genomics and proteomics will be presented
BELS428. COMPUTATIONAL BIOMECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.
and the techniques for collecting, storing, retrieving and processing
(I) Computational Biomechanics provides and introduction to the
such data will be discussed. Topics include analyzing DNA, RNA and
application of computer simulation to solve some fundamental problems
protein sequences, gene recognition, gene expression, protein structure
in biomechanics and bioengineering. Musculoskeletal mechanics,
prediction, modeling evolution, utilizing BLAST and other online tools
medical image reconstruction, hard and soft tissue modeling, joint
for the exploration of genome, proteome and other available databases.
mechanics, and inter-subjectvariability will be considered. An emphasis
In parallel, there will be an introduction to the PERL programming
will be placed on understanding the limitations of the computer model as
language. Practical applications to biological research and disease will be
a predictive tool and the need for rigorous verification and validation of
presented and students given opportunities to use the tools discussed.
computational techniques. Clinical application of biomechanical modeling
Prerequisites: General Biology BELS301 or Senior/Graduate standing. 3
tools is highlighted and impact on patient quality of life is demonstrated.
hour lecture; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisites: EGGN413 Computer Aided Engineering, EGGN325/
BELS470. INTRODUCTION TO MICROFLUIDICS. 3.0 Hours.
BELS325 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering. 3 hours lecture; 3
This course introduces the basic principles and applications of
semester hours.
microfluidic systems. Concepts related to microscale fluid mechanics,
BELS431. IMMUNOLOGY FOR ENGINEERS AND SCIENTISTS. 3.0
transport, physics, and biology
Hours.
are presented. To gain familiarity with small-scale systems, students
(II) This course introduces the basic concepts of immunology and
are provided with the opportunity to design, fabricate, and test a simple
their applications in engineering and science. We will discuss the
microfluidic device. Prerequisites: CHEN307 (or equivalent) and
molecular, biochemical and cellular aspects of the immune system
DCGN210 (or equivalent) or permission of instructor. 3 semester hours.
including structure and function of the innate and acquired immune
BELS498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOENGINEERING AND LIFE
systems. Building on this, we will discuss the immune response to
SCIENCES. 1-6 Hour.
infectious agents and the material science of introduced implants and
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
materials such as heart valves, artificial joints, organ transplants and
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
lenses. We will also discuss the role of the immune system in cancer,
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
allergies, immune deficiencies, vaccination and other applications such
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
as immunoassay and flow cytometry.Prerequisites: General Biology
BELS301 or equivalent. 3 Lecture hours, 3 semester hours.
BELS499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
BELS432. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS.
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
3.0 Hours.
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
The goal of this course is to develop and analyze models
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
of biological transport and reaction processes. We will apply the
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
principles of
mass, momentum, and energy conservation to describe mechanisms of
CHEN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 0.5-6 Hour.
physiology and pathology. We will explore the applications of transport
Individual research or special problem projects. Topics, content, and
phenomena in the design of drug delivery systems, engineered tissues,
credit hours to be agreed upon by student and supervising faculty
and
member. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and department head,
biomedical diagnostics with an emphasis on the barriers to molecular
submission of “Independent Study” form to CSM Registrar. 1 to 6
transport
semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
in cardiovascular disease and cancer. Prerequisites: CHEN430 or
equivalent. 3 lecture hours, 3 credit hours.

140 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
CHEN200. COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN CHEMICAL
CHEN312. UNIT OPERATIONS LABORATORY. 3.0 Hours.
ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
Summer (WI) Unit Operations Laboratory. This course covers principles
Fundamentals of computer programming as applied to the solution
of
of chemical engineering problems. Introduction to Visual Basic,
mass, energy, and momentum transport as applied to laboratory-scale
computational methods and algorithm development. Prerequisite:
processing
MATH112 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
equipment. Written and oral communications skills, teamwork, and critical
hours.
thinking
are emphasized. 6 hours lab, 6 semester hours. Prerequisites: CHEN201,
CHEN201. MATERIAL AND ENERGY BALANCES. 3.0 Hours.
CHEN202, CHEN307, CHEN308, CHEN357, CHEN375, EPIC265 or
(II) Introduction to the formulation and solution of material and energy
equivalent.
balances on chemical processes. Establishes the engineering approach
to problem solving, the relations between known and unknown process
CHEN313. UNIT OPERATIONS LABORATORY. 3.0 Hours.
variables, and appropriate computational methods. Corequisites:
Summer (WI) Unit Operations Laboratory. This course covers principles
DCGN210 (or equivalent); CHEN202, MATH213, MATH225, or consent
of
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
mass, energy, and momentum transport as applied to laboratory-scale
processing
CHEN202. CHEMICAL PROCESS PRINCIPLES LABORATORY. 1.0
equipment. Written and oral communications skills, teamwork, and critical
Hour.
thinking
(II) Laboratory measurements demonstrating the first and second
are emphasized. 6 hours lab, 6 semester hours. Prerequisites: CHEN201,
laws of thermodynamics, calculation and analysis of experimental results,
CHEN202, CHEN307, CHEN308, CHEN357, CHEN375, EPIC265 or
and
equivalent.
professional report writing. Introduction to computer-aided process
simulation.
CHEN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION. 1-3 Hour.
Corequisites: CHEN201. 3 hours laboratory; 1 credit hour.
Cooperative work/education experience involving employment of a
chemical engineering nature in an internship spanning at least one
CHEN250. INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL ENGINEERING ANALYSIS
academic semester. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester
AND DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.
hours. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 hours.
Introduction to chemical process industries and how analysis and design
concepts guide the development of new processes and products. Use
CHEN350. HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1-3 Hour.
of simple mathematical models to describe the performance of common
Scholarly research of an independent nature. Prerequisite: Junior
process building blocks including pumps, heat exchangers, chemical
standing, consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
reactors, and separators. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in DCGN
210 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CHEN351. HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1-3 Hour.
Scholarly research of an independent nature. Prerequisite: junior
CHEN298. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
standing, consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
Topical courses in chemical engineering of special interest. Prerequisite:
consent of instructor; 1 to 6 semester hours. Repeatable for credit under
CHEN357. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS. 3.0
different titles.
Hours.
(I) Introduction to non-ideal behavior in thermodynamic systems and
CHEN307. FLUID MECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.
their applications. Phase and reaction equilibria are emphasized.
(I) This course covers theory and application of momentum transfer
Relevant aspects of computer-aided process simulation are incorporated.
and fluid flow. Fundamentals of microscopic phenomena and application
Prerequisites: DCGN210 (or equivalent), MATH225, grade of C- or better
to
in CHEN201. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
macroscopic systems are addressed. Course work also includes
computational fluid
CHEN358. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS
dynamics. Prerequisites: MATH225, grade of C- or better in CHEN201. 3
LABORATORY. 1.0 Hour.
hours
(II) This course includes an introduction to process modeling as well
lecture; 3 semester hours.
as hands-on laboratory measurements of physical data. Methods and
concepts explored include calculation and analysis of physical properties,
CHEN308. HEAT TRANSFER. 3.0 Hours.
phase equilibria, and reaction equilibria and the application of these
(II) This course covers theory and applications of energy transfer:
concepts in chemical engineering. Prerequisite: CHEN202. Corequisite:
conduction, convection, and radiation. Fundamentals of microscopic
CHEN357. 3 hours laboratory; 1 semester hour.
phenomena and their application to macroscopic systems are addressed.
Course work also includes application of relevant numerical methods to
CHEN368. INTRODUCTION TO UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1.0
solve heat transfer problems. Prerequisites: MATH225, grade of C- or
Hour.
better in CHEN307. 3 hours lecture; 3
(I, II) Introduction to Undergraduate Research. This course introduces
semester hours.
research methods and provides a survey of the various fields in which
CBE faculty conduct research. Topics such as how to conduct literature
searches, critically reading and analyzing research articles, ethics, lab
safety, and how to write papers are addressed. Prerequisites: None. 1
hour lecture; 1 semester hour.

Colorado School of Mines 141
CHEN375. MASS TRANSFER. 3.0 Hours.
CHEN415. POLYMER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
(II) This course covers fundamentals of stage-wise and diffusional
Chemistry and thermodynamics of polymers and polymer solu tions.
mass transport with applications to chemical engineering systems and
Reaction engineering of polymerization. Characterization techniques
processes. Relevant aspects of computer-aided process simulation and
based on solution properties. Materials science of polymers in varying
computational methods are incorporated. Prerequisites: grade of C- or
physical states. Processing operations for polymeric materials and use in
better in CHEN357. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
separations. Prerequisite: CHGN221, MATH225, ChEN357, or consent of
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CHEN398. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
Topical courses in chemical engineering of special interest. Prerequisite:
CHEN416. POLYMER ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
consent of instructor; 1 to 6 semester hours. Repeatable for credit under
Polymer fluid mechanics, polymer rheological response, and polymer
different titles.
shape forming. Definition and measure ment of material properties.
Interrelationships between response functions and correlation of data
CHEN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
and material response. Theoretical approaches for prediction of polymer
Individual research or special problem projects. Topics, content, and
properties. Processing operations for polymeric materials; melt and flow
credit hours to be agreed upon by student and supervising faculty
instabilities. Prerequisite: ChEN307, MATH225, or consent of instructor. 3
member. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and department head,
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
submission of “Independent Study” form to CSM Registrar. 1 to 6
semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
CHEN418. KINETICS AND REACTION ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
(I) (WI) This course emphasizes applications of the fundamentals of
CHEN401. INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL PROCESS DESIGN. 3.0
thermodynamics, physical chemistry, organic chemistry, and material
Hours.
and energy balances to the engineering of reactive processes. Key
(I) This course introduces skills and knowledge required to develop
topics include reactor design, acquisition and analysis of rate data,
conceptual designs of new processes and tools to analyze troubleshoot,
and heterogeneous catalysis. Computational methods as related to
and optimize existing processes. Prerequisites: ChEN201, ChEN308,
reactor and reaction modeling are incorporated. Prerequisites: CHEN308,
ChEN307, ChEN357, ChEN375 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture;
CHEN357, MATH225, CHGN221, CHGN353, or consent of instructor. 3
3 semester hours.
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CHEN402. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.
CHEN420. MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN CHEMICAL
(II) (WI) This course covers simulation, synthesis, analysis, evaluation,
ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
as well as costing and economic evaluation of chemical processes.
Formulation and solution of chemical engineering problems using
Computer-aided process simulation to plant and process design is
numerical solution methods within the Excel and MathCAD environments.
applied. 3 hours lecture; 3 Semester hours. Prerequisites: CHEN307,
Setup and numerical solution of ordinary and partial differential equations
CHEN308, CHEN357, CHEN375, CHEN418 (co-requisite), CHEN421
for typical chemical engineering systems and transport processes.
(co-requisite), or consent of instructor.
Prerequisite: MATH225, DCGN209 or DCGN210, ChEN307, ChEN357,
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CHEN403. PROCESS DYNAMICS AND CONTROL. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Mathematical modeling and analysis of transient systems.
CHEN421. ENGINEERING ECONOMICS. 3.0 Hours.
Applications of control theory to response of dynamic chemical
(II) Time value of money concepts of present worth, future worth,
engineering systems and processes. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
annual worth, rate of return and break-even analysis applied to after-
Prerequisites: CHEN201, CHEN307, CHEN308, CHEN375, MATH315 or
tax economic analysis of mineral, petroleum and general investments.
consent on instructor.
Related topics on proper handling of (1) inflation and escalation, (2)
leverage (borrowed money), (3) risk adjustment of analysis using
CHEN408. NATURAL GAS PROCESSING. 3.0 Hours.
expected value concepts, (4) mutually exclusive alternative analysis and
(II) Application of chemical engineering principles to the processing of
service producing alternatives. Prerequisite: EBGN201. 3 hours lecture; 3
natural gas. Emphasis on using thermodynamics and mass transfer
semester hours.
operations to analyze existing plants. Relevant aspects of computer-
aided process simulation. Prerequisites: CHGN221, ChEN201, ChEN307,
CHEN430. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA. 3.0 Hours.
ChEN308, ChEN357, ChEN375, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture,
(I) This course covers theory and applications of momentum, energy,
3 semester hours.
and mass transfer based on microscopic control volumes. Analytical and
numerical solution methods are employed in this course. Prerequisites:
CHEN409. PETROLEUM PROCESSES. 3.0 Hours.
CHEN307, CHEN308, CHEN357, CHEN375, MATH225. 3 hours lecture;
(I) Application of chemical engineering principles to petroleum refining.
3 semester hours.
Thermodynamics and reaction engineering of complex hydro carbon
systems. Relevant aspects of computer-aided process simulation for
complex mixtures. Prerequisite: CHGN221, ChEN201, ChEN357,
ChEN375, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

142 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
CHEN432. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS.
CHEN469. FUEL CELL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
3.0 Hours.
(I) Investigate fundamentals of fuel-cell operation and electrochemistry
The goal of this course is to develop and analyze models
from a chemical-thermodynamics and materials- science perspective.
of biological transport and reaction processes. We will apply the
Review types of fuel cells, fuel-processing requirements and approaches,
principles of
and fuel-cell system integration. Examine current topics in fuel-cell
mass, momentum, and energy conservation to describe mechanisms of
science and technology. Fabricate and test operational fuel cells in the
physiology and pathology. We will explore the applications of transport
Colorado Fuel Cell Center. Prerequisites: EGGN371 or ChEN357 or
phenomena in the design of drug delivery systems, engineered tissues,
MTGN351, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and
biomedical diagnostics with an emphasis on the barriers to molecular
CHEN470. INTRODUCTION TO MICROFLUIDICS. 3.0 Hours.
transport
(I) This course introduces the basic principles and applications of
in cardiovascular disease and cancer. Prerequisites: CHEN430 or
microfluidic systems. Concepts related to microscale fluid mechanics,
equivalent. 3 lecture hours, 3 credit hours.
transport, physics, and biology are presented. To gain familiarity with
small-scale systems, students are provided with the opportunity to
CHEN435. INTERDISCIPLINARY MICROELECTRONICS. 3.0 Hours.
design, fabricate, and test a simple microfluidic device. Prerequisites:
(II) Application of science and engineering principles to the design,
ChEN307 (or equivalent) and DCGN210 (or equivalent) or permission of
fabrication, and testing of microelectronic devices. Emphasis on
instructor. 3 semester hours. ChEN480.
specific unit operations and the interrelation among processing steps.
Prerequisites: Senior standing in PHGN, ChEN, MTGN, or EGGN.
CHEN472. INTRODUCTION TO ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES. 3.0 Hours.
Consent of instructor. Due to lab space the enrollment is limited to 20
(II) In this course the student will gain an understanding about energy
students. 1.5 hours lecture, 4 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
technologies including how they work, how they are quantitatively
evaluated, what they cost, and what is their benefit or impact on the
CHEN440. MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVES IN CHEMICAL
natural environment. There will be discussions about proposed energy
ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
systems and how they might become a part of the existing infrastructure.
Applications of statistical and quantum mechanics to understanding and
However, to truly understand the impact of proposed energy systems,
prediction of
the student must also have a grasp on the infrastructure of existing
equilibrium and transport properties and processes. Relations between
energy systems. Prerequisites: CHEN250 Intro to Chemical Engineering
microscopic properties of materials and systems to macroscopic
Anaysis & Design, CHEN357 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (or
behavior. Prerequisite: ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN357, ChEN375,
equivalent). 3 lecture hours, 3 credit hours.
CHGN351 and CHGN353, CHGN221 and CHGN222, MATH225, or
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CHEN480. NATURAL GAS HYDRATES. 3.0 Hours.
The purpose of this class is to learn about clathrate hydrates, using two
CHEN450. HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1-3 Hour.
of the instructor’s books, (1) Clathrate Hydrates of Natural Gases, Third
Scholarly research of an independent nature. Prerequisite: senior
Edition (2008) co-authored by C.A.Koh, and (2) Hydrate Engineering,
standing, consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
(2000). Using a basis of these books, and accompanying programs,
we have abundant resources to act as professionals who are always
CHEN451. HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1-3 Hour.
learning. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Scholarly research of an independent nature. Prerequisite: senior
standing, consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
CHEN497. SPECIAL SUMMER COURSE. 15.0 Hours.
CHEN460. BIOCHEMICAL PROCESS ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
CHEN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING. 1-6 Hour.
(I) The analysis and design of microbial reactions and biochemical unit
Topical courses in chemical engineering of special interest. Prerequisite:
operations, including processes used in conjunction with bioreactors,
consent of instructor; 1 to 6 semester hours. Repeatable for credit under
are investigated in this course. Industrial enzyme technologies are
different titles.
developed and explored. A strong focus is given to the basic processes
for producing fermentation products and biofuels. Biochemical systems
CHEN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
for organic oxidation and fermentation and inorganic oxidation and
Individual research or special problem projects. Topics, content, and
reduction are presented. Prerequisites: CHEN375, CHGN428, CHGN462
credit hours to be agreed upon by student and supervising faculty
or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
member. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and department head,
submission of “Independent Study” form to CSM Registrar. 1 to 6
CHEN461. BIOCHEMICAL PROCESS ENGINEERING LABORATORY.
semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
1.0 Hour.
(I) This course emphasizes bio-based product preparation, laboratory
measurement, and calculation and analysis of bioprocesses including
fermentation and bio-solids separations and their application to
biochemical engineering. Computer-aided process simulation is
incorporated. Prerequisites: CHEN375, CHGN428, CHGN462 or consent
of instructor. Co-requisite: CHEN460, 3 hours laboratory, 1 semester
hour.

Colorado School of Mines 143
DCGN210. INTRO TO ENG THERMODYNAMICS. 3.0 Hours.
(I, II) Introduction to the fundamental principles of classical engineering
thermodynamics.
Application of mass and energy balances to closed and open systems
including systems undergoing transient processes. Entropy generation
and the second law of thermodynamics for closed and open systems.
Introduction to phase equilibrium and chemical reaction equilibria. Ideal
solution behavior. Prerequisites: CHGN121, CHGN124, MATH111,
MATH112, PHGN100. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Students with
credit in DCGN209 may not also receive credit in DCGN210.

144 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
Chemistry and Geochemistry
• Impart mastery of chemistry fundamentals;
• Develop ability to apply chemistry fundamentals in solving open-ended
http://chemistry.mines.edu
problems;
Program Description
• Impart knowledge of and ability to use modern tools of chemical
analysis and synthesis;
Chemistry is the field of science associated with atoms and molecules.
• Develop ability to locate and use pertinent information from the
It focuses on the behavior and properties of matter, the reactions and
chemical literature;
transformations that dictate chemical processes, and the creation
• Develop ability to interpret and use experimental data for chemical
of new substances. Chemistry is the primary field that deals with
systems;
nanoscience and nanotechnology. It is often considered the central
• Develop ability to effectively communicate in both written and oral
science, linking the physical sciences with engineering, medicine, and
formats;
life sciences. The subject of chemistry is typically organized into more
focused subdisciplines, including organic chemistry, physical chemistry,
• Prepare students for entry to and success in professional careers;
inorganic chemistry, biochemistry, analytical chemistry, theoretical and
• Prepare students for entry to and success in graduate programs; and
computational chemistry, and materials chemistry. A degree in chemistry
• Prepare students for responsible contribution to society.
examines these topics to promote a fundamental understanding of the
world and an application toward technological problems. Professional
Curriculum
chemists apply their knowledge in many different areas ranging from
The B.S. chemistry curricula, in addition to the strong basis provided by
environmental processes to the development of new materials and
the common core, contain three components: chemistry fundamentals,
renewable energy. They work in academic environments, high-tech
laboratory and communication skills, and applications courses.
start-ups, and research and development laboratories associated with
practically every advanced technological field including medicine, energy,
Chemistry fundamentals
biotechnology, computing, and agriculture.
• Analytical chemistry - sampling, method selection, statistical data
The B.S. degree program in chemistry is approved by the American
analysis, error sources, theory of operation of analytical instruments
Chemical Society (ACS) and is designed to educate professionals for
(atomic and molecular spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, nuclear
the varied career opportunities this central scientific discipline affords.
magnetic resonance spectroscopy, chromatography and other
The curricula are therefore founded in rigorous fundamental science
separation methods, electroanalytical methods, and thermal methods),
complemented by application of these principles to the materials, energy,
calibration, standardization, stoichiometry of analysis, equilibrium and
minerals, or environmental fields. For example, specific curricular tracks
kinetic principles in analysis.
emphasizing environmental chemistry or biochemistry are offered along
• Inorganic chemistry - atomic structure and periodicity, crystal
with a more flexible chemistry track that can be tailored to optimize
lattice structure, molecular geometry and bonding (VSEPR, Lewis
preparation consistent with a student’s individual career goals. Those
structures, VB and MO theory, bond energies and lengths), metals
aspiring to enter Ph.D. programs in chemistry are encouraged to include
structure and properties, acid-base theories, main-group element
undergraduate research beyond the minimum required among their
chemistry, coordination chemistry, term symbols, ligand field theory,
elective hours. Others interested in industrial chemistry choose area
spectra and magnetism of complexes, organometallic chemistry, and
of special interest courses, for example in chemical engineering or
nanomaterials chemistry and design.
metallurgy. A significant number of students complete degrees in both
• Organic chemistry - bonding and structure, structure- physical property
chemistry and chemical engineering as an excellent preparation for
relationships, reactivity-structure relationships, reaction mechanisms
industrial careers.
(nucleophilic and electrophilic substitution, addition, elimination, radical
The instructional and research laboratories located in Coolbaugh Hall are
reactions, rearrangements, redox reactions, photochemical reactions,
state-of-the-art facilities with modern instrumentation for synthesis and
and metal-mediated reactions), chemical kinetics, catalysis, major
characterization of molecules and materials. Instrumentation includes:
classes of compounds and their reactions, and design of synthetic
gas chromatographs (GC), high-performance liquid chromatographs
pathways.
(HPLC), inductively-coupled-plasma-atomic emission spectrometers
• Physical chemistry - thermodynamics (energy, enthalpy, entropy,
(ICP-AES), field-flow fractionation (FFF) equipment, mass spectrometry
equilibrium constants, free energy, chemical potential, non-ideal
equipment (MS, GC/MS, GC/MS/MS, PY/MS, PY/GC/MS, SFC/MS,
systems, standard states, activity, phase rule, phase equilibria,
MALDI-TOF), 400 MHz and 500 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance
phase diagrams), electrochemistry, kinetic theory (Maxwell-
spectrometers (NMR), infrared spectrometers (FTIR), ultraviolet-visible
Boltzmann distribution, collision frequency, effusion, heat capacity,
(UV) spectrometers, thermogravimetric analyzers (TGA), differential
equipartition of energy), kinetics (microscopic reversibility, relaxation
scanning calorimeters (DSC), and others including equipment for
processes, mechanisms and rate laws, collision and absolute
microscopy, light scattering, and elemental analysis. In addition,
rate theories), quantum mechanics (Schroedinger equations,
the campus provides access to the CSM 2,144 core 23 teraflop
operators and matrix elements, particle-in-a-box, simple harmonic
supercomputer for computational research.
oscillator, rigid rotor, angular momentum, hydrogen atom, hydrogen
wave functions, spin, Pauli principle, LCAO method, MO theory,
bonding), spectroscopy (dipole selection rules, rotational spectra,
Program Educational Objectives (Bachelor of
term symbols, atomic and molecular electronic spectra, magnetic
Science in Chemistry)
spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, multiphoton selection rules,
In addition to contributing toward achieving the educational objectives
lasers), statistical thermodynamics (ensembles, partition functions,
described in the CSM Graduate Profile and the ABET Accreditation
Criteria, the B.S. curricula in chemistry are designed to:

Colorado School of Mines 145
Einstein crystals, Debye crystals), group theory, surface chemistry,
CHGN222
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II
3.0
3
X-ray crystallography, electron diffraction, dielectric constants, dipole
CHGN224
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II
3.0
1
moments, and elements of computational chemistry.
LABORATORY
Laboratory and communication skills
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3.0
3
CHGN335
INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS
3.0
3
• Analytical methods - gravimetry, titrimetry, sample dissolution,
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
quantitative spectroscopy, GC, HPLC, GC/MS, potentiometry, NMR,
AA, ICP-AES
16.5
• Synthesis techniques - batch reactor assembly, inert-atmosphere
Junior
manipulations, vacuum line methods, high-temperature methods, high-
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
pressure methods, distillation, recrystallization, extraction, sublimation,
CHGN336
ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY
3.0
3
chromatographic purification, product identification
CHGN337
ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY
3.0
1
• Physical measurements - refractometry, viscometry, colligative
LABORATORY
properties, FTIR, NMR
CHGN341
DESCRIPTIVE INORGANIC
3.0
3
• Information retrieval - Chemical Abstracts online searching, CA
CHEMISTRY
registry numbers, Beilstein, Gmelin, handbooks, organic syntheses,
CHGN351
PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A
3.0
3.0
4
organic reactions, inorganic syntheses, primary sources, ACS Style
MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVE I
Guide
CHGN395
INTRODUCTION TO
3.0
1
• Reporting - lab notebook, experiment and research reports, technical
UNDERGRADUATE
oral reports
RESEARCH
• Communication - scientific reviews, seminar presentations, publication
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective I
3.0
3.0
of research results
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
Applications
18.0
• Elective courses - application of chemistry fundamentals in chemistry
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
elective courses or courses in another discipline; e.g. chemical
CHGN353
PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A
3.0
3.0
4
engineering, environmental science, materials science
MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVE
• Internship - summer or semester experience in an industrial or
II
governmental organization working on real-world problems
CHGN323
QUALITATIVE ORGANIC
1.0
3.0
2
• Undergraduate research - open-ended problem solving in the context
ANALYSIS AND APPLIED
of a research project
SPECTROSCOPY
CHGN428
BIOCHEMISTRY
3.0
3
Students are strongly encouraged to go to http://
TECH
chemistry.mines.edu for the most up-to-date curriculum flowcharts
Technical Elective*
3.0
3.0
ELECT
and degree requirements.
TECH
Technical Elective*
3.0
3.0
Degree Requirements (Chemistry Track)
ELECT
Freshman
15.0
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Summer
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Common Core
33.0
CHGN490
SYNTHESIS AND
18.0
6
CHARACTERIZATION
33.0
6.0
Sophomore
Senior
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
MATH213
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4.0
4
AND ENGINEERS III
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective II
3.0
3.0
PHGN200
PHYSICS II-
2.0
4.0
4.5
CHGN
Chemistry Elective**
3.0
ELECTROMAGNETISM AND
ELECT
OPTICS
TECH
Technical Elective*
3.0
3.0
DCGN209
DIST CORE THERMO
3.0
3
ELECT
CHGN221
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I
3.0
3
TECH
Technical Elective*
3.0
3.0
ELECT
CHGN223
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I
3.0
1
LABORATORY
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
15.0
16.0
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective III
3.0
3.0
SYGN200
HUMAN SYSTEMS
3.0
3
CHGN401
THEORETICAL INORGANIC
3.0
3
CHEMISTRY
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3.0
3

146 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
CHGN
Chemistry Elective**
2.0
PHGN200
PHYSICS II-
2.0
4.0
4.5
ELECT
ELECTROMAGNETISM AND
TECH
OPTICS
Technical Elective*
3.0
3.0
ELECT
DCGN209
DIST CORE THERMO
3.0
3
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
CHGN221
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I
3.0
3
14.0
CHGN223
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I
3.0
1
Total Hours: 133.5
LABORATORY
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
* Technical Electives are courses in any technical field. Examples of
16.0
possible electives that will be recommended to students are:
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
SYGN203
NATURAL & ENGINEERED ENVIR SYS
3.0
SYGN200
HUMAN SYSTEMS
3.0
3
PHGN300
PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS I
3.0
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3.0
3
EBGN305
FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING
3.0
CHGN222
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II
3.0
3
EBGN306
MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING
3.0
CHGN224
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II
3.0
1
EBGN310
ENVIRONMENTAL AND RESOURCE
3.0
LABORATORY
ECONOMICS
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3.0
3
BELS301/
GENERAL BIOLOGY I
3.0
CHGN335
INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS
3.0
3
ESGN353
FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL
3.0
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING I
16.5
GEGN206
EARTH MATERIALS
3.0
Junior
MATH323
PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS FOR
3.0
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
ENGINEERS
CHGN336
ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY
3.0
3
MATH332
LINEAR ALGEBRA
3.0
CHGN337
ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY
3.0
1.0
1
MNGN210
INTRODUCTORY MINING
3.0
LABORATORY
MTGN311
STRUCTURE OF MATERIALS
4.0
CHGN341
DESCRIPTIVE INORGANIC
3.0
3
PEGN102
INTRODUCTION TO PETROLEUM INDUSTRY
3.0
CHEMISTRY
PHGN419
PRINCIPLES OF SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS
3.0
CHGN351
PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A
3.0
3.0
4
CHGN430
INTRODUCTION TO POLYMER SCIENCE
3.0
MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVE I
CHGN462
MICROBIOLOGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
3.0
CHGN395
INTRODUCTION TO
3.0
1.0
1
** Chemistry Electives are non-required courses taught within the
UNDERGRADUATE
Chemistry Department. In addition, graduate level Chemistry and
RESEARCH
Geochemistry courses taught within the Department are acceptable.
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective I
3.0
3.0
CHEV
CHGN495 SENIOR UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH is taught as a
Environmental Elective**
3.0
3.0
ELECT
possible chemistry elective. Those aspiring to enter Ph.D. programs in
Chemistry or related fields are encouraged to include undergraduate
18.0
research in their curricula. The objective of CHGN495 is that students
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
successfully perform an open-ended research project under the direction
CHGN353
PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A
3.0
3.0
4
of a CSM faculty member. Students must demonstrate through the
MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVE
preparation of a proposal, prepared in consultation with the potential
II
faculty research advisor and the CHGN495 instructor, that they qualify for
CHGN323
QUALITATIVE ORGANIC
1.0
3.0
2
enrollment in CHGN495. Up to 5 credit hours of CHGN495 can be taken.
ANALYSIS AND APPLIED
Students are strongly encouraged to go to http://
SPECTROSCOPY
chemistry.mines.edu for the most up-to-date curriculum flowcharts
CHGN428
BIOCHEMISTRY
3.0
3
and degree requirements.
CHEV
Environmental Elective**
3.0
3.0
Environmental Chemistry Track
ELECT
TECH
Technical Elective*
3.0
3.0
Freshman
ELECT
lec
lab
sem.hrs
15.0
Common Core
33.0
Summer
lec
lab
sem.hrs
33.0
CHGN490
SYNTHESIS AND
18.0
6
Sophomore
CHARACTERIZATION
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
6.0
MATH213
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4.0
4
AND ENGINEERS III

Colorado School of Mines 147
Senior
CHGN223
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I
3.0
1
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
LABORATORY
CHEV
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
Environmental Elective**
3.0
3.0
ELECT
16.0
CHEV
Environmental Elective**
3.0
3.0
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
ELECT
SYGN200
HUMAN SYSTEMS
3.0
3
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective II
3.0
3.0
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3.0
3
CHGN
Chemistry Elective**
3.0
CHGN222
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II
3.0
3
ELECT
CHGN224
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II
3.0
1
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
LABORATORY
15.0
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3.0
3
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
CHGN335
INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS
3.0
3
CHGN410
SURFACE CHEMISTRY
3.0
3
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective III
3.0
3.0
16.5
CHGN403
INTRODUCTION TO
3.0
3
Junior
ENVIRONMENTAL
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
CHEMISTRY
BELS301
GENERAL BIOLOGY I
3.0
3
CHGN
Chemistry Elective**
2.0
BELS311
GENERAL BIOLOGY I
3.0
1.0
1
ELECT
LABORATORY
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
CHGN336
ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY
3.0
3
14.0
CHGN337
ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY
3.0
1
Total Hours: 133.5
LABORATORY
* Technical Electives are courses in any technical field. LAIS, PAGN,
CHGN341
DESCRIPTIVE INORGANIC
3.0
3
Military Science and ROTC, McBride and the business courses of EBGN
CHEMISTRY
are not accepted technical electives.
CHGN351
PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A
3.0
4.0
4
** Chemistry Electives are non-required courses taught within the
MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVE I
Chemistry Department. In addition, graduate level Chemistry and
CHGN395
INTRODUCTION TO
3.0
1
Geochemistry courses taught within the Department are acceptable.
UNDERGRADUATE
RESEARCH
CHGN495 SENIOR UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH is taught as a
16.0
possible chemistry elective. Those aspiring to enter Ph.D. programs in
Chemistry or related fields are encouraged to include undergraduate
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
research in their curricula. The objective of CHGN495 is that students
CHGN353
PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A
3.0
3.0
4
successfully perform an open-ended research project under the direction
MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVE
of a CSM faculty member. Students must demonstrate through the
II
preparation of a proposal, prepared in consultation with the potential
CHGN323
QUALITATIVE ORGANIC
1.0
3.0
2
faculty research advisor and the CHGN495 instructor, that they qualify for
ANALYSIS AND APPLIED
enrollment in CHGN495. Up to 5 credit hours of CHGN495 can be taken.
SPECTROSCOPY
Students are strongly encouraged to go to http://
CHGN428
BIOCHEMISTRY
3.0
3
chemistry.mines.edu for the most up-to-date curriculum flowcharts
BELS303
GENERAL BIOLOGY II
3.0
3
and degree requirements.
BELS313
GENERAL BIOLOGY II
3.0
1.0
1
Biochemistry Track
LABORATORY
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective I
3.0
3.0
Freshman
16.0
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Summer
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Common Core
33.0
CHGN490
SYNTHESIS AND
18.0
6
33.0
CHARACTERIZATION
Sophomore
6.0
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Senior
MATH213
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4.0
4
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
AND ENGINEERS III
CHGN429
BIOCHEMISTRY II
3.0
3
PHGN200
PHYSICS II-
2.0
4.0
4.5
CHGN
ELECTROMAGNETISM AND
Chemistry Elective**
3.0
ELECT
OPTICS
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective II
3.0
3.0
DCGN209
DIST CORE THERMO
3.0
3
TECH
CHGN221
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I
3.0
3
Technical Elective*
3.0
3.0
ELECT

148 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
Courses
15.0
CHGN111. INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY. 3.0 Hours.
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
(S) Introductory college chemistry. Elementary atomic structure and the
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective III
3.0
3.0
periodic chart, chemical bonding, chemical reactions and stoichiometry
CHGN401
THEORETICAL INORGANIC
3.0
3
of chemical reactions, chemical equilibrium, thermochemistry, and
CHEMISTRY
properties of gases. Must not be used for elective credit. Does not apply
toward undergraduate degree or g.p.a. 3 hours lecture and 3 hours lab; 3
CHGN
Chemistry Elective**
2.0
semester hours.
ELECT
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
CHGN121. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I. 4.0 Hours.
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
3.0
(I, II) Study of matter and energy based on atomic structure, correlation
14.0
of properties of elements with position in periodic chart, chemical
bonding, geometry of molecules, phase changes, stoichiometry, solution
Total Hours: 132.5
chemistry, gas laws, and thermochemistry. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4
* Possible technical electives that will be recommended to students are:
semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education
transfer. Equivalency for GT-SC1.
CHGN403
INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL
3.0
CHEMISTRY
CHGN122. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II (SC1). 4.0 Hours.
CHGN462
MICROBIOLOGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
3.0
(I, II, S) Continuation of CHGN121 concentrating on chemical kinetics,
BELS321
INTRO TO GENETICS
4.0
gas laws, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and chemical equilibrium
BELS402
CELL BIOLOGY AND PHYSI OLOGY
3.0
(acid- base, solubility, complexation, and redox). Laboratory experiments
emphasizing quantitative chemical measurements. Prerequisite: Grade of
BELS404
ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY
3.0
C- or better in CHGN121. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours lab, 4 semester hours.
** Chemistry Electives are non-required courses taught within the
Chemistry Department. In addition, graduate level Chemistry and
CHGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
Geochemistry courses taught within the Department are acceptable.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
CHGN495 SENIOR UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH is taught as a
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
possible chemistry elective. Those aspiring to enter Ph.D. programs in
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
Chemistry or related fields are encouraged to include undergraduate
research in their curricula. The objective of CHGN495 is that students
CHGN221. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I. 3.0 Hours.
successfully perform an open-ended research project under the direction
(I, S) Structure, properties, and reactions of the important classes of
of a CSM faculty member. Students must demonstrate through the
organic compounds, introduction to reaction mechanisms. Prerequisites:
preparation of a proposal, prepared in consultation with the potential
Grade of C- or better in CHGN122. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
faculty research advisor and the CHGN495 instructor, that they qualify for
enrollment in CHGN495. Up to 5 credit hours of CHGN495 can be taken.
CHGN222. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II. 3.0 Hours.
(II, S) Continuation of CHGN221. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in
Students are strongly encouraged to go to http://
CHGN221. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
chemistry.mines.edu for the most up-to-date curriculum flowcharts
and degree requirements.
CHGN223. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY. 1.0 Hour.
(I,II, S) Laboratory exercises including purification techniques, synthesis,
General CSM Minor/ASI requirements can be found here.
and characterization. Experiments are designed to support concepts
presented in the CHGN221. Students are introduced to Green Chemistry
Chemistry Minor and ASI Programs
principles and methods of synthesis and the use of computational
No specific course sequences are suggested for students wishing to
software. Prerequisites: CHGN221 or concurrent enrollment. 3 hours
include chemistry minors or areas of special interest in their programs.
laboratory, 1 semester hour.
Rather, those students should consult with the Chemistry department
head (or designated faculty member) to design appropriate sequences.
CHGN224. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY. 1.0 Hour.
For the purpose of completing a minor in Chemistry, the Organic
(II, S) Laboratory exercises using more advanced synthesis techniques.
Chemistry sequence is exempt from the 100-200 level limit.
Experiments are designed to support concepts presented in CHGN222.
Prerequisites: CHGN221, CHGN223, and CHGN222 or concurrent
ASI programs include Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Environmental
enrollment. 3 hours laboratory, 1 semester hour.
Chemistry, and Biochemistry. Refer to the main ASI section of the Bulletin
for applicable rules for Areas of Special Interest (bulletin.mines.edu/
CHGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
undergraduate/sectionundergraduateinformation/specialprograms).
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.

Colorado School of Mines 149
CHGN299. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
CHGN353. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVE
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
II. 4.0 Hours.
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
(II) A continuation of CHGN351. Includes statistical thermodynamics,
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
chemical kinetics, chemical reaction mechanisms, electrochemistry, and
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
selected additional
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
topics. Prerequisite: CHGN351. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours laboratory; 4
semester hours.
CHGN323. QUALITATIVE ORGANIC ANALYSIS AND APPLIED
SPECTROSCOPY. 2.0 Hours.
CHGN395. INTRODUCTION TO UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1.0
(II) Identification, separation and purification of organic compounds
Hour.
including use of modern physical and instrumental methods. Prerequisite:
(I) (WI) Introduction to Undergraduate Research is designed to introduce
Grade of C- or better in CHGN222, CHGN224. 1 hour lecture; 3 hours
students to the research endeavor. Topics include ethics, hypothesis
lab; 2 semester hours.
testing, critical evaluation of the scientific literature, scientific writing,
bibliographic software, and proposal preparation. Prerequisites:
CHGN335. INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS. 3.0 Hours.
Completion of the chemistry curriculum through the Spring semester
(II) Principles of AAS, AES, Visible-UV, IR, NMR, XRF, XRD, XPS,
of the sophomore year or permission of the department head. Credit: 1
electron, and mass spectroscopy; gas and liquid chromatography; data
semester hour.
interpretation. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in CHGN122. 3 hours
lecture; 3 semester hours.
CHGN396. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1-5 Hour.
(I,II,S) Individual research project for freshman, sophomores or juniors
CHGN336. ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY. 3.0 Hours.
under direction of a member of the departmental faculty. Prerequisites:
(I) Theory and techniques of gravimetry, titrimetry (acid-base,
permission of instructor or department head. Variable credit; 1 to 5 credit
complexometric, redox, precipitation), electrochemical analysis, chemical
hours. Repeatable for credit. Seniors should take CHGN495 instead of
separations; statistical evaluation of data. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or
CHGN396.
better in both CHGN122 and DCGN209 or DCGN210. 3 hours lecture; 3
semester hours.
CHGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
CHGN337. ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY. 1.0 Hour.
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
(I) (WI) Laboratory exercises emphasizing sample preparation and
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
instrumental methods of analysis. Prerequisite: CHGN336 or concurrent
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
enrollment. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
CHGN398L. SPECIAL TOPICS LAB. 1-6 Hour.
CHGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION. 3.0 Hours.
(I, II, S) Supervised, full-time, chemistry-related employment for
CHGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
a continuous six-month period (or its equivalent) in which specific
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
educational objectives are achieved. Prerequisite: Second semester
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
sophomore status and a cumulative grade-point average
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
of at least 2.00. 0 to 3 semester hours. Cooperative Education credit
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
does not count toward graduation except under special conditions.
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
CHGN341. DESCRIPTIVE INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 3.0 Hours.
CHGN401. THEORETICAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 3.0 Hours.
(I) The chemistry of the elements and periodic trends in reactivity
(II) Introduction to symmetry and group theory; application of group
discussed in relation to the preparation and use of inorganic chemicals
theory to molecular orbitals and spectroscopy; molecular orbital
in industry and the environment. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in
theory; coordination chemistry; electronic structure of solids and
both CHGN222 and DCGN209 or DCGN210. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
quantum confinement; introduction to preparation and characterization
hours.
of nanostructured materials. Prerequisite: CHGN341 or consent of
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CHGN351. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVE I.
4.0 Hours.
CHGN403. INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY. 3.0
(I) A study of chemical systems from a molecular physical chemistry
Hours.
perspective. Includes an introduction to quantum mechanics, atoms and
(II) Processes by which natural and anthro¬pogenic chemicals interact,
molecules, spectroscopy, bonding and symmetry, and an introduction to
react and are transformed and redistributed in various environmental
modern computational chemistry. Prerequisite: MATH225; PHGN200;
compartments. Air, soil and aqueous (fresh and saline surface and
Grade of C- or better in both CHGN122 and DCGN209 or DCGN210. 3
groundwaters) environments are covered, along with specialized
hours lecture; 3 hours laboratory; 4 semester hours.
envi¬ronments such as waste treatment facilities and the upper
atmosphere. Prerequisites: CHGN222, DCGN209 or DCGN210 or
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

150 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
CHGN410. SURFACE CHEMISTRY. 3.0 Hours.
CHGN490. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION. 6.0 Hours.
(II) Introduction to colloid systems, capillarity, surface tension and contact
(S) (WI) Advanced methods of organic and inorganic synthesis; high-
angle, adsorption from solution, micelles and micro - emulsions, the
temperature, high-pressure, inert-atmosphere, vacuumline, and
solid/gas interface, surface analytical techniques, van der Waal forces,
electrolytic methods. Prerequisites: CHGN323, CHGN341. 6-week
electrical properties and colloid stability, some specific colloid systems
summer session; 6 semester hours.
(clays, foams and emulsions). Students enrolled for graduate credit in
MLGN510 must complete a special project. Prerequisite: DCGN209 or
CHGN495. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1-5 Hour.
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(I, II, S) (WI) Individual research project under direction of a member of
the Departmental faculty. Prerequisites: selection of a research topic and
CHGN422. POLYMER CHEMISTRY LABORATORY. 1.0 Hour.
advisor, preparation and approval of a research proposal, completion
(I) Prerequisites: CHGN221, CHGN223. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
of chemistry curriculum through the junior year or permission of the
department head. Variable credit; 1 to 5 credit hours. Repeatable for
CHGN428. BIOCHEMISTRY. 3.0 Hours.
credit.
(I) Introductory study of the major molecules of biochemistry: amino
acids, proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, lipids, and saccharides- their
CHGN496. SPECIAL SUMMER COURSE. 16.0 Hours.
structure, chemistry, biological function, and biosynthesis. Stresses
bioenergetics and the cell as a biological unit of organization. Discussion
CHGN497. INTERNSHIP. 1-6 Hour.
of classical genetics, molecular genetics, and protein synthesis.
(I, II, S) Individual internship experience with an industrial, academic,
Prerequisite: CHGN222 or permission of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
or governmental host supervised by a Departmental faculty member.
semester hours.
Prerequisites: Completion of chemistry curriculum through the junior year
or permission of the department head. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
CHGN429. BIOCHEMISTRY II. 3.0 Hours.
(I) A continuation of CHGN428. Topics include: nucleotide synthesis;
CHGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY. 1-6 Hour.
DNA repair,
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
replication and recombination; transcription, translation and regulation;
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
proteomics; lipid and amino acid synthesis; protein target and
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
degradation; membranes; receptors and
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
signal transduction. Prerequisites: CHGN428 or permission of instructor.
CHGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 0.5-6 Hour.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
CHGN430. INTRODUCTION TO POLYMER SCIENCE. 3.0 Hours.
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
(I) An introduction to the chemistry and physics of macromolecules.
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
Topics include the properties and statistics of polymer solutions,
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
measurements of molecular weights, molecular weight distributions,
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
properties of bulk polymers, mechanisms of polymer formation, and
DCGN209. DIST CORE THERMO. 3.0 Hours.
properties of thermosets and thermoplastics including elastomers.
(I, II, S) Introduction to the fundamental principles of classical
Pre requisite: CHGN222 or permission of instructor. 3 hour lecture, 3
thermodynamics, with particular emphasis on chemical and phase
semester hours.
equilibria. Volume-temperature-pressure relationships for solids, liquids,
CHGN462. MICROBIOLOGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT. 3.0 Hours.
and gases; ideal and non-ideal gases. Introduction to kineticmolecular
This course will cover the basic fundamentals of microbiology, such as
theory of ideal gases and the Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions. Work,
structure and function of procaryotic versus eucaryotic cells; viruses;
heat, and application of the First Law to closed systems, including
classification of microorganisms; microbial metabolism, energetics,
chemical reactions. Entropy and the Second and Third Laws; Gibbs Free
genetics, growth and diversity, microbial interactions with plants, animals,
Energy. Chemical equilibrium and the equilibrium constant; introduction to
and other microbes. Additional topics covered will include various aspects
activities & fugacities. One- and two-component phase diagrams; Gibbs
of environmental microbiology such as global biogeochemical cycles,
Phase Rule. Prerequisites: CHGN121, CHGN124, MATH111, MATH112,
bioleaching, bioremediation, and wastewater treatment. Prerequisite:
PHGN100. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Students with credit in
Consent of instructor 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours. Offered in
DCGN210
alternate years.
may not also receive credit in DCGN209.
CHGN475. COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY. 3.0 Hours.
(II) This class provides a survey of techniques of computational
chemistry, including quantum mechanics (both Hartree-Fock and density
functional approaches) and molecular dynamics. Emphasis is given to the
integration of these techniques with experimental programs of molecular
design and development. Prerequisites: CHGN351, CHGN401. 3 hours
lecture; 3 semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 151
Metallurgical and Materials
needs. The objective of the metallurgical and materials engineering
program is to impart a fundamental knowledge of materials processing,
Engineering
properties, selection and application in order to provide graduates with
the background and skills needed for successful careers in materials-
http://metallurgy.mines.edu/
related industries, for continued education toward graduate degrees and
Program Description
for the pursuit of knowledge in other disciplines.
The Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET
Metallurgical and materials engineering plays a role in all manufacturing
111 Market Place, Suite 1050
processes which convert raw materials into useful products adapted
Baltimore, MD 21202-4012
to human needs. The primary goal of the Metallurgical and Materials
Telephone (410) 347-7700
Engineering program is to provide undergraduates with a fundamental
knowledge base associated with materials-processing, their properties,
The Departments of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering and Physics
and their selection and application. Upon graduation, students will
collaborate to offer a five-year program designed to meet the needs of
have acquired and developed the necessary background and skills for
the electronics and similar high-tech industries. Students who satisfy
successful careers in materials related industries. Furthermore, the
the requirements of the program obtain an undergraduate degree in
benefits of continued education toward graduate degrees and other
either Engineering Physics or in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
avenues, and the pursuit of knowledge in other disciplines should be well
in four years and a Master of Engineering degree in Metallurgical
inculcated.
and Materials Engineering at the end of the fifth year. The program is
designed to provide a strong background in science fundamentals, as
The emphasis in the Department is on materials processing operations
well as specialized training in the materials-science and processing
which encompass: the conversion of mineral and chemical resources into
needs of these industries. Thus, the educational objective of the program
metallic, ceramic or polymeric materials; the synthesis of new materials;
is to provide students with the specific educational requirements to
refining and processing to produce high performance materials for
begin a career in microelectronics and, at the same time, a broad and
applications from consumer products to aerospace and electronics;
flexible background necessary to remain competitive in this exciting and
the development of mechanical, chemical and physical properties of
rapidly changing industry. The undergraduate electives which satisfy
materials related to their processing and structure; and the selection of
the requirements of the program and an overall curriculum need to be
materials for specific applications.
discussed with the student’s advisor and approved by the Physics or
The metallurgical and materials engineering discipline is founded on
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Departments. A Program Mentor
fundamentals in chemistry, mathematics and physics which contribute
in each Department can also provide counseling on the program.
to building the knowledge base and developing the skills for the
processing of materials so as to achieve specifications requested for
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
a particular industrial or advanced product. The engineering principles
(MME) Program Educational Objectives
in this discipline include: crystal structure and structural analysis,
The Metallurgical and Materials Engineering (MME) program emphasizes
thermodynamics of materials, reaction kinetics, transport phenomena,
the structure, properties, processing and performance of materials.
phase equilibria, phase transformations, microstructural evolution,
Program educational objectives are broad statements that describe
mechanical behavior, and properties of materials.
what graduates are expected to attain within a few years of graduation.
The core-discipline fundamentals are applied to a broad range of
The Metallurgical and Materials Engineering program at CSM prepares
materials processes including extraction and refining of materials,
graduates who:
alloy development, casting, mechanical working, joining and forming,
1. obtain a range of positions in industry or positions in government
ceramic particle processing, high temperature reactions and synthesis
facilities or pursue graduate education in engineering, science, or
of engineered materials. In each stage of processing, the effects of
other fields;
resultant microstructures and morphologies on materials properties and
2. demonstrate advancement in their chosen careers;
performance are emphasized.
3. engage in appropriate professional societies and continuing
Laboratories, located in Nathaniel Hill Hall, are among the finest in
education activities.
the nation. The laboratories, in conjunction with classroom instruction,
provide for a well-integrated education of the undergraduates working
The three MME program educational objectives were determined by
towards their baccalaureate degrees. These facilities are well equipped
using inputs from program constituencies (faculty, students, visiting
and dedicated to: particulate and chemical/extraction, metallurgical and
committee, industry recruiters and alumni). These objectives are
materials processing, foundry science, corrosion and hydro/electro-
consistent with those of the Colorado School of Mines (CSM). CSM is an
metallurgical studies, physical and mechanical metallurgy, welding and
engineering and applied science institution, dedicated to the education
joining, forming, processing and testing of ceramic materials. Mechanical
and training of students who will be stewards of the earth’s resources.
testing facilities include computerized machines for tension, compression,
torsion, toughness, fatigue and thermo-mechanical testing.
Curriculum
There are also other highly specialized research laboratories dedicated
The Metallurgical and Materials Engineering (MME) curriculum is
to: vapor deposition, and both plasma and high-temperature reaction
organized to educate students in the fundamentals of materials (MME
systems. Supporting analytical laboratories also exist for surface
Basics) and their applications (MME Applications) with the option of
analysis, emission spectrometry, X-ray analysis, optical microscopy
pursuing a track in one of four focus areas.
and image analysis, scanning and transmission electron microscopy,
and micro-thermal-analysis/mass spectrometry. Metallurgical and
materials engineering involves all of the processes that transform
precursor materials into final engineered products adapted to human

152 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
A. MME Basics: The basic curriculum in the Metallurgical and Materials
to satisfy the curriculum requirements. The time sequence of courses
Engineering program will provide a background in the following topic
organized by degree program, year and semester, is listed below.
areas:
Degree Requirements (Metallurgical and
1. Crystal Structures and Structural Analysis: crystal systems;
Materials Engineering)
symmetry elements and Miller indices; atomic bonding; metallic,
ceramic and polymeric structures; x-ray and electron diffraction;
The B.S. curricula in metallurgical and materials engineering are outlined
stereographic projection and crystal orientation; long range order;
below:
defects in materials.
Freshman
2. Thermodynamics of Materials: heat and mass balances;
lec
lab
sem.hrs
thermodynamic laws; chemical potential and chemical equilibrium;
Common Core
33.0
solution thermodynamics & solution models; partial molar and
excess quantities; solid state thermodynamics; thermodynamics of
33.0
surfaces; electrochemistry.
Sophomore
3. Transport Phenomena and Kinetics: Heat, mass and momentum
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
transport; transport properties of fluids; diffusion mechanisms;
DCGN209
DIST CORE THERMO
3
reaction kinetics; nucleation and growth kinetics.
MATH213
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4
4. Phase Equilibria: phase rule; binary and ternary systems;
AND ENGINEERS III
microstructural evolution; defects in crystals; surface phenomena;
PHGN200
PHYSICS II-
4.5
phase transformations: eutectic, eutectoid, martensitic, nucleation
ELECTROMAGNETISM AND
and growth, recovery; microstructural evolution; strengthening
OPTICS
mechanisms; quantitative stereology; heat treatment.
MTGN202
ENGINEERED MATERIALS
3
5. Properties of Materials: mechanical properties; chemical properties
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
(oxidation and corrosion); electrical, magnetic and optical
15.0
properties: failure analysis.
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
B. MME Applications: The course content in the Metallurgical and
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3
Materials Engineering program emphasizes the following applications:
TECH
Restricted Technical Elective**
3.0
1. Materials Processing: particulate processing; thermo- and electro-
ELECT
chemical materials processing; hydrometallurgical processing;
DCGN241
DIST CORE - STATICS
3
synthesis of materials; deformation processing; solidification and
EPIC251
DESIGN (EPICS) II
3
casting; welding and joining.
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3
2. Design and Application of Materials: materials selection; ferrous
SYGN200
HUMAN SYSTEMS
3
and nonferrous metals; ceramics; polymers; composites; electronic
materials.
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
3. Statistical Process Control and Design of Experiments: statistical
18.5
process control; process capability analysis; design of experiments.
Summer
lec
lab
sem.hrs
MTGN272
PARTICULATE MATERIALS
3
C. MME Curriculum Requirements: The Metallurgical and Materials
PROCESSING
Engineering course sequence is designed to fulfill the program
educational objectives. In addition, there are four focus areas within
3.0
the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering curriculum. Students have
Junior
the option to select one of these focus areas by pursuing one of four
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
tracks. A track is not required to obtain a degree in Metallurgical and
MTGN311
STRUCTURE OF MATERIALS
4
Materials Engineering. Only a single track can be taken as part of the
MTGN381
INTRODUCTION TO PHASE
2
degree. The track designation will only appear on the transcript and it
EQUILIBRIA IN MATERIALS
does not appear on the diploma. To pursue a track, the student must
SYSTEMS
file appropriate paper work with the registrar and the student will need
MTGN351
METALLURGICAL
3
to fulfill the curricular requirements for that track as listed below. Once a
AND MATERIALS
track has been declared the student can change their track or return to
THERMODYNAMICS
the basic curriculum by submitting appropriate paperwork to the registrar.
EGGN320
MECHANICS OF MATERIALS
3
The four focus areas (tracks) in MME are:
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Cluster Elective I
3.0
1. Physical and Manufacturing Metallurgy
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
2. Ceramic and Electronic Materials
18.0
3. Physicochemical Processing of Materials
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
4. Biomaterials
MTGN334
CHEMICAL PROCESSING OF
4
MATERIALS
D. MME Curriculum Requirements: The Metallurgical and Materials
Engineering course sequence is designed to fulfill the program goals and
MTGN348
MICROSTRUCTURAL
4
DEVELOPMENT

Colorado School of Mines 153
MTGN352
METALLURGICAL AND
3
Sophomore and Junior Year is the same as the MME degree
MATERIALS KINETICS
Freshman
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Cluster Elective II
3.0
lec
lab
sem.hrs
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
Common Core
33.0
17.0
33.0
Senior
Sophomore
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
lec
lab
sem.hrs
MTGN445
MECHANICAL PROPERTIES
4
Sophomore Year
36.5
OF MATERIALS
36.5
MTGN461
TRANSPORT PHENOMENA
3
Junior
AND REACTOR DESIGN
FOR METALLURGICAL-AND-
lec
lab
sem.hrs
MATERIALS ENGINEERS
Junior Year
35.0
MTGN450
STATISTICAL PROCESS
3
35.0
CONTROL AND DESIGN OF
Senior
EXPERIMENTS
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
MTGN
MTGN Elective
3.0
MTGN445
MECHANICAL PROPERTIES
4
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Cluster Elective III
3.0
OF MATERIALS
16.0
MTGN461
TRANSPORT PHENOMENA
3
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
AND REACTOR DESIGN
MTGN466
MATERIALS DESIGN:
3
FOR METALLURGICAL-AND-
SYNTHESIS,
MATERIALS ENGINEERS
CHARACTERIZATION AND
MTGN450
STATISTICAL PROCESS
3
SELECTION
CONTROL AND DESIGN OF
MTGN415
ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES
3
EXPERIMENTS
AND APPLICATIONS OF
MTGN
Track MTGN Elective#
3.0
MATERIALS
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Cluster Elective
3.0
MTGN
MTGN Elective
3.0
16.0
MTGN
MTGN Elective
3.0
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
MTGN
MTGN Elective
3.0
MTGN466
MATERIALS DESIGN:
3
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
SYNTHESIS,
18.0
CHARACTERIZATION AND
Total Hours: 138.5
SELECTION
MTGN415
ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES
3
** Restricted Electives:
AND APPLICATIONS OF
BELS301
GENERAL BIOLOGY I
3
MATERIALS
CSCI261
PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS
3
MTGN442
ENGINEERING ALLOYS
3
CHGN221
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I
3
MTGN
Track MTGN Elective#
3.0
CHGN335
INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS
3
MTGN
Track MTGN Elective#
3.0
CHGN336
ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY
3
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
CHGN351
PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A MOLECULAR
4
18.0
PERSPECTIVE I
Total Hours: 138.5
EGGN281
INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS,
3
ELECTRONICS AND POWER
# Track MTGN Electives must be selected from the following courses:
ENGY200
INTRODUCTION TO ENERGY
3
MTGN300
FOUNDRY METALLURGY
2
ESGN353
FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL
3
MTGN302
FOUNDRY METALLURGY LABORATORY
1
SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING I
MTGN456
ELECTRON MICROSCOPY
2
MATH323
PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS FOR
3
MTGN458
ELECTRON MICROSCOPY LABORATORY
1
ENGINEERS
MTGN464
FORGING AND FORMING
3
MATH332
LINEAR ALGEBRA
3
MTGN475
METALLURGY OF WELDING
2
MATH348
ADVANCED ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS
3
MTGN477
METALLURGY OF WELDING LABORATORY
1
PHGN215
ANALOG ELECTRONICS
4
PHGN300
PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS I
3
Ceramic and Electronic Materials Track requires:
Physical and Manufacturing Metallurgy Track requires:
Sophomore and Junior Year is the same as the MME degree

154 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
Freshman
MTGN414
PROCESSING OF CERAMICS
3
lec
lab
sem.hrs
PHGN435
INTERDISCIPLINARY MICROELECTRONICS
3
Common Core
33.0
PROCESSING LABORATORY
33.0
Physicochemical Processing of Materials Track requires:
Sophomore
Sophomore and Junior Year is the same as the MME degree
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Freshman
Sophomore Year
36.5
lec
lab
sem.hrs
36.5
Common Core
33.0
Junior
33.0
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Sophomore
Junior Year
35.0
lec
lab
sem.hrs
35.0
Sophomore Year
36.5
Senior
36.5
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Junior
MTGN445
MECHANICAL PROPERTIES
4
OF MATERIALS
lec
lab
sem.hrs
MTGN461
TRANSPORT PHENOMENA
3
Junior Year
35.0
AND REACTOR DESIGN
35.0
FOR METALLURGICAL-AND-
Senior
MATERIALS ENGINEERS
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
MTGN450
STATISTICAL PROCESS
3
MTGN445
MECHANICAL PROPERTIES
4
CONTROL AND DESIGN OF
OF MATERIALS
EXPERIMENTS
MTGN461
TRANSPORT PHENOMENA
3
MTGN412
CERAMIC ENGINEERING
3
AND REACTOR DESIGN
MTGN
Restricted Track MTGN
3.0
FOR METALLURGICAL-AND-
Elective##
MATERIALS ENGINEERS
16.0
MTGN450
STATISTICAL PROCESS
3
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
CONTROL AND DESIGN OF
EXPERIMENTS
MTGN466
MATERIALS DESIGN:
3
SYNTHESIS,
MTGN
Track MTGN Elective#
3.0
CHARACTERIZATION AND
MTGN
Track MTGN Elective#
3.0
SELECTION
16.0
MTGN415
ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES
3
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
AND APPLICATIONS OF
MATERIALS
MTGN466
MATERIALS DESIGN:
3
SYNTHESIS,
MTGN
Track MTGN Elective#
3.0
CHARACTERIZATION AND
MTGN
MTGN Elective
3.0
SELECTION
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
MTGN415
ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES
3
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Cluster Elective
3.0
AND APPLICATIONS OF
18.0
MATERIALS
Total Hours: 138.5
MTGN
Track MTGN Elective#
3.0
MTGN
MTGN Elective
3.0
# Track MTGN Electives must be selected from the following courses:
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective
3.0
MTGN414
PROCESSING OF CERAMICS
3
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
MTGN456
ELECTRON MICROSCOPY
2
18.0
MTGN458
ELECTRON MICROSCOPY LABORATORY
1
Total Hours: 138.5
MTGN465
MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CERAMICS
3
MTGN469
FUEL CELL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
3
# Track MTGN Electives must be selected from the following courses:
CHGN410
SURFACE CHEMISTRY
3
MTGN430
PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY OF IRON AND
3
PHGN419
PRINCIPLES OF SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS
3
STEELMAKING
PHGN435
INTERDISCIPLINARY MICROELECTRONICS
3
MTGN431
HYDRO- AND ELECTRO-METALLURGY
3
PROCESSING LABORATORY
MTGN432
PYROMETALLURGY
3
## Restricted Track MTGN Elective must be selected from the following
MTGN532
PARTICULATE MATERIAL PROCESSING I -
3
courses:
COMMINUTION AND PHYSICAL SEPARATIONS

Colorado School of Mines 155
MTGN533
PARTICULATE MATERIAL PROCESSING II -
3
The Departments of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering and Physics
APPLIED SEPARATIONS
collaborate to offer a five-year program designed to meet the needs of
the electronics and similar high-tech industries. Students who satisfy
Biomaterials Track requires:
the requirements of the program obtain an undergraduate degree in
Sophomore and Junior Year is the same as the MME degree
either Engineering Physics or in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
in four years and a Master of Engineering degree in Metallurgical
Freshman
and Materials Engineering at the end of the fifth year. The program is
lec
lab
sem.hrs
designed to provide a strong background in science fundamentals, as
Common Core
33.0
well as specialized training in the materials-science and processing
33.0
needs of these industries. Thus, the educational objective of the program
is to provide students with the specific educational requirements to
Sophomore
begin a career in microelectronics and, at the same time, a broad and
lec
lab
sem.hrs
flexible background necessary to remain competitive in this exciting and
Sophomore Year
36.5
rapidly changing industry. The undergraduate electives which satisfy
36.5
the requirements of the program and an overall curriculum need to be
Junior
discussed with the student’s advisor and approved by the Physics or
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Departments. A Program Mentor
in each Department can also provide counseling on the program.
Junior Year
35.0
35.0
Application for admission to this program should be made during the first
semester of the sophomore year (in special cases, later entry may be
Senior
approved, upon review, by one of the program mentors). Undergraduate
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
students admitted to the program must maintain a 3.0 grade-point
MTGN445
MECHANICAL PROPERTIES
4
average or better. The graduate segment of the program requires a case
OF MATERIALS
study report, submitted to the student’s graduate advisor. Additional
MTGN461
TRANSPORT PHENOMENA
3
details on the Master of Engineering can be found in the Graduate
AND REACTOR DESIGN
Degree and Requirements section of the Graduate Bulletin. The case
FOR METALLURGICAL-AND-
study is started during the student’s senior design-project and completed
MATERIALS ENGINEERS
during the year of graduate study. A student admitted to the program is
MTGN450
STATISTICAL PROCESS
3
expected to select a graduate advisor, in advance of the graduate-studies
CONTROL AND DESIGN OF
final year, and prior to the start of their senior year. The case-study topic
EXPERIMENTS
is then identified and selected in consultation with the graduate advisor.
MTGN472
BIOMATERIALS I
3.0
A formal application, during the senior year, for admission to the graduate
program in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering must be submitted to
MTGN
Track MTGN Elective#
3.0
the Graduate School. Students who have maintained all the standards
16.0
of the program requirements leading up to this step, can expect to be
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
admitted.
MTGN466
MATERIALS DESIGN:
3
*
Additional “Emphasis” areas are being developed in conjunction with
SYNTHESIS,
other Departments on Campus.
CHARACTERIZATION AND
SELECTION
General CSM Minor/ASI requirements can be found here.
MTGN415
ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES
3
AND APPLICATIONS OF
Minor in Metallurgical and Materials
MATERIALS
Engineering
MTGN463
POLYMER ENGINEERING
3
General Requirements: A minor program in metallurgical and materials
MTGN570
BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF
3
engineering consists of a minimum of 18 credit hours of a logical
MATERIALS
sequence of courses. Only three of these hours may be taken in the
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS Restricted Elective
3.0
student’s degree-granting department and no more than three of
FREE
Free Elective
3.0
these hours may be at the 100- or 200- level. Students majoring in
18.0
metallurgical and material engineering are not eligible to earn a minor in
Total Hours: 138.5
the department.
# Track MTGN Elective must be selected from the following courses:
A minor program declaration (available in the Registrar’s Office) must
be submitted for approval prior to the student’s completion of half of the
MTGN412
CERAMIC ENGINEERING
3
hours proposed to constitute the program. Approvals are required from
MTGN451
CORROSION ENGINEERING
3
the department head of metallurgical and materials engineering, the
student’s advisor, and the department head or division director in the
Five Year Combined Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
department or division in which the student is enrolled.
Baccalaureate and Master of Engineering in Metallurgical and Materials
Engineering, with an Electronic-Materials Emphasis.*
Recommended Courses: The following courses are recommended
for students seeking to earn a minor in metallurgical and materials
engineering:

156 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
MTGN202
ENGINEERED MATERIALS
3.0
MTGN202. ENGINEERED MATERIALS. 3.0 Hours.
MTGN311
STRUCTURE OF MATERIALS
4.0
(I,II) Introduction to the structure, properties, and processing of materials.
The historical role that engineered and natural materials have made
MTGN348
MICROSTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT
4.0
on the advance of civilization. Engineered materials and their life
MTGN445
MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS
4.0
cycles through processing, use, disposal, and recycle. The impact that
300- or 400- level course in metallurgical and materials engineering
3.0
engineered materials have on selected systems to show the breadth of
Total Hours
18.0
properties that are important and how they can be controlled by proper
material processing. Recent trends in materials development mimicking
Other sequences are permissible to suit the special interests of individual
natural materials in the context of the structure and functionality
students. These other sequences need to be discussed and approved by
of material in living systems. Corequisites: CHGN122, MATH112,
the department head in metallurgical and materials engineering.
PHGN100. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Explosive Processing of Materials Minor
MTGN272. PARTICULATE MATERIALS PROCESSING. 3.0 Hours.
Program Advisor: Dr. Stephen Liu
(S) Summer session. Characterization and production of particles.
There are very few academic explosive engineering-related programs
Physical and interfacial phenomena associated with particulate
in the United States of America and around the world. In fact, Colorado
processes. Applications to metal and ceramic powder processing.
School of Mines is the only educational institution that offers an explosive
Laboratory projects and plant visits. Prerequisites: DCGN209 and
processing of materials minor program in the U.S.A. Built to the tradition
PHGN200. 3 weeks; 3 semester hours.
of combining academic education with hands-on experience of CSM,
MTGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS
this minor program will prepare the students for new and developing
ENGINEERING. 1-3 Hour.
applications in materials joining, forming and synthesis that involve the
(I, II, S) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
use of explosives.
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). The course topic is generally
Under proper development of courses and background in explosives,
offered only once. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester
students enrolled in this program will apply these energetic materials
hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.
to the processing of traditional and advanced materials. The program
focuses on the microstructural and property development in materials as
MTGN299. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-3 Hour.
a function of deformation rate. Selection of suitable explosives and proper
(I, II, S) Independent work leading to a comprehensive report. This work
parameters, selection of specific materials for explosive processing and
may take the form of conferences, library, and laboratory work. Choice
application, and optimization of post-processing properties are the three
of problem is arranged between student and a specific department
major attributes acquired at the completion of this minor program. With
faculty-member. Prerequisite: Selection of topic with consent of faculty
the help of the program advisor, the students will design and select the
supervisor; “Independent Study Form” must be completed and submitted
proper course sequence and complete a hands-on research project
to Registrar. 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
under the supervision of a faculty advisor.
MTGN300. FOUNDRY METALLURGY. 2.0 Hours.
(II) Design and metallurgical aspects of casting, patterns, molding
materials and processes, solidification processes, risers and gating
Courses
concepts, casting defects and inspection, melting practice, cast alloy
MTGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS
selection. Prerequisite: PHGN200/PHGN210. Co-requisite: MTGN302 or
ENGINEERING. 1-3 Hour.
consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
(I, II, S) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
MTGN302. FOUNDRY METALLURGY LABORATORY. 1.0 Hour.
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). The course topic is generally
(II) Experiments in the foundry designed to supplement the lectures of
offered only once. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester
MTGN300. Co-requisite: MTGN300. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.
MTGN311. STRUCTURE OF MATERIALS. 4.0 Hours.
MTGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-3 Hour.
(I) (WI) Principles of crystallography and crystal chemistry.
(I, II, S) Independent work leading to a comprehensive report. This work
Characterization of crystalline materials using X-ray diffraction
may take the form of conferences, library, and laboratory work. Choice
techniques. Applications to include compound identification, lattice
of problem is arranged between student and a specific department
parameter measurement, orientation of single crystals, and crystal
faculty-member. Prerequisite: Selection of topic with consent of faculty
structure determination. Laboratory experiments to supplement the
supervisor; “Independent Study Form” must be completed and submitted
lectures. Prerequisites: PHGN200 or PHGN210 and MTGN202. 3 hours
to Registrar. 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 157
MTGN334. CHEMICAL PROCESSING OF MATERIALS. 4.0 Hours.
MTGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS
(II) Development and application of fundamental principles related to
ENGINEERING. 1-3 Hour.
the processing of metals and materials by thermochemical and aqueous
(I, II, S) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
and fused salt electrochemical/chemical routes. The course material
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). The course topic is generally
is presented within the framework of a formalism that examines the
offered only once. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester
physical chemistry, thermodynamics, reaction mechanisms and kinetics
hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.
inherent to a wide selection of chemical processing systems. The general
formalism provides for a transferable knowledge-base to other systems
MTGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-3 Hour.
not specifically covered in the course. Prerequisite: MTGN272, MTGN351
(I, II, S) Independent work leading to a comprehensive report. This work
and EPIC251, 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 semester hours.
may take the form of conferences, library, and laboratory work. Choice
of problem is arranged between student and a specific department
MTGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION. 1-3 Hour.
faculty-member. Prerequisite: Selection of topic with consent of faculty
(I, II, S) Supervised, full-time, engineering-related employment for
supervisor; “Independent Study Form” must be completed and submitted
a continuous six-month period (or its equivalent) in which specific
to Registrar. 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
educational objectives are achieved. Prerequisite: Second semester
sophomore status and a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.00.
MTGN403. SENIOR THESIS. 3.0 Hours.
1 to 3 semester hours. Cooperative education credit does not count
(I, II) Two semester individual research under the direction of members
toward graduation except under special conditions. Repeatable.
of the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering faculty. Work may include
library and laboratory research on topics of relevance. Oral presentation
MTGN348. MICROSTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT. 4.0 Hours.
will be given at the end of the second semester and written thesis
(II) (WI) An introduction to the relationships between microstructure and
submitted to the committee for evaluation. Prerequisites: Senior standing
properties of materials, with emphasis on metallic and ceramic systems;
in the Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering and consent
Fundamentals of imperfections in crystalline materials on material
of department head. 3 hours per semester. Repeatable for credit to a
behavior; recrystallization and grain growth; strengthening mechanisms:
maximum of 6 hours.
grain refinement, solid solution strengthening, precipitation strengthening,
and microstructural strengthening; and phase transformations.
MTGN412. CERAMIC ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
Prerequisite: MTGN311 and MTGN351. 3
(I) Application of engineering principles to nonmetallic and ceramic
hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.
materials. Processing of raw materials and production of ceramic bodies,
glazes, glasses, enamels, and cements. Firing processes and reactions
MTGN351. METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS THERMODYNAMICS.
in glass bonded as well as mechanically bonded systems. Prerequisite:
3.0 Hours.
MTGN348. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(I) Applications of thermodynamics in extractive and physical metallurgy
and materials science. Thermodynamics of solutions including solution
MTGN414. PROCESSING OF CERAMICS. 3.0 Hours.
models, calculation of activities from phase diagrams, and measurements
(II) Principles of ceramic processing and the relationship between
of thermodynamic properties of alloys and slags. Reaction equilibria
processing and microstructure. Raw materials and raw materials
with examples in alloy systems and slags. Phase stability analysis.
preparation, forming and fabrication, thermal processing, and finishing
Thermodynamic properties of phase diagrams in material systems, defect
of ceramic materials will be covered. Principles will be illustrated by case
equilibrium and interactions. Prerequisite DCGN209. 3 hours lecture, 3
studies on specific ceramic materials. A project to design a ceramic
semester hours.
fabrication process is required. Field trips to local ceramic manufacturing
operations. Prerequisite: MTGN311 or consent of the instructor. 3 hours
MTGN352. METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS KINETICS. 3.0
lecture; 3 semester hours.
Hours.
(II) Introduction to reaction kinetics: chemical kinetics, atomic and
MTGN415. ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS OF
molecular diffusion, surface thermodynamics and kinetics of interfaces
MATERIALS. 3.0 Hours.
and nucleation-and-growth. Applications to materials processing and
(II) Survey of the electrical properties of materials, and the applications
performance aspects associated with gas/solid reactions, precipitation
of materials as electrical circuit components. The effects of chemistry,
and dissolltion behavior, oxidation and corrosion, purification of
processing and microstructure on the electrical properties. Functions,
semiconductors, carburizing of steel, formation of p-n junctions and other
performance requirements and testing methods of materials for each type
important materials systems. Prerequisite: MTGN351. 3 hours lecture; 3
of circuit component. General topics
semester hours.
covered are conductors, resistors, insulators, capacitors, energy
converters, magnetic materials and integrated circuits. Prerequisites:
MTGN381. INTRODUCTION TO PHASE EQUILIBRIA IN MATERIALS
PHGN200, MTGN311 or MLGN501, or consent of instructor. 3 hours
SYSTEMS. 2.0 Hours.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
(I) Review of the concepts of chemical equilibrium and derivation of the
Gibbs phase rule. Application of the Gibbs phase rule to interpreting
MTGN419. NON-CRYSTALLINE MATERIALS. 3.0 Hours.
one, two and three component phase equilibrium diagrams. Application
(II) Introduction to the principles of glass science-andengineering
to alloy and ceramic materials systems. Emphasis on the evolution of
and non-crystalline materials in general. Glass formation, structure,
phases and their amounts and the resulting microstructural development.
crystallization and properties will be covered, along with a survey of
Prerequisite/Co-requisite: MTGN351. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
commercial glass compositions,
manufacturing processes and applications. Prerequisites: MTGN311
or MLGN501, MLGN512/MTGN412, or consent of instructor. 3 hours
lecture; 3 semester hours.

158 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
MTGN429. METALLURGICAL ENVIRONMENT. 3.0 Hours.
MTGN450. STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL AND DESIGN OF
(I) Examination of the interface between metallurgical process
EXPERIMENTS. 3.0 Hours.
engineering and environmental engineering. Wastes, effluents and their
(I) Introduction to statistical process control, process capability analysis
point sources in metallurgical processes such as mineral concentration,
and
value extraction and process metallurgy are studied in context.
experimental design techniques. Statistical process control theory and
Fundamentals of metallurgical unit operations and unit processes with
techniques developed and applied to control charts for variables and
those applicable to waste and effluent control, disposal and materials
attributes involved in process control and evaluation. Process capability
recycling are covered. Engineering design and engineering cost
concepts developed and applied to the evaluation of manufacturing
components are also included for selected examples. Fundamentals and
processes. Theory of designed experiments developed and applied to
applications receive equal coverage. Prerequisites: MTGN334 or consent
full factorial experiments, fractional factorial experiments, screening
of Instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
experiments, multilevel experiments and mixture experiments. Analysis
of designed experiments by graphical and statistical techniques.
MTGN430. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY OF IRON AND STEELMAKING.
Introduction to computer software for statistical process control and
3.0 Hours.
for the design and analysis of experiments. Prerequisite: Consent of
(I) Physical chemistry principles of blast furnace and direct reduction
Instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
production of iron and refining of iron to steel. Discussion of raw
materials, productivity,
MTGN451. CORROSION ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
impurity removal, deoxidation, alloy additions, and ladle metallurgy.
(II) Principles of electrochemistry. Corrosion mechanisms. Methods of
Prerequisite: MTGN334. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
corrosion
control including cathodic and anodic protection and coatings. Examples,
MTGN431. HYDRO- AND ELECTRO-METALLURGY. 3.0 Hours.
from various industries, of corrosion problems and solutions. Prerequisite:
(I) Physicochemical principles associated with the extraction and refining
DCGN209. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
of metals by hydro- and electrometallurgical techniques. Discussion of
unit processes in hydrometallurgy, electrowinning, and electrorefining.
MTGN456. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY. 2.0 Hours.
Analysis of integrated flowsheets for the recovery of nonferrous metals.
(II) Introduction to electron optics and the design and application of
Prerequisites: MTGN334, MTGN351 and MTGN352. Co-requisite:
transmission
MTGN461, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and scanning electron microscopes. Interpretation of images produced
by various contrast mechanisms. Electron diffraction analysis and
MTGN432. PYROMETALLURGY. 3.0 Hours.
the indexing of electron diffraction patterns. Prerequisite: MTGN311
(II) Extraction and refining of metals including emerging practices.
or Consent of Instructor. Co-requisite: MTGN458. 2 hours lecture; 2
Modifications
semester hours.
driven by environmental regulations and by energy minimization. Analysis
and design of processes and the impact of economic constraints.
MTGN458. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY LABORATORY. 1.0 Hour.
Prerequisite: MTGN334. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(II) Laboratory exercises to illustrate specimen preparation techniques,
microscope operation, and the interpretation of images produced from a
MTGN442. ENGINEERING ALLOYS. 3.0 Hours.
variety of specimens, and to supplement the lectures in MTGN456. Co-
(II) This course is intended to be an important component of the physical
requisite: MTGN456. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.
metallurgy sequence, to reinforce and integrate principles from earlier
courses, and enhance the breadth and depth of understanding of
concepts in a wide variety of alloy systems. Metallic systems considered
include iron and steels, copper,
aluminum, titanium, superalloys, etc. Phase stability, microstructural
evolution and structure/property relationships are emphasized.
Prerequisite: MTGN348 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
semester hours.
MTGN445. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS. 4.0 Hours.
(I) (WI) Mechanical properties and relationships. Plastic deformation
of crystalline materials. Relationships of microstructures to mechanical
strength. Fracture, creep, and fatigue. Laboratory sessions devoted to
advanced mechanical-testing techniques to illustrate the application of
the fundamentals presented in the lectures. Prerequisite: MTGN348. 3
hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4/3* semester hours. *This is a 3 semester-
hours graduate-course in the Materials Science Program (ML) and a 4
semester-hours undergraduate- course in the Metallurgical and Materials
Engineering program.

Colorado School of Mines 159
MTGN461. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA AND REACTOR DESIGN FOR
MTGN465. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CERAMICS. 3.0 Hours.
METALLURGICAL-AND-MATERIALS ENGINEERS. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Mechanical properties of ceramics and ceramic-based composites;
(I) Introduction to the conserved-quantities: momentum, heat, and mass
brittle fracture of solids; toughening mechanisms in composites;
transfer, and application of chemical kinetics to elementary reactor-
fatigue, high temperature mechanical behavior, including fracture,
design. Examples from
creep deformation. Prerequisites: MTGN445, MTGN412 or consent of
materials processing and process metallurgy. Molecular transport
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
properties: viscosity, thermal conductivity, and mass diffusivity of
materials encountered during processing operations. Uni-directional
MTGN466. MATERIALS DESIGN: SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION
transport: problem formulation based on the required balance of the
AND SELECTION. 3.0 Hours.
conserved-quantity applied to a control-volume. Prediction of velocity,
(II) (WI) Application of fundamental materials-engineering principles to the
temperature and concentration profiles. Equations of change: continuity,
design
motion, and energy. Transport with two independent variables
of systems for extraction and synthesis, and to the selection of materials.
(unsteady-state behavior). Interphase transport: dimensionless
Systems covered range from those used for metallurgical processing to
correlations friction factor, heat, and mass transfer coefficients.
those used for processing of emergent materials. Microstructural design,
Elementary concepts of radiation heat-transfer. Flow behavior in packed
characterization and
beds. Design equations for: continuous- flow/batch reactors with uniform
properties evaluation provide the basis for linking synthesis to
dispersion and plug flow reactors. Digital computer methods for the
applications. Selection criteria tied to specific requirements such as
design of metallurgical systems. Laboratory sessions devoted to:
corrosion resistance, wear and abrasion resistance, high temperature
tutorials/ demonstrations to facilitate the understanding of concepts
service, cryogenic service, vacuum systems, automotive systems,
related to selected topics; and, Projects with the primary focus on the
electronic and optical systems, high strength/weight ratios, recycling,
operating principles and use of modern electronic- instrumentation for
economics and safety issues. Materials investigated include mature
measurements on lab-scale systems in conjunction with correlation and
and emergent metallic, ceramic and composite systems used in the
prediction strategies for analysis of results. Prerequisites: MATH225,
manufacturing and fabrication industries. Student-team designactivities
MTGN334 and MTGN352. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester
including oral- and written–reports. Prerequisite: MTGN351, MTGN352,
hours.
MTGN445 and MTGN461 or consent of instructor. 1 hour lecture, 6 hours
lab; 3 semester hours.
MTGN462. SOLID WASTE MINIMIZATION AND RECYCLING. 3.0
Hours.
MTGN469. FUEL CELL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.
(I) This course will examine, using case studies, how industry applies
(I) Investigate fundamentals of fuel-cell operation and electrochemistry
engineering principles to minimize waste formation and to meet solid
from a chemical-thermodynamics and materials- science perspective.
waste recycling challenges. Both proven and emerging solutions to solid
Review types of fuel cells, fuel-processing requirements and approaches,
waste environmental problems, especially those associated with metals,
and fuel-cell system integration. Examine current topics in fuel-cell
will be discussed. Prerequisites: EGGN353/ESGN353, EGGN354/
science and technology. Fabricate and test operational fuel cells in the
ESGN354, and ESGN302/CHGN403 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
Colorado Fuel Cell Center. Prerequisites: EGGN371 or ChEN357 or
lecture; 3 semester hours.
MTGN351, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MTGN463. POLYMER ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
MTGN472. BIOMATERIALS I. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Introduction to the structure and properties of polymeric materials,
(I) This course covers a broad overview on materials science and
their
engineering principles for biomedical applications, and is organized
deformation and failure mechanisms, and the design and fabrication
around three main topics: 1) The fundamental properties of biomaterials;
of polymeric end items. Molecular and crystallographic structures of
2) The fundamental concepts in biology; 3) The interactions between
polymers will be developed and related to the elastic, viscoelastic,
biological systems with exogenous materials. Particular emphasis will
yield and fracture properties of polymeric solids and reinforced polymer
be put on understanding surface energy and surface modification;
composites. Emphasis on forming and joining techniques for end-item
protein adsorption; cell adhesion, spreading and migration; Biomaterials
fabrication including: extrusion, injection molding, reaction
implantation and acute inflammation; blood-materials interactions and
injection molding, thermoforming, and blow molding. The design of end-
thrombosis; biofilm and biomaterials-related pathological reactions. In
items in relation to: materials selection, manufacturing engineering,
addition to the reign of biomedical materials, this course also introduces
properties, and applications. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 3 hours
the basic principles of bio-mimetic materials synthesis and assembly.
lecture; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisites: MTGN202 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
MTGN464. FORGING AND FORMING. 3.0 Hours.
MTGN475. METALLURGY OF WELDING. 2.0 Hours.
(II) Introduction to plasticity. Survey and analysis of working operations
(I) Introduction to welding processes; thermal aspects; selection of
of forging, extrusion, rolling, wire drawing and sheet-metal forming.
filler metals; stresses; stress relief and annealing; pre- and postweld
Metallurgical structure evolution during working. Prerequisites: EGGN320
heat treating; weld defects; welding ferrous and nonferrous alloys;
and MTGN348 or
weld metal phase transformations; metallurgical evaluation of resulting
EGGN350. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab, 3 semester hours.
weld microstructures and properties; and welding tests. Prerequisite:
MTGN348. Co-requisite: MTGN477. 2 hours lecture; 2 semester hours.
MTGN477. METALLURGY OF WELDING LABORATORY. 1.0 Hour.
(I) Experiments designed to supplement the lectures in MTGN475. Co-
requisite: MTGN475. 3 hours lab; 1 semester hour.

160 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
MTGN497. SUMMER PROGRAMS. 6.0 Hours.
MTGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS
ENGINEERING. 1-3 Hour.
(I, II, S) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). The course topic is generally
offered only once. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester
hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.
MTGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-3 Hour.
(I, II, S) Independent advanced-work leading to a comprehensive report.
This work may take the form of conferences, library, and laboratory
work. Selection of problem is arranged between student and a specific
Department faculty-member. Prerequisite: Selection of topic with consent
of faculty supervisor; “Independent Study Form” must be completed and
submitted to Registrar. 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit to a
maximum of 6 hours.

Colorado School of Mines 161
Physics
2. Communicate and perform effectively within hte criteria of their
chosen careers;
Program Description
3. Engage in appropriate professional societies and continuing
education activities;
Engineering Physics
4. Participate ethically as members of the global society.
Physics is the most basic of all sciences and the foundation of most of
the science and engineering disciplines. As such, it has always attracted
Degree Requirements (Engineering Physics)
those who want to understand nature at its most fundamental level.
Freshman
Engineering Physics is not a specialized branch of physics, but an
lec
lab
sem.hrs
interdisciplinary area wherein the basic physics subject matter, which
CORE
Common Core
33.0
forms the backbone of any undergraduate physics degree, is taken
further toward application to engineering. The degree is accredited by
33.0
the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for
Sophomore
Engineering and Technology (ABET). At CSM, the required engineering
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
physics curriculum includes all of the undergraduate physics courses that
MATH213
CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS
4
would form the physics curriculum at any good university, but in addition
AND ENGINEERS III
to these basic courses, the CSM requirements include pre-engineering
PHGN200
PHYSICS II-
4.5
and engineering courses, which physics majors at other universities
ELECTROMAGNETISM AND
would not ordinarily take. These courses include engineering science,
OPTICS
design, systems, summer field session, and a capstone senior design
sequence culminating in a senior thesis.
EPIC251
DESIGN (EPICS) II
3
SYGN200
HUMAN SYSTEMS
3
This unique blend of physics and engineering makes it possible for
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
the engineering physics graduate to work at the interface between
science and technology, where new discoveries are continually being
15.0
put to practice. While the engineering physicist is at home applying
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
existing technologies, he or she is also capable of striking out in different
MATH225
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3
directions to develop new technologies. It is the excitement of being able
MATH332
LINEAR ALGEBRA
3
to work at this cutting edge that makes the engineering physics degree
DCGN210
INTRO TO ENG
3
attractive to many students.
THERMODYNAMICS
Career paths of CSM engineering physics graduates vary widely,
PHGN300
PHYSICS III-MODERN
3
illustrating the flexibility inherent in the program. More than half of
PHYSICS I
the graduating seniors go on to graduate school in physics or a
PHGN215
ANALOG ELECTRONICS
4
closely related field of engineering. Some go to medical, law, or other
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
professional post-graduate schools. Others find employment in fields as
diverse as electronics, semiconductor processing, aerospace, materials
16.5
development, biomedical applications, nuclear energy, solar energy, and
Summer
lec
lab
sem.hrs
geophysical exploration.
PHGN384
FIELD SESSION
6.0
The Physics Department maintains modern well-equipped laboratories
TECHNIQUES IN PHYSICS
for general physics, modern physics, electronics, and advanced
6.0
experimentation. There are research laboratories for the study of
Junior
condensed matter physics, surface physics, materials science, optics,
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
and nuclear physics, including an NSF-funded laboratory for solar and
PHGN315
ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB I
2
electronic materials processing. The department also maintains electronic
PHGN311
INTRODUCTION TO
3
and machine shops.
MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS GenEd Restricted
3.0
Program Educational Objectives (Bachelor of
Elective I
Science in Engineering Physics)
PHGN317
SEMICONDUCTOR
3
In addition to contributing toward achieving the educational objectives
CIRCUITS- DIGITAL
described in the CSM Graduate Profile, the Physics Department is
PHGN350
INTERMEDIATE MECHANICS
4
dedicated to additional educational objectives.
15.0
The program prepares graduates who, based on factual knowledge
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
and other skills necessary to construct an appropriate understanding of
PHGN361
INTERMEDIATE
3
physical phenomena in applied contexts, will:
ELECTROMAGNETISM
1. Obtain a range of positions in industry or positions in government
PHGN320
MODERN PHYSICS II: BASICS
4
facilities or pursue graduate education in engineering, science or
OF QUANTUM MECHANICS
related fields;
PHGN326
ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB II
2
PHGN341
THERMAL PHYSICS
3

162 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
EBGN201
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
3
appropriate project and help coordinate the senior design project with the
15.0
case study or thesis completed in the last year.
Senior
It is also possible for undergraduate students to begin work on a Doctoral
Fall
lec
lab
sem.hrs
Degree in Applied Physics while completing the requirements for their
Bachelor’s Degree. Students in this Combined Baccalaureate/Doctoral
PHGN471
SENIOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES
0.5
Program may fulfill part of the requirements of their doctoral degree by
I
including up to six hours of specified course credits that are also used to
PHGN481
SENIOR DESIGN PRACTICE
2.5
fulfill the requirements of their undergraduate degree. These courses may
PHGN462
ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES
3
only be applied toward fulfilling Doctoral Degree requirements. Courses
AND OPTICAL PHYSICS
must meet all requirements for graduate credit, but their grades are not
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS GenEd Restricted
3.0
included in calculating the graduate GPA.
Elective II
Interested students can obtain additional information and detailed
FREE
Free Elective I
3.0
curricula from the Physics Department or from the participating
FREE
Free Elective II
3.0
Engineering Departments.
15.0
Spring
lec
lab
sem.hrs
General CSM Minor/ASI requirements can be found here.
PHGN472
SENIOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES
0.5
II
Minor and Area of Special Interest
PHGN482
SENIOR DESIGN PRACTICE
2.5
The department offers a Minor and Area of Special Interest for students
LAIS/EBGN
H&SS GenEd Restricted
3.0
not majoring in physics. The requirements are as follows:
Elective III
Area of Special Interest (12 semester hours minimum)
ENG SCI
Engineering Science Elective
3.0
PHGN100
PHYSICS I - MECHANICS
4.5
FREE
Free Elective III
3.0
or PHGN200
PHYSICS II-ELECTROMAGNETISM AND OPTICS
FREE
Free Elective IV
3.0
Minor (18 semester hours minimum)
15.0
PHGN100
PHYSICS I - MECHANICS
4.5
Total Hours: 130.5
or PHGN200
PHYSICS II-ELECTROMAGNETISM AND OPTICS
Combined Baccalaureate / Masters
PHGN300/310
PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS I
3.0
and Baccalaureate / Doctoral Degree
PHGN320
MODERN PHYSICS II: BASICS OF QUANTUM
4.0
MECHANICS
Programs
Select one of the following:
3-4
The Physics Department, independently, and in collaboration with the
PHGN341
THERMAL PHYSICS
Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, the Department
PHGN350
INTERMEDIATE MECHANICS
of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, the Department of Mechanical
PHGN361
INTERMEDIATE ELECTROMAGNETISM
Engineering, the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer
Total Hours
19-20
Science, and the Nuclear Science and Engineering Program offers
programs in which students obtain an undergraduate degree in
Selected courses to complete the Minor: Upper division (400-level) and/or
Engineering Physics in four years as well as a Masters Degree in
graduate (500-level) courses which form a logical sequence in a specific
Applied Physics, an Engineering discipline, or Mathematics after an
field of study as determined in consultation with the Physics Department
additional year of study. There are four engineering tracks, three physics
and the student’s option department.
tracks, and one mathematics track. These programs emphasize a
strong background in fundamentals of science, in addition to practical
experience within an applied physics, engineering, or mathematics
discipline. Many of the undergraduate electives of students involved
Courses
in each track are specified. For this reason, students are expected to
PHGN100. PHYSICS I - MECHANICS. 4.5 Hours.
apply to the program during the first semester of their sophomore year (in
(I, II, S) A first course in physics covering the basic principles of
special cases late entry can be approved by the program mentors). A 3.0
mechanics using vectors and calculus. The course consists of a
grade point average must be maintained to guarantee admission into the
fundamental treatment of the concepts and applications of kinematics
engineering and physics graduate programs. A 3.3 grade point average
and dynamics of particles and systems of particles, including Newton’s
must be maintained to guarantee admission into the mathematics
laws, energy and momentum, rotation, oscillations, and waves.
graduate program.
Prerequisite: MATH111 and concurrent enrollment in MATH112/
Students in the engineering tracks must complete a report or case study
MATH122 or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture; 4 hours studio; 4.5
during the last year. Students in the physics and mathematics tracks must
semester hours. Approved for Colorado Guaranteed General Education
complete a master’s thesis. Students in the nuclear engineering program
transfer. Equivalency for GT-SC1.
can choose between thesis and non-thesis options. The case study or
thesis should begin during the senior year as part of the Senior Design
experience. Participants must identify an engineering or physics advisor
as appropriate prior to their senior year who will assist in choosing an

Colorado School of Mines 163
PHGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
PHGN310. HONORS PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS. 3.0 Hours.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Prerequisite: Consent of
(II) The third course in introductory physics with in depth discussion
Department. Credit to be determined by instructor, maximum of 6 credit
on special relativity, wave-particle duality, the Schroedinger equation,
hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.
electrons in solids, quantum tunneling, nuclear structure and
transmutations. Registration is strongly recommended for declared
PHGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
physics majors and those considering majoring or minoring in physics.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
Prerequisite: PHGN200; Concurrent enrollment in MATH225 or consent
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
of instructor.
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
PHGN311. INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS. 3.0
Hours.
PHGN200. PHYSICS II-ELECTROMAGNETISM AND OPTICS. 4.5
Demonstration of the unity of diverse topics such as mechanics, quantum
Hours.
mechanics, optics, and electricity and magnetism via the techniques
(I, II, S) Continuation of PHGN100. Introduction to the fundamental laws
of linear algebra, complex variables, Fourier transforms, and vector
and concepts of electricity and magnetism, electromagnetic devices,
calculus. Prerequisite:
electromagnetic behavior of materials, applications to simple circuits,
PHGN300/PHGN310, MATH225, and MATH332 or consent of instructor.
electromagnetic radiation, and an introduction to optical phenomena.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisite: Grade of C- or higher in PHGN100, concurrent enrollment
in MATH213/MATH223. 2 hours lecture; 4 hours studio; 4.5 semester
PHGN315. ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB I. 2.0 Hours.
hours.
(I) (WI) Introduction to laboratory measurement techniques as applied
to modern physics experiments. Experiments from optics and atomic
PHGN215. ANALOG ELECTRONICS. 4.0 Hours.
physics. A writing-intensive course with laboratory and computer
(II) Introduction to analog devices used in modern electronics and basic
design projects based on applications of modern physics. Prerequisite:
topics in
PHGN300/PHGN310, PHGN384 or consent of instructor. 1 hour lecture,
electrical engineering. Introduction to methods of electronics
3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.
measurements, particularly the application of oscilloscopes and computer
based data acquisition. Topics covered include circuit analysis, electrical
PHGN317. SEMICONDUCTOR CIRCUITS- DIGITAL. 3.0 Hours.
power, diodes, transistors (FET
(I) Introduction to digital devices used in modern electronics. Topics
and BJT), operational amplifiers, filters, transducers, and integrated
covered include logic gates, flip-flops, timers, counters, multiplexing,
circuits. Laboratory experiments in the use of basic electronics for
analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog devices. Emphasis is on practical
physical measurements. Emphasis is on practical knowledge gained in
circuit design and assembly.
the laboratory, including prototyping, troubleshooting, and laboratory
Prerequisite: PHGN215. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
notebook style. Prerequisite: PHGN200. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4
semester hours.
PHGN320. MODERN PHYSICS II: BASICS OF QUANTUM
MECHANICS. 4.0 Hours.
PHGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
(II) Introduction to the Schroedinger theory of quantum mechanics.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Prerequisite: Consent of
Topics include Schroedinger’s equation, quantum theory of
Department. Credit to be determined by instructor, maximum of 6 credit
measurement, the uncertainty principle, eigenfunctions and energy
hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.
spectra, anular momentum, perturbation theory, and the treatment of
identical particles. Example applications taken from atomic, molecular,
PHGN299. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
solid state or nuclear systems. Prerequisites: PHGN300/PHGN310 and
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
PHGN311. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester hours.
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
PHGN324. INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS.
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
3.0 Hours.
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
(II) Celestial mechanics; Kepler’s laws and gravitation; solar system
and its contents; electromagnetic radiation and matter; stars: distances,
PHGN300. PHYSICS III-MODERN PHYSICS I. 3.0 Hours.
magnitudes, spectral classification, structure, and evolution. Variable
(I, II, S) Our technical world is filled with countless examples of modern
and unusual stars, pulsars and neutron stars, supernovae, black holes,
physics. This course will discuss some historic experiments that led
and models of the origin and evolution of the universe. Prerequisite:
to the key discoveries, and the basic concepts, theories, and models
PHGN200. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
behind some of our present day technologies. Topics may include special
relativity, quantum physics, atomic and molecular physics, solid-state
PHGN326. ADVANCED PHYSICS LAB II. 2.0 Hours.
physics, semiconductor theory and devices, nuclear physics, particle
(II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN315. A writing-intensive course which
physics and cosmology.
expands laboratory experiments to include nuclear and solid state
Prerequisite: PHGN200; Concurrent enrollment in MATH225 or consent
physics. Prerequisite: PHGN315. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester
of instructor.
hours.
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

164 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
PHGN333. INTRODUCTION TO BIOPHYSICS. 3.0 Hours.
PHGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(II) This course is designed to show the application of physics to
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
biology. It will assess the relationships between sequence structure
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
and function in complex biological networks and the interfaces between
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
physics, chemistry, biology and medicine. Topics include: biological
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
membranes, biological mechanics and movement, neural networks,
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
medical imaging basics including optical methods, MRI, isotopic tracers
and CT, biomagnetism and pharmacokinetics. Prerequisites:
PHGN401. THEORETICAL PHYSICS SEMINAR. 1.0 Hour.
PHGN200 and BELS301/ESGN301, or permission of the instructor, 3
(I,II) Students will attend the weekly theoretical physics seminar.
hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
Students will be responsible for presentation and discussion. Corequisite:
PHGN300/PHGN310. 1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour.
PHGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION. 1-3 Hour.
(I, II, S) Supervised, full-time, engineering-related employment for a
PHGN419. PRINCIPLES OF SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.
continuous
Review of the solar resource and components of solar irradiance;
six-month period (or its equivalent) in which specific educational
principles of photovoltaic devices and photovoltaic system design;
objectives are achieved. Prerequisite: Second semester sophomore
photovoltaic electrical energy production and cost analysis of photovoltaic
status and a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.00. 1 to 3
systems relative to fossil fuel alternatives; introduction to concentrated
semester hours. Repeatable up to 3 credit hours.
photovoltaic systems and manufacturing methods for wafer-based and
thin film photovoltaic panels. Prerequisite: PHGN200 and MATH225. 3
PHGN341. THERMAL PHYSICS. 3.0 Hours.
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(II) An introduction to statistical physics from the quantum mechanical
point of view. The microcanonical and canonical ensembles. Heat,
PHGN422. NUCLEAR PHYSICS. 3.0 Hours.
work and the laws of thermodynamics. Thermodynamic potentials;
Introduction to subatomic (particle and nuclear) phenomena.
Maxwell relations; phase transformations. Elementary kinetic theory. An
Characterization and systematics of particle and nuclear states;
introduction to quantum statistics.
symmetries; introduction and systematics of the electromagnetic, weak,
Prerequisite: DCGN209 or 210 and PHGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3
and strong interactions; systematics of radioactivity; liquid drop and shell
semester hours.
models; nuclear technology. Prerequisite:
PHGN300/PHGN310. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PHGN350. INTERMEDIATE MECHANICS. 4.0 Hours.
(I)Begins with an intermediate treatment of Newtonian mechanics and
PHGN424. ASTROPHYSICS. 3.0 Hours.
continues through an introduction to Hamilton’s principle and Hamiltonian
(II) A survey of fundamental aspects of astrophysical phenomena,
and Lagrangian dynamics. Includes systems of particles, linear and
concentrating on measurements of basic stellar properties such as
driven oscillators, motion under a central force, two-particle collisions and
distance, luminosity, spectral classification, mass, and radii. Simple
scattering, motion in non-inertial reference frames and dynamics of rigid
models of stellar structure evolution and the associated nuclear
bodies.Prerequisite: PHGN200. Corequisite: PHGN311. 4 hours lecture;
processes as sources of energy and nucleosynthesis. Introduction to
4 semester hours.
cosmology and physics of standard big-bang models. Prerequisite:
PHGN300/PHGN310. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PHGN361. INTERMEDIATE ELECTROMAGNETISM. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Theory and application of the following: static electric and magnetic
PHGN435. INTERDISCIPLINARY MICROELECTRONICS
fields in free space, dielectric materials, and magnetic materials; steady
PROCESSING LABORATORY. 3.0 Hours.
currents; scalar and vector potentials; Gauss’ law and Laplace’s equation
Application of science and engineering principles to the design,
applied to boundary
fabrication, and testing of microelectronic devices. Emphasis on
value problems; Ampere’s and Faraday’s laws. Prerequisite: PHGN200
specific unit operations and the interrelation among processing steps.
and PHGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Prerequisites: Senior standing in PHGN, CHGN, MTGN, or EGGN.
Consent of instructor. 1.5 hours lecture, 4 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
PHGN384. FIELD SESSION TECHNIQUES IN PHYSICS. 1-6 Hour.
(S1) Introduction to the design and fabrication of engineering physics
PHGN440. SOLID STATE PHYSICS. 3.0 Hours.
apparatus. Intensive individual participation in the design of machined
An elementary study of the properties of solids including crystalline
system components, vacuum systems, electronics, optics, and
structure and its determination, lattice vibrations, electrons in metals,
application of computer interfacing systems and computational tools.
and semiconductors. (Graduate students in physics may register only for
Supplementary lectures on safety, laboratory techniques and professional
PHGN440.) Prerequisite: PHGN320. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
development. Visits to regional research facilities and industrial plants.
PHGN441. SOLID STATE PHYSICS APPLICATIONS AND
Prerequisite: PHGN300/PHGN310, PHGN215. (6 credit hours).
PHENOMENA. 3.0 Hours.
PHGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
Continuation of PHGN440/MLGN502 with an emphasis on applications
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Prerequisite: Consent of
of the principles of solid state physics to practical properties of materials
Department. Credit to be determined by instructor, maximum of 6 credit
including: optical properties, superconductivity, dielectric properties,
hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.
magnetism, noncrystalline structure, and interfaces. (Graduate students
in physics may register only for PHGN441.) Prerequisite: PHGN440 or
MLGN502, or equivalent by instructor’s permission. 3 hours lecture; 3
semester hours.

Colorado School of Mines 165
PHGN450. COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS. 3.0 Hours.
PHGN482. SENIOR DESIGN PRACTICE. 2.5 Hours.
Introduction to numerical methods for analyzing advanced physics
(II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN481. The course culminates in a formal
problems. Topics covered include finite element methods, analysis of
written report and poster. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-
scaling, efficiency, errors, and stability, as well as a survey of numerical
requisite: PHGN472. 6 hour lab; 2.5 semester hours.
algorithms and packages for analyzing algebraic, differential, and matrix
systems. The numerical methods are introduced and developed in the
PHGN491. HONORS SENIOR DESIGN PRACTICE. 2.5 Hours.
analysis of advanced physics problems taken from classical physics,
(I) (WI) Individual work on an advanced research topic that involves
astrophysics, electromagnetism, solid state, and nuclear physics.
more challenging demands than a regular senior design project. Honors
Prerequisites: Introductory-level knowledge of C, Fortran, or Basic; and
students will devote more time to their project, and will produce an
PHGN311. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
intermediate report in a more advanced format. Prerequisite: PHGN384
and PHGN326. Corequisite: PHGN471. 7.5 hour lab; 2.5 semester hours.
PHGN462. ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES AND OPTICAL PHYSICS.
3.0 Hours.
PHGN492. HONORS SENIOR DESIGN PRACTICE. 2.5 Hours.
(I) Solutions to the electromagnetic wave equation are studied, including
(II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN481 or PHGN491. The course culminates
plane waves, guided waves, refraction, interference, diffraction and
in a formal written report and poster. The report may be in the form of a
polarization; applications in optics; imaging, lasers, resonators and wave
manuscript suitable for submission to a professional journal. Prerequisite:
guides. Prerequisite:
PHGN481 or PHGN491. Corequisite: PHGN472. 7.5 hour lab; 2.5
PHGN361. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
semesterhours.
PHGN466. MODERN OPTICAL ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
PHGN497. SUMMER PROGRAMS. 6.0 Hours.
Provides students with a comprehensive working knowledge of optical
PHGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
system design that is sufficient to address optical problems found in their
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Prerequisite: Consent of
respective disciplines. Topics include paraxial optics, imaging, aberration
Department. Credit to be determined by instructor, maximum of 6 credit
analysis, use of commercial ray tracing and optimization, diffraction,
hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.
linear systems and optical
transfer functions, detectors and optical system examples. Prerequisite:
PHGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
PHGN462 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
PHGN471. SENIOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES I. 0.5 Hours.
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
(I) (WI) The first of a two semester sequence covering the principles of
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
project design. Class sessions cover effective team organization, project
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
planning, time management, literature research methods, record keeping,
fundamentals of technical writing, professional ethics, project funding
and intellectual property. Prerequisites: PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-
requisites: PHGN481 or PHGN491. 1 hour lecture in 7 class sessions; 0.5
semester hours.
PHGN472. SENIOR DESIGN PRINCIPLES II. 0.5 Hours.
(II) (WI) Continuation of PHGN471. Prerequisite: PHGN384 and
PHGN326. Co-requisite: PHGN482 or PHGN492. 1 hour lecture in 7
class sessions; 0.5 semester hours.
PHGN480. LASER PHYSICS. 3.0 Hours.
(I) Theory and application of the following: Gaussian beams, optical
cavities and wave guides, atomic radiation, detection of radiation, laser
oscillation, nonlinear optics and ultrafast pulses. Prerequisite: PHGN320.
Co-requisite: PHGN462. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
PHGN481. SENIOR DESIGN PRACTICE. 2.5 Hours.
(I) (WI) The first of a two semester program covering the full spectrum of
project design, drawing on all of the student’s previous course work. At
the beginning of the first semester, the student selects a research project
in consultation with the Senior Design Oversight Committee (SDOC)
and the Project Mentor. The objectives of the project are given to the
student in broad outline form. The student then designs the entire project,
including any or all of the following elements as appropriate: literature
search, specialized apparatus or algorithms,
block-diagram electronics, computer data acquisition and/or analysis,
sample materials, and measurement and/or analysis sequences.
The course culminates in a formal interim written report. Prerequisite:
PHGN384 and PHGN326. Co-requisite:
PHGN471. 6 hour lab; 2.5 semester hours.

166 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
Aerospace Studies
later than the beginning of the spring semester to apply for the following
academic year. A complete listing of all available AFROTC scholarships
Air Force ROTC (AFROTC)
is available at www.afrotc.com (bulletin.mines.edu/undergraduate/
programs/additionalprograms/aerospacestudies/http://www.afrotc.com).
The Department of Aerospace Studies offers programs leading
to an officer’s commission in the Air Force in conjunction with an
Registration and Credits
undergraduate or graduate degree.
Air Force ROTC serves as elective credit in most departments. Elective
Aerospace science courses are designed to supplement a regular degree
course credit toward your degree for AFROTC classes will be determined
program by offering practical leadership and management experience.
by your individual academic advisor. Students who wish to register for
The Aerospace Studies Program at the Colorado School of Mines (CSM)
Air Force ROTC classes do so through the normal course registration
is offered in conjunction with the University of Colorado at Boulder (CUB).
process at CSM. AFROTC classes begin with the AFGN prefix. For
more information about AFROTC, contact the Air Force ROTC Unit
Four-Year Program
Admissions Officer at www.afrotc.colorado.edu (bulletin.mines.edu/
The four-year program consists of two phases: the general military
undergraduate/programs/additionalprograms/aerospacestudies/http://
course (freshman and sophomore years) and the professional officer
www.afrotc.colorado.edu), or the department on campus directly at
course (junior and senior years). This program is designed for incoming
303-273-3380. The department is located in the Military Science building
freshmen or any student with four years remaining until degree
on West Campus Road. For information about CSM, call 303-273-3380.
completion. It consists of three parts: the General Military Course (GMC)
Aerospace Studies Minor
for lower division (normally freshmen and sophomore) students; the
Professional Officer Course (POC) for upper division students (normally
Air Force ROTC cadets desiring to receive a minor in Aerospace Studies
juniors and seniors); and Leadership Laboratory (LLAB-attended by all
must complete at least 20 hours of Aerospace Studies courses as
cadets). Completion of a four-week summer training course is required
follows:
prior to commissioning.
AFGN101
FOUNDATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES AIR
1.5
Leadership Lab
FORCE
AFGN102
FOUNDATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES AIR
1.5
All AFROTC cadets must attend Leadership Lab (2 hours per week). The
FORCE
laboratory involves a study of Air Force customs and courtesies, drill and
AFGN201
THE EVOLUTION OF USAF AIR AND SPACE
1.5
ceremonies, career opportunities, and the life and work of an Air Force
POWER
officer.
AFGN202
THE EVOLUTION OF USAF AIR AND SPACE
1.5
General Military Course (GMC)
POWER
The basic course covers Air Force history and organization as well as
AFGN301
AIR FORCE LEADERHIP STUDIES
3.5
military leadership and management. Laboratory sessions provide the
AFGN302
AIR FORCE LEADERHIP STUDIES
3.5
opportunity to apply leadership skills while learning basic military skills.
AFGN401
NATIONAL SECURITY AFFAIRS AND
3.5
Enrollment in the basic course incurs no military obligation except for Air
PREPARATION FOR ACTIVE DUTY
Force scholarship recipients.
AFGN402
NATIONAL SECURITY AFFAIRS AND
3.5
Professional Officer Course (POC)
PREPARATION FOR ACTIVE DUTY
The advanced course covers military officership, leadership and
Total Hours
20.0
unit operations, training techniques, military law, and professional
General CSM Minor/ASI requirements can be
ethics, and includes a leadership practicum each semester. A Field
Training encampment provides challenging leadership training and is a
found at
prerequisite for commissioning. Advanced course students must have
https://nextbulletin.mines.edu/undergraduate/undergraduateinformation/
completed the basic course and obtain permission from the Professor of
specialprograms/minorasi/
Aerospace Studies (PAS) to enroll in the POC.
Other AFROTC Programs
Three-Year Program
Other programs are frequently available based on current Air Force
The three-year program consists of the first two years of GMC courses
needs. Contact a Det 105 representative at afrotc.colorado.edu
taken concurrently in one year. The student then attends a Field Training
(bulletin.mines.edu/undergraduate/programs/additionalprograms/
encampment, and completes two years of advanced POC courses.
aerospacestudies/http://afrotc.colorado.edu).
Scholarship Programs
Four-year college scholarships are available to high school seniors, who
apply before December 1 of their senior year. Competition for two- and
three- year scholarships is open to all university students, regardless of
academic major and whether or not they are currently enrolled in ROTC.
Scholarship students receive tuition assistance and mandatory laboratory
fees, a book allowance, and a monthly stipend. Students interested in the
scholarship program should contact the AFROTC Unit Admissions Officer
at www.afrotc.colorado.edu (bulletin.mines.edu/undergraduate/programs/
additionalprograms/aerospacestudies/http://www.afrotc.colorado.edu) no

Colorado School of Mines 167
Courses
AFGN302. AIR FORCE LEADERHIP STUDIES. 3.5 Hours.
Two semesters, 3.5 hours per semester. This course is a study in the
AFGN101. FOUNDATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE. 1.5
anatomy of leadership, the need for quality and management leadership,
Hour.
the role of discipline in leadership situations and the variables affecting
Two semesters, 1.5 hours per semester. This survey course briefly
leadership. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and
covers topics relating to the Air Force and defense. It focuses on
management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising
the structure and missions of Air Force organizations, officership
practical application of the concepts. Deal with actual problems and
and professionalism. It is also a good introduction into the use of
complete projects associated with planning and managing the Leadership
communication skills. Weekly Leadership Lab for this
Laboratory. Weekly Leadership Laboratory (LLAB) for this course (to be
course (to be taken in conjunction with AS 101 and 102) is a weekly
taken in conjunction with AS 301 and 302) provides you the opportunity
laboratory that touches on the topics of Air Force customs and
to develop
courtesies, health and physical fitness, and drill and ceremonies.
your fundamental management skills while planning and conducting
cadet activities.
AFGN102. FOUNDATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE. 1.5
Hour.
AFGN401. NATIONAL SECURITY AFFAIRS AND PREPARATION FOR
Two semesters, 1.5 hours per semester. This survey course briefly
ACTIVE DUTY. 3.5 Hours.
covers topics relating to the Air Force and defense. It focuses on
Two semesters, 3.5 hours per semester. Learn about the role of the
the structure and missions of Air Force organizations, officership
professional
and professionalism. It is also a good introduction into the use of
military leader in a democratic society; societal attitudes toward the
communication skills. Weekly Leadership Lab for this
armed forces; the requisites for maintaining adequate national defense
course (to be taken in conjunction with AS 101 and 102) is a weekly
structure; the impact of technological and international developments
laboratory that touches on the topics of Air Force customs and
on strategic preparedness and the overall policy-making process; and
courtesies, health and physical fitness, and drill and ceremonies.
military law. In addition, you will study topics that will prepare you for
your first active-duty assignment as an officer in the Air Force. Weekly
AFGN201. THE EVOLUTION OF USAF AIR AND SPACE POWER. 1.5
Leadership Laboratory (LLAB) for this course (to be taken in conjunction
Hour.
with AS 401 and 402) provides you with the opportunity to use your
Two semesters, 1.5 hours per semester. This survey course is concerned
leadership skills in planning and conducting cadet activities. It prepares
with the beginnings of manned flight and the development of aerospace
you for commissioning and entry into the active-duty Air Force.
power in the United States, including the employment of air power in
WWI, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, the Gulf War and the peaceful employment
AFGN402. NATIONAL SECURITY AFFAIRS AND PREPARATION FOR
of U.S. air power in civic actions, scientific missions and support of space
ACTIVE DUTY. 3.5 Hours.
exploration. Weekly Leadership Laboratory (LLAB) for this course (to
Two semesters, 3.5 hours per semester. Learn about the role of the
be taken in conjunction with AS 201 and 202) provides you with the
professional
opportunity to demonstrate fundamental management skills and prepares
military leader in a democratic society; societal attitudes toward the
you for Field Training.
armed forces; the requisites for maintaining adequate national defense
structure; the impact of technological and international developments
AFGN202. THE EVOLUTION OF USAF AIR AND SPACE POWER. 1.5
on strategic preparedness and the overall policy-making process; and
Hour.
military law. In addition, you will study topics that will prepare you for
Two semesters, 1.5 hours per semester. This survey course is concerned
your first active-duty assignment as an officer in the Air Force. Weekly
with the beginnings of manned flight and the development of aerospace
Leadership Laboratory (LLAB) for this course (to be taken in conjunction
power in the United States, including the employment of air power in
with AS 401 and 402) provides you with the opportunity to use your
WWI, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, the Gulf War and the peaceful employment
leadership skills in planning and conducting cadet activities. It prepares
of U.S. air power in civic actions, scientific missions and support of space
you for commissioning and entry into the active-duty Air Force.
exploration. Weekly Leadership Laboratory (LLAB) for this course (to
be taken in conjunction with AS 201 and 202) provides you with the
MSGN103. ADVENTURES IN LEADERSHIP I. 2.0 Hours.
opportunity to demonstrate fundamental management skills and prepares
(I) Introduces fundamentals of leadership and the United States Army.
you for Field Training.
Examines its organization, customs, and history as well as its current
relevance and purpose. Students also investigate basic leadership
AFGN301. AIR FORCE LEADERHIP STUDIES. 3.5 Hours.
and management skills necessary to be successful in both military and
Two semesters, 3.5 hours per semester. This course is a study in the
civilian settings. Includes fundamentals of Army leadership doctrine,
anatomy of leadership, the need for quality and management leadership,
teambuilding concepts, time and stress management, an
the role of discipline in leadership situations and the variables affecting
introduction to cartography and land navigation, marksmanship, briefing
leadership. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and
techniques, and some basic military tactics. Lab fee. 1 hour lecture, 2
management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising
hours lab, 3 hours PT, and 80 hours field training; 2 semester hours.
practical application of the concepts. Deal with actual problems and
(Fall).
complete projects associated with planning and managing the Leadership
Laboratory. Weekly Leadership Laboratory (LLAB) for this course (to be
taken in conjunction with AS 301 and 302) provides you the opportunity
to develop
your fundamental management skills while planning and conducting
cadet activities.

168 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
MSGN104. ADVENTURES IN LEADERSHIP II. 2.0 Hours.
MSGN301. MILITARY OPERATIONS AND TRAINING I. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Continues the investigation of leadership in small organizations.
(I) Further explores the theory of managing and leading small military
Covers selected topics such as basic troop leading procedures, military
units with an emphasis on practical applications at the squad and platoon
first aid and casualty evacuation concepts, creating ethical work climates,
levels. Students examine various leadership styles and techniques as
an introduction to Army organizations and installations, and a further
they relate to advanced small unit tactics. Familiarizes students with a
examination of basic military tactics. Introduces students to effective
variety of topics such as cartography, land navigation, field craft, and
military writing styles. Lab fee. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab, 3 hours PT,
weapons systems. Involves multiple, evaluated
and 80 hours field training; 2 semester hours. (Spring).
leadership opportunities in field settings and hands-on experience with
actual military equipment. Students are given maximum leadership
MSGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MILITARY SCIENCE. 1-6 Hour.
opportunities in weekly labs. Prerequisite: Consent of the Professor of
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
Military Science. Lab Fee. 3
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall).
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
MSGN302. MILITARY OPERATIONS AND TRAINING II. 3.0 Hours.
(II) Studies theoretical and practical applications of small unit leadership
MSGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
principles. Focuses on managing personnel and resources, the
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
military decision making process, the operations order, and oral
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
communications. Exposes the student to tactical unit leadership in a
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
variety of environments with a focus on preparation for the summer
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
advance camp experience. Prerequisite: Consent of the Professor of
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
Military Science. Lab Fee. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring).
MSGN203. METHODS OF LEADERSHIP. 2.0 Hours.
MSGN303. LEADERSHIP LABORATORY. 0.5 Hours.
(I) Comprehensively reviews advanced leadership and management
(I) Development of military leadership techniques to include preparation
concepts including motivation, attitudes, communication skills, problem
of operation plans, presentation of instruction, and supervision of
solving, human needs and behavior, and leadership self development.
underclass military cadets. Instruction in military drill, ceremonies, and
Students continue to refine effective written and oral communications
customs and courtesies of the Army. Must be taken in conjunction with
skills and to explore topics such as the basic branches of the Army,
MSGN301. Prerequisite: Consent of department. Lab Fee. 2 hours lab, 3
and officer and NCO duties. Students conduct classroom and practical
hours PT, 80 hours field training; .5 semester hour. (Fall).
exercises in small unit light infantry tactics and are prepared to perform
as midlevel leaders in the cadet organization. Lab fee: 1 hour lecture, 2
MSGN304. LEADERSHIP LABORATORY. 0.5 Hours.
hours lab, 3 hours PT, and 80 hours field training; 2 semester hours.
(II) Continued development of military leadership techniques with the
(Fall).
major
emphasis on leading an Infantry Squad. Training is "handson." Practical
MSGN204. METHODS OF LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT II. 2.0
exercises are used to increase understanding of the principles of
Hours.
leadership learned in MSGN302. Must be taken in conjunction with
(II) Focuses on leadership and management functions in military and
MSGN302. Prerequisite: Consent of department. Lab Fee. 2 hours lab, 3
corporate environments. Studies various components of Army leadership
hours PT, 80 hours field training; .5 semester hour. (Spring).
doctrine to include
the four elements of leadership, leadership principles, risk management
MSGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MILITARY SCIENCE. 1-6 Hour.
and planning theory, the be-know-do framework, and the Army leadership
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
evaluation program. Continue to refine communication skills. Lab fee.
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab, 3 hours PT, and 80 hours field training; 2
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
semester hours. (Spring).
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
MSGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MILITARY SCIENCE. 1-6 Hour.
MSGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
MSGN299. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

Colorado School of Mines 169
MSGN401. OFFICER LEADERSHIP AND DEVELOPMENT I. 3.0 Hours.
MSGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(I) Examines management and leadership concepts and techniques
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
associated with planning and executing military training and operations
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
at company and higher echelons. Includes analyses of professional
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
ethics and values, effective training principles and procedures,
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
subordinate counseling, and effective staff officer briefing techniques.
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
Also investigates other subjects such as counter terrorism, modern
peacekeeping missions, and the impact of the information revolution on
the art of land warfare. Conducted both in and out of classroom setting
and with multiple practical leadership opportunities to organize cadet
training and activities.
Prerequisite: Consent of the Professor of Military Science. Lab Fee. 3
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall).
MSGN402. OFFICER LEADERSHIP AND DEVELOPMENT II. 3.0
Hours.
(II) Continues MSGN401 study of management and leadership concepts
and techniques, providing practical leadership experiences in the
classroom and during multiple cadet-run activities. Also examines varied
topics such as theory and practice of the military justice system, law of
war, military-media relations, support mechanisms for soldiers and their
families, operational security considerations, and historical case studies
in military leadership in the context of
21st century land warfare. Prerequisite: Consent of the Professor of
Military Science. Lab Fee. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring).
MSGN403. LEADERSHIP LABORATORY. 0.5 Hours.
(I) Continued development of leadership techniques by assignment in the
command and staff positions in the Cadet Battalion. Cadets are expected
to plan and execute much of the training associated with the day-to-
day operations within the cadet battalion. Utilizing the troop leading and
management principles
learned in previous classes, cadets analyze the problems which the
battalion faces, develop strategies, brief recommendations, and execute
the approved plan. Prerequisite: Consent of department. Lab Fee. 2
hours lab, 3 hours PT, and 80 hours field training; .5 semester hour.
(Fall).
MSGN404. LEADERSHIP LABORATORY. 0.5 Hours.
(II) Continued leadership development by serving in the command
and staff positions in the Cadet Battalion. Cadets take a large role in
determining the goals and direction of the cadet organization, under
supervision of the cadre. Cadets are required to plan and organize
cadet outings and much of the training of underclassmen. Lab Fee.
Prerequisite: Consent of department. Lab Fee. 2 hours lab, 3 hours PT,
and 80 hours field training; .5 semester hour. (Spring).
MSGN497. SPEC STDY LDRSHIP/SMALL GRP. 3.0 Hours.
(I) The course is specifically geared to the unique leadership challenges
faced by individuals involved in CSM student government and other
campus leadership positions. Instruction emphasis is on forces and
dynamics which shape and define leader/manager’s job in the campus
environment. Prerequisite: Currently appointed or elected leader of a
recognized student organization or consent of the department head. 1
hour lecture and 5 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
MSGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MILITARY SCIENCE. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.

170 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
Design -- EPICS (Engineering
EPIC199. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
Practices Introductory Course
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
Sequence)
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
Design EPICS is designed to prepare students for their upper-division
courses and to develop some of the key skills of the professional
EPIC251. DESIGN (EPICS) II. 3.0 Hours.
engineer: the ability to solve complex, open-ended problems, the ability to
(I,II,S). Design EPICS II builds on the design process introduced in
work in teams, the ability to select a solution from competing alternatives,
Design EPICS I, which
and the ability to communicate effectively. The first semester course,
focuses on open-ended problem solving in which students integrate
EPIC151, is required by all undergraduate options. The second semester
teamwork and communications with the use of computer software as
course, EPIC251, is required by all undergraduate engineering options
tools to solve engineering problems. Computer applications emphasize
according to ABET requirements. EPIC251 is not required for majors in
information acquisition and processing based on knowing what new
Chemistry, Mathematical and Computer Sciences, and Economics and
information is necessary to solve a problem and where to find the
Business.
information efficiently. Teams analyze team dynamics through weekly
An award-winning program, Design EPICS replaces the traditional
team meetings and progress reports. The course emphasizes oral
core courses in introductory computing skills, graphics, and technical
presentations and builds on written communications techniques
communication. Whenever possible, instruction in these subjects is
introduced in Design EPICS I Prerequisite: EPIC151. 3 semester hours.
"hands-on" and experimental, with the instructor serving primarily as
mentor rather than lecturer.
EPIC252. LEADERSHIP DESIGN II. 4.0 Hours.
(I,II). EPIC252 can be taken in place of EPIC251. Students integrate
Problem-solving skills are developed through open-ended design
teamwork, communications, computer software applications and project
problems organized as semester-long "projects," which the students
management skills to solve engineering problems, and the deliverables
solve in teams. Projects grow in content and complexity as the program
are equivalent to those for EPICS 251. In addition, students examine
applies a guided methodology to projects submitted by an external client.
the global nature of modern engineering design by combining a project
The projects require extensive library research and self-education in
of global interest with an emphasis on leadership and communications
appropriate technical areas; they also require students to consider non-
skills across a variety of cultures. To support these objectives, students
technical constraints (economic, ethical, political, societal, etc.) and
conduct research in the effect of international influences and cultural
incorporate them into their solutions.
diversity on the acceptance and
Written and oral communications skills are studied and practiced as an
implementation of their design solutions. Prerequisite: EPIC151. 4
integral part of the project work. Specific graphics and computing skills
semester hours.
are integrated within projects wherever applicable.
EPIC261. EPICS II: GIS. 3.0 Hours.
(I,II): Design EPICS II builds on the design process introduced in
Design EPICS I, which focuses on open-ended problem solving in
Courses
which students integrate teamwork and communication with the use of
computer software as tools to
EPIC151. DESIGN (EPICS) I. 3.0 Hours.
solve engineering problems. Computer applications emphasize
(I,II,S). Design EPICS I introduces students to a design process that
information acquisition and processing based on knowing what new
includes open-ended problem solving and teamwork integrated with
information is necessary to solve a problem and where to find the
the use of computer software as tools to solve engineering problems.
information efficiently. EPICS 261 – GIS incorporates instruction
Computer applications emphasize graphical visualization and production
and practice in ArcView, a geographic information system software
of clear and coherent graphical images, charts, and drawings. Teams
package, to enable students to capture, manage, analyze and display
assess engineering ethics, group dynamics and time management with
geographic information in maps, charts or tables, with projects that
respect to decisionmaking. The course emphasizes written technical
depend on GIS for their design solutions. Recent projects involving the
communications and introduces oral presentations. 3 semester hours.
use of GIS include campus emergency management and room usage
EPIC155. EPICS I GRAPHICS. 1.0 Hour.
maps, groundwater testing well analysis and reporting for the Colorado
(I,II). Instruction and practice inmechanical sketching and computer-
Department of Agriculture and trail maps for the Foothills Recreation
aided drafting methods.Specific lessons include perspective sketching,
District. Students interested in Petroleum Engineering, or another major
geometricconstruction, isometric and orthographic views, dimensions,and
where GIS is used, should consider registering for this section. Geology
sections. Homework is assigned weekly. Each unit culminatesin one
and Geological Engineering students are directed to register for
in-class proficiency examination or extended written assignment, plus
Geology GIS EPICS251, which is a different course. Prerequisite:
one capstone design portfolio. Prerequisites: permission of the EPICS
EPIC151. 3 semester hours.
Program Director. 1hour lecture, 1 hour laboratory, 1 semester hour.

Colorado School of Mines 171
EPIC262. EPICS II: AUTO CAD. 3.0 Hours.
EPIC265. EPIC II: BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES. 3.0 Hours.
(I,II): Design EPICS II builds on the design process introduced in
(I,II): Design EPICS II builds on the design process introduced in
Design EPICS I, which focuses on open-ended problem solving in
Design EPICS I, which focuses on open-ended problem solving in
which students integrate teamwork and communication with the use of
which students integrate teamwork and communication with the use of
computer software as tools to
computer software as tools to solve engineering problems. Computer
solve engineering problems. Computer applications emphasize
applications emphasize information acquisition and processing based on
information acquisition and processing based on knowing what new
knowing what new information is necessary to solve a problem and where
information is necessary to solve a problem and where to find the
to find the information efficiently. This course emphasizes
information efficiently. EPICS 262-AutoCAD incorporates semester-
steady-state design in biochemical production processes and provides
long instruction and practice in AutoCAD computer-aided drawing,
exposure to information about various manufacturing and research
with projects involving the use of AutoCAD in design solutions. Recent
segments. Projects are selected to represent real-world biochemical
projects include remodeling plans for the Ford Building, a solar tree
engineering problems in biofuels, food sciences and pharmaceuticals,
house education center, an environmentally sustainable house, and new
wherein creative and critical thinking skills are necessary. These projects
structural designs for use in Haiti following the January 2010 earthquake
may often involve computer-based optimization to obtain a solution.
in Haiti. Students in the Civil Engineering specialty in Engineering,
Students are exposed to the range of core engineering computation
the Environmental Engineering specialty in Engineering, or in Mining
skills that are utilized in both the chemical and biochemical engineering
Engineering, should consider registering for this course. Prerequisite:
disciplines, and subsequently employ these skills to their design projects.
EPIC151. 3 semester hours.
This approach also integrates the content of future courses with the
application of engineering design. Prerequisite: EPIC151. 3 semester
EPIC263. EPICS II: DRILLING ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
hours.
(S): Design EPICS II builds on the design process introduced in
Design EPICS I, which focuses on open-ended problem solving in
EPIC266. EPICS II: CHEMICAL PROCESSES. 3.0 Hours.
which students integrate teamwork and communication with the use of
(I, II): Design EPICS II builds on the design process introduced in
computer software as tools to solve engineering problems. Computer
Design EPICS I, which focuses on open-ended problem solving
applications emphasize information acquisition and processing based on
in which students integrate teamwork and communication with the
knowing what new information is necessary to solve a problem and where
use of computer software as tools to solve engineering problems.
to find the information efficiently. This course implements the design
Computer applications emphasize information acquisition and processing
process with drilling technology and automated drilling processes to solve
based on knowing what new information is necessary to solve a
multidisciplinary drilling project issues. Based on the project conditions
problem and where to find the information efficiently. This course
set by the client, various alternatives and configurations are possible to
emphasizes steady-state design in chemical production processes
meet the project objectives. Teams select and build a body of evidence
and provides exposure to information about various manufacturing
to market their most desirable alternatives. Prerequisite: EPIC151. 3
and research segments. Projects are selected to represent realworld
semester hours.
chemical engineering problems in the energy sectors, chemicals and
environmental stewardship, wherein creative and critical thinking skills
EPIC264. EPICS II: GEOLOGY GIS. 3.0 Hours.
are necessary. These projects may often involve computer-based
(II): Design EPICS II builds on the design process introduced in Design
optimization to obtain a solution. Students are exposed to the range of
EPICS I, which focuses on open-ended problem solving in which
core engineering computation skills that are utilized in both the chemical
students integrate teamwork and communication with the use of
and biochemical engineering disciplines, and subsequently employ these
computer software as tools to solve engineering problems. Computer
skills to their design projects. This approach also integrates the content
applications emphasize information acquisition and processing based on
of future courses with the application of engineering design. Prerequisite:
knowing what new information is necessary to solve a problem and where
EPIC151. 3 semester hours.
to find the information efficiently. There are typically eight geology-based
projects in the course, based on the needs of multiple outside clients.
EPIC267. EPICS II: CIVIL ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.
Many of the course deliverables are maps with associated data sets.
(II): Design EPICS II builds on the design process introduced in Design
Prerequisite: EPIC151. 3 semester hours.
EPICS I, which focuses on open-ended problem solving in which
students integrate teamwork and communication with the use of
computer software as tools to solve engineering problems. Computer
applications emphasize information acquisition and processing based on
knowing what new information is necessary to solve a problem and where
to find the information efficiently. Prerequisite: EPIC151. 3 semester
hours.

172 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
EPIC268. EPIC II: FOR GEOPHYSICS. 3.0 Hours.
(II): Design EPICS II builds on the design process introduced in Design
EPICS I, which focuses on open-ended problem solving in which
students integrate teamwork and communication with the use of
computer software as tools to solve engineering problems. Computer
applications emphasize information acquisition and processing based
on knowing what new information is necessary to solve a problem and
where to find the information efficiently. Students work on projects from
the geophysical engineering practice in which they analyze (process,
model, visualize) data. In their projects, students encounter limitations
and uncertainties in data and learn quantitative means for handling
them. They learn how to analyze errors in data, and their effects on data
interpretation and decision making. Prerequisite: EPIC151. 3 semester
hours.
EPIC298. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
EPIC299. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
EPIC398. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
EPIC399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
EPIC497. SPECIAL SUMMER COURSE. 6.0 Hours.
EPIC498. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.

Colorado School of Mines 173
Military Science
stipend plus their unit pay at the E-5 grade. SMP participants may be
eligible for Army Reserve or Army National Guard tuition assistance
(Army ROTC-AROTC)
benefits.
The Department of Military Science offers programs leading to an officer’s
Leadership Laboratories
commission in the active Army, Army Reserve, or National Guard in
Leadership labs provide cadets with practical leadership experience
conjunction with an undergraduate or graduate degree. Military science
and performance-oriented, hands-on instruction outside the classroom..
courses are designed to supplement a regular degree program by
Diagnostic evaluations of cadets in leadership roles are frequently
offering practical leadership and management experience. The Military
administered. Leadership labs are compulsory for enrolled cadets.
Science Program at the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) is offered in
Physical training is conducted three times a week with the purpose
conjunction with the University of Colorado at Boulder (CU-B). Students
of developing muscular strength, endurance, and cardio-respiratory
attend classes at the Colorado School of Mines in Golden.
endurance.
Four-Year Program
Veterans
The four-year program consists of two phases: the basic course
Veterans who have served on active duty or in the Army Reserve/
(freshman and sophomore years) and the advanced course (junior and
National Guard are also eligible for the ROTC program. Although
senior years).
veterans are not required to take the Basic Course, they are encouraged
Basic course
to do so. A minimum of 60 credit hours are required prior to enrolling in
the Advanced Course.
The basic course offers a 2- or 3-credit course each semester, covering
Army history and organization as well as military leadership and
Registration and Credits
management. Laboratory sessions provide the opportunity to apply
Army ROTC serves as elective credit in most departments. Elective
leadership skills while learning basic military skills. Enrollment in the
course credit toward your degree for AROTC classes will be determined
basic course incurs no military obligation except for Army scholarship
by your individual academic advisor. Students who wish to register
recipients.
for Army ROTC classes do so through the normal course registration
Advanced course
process at CSM. AROTC classes begin with the MSGN prefix.
For more information about AROTC, contact:
The advanced course covers leadership, tactics and unit operations,
training techniques, military law, and professional ethics, and includes a
the Army ROTC Enrollment and Scholarship Officer at:
leadership practicum each semester. A 33-day summer advanced camp
303-492-3549 or 303-492-6495
at Fort Lewis, Washington, provides challenging leadership training and
or the department on campus directly at:
is a prerequisite for commissioning. Advanced course students must have
303-273-3380
completed the basic course and obtain permission from the Professor of
Military Science (PMS).
The department is located in the Military Science building, 1232 West
Campus Road.
Two-Year Program
You can also go to http://www.colorado.edu/AROTC.
The two-year program consists of the advanced course, preceded by
attending the Leaders Training course (a four-week summer ROTC basic
For information about ROTC at CSM, call 303-273-3398 or
course at Ft. Knox, Kentucky). Veterans, or Active Army Reserve/Army
303-273-3380.
National Guard Soldiers, or students who have participated in three
years of Junior ROTC or Civil Air Patrol, may be eligible to enroll in the
General CSM Minor/ASI requirements can be found here.
advanced course without attendance at basic camp or completion of the
basic course. Advanced course students must obtain permission from the
Military Science Minor
Professor of Military Science (PMS) at 303-492-6495.
Army ROTC cadets desiring to receive a minor in Military Science must
Scholarship Programs
complete at least 22 hours of Military Science courses as follows:
Four-year college scholarships are available to high school seniors, who
MSGN103
ADVENTURES IN LEADERSHIP I
2
apply before December 1 of their senior year. Competition for two- and
MSGN104
ADVENTURES IN LEADERSHIP II
2
three- year scholarships is open to all university students, regardless of
MSGN203
METHODS OF LEADERSHIP
2
academic major and whether or not they are currently enrolled in ROTC.
MSGN204
METHODS OF LEADERSHIP AND
2
Scholarship students receive full tuition and mandatory laboratory fees,
MANAGEMENT II
a book allowance, and an allowance of $300- $500 per month during the
academic year. Students interested in the scholarship program should
MSGN301
MILITARY OPERATIONS AND TRAINING I
3.0
contact the AROTC Enrollment and Scholarship Officer at 303-492-3549
MSGN302
MILITARY OPERATIONS AND TRAINING II
3.0
no later than the beginning of the spring semester to apply for the
MSGN303
LEADERSHIP LABORATORY
0.5
following academic year.
MSGN304
LEADERSHIP LABORATORY
0.5
Simultaneous Membership Program
MSGN401
OFFICER LEADERSHIP AND DEVELOPMENT I 3.0
Students currently in the Army Reserves or Army National Guard and
MSGN402
OFFICER LEADERSHIP AND DEVELOPMENT II 3.0
entering either the second year of the basic course or the advanced
MSGN403
LEADERSHIP LABORATORY
0.5
course may participate in the Simultaneous Membership Program (SMP).
Students participating in this program will receive $450 to $500 monthly

174 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
MSGN404
LEADERSHIP LABORATORY
0.5
AFGN301. AIR FORCE LEADERHIP STUDIES. 3.5 Hours.
Total Hours
22.0
Two semesters, 3.5 hours per semester. This course is a study in the
anatomy of leadership, the need for quality and management leadership,
Note: In order to Commission as a 2nd Lieutenant in the US Army,
the role of discipline in leadership situations and the variables affecting
completion of a Military History Course (LAIS365) is also required.
leadership. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and
management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising
practical application of the concepts. Deal with actual problems and
Courses
complete projects associated with planning and managing the Leadership
Laboratory. Weekly Leadership Laboratory (LLAB) for this course (to be
AFGN101. FOUNDATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE. 1.5
taken in conjunction with AS 301 and 302) provides you the opportunity
Hour.
to develop
Two semesters, 1.5 hours per semester. This survey course briefly
your fundamental management skills while planning and conducting
covers topics relating to the Air Force and defense. It focuses on
cadet activities.
the structure and missions of Air Force organizations, officership
and professionalism. It is also a good introduction into the use of
AFGN302. AIR FORCE LEADERHIP STUDIES. 3.5 Hours.
communication skills. Weekly Leadership Lab for this
Two semesters, 3.5 hours per semester. This course is a study in the
course (to be taken in conjunction with AS 101 and 102) is a weekly
anatomy of leadership, the need for quality and management leadership,
laboratory that touches on the topics of Air Force customs and
the role of discipline in leadership situations and the variables affecting
courtesies, health and physical fitness, and drill and ceremonies.
leadership. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and
management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising
AFGN102. FOUNDATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE. 1.5
practical application of the concepts. Deal with actual problems and
Hour.
complete projects associated with planning and managing the Leadership
Two semesters, 1.5 hours per semester. This survey course briefly
Laboratory. Weekly Leadership Laboratory (LLAB) for this course (to be
covers topics relating to the Air Force and defense. It focuses on
taken in conjunction with AS 301 and 302) provides you the opportunity
the structure and missions of Air Force organizations, officership
to develop
and professionalism. It is also a good introduction into the use of
your fundamental management skills while planning and conducting
communication skills. Weekly Leadership Lab for this
cadet activities.
course (to be taken in conjunction with AS 101 and 102) is a weekly
laboratory that touches on the topics of Air Force customs and
AFGN401. NATIONAL SECURITY AFFAIRS AND PREPARATION FOR
courtesies, health and physical fitness, and drill and ceremonies.
ACTIVE DUTY. 3.5 Hours.
Two semesters, 3.5 hours per semester. Learn about the role of the
AFGN201. THE EVOLUTION OF USAF AIR AND SPACE POWER. 1.5
professional
Hour.
military leader in a democratic society; societal attitudes toward the
Two semesters, 1.5 hours per semester. This survey course is concerned
armed forces; the requisites for maintaining adequate national defense
with the beginnings of manned flight and the development of aerospace
structure; the impact of technological and international developments
power in the United States, including the employment of air power in
on strategic preparedness and the overall policy-making process; and
WWI, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, the Gulf War and the peaceful employment
military law. In addition, you will study topics that will prepare you for
of U.S. air power in civic actions, scientific missions and support of space
your first active-duty assignment as an officer in the Air Force. Weekly
exploration. Weekly Leadership Laboratory (LLAB) for this course (to
Leadership Laboratory (LLAB) for this course (to be taken in conjunction
be taken in conjunction with AS 201 and 202) provides you with the
with AS 401 and 402) provides you with the opportunity to use your
opportunity to demonstrate fundamental management skills and prepares
leadership skills in planning and conducting cadet activities. It prepares
you for Field Training.
you for commissioning and entry into the active-duty Air Force.
AFGN202. THE EVOLUTION OF USAF AIR AND SPACE POWER. 1.5
AFGN402. NATIONAL SECURITY AFFAIRS AND PREPARATION FOR
Hour.
ACTIVE DUTY. 3.5 Hours.
Two semesters, 1.5 hours per semester. This survey course is concerned
Two semesters, 3.5 hours per semester. Learn about the role of the
with the beginnings of manned flight and the development of aerospace
professional
power in the United States, including the employment of air power in
military leader in a democratic society; societal attitudes toward the
WWI, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, the Gulf War and the peaceful employment
armed forces; the requisites for maintaining adequate national defense
of U.S. air power in civic actions, scientific missions and support of space
structure; the impact of technological and international developments
exploration. Weekly Leadership Laboratory (LLAB) for this course (to
on strategic preparedness and the overall policy-making process; and
be taken in conjunction with AS 201 and 202) provides you with the
military law. In addition, you will study topics that will prepare you for
opportunity to demonstrate fundamental management skills and prepares
your first active-duty assignment as an officer in the Air Force. Weekly
you for Field Training.
Leadership Laboratory (LLAB) for this course (to be taken in conjunction
with AS 401 and 402) provides you with the opportunity to use your
leadership skills in planning and conducting cadet activities. It prepares
you for commissioning and entry into the active-duty Air Force.

Colorado School of Mines 175
MSGN103. ADVENTURES IN LEADERSHIP I. 2.0 Hours.
MSGN299. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(I) Introduces fundamentals of leadership and the United States Army.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
Examines its organization, customs, and history as well as its current
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
relevance and purpose. Students also investigate basic leadership
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
and management skills necessary to be successful in both military and
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
civilian settings. Includes fundamentals of Army leadership doctrine,
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
teambuilding concepts, time and stress management, an
introduction to cartography and land navigation, marksmanship, briefing
MSGN301. MILITARY OPERATIONS AND TRAINING I. 3.0 Hours.
techniques, and some basic military tactics. Lab fee. 1 hour lecture, 2
(I) Further explores the theory of managing and leading small military
hours lab, 3 hours PT, and 80 hours field training; 2 semester hours.
units with an emphasis on practical applications at the squad and platoon
(Fall).
levels. Students examine various leadership styles and techniques as
they relate to advanced small unit tactics. Familiarizes students with a
MSGN104. ADVENTURES IN LEADERSHIP II. 2.0 Hours.
variety of topics such as cartography, land navigation, field craft, and
(II) Continues the investigation of leadership in small organizations.
weapons systems. Involves multiple, evaluated
Covers selected topics such as basic troop leading procedures, military
leadership opportunities in field settings and hands-on experience with
first aid and casualty evacuation concepts, creating ethical work climates,
actual military equipment. Students are given maximum leadership
an introduction to Army organizations and installations, and a further
opportunities in weekly labs. Prerequisite: Consent of the Professor of
examination of basic military tactics. Introduces students to effective
Military Science. Lab Fee. 3
military writing styles. Lab fee. 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab, 3 hours PT,
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall).
and 80 hours field training; 2 semester hours. (Spring).
MSGN302. MILITARY OPERATIONS AND TRAINING II. 3.0 Hours.
MSGN198. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MILITARY SCIENCE. 1-6 Hour.
(II) Studies theoretical and practical applications of small unit leadership
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
principles. Focuses on managing personnel and resources, the
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
military decision making process, the operations order, and oral
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
communications. Exposes the student to tactical unit leadership in a
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
variety of environments with a focus on preparation for the summer
advance camp experience. Prerequisite: Consent of the Professor of
MSGN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
Military Science. Lab Fee. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring).
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
MSGN303. LEADERSHIP LABORATORY. 0.5 Hours.
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
(I) Development of military leadership techniques to include preparation
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
of operation plans, presentation of instruction, and supervision of
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
underclass military cadets. Instruction in military drill, ceremonies, and
customs and courtesies of the Army. Must be taken in conjunction with
MSGN203. METHODS OF LEADERSHIP. 2.0 Hours.
MSGN301. Prerequisite: Consent of department. Lab Fee. 2 hours lab, 3
(I) Comprehensively reviews advanced leadership and management
hours PT, 80 hours field training; .5 semester hour. (Fall).
concepts including motivation, attitudes, communication skills, problem
solving, human needs and behavior, and leadership self development.
MSGN304. LEADERSHIP LABORATORY. 0.5 Hours.
Students continue to refine effective written and oral communications
(II) Continued development of military leadership techniques with the
skills and to explore topics such as the basic branches of the Army,
major
and officer and NCO duties. Students conduct classroom and practical
emphasis on leading an Infantry Squad. Training is "handson." Practical
exercises in small unit light infantry tactics and are prepared to perform
exercises are used to increase understanding of the principles of
as midlevel leaders in the cadet organization. Lab fee: 1 hour lecture, 2
leadership learned in MSGN302. Must be taken in conjunction with
hours lab, 3 hours PT, and 80 hours field training; 2 semester hours.
MSGN302. Prerequisite: Consent of department. Lab Fee. 2 hours lab, 3
(Fall).
hours PT, 80 hours field training; .5 semester hour. (Spring).
MSGN204. METHODS OF LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT II. 2.0
MSGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MILITARY SCIENCE. 1-6 Hour.
Hours.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
(II) Focuses on leadership and management functions in military and
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
corporate environments. Studies various components of Army leadership
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
doctrine to include
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
the four elements of leadership, leadership principles, risk management
and planning theory, the be-know-do framework, and the Army leadership
MSGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
evaluation program. Continue to refine communication skills. Lab fee.
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab, 3 hours PT, and 80 hours field training; 2
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
semester hours. (Spring).
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
MSGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MILITARY SCIENCE. 1-6 Hour.
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.

176 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
MSGN401. OFFICER LEADERSHIP AND DEVELOPMENT I. 3.0 Hours.
MSGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.
(I) Examines management and leadership concepts and techniques
(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a
associated with planning and executing military training and operations
faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject
at company and higher echelons. Includes analyses of professional
matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form
ethics and values, effective training principles and procedures,
must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6
subordinate counseling, and effective staff officer briefing techniques.
credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
Also investigates other subjects such as counter terrorism, modern
peacekeeping missions, and the impact of the information revolution on
the art of land warfare. Conducted both in and out of classroom setting
and with multiple practical leadership opportunities to organize cadet
training and activities.
Prerequisite: Consent of the Professor of Military Science. Lab Fee. 3
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Fall).
MSGN402. OFFICER LEADERSHIP AND DEVELOPMENT II. 3.0
Hours.
(II) Continues MSGN401 study of management and leadership concepts
and techniques, providing practical leadership experiences in the
classroom and during multiple cadet-run activities. Also examines varied
topics such as theory and practice of the military justice system, law of
war, military-media relations, support mechanisms for soldiers and their
families, operational security considerations, and historical case studies
in military leadership in the context of
21st century land warfare. Prerequisite: Consent of the Professor of
Military Science. Lab Fee. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. (Spring).
MSGN403. LEADERSHIP LABORATORY. 0.5 Hours.
(I) Continued development of leadership techniques by assignment in the
command and staff positions in the Cadet Battalion. Cadets are expected
to plan and execute much of the training associated with the day-to-
day operations within the cadet battalion. Utilizing the troop leading and
management principles
learned in previous classes, cadets analyze the problems which the
battalion faces, develop strategies, brief recommendations, and execute
the approved plan. Prerequisite: Consent of department. Lab Fee. 2
hours lab, 3 hours PT, and 80 hours field training; .5 semester hour.
(Fall).
MSGN404. LEADERSHIP LABORATORY. 0.5 Hours.
(II) Continued leadership development by serving in the command
and staff positions in the Cadet Battalion. Cadets take a large role in
determining the goals and direction of the cadet organization, under
supervision of the cadre. Cadets are required to plan and organize
cadet outings and much of the training of underclassmen. Lab Fee.
Prerequisite: Consent of department. Lab Fee. 2 hours lab, 3 hours PT,
and 80 hours field training; .5 semester hour. (Spring).
MSGN497. SPEC STDY LDRSHIP/SMALL GRP. 3.0 Hours.
(I) The course is specifically geared to the unique leadership challenges
faced by individuals involved in CSM student government and other
campus leadership positions. Instruction emphasis is on forces and
dynamics which shape and define leader/manager’s job in the campus
environment. Prerequisite: Currently appointed or elected leader of a
recognized student organization or consent of the department head. 1
hour lecture and 5 hours lab; 3 semester hours.
MSGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MILITARY SCIENCE. 1-6 Hour.
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.

Colorado School of Mines 177
Physical Education and Athletics
Required Physical Education
Each student at Colorado School of Mines is required to complete four
http://www.csmorediggers.com
separate semesters of Physical Education classes (PAGN):
The Department of Physical Education and Athletics offers a four-fold
PAGN101
PHYSICAL EDUCATION (prerequisite)
0.5
physical education and athletics program which includes:
PAGN102
PHYSICAL EDUCATION (prerequisite)
0.5
1. Required physical education classes;
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
2. Intercollegiate athletics;
PAGN2XX
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
0.5
3. Intramural athletics and club sports; and
Total Hours
2.0
4. Recreational athletics.
Exceptions:
A large number of students use the institution’s facilities for recreational
purposes, including swimming, tennis, soccer, basketball, volleyball,
1. A medical excuse verified by a physician;
weight lifting, softball, and racquetball.
2. Veterans, honorably or generally discharged from the armed forces;
3. New students entering CSM for the first time who are 26 years or
Russell H. Volk Gymnasium
older prior to the first day of class;
A tri-level complex containing a NCAA regulation basketball arena, two
4. Students holding a bachelor’s degree.
racquetball/handball courts, wrestling room, weight training facility, locker
space, and offices for the Physical Education Department.
Normally, it is fulfilled during the first two years of attendance. Transfer
students should check with the Admissions Office regarding advanced
Steinhauer Field House
standing in physical education. Participation in intercollegiate athletics
A facility of 35,000-sq. ft., which provides for the needs of intercollegiate
may be substituted for required semesters and hours of physical
athletics and physical education classes.
education. ROTC students can waive the physical education requirement
when a similar four-semester physical activity is required in their
Darden Baseball Field
respective ROTC Programs.
Newly renovated with dugouts, fencing, 10 inning score-board, netted
Upper-class students who wish to continue taking physical education
backstop, press-box and lights for night games. Located west of Brooks
after completing graduation requirements may re-enroll in any of the 200-
Field and has seating accommodations for 500 spectators.
level courses.
Softball Field
Some of the 200-level courses may require off campus transportation,
Newly constructed dugouts, batting cage, perimeter fencing, sound
please check with Department of Athletics. All students enrolled in
system and new irrigation system. Located west of Darden Field seating
physical education shall provide their own gym uniform, athletic shoes, or
for 200 people.
swimming suit. Students are encouraged to rent a locker and lock in Volk
for a $10 rental fee.
Harry D. Campbell Field
Intercollegiate Athletics
Includes a synthetic surface named in honor of Harry D. Campbell, Class
of 1939. This is equipped with lights and a steel-concrete grandstand and
The School is a charter member of the Rocky Mountain Athletic
bleachers which seat 3,500 spectators.
Conference (RMAC) and the National Collegiate Athletic Association
(NCAA). Sports offered include: football, men’s and women’s basketball,
Tennis Courts
wrestling, men’s and women’s track, men’s and women’s cross country,
The Department maintains four tennis courts.
baseball, men’s golf, men’s and women’s swimming and diving, men’s
and women’s soccer, and women’s volleyball and softball. An athlete can
Student Recreation Center
register each semester for one hour physical activity credit to meet their
A three-level, 108,000 square foot facility that features an 8 lane, 25 yard
graduation requirements.
swimming pool with 2 diving boards and a 14 person hot tub. There are
Through a required athletic fee, all full-time students attending CSM
men’s and women’s locker rooms, a 4,000 square foot climbing wall, a full
become members of the CSM Athletic Association, which financially
service juice bar, an elevated jogging track, a 5,500 square foot fitness
supports the intercollegiate athletic program. With this fee, each CSM
area, 2 multi-purpose rooms, a recreational gym and an arena that seats
student receives free admission to all home athletic events. The Director
3,000 for varsity athletic contests.
of Athletics administers this program.
Swenson Intramural Complex
Intramural and Club Sports
Two fields are available for intramural/recreation sports.
The intramural program features a variety of activities ranging from those
Stermole Track and Field Complex
offered in the intercollegiate athletic program to more recreational type
activities. They are governed by the CSM Rec. Sports Department. All
Nine lane metric track with all field event components necessary to host
activities are offered in the following categories: men, women and co-ed.
NCAA, RMAC sanctioned events. Seating for 800 spectators.
The club sport program is governed by the CSM Sport Club Council.
CSM Soccer Stadium
There are 14 competitive groups currently under this umbrella. Some
Synthetic surface which provides opportunities for Men’s and Women’s
teams engage in intercollegiate competition at the non-varsity level,
NCAA, RMAC sanctioned events. Seating for 500 spectators.
some serve as instructional/recreational entities, and some as strictly
recreational interest groups. They are funded through ASCSM. Some
of the current organizations are Cycling, Ice Hockey, Lacrosse, Men’s

178 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
Rugby, Women’s Rugby, Ski Team, Men’s Soccer, Women’s Soccer,
PAGN168. VARSITY WOMEN’S SOCCER. 1.0 Hour.
Men’s Ultimate Frisbee, Women’s Ultimate Frisbee, Men’s Volleyball,
Instruction and practice in fundamentals and mechanics of women’s
Women’s Volleyball, Water Polo, Bowling and In-Line Hockey.
soccer in preparation for collegiate competition. Satisfactory completion
of any course fulfills one semester of physical education requirements.
Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1 semester hour.
Courses
PAGN169. VARSITY SWIMMING AND DIVING. 1.0 Hour.
PAGN101. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 0.5 Hours.
Instruction and practice in fundamentals and mechanics of swimming and
(I) (Required and not repeatable for credit) A general overview of life
diving in preparation for collegiate competition. Satisfactory completion
fitness basics which includes exposure to educational units of Nutrition,
of any course fulfills one semester of physical education requirements.
Stress Management, Drug and Alcohol Awareness. Instruction in Fitness
Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1 semester hour.
units provides the student an opportunity for learning and the beginning
PAGN173. VARSITY TRACK AND FIELD. 1.0 Hour.
basics for a healthy life style.
Instruction and practice in fundamentals and mechanics of track and
PAGN102. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 0.5 Hours.
field in preparation for collegiate competition. Satisfactory completion
(II) (Required and not repeatable for credit) Sections in physical fitness
of any course fulfills one semester of physical education requirements.
and team sports, relating to personal health and wellness activities.
Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1 semester hour.
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or consent of the Department Head.
PAGN175. VARSITY WRESTLING. 1.0 Hour.
PAGN151. VARSITY BASEBALL. 1.0 Hour.
Instruction and practice in fundamentals and mechanics of wrestling
Instruction and practice in fundamentals and mechanics of baseball
in preparation for collegiate competition. Satisfactory completion of
in preparation for collegiate competition. Satisfactory completion of
any course fulfills one semester of physical education requirements.
any course fulfills one semester of physical education requirements.
Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1 semester hour.
Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1 semester hour.
PAGN177. VARSITY VOLLEYBALL. 1.0 Hour.
PAGN153. VARSITY MEN’S BASKETBALL. 1.0 Hour.
Instruction and practice in fundamentals and mechanics of volleyball
Instruction and practice in fundamentals and mechanics of men’s
in preparation for collegiate competition. Satisfactory completion of
basketball in preparation for collegiate competition. Satisfactory
any course fulfills one semester of physical education requirements.
completion of any course fulfills one semester of physical education
Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1 semester hour.
requirements. Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1 semester hour.
PAGN179. VARSITY SOFTBALL. 1.0 Hour.
PAGN154. VARSITY WOMEN’S BASKETBALL. 1.0 Hour.
Instruction and practice in fundamentals and mechanics of softball
Instruction and practice in fundamentals and mechanics of women’s
in preparation for collegiate competition. Satisfactory completion of
basketball in preparation for collegiate competition. Satisfactory
any course fulfills one semester of physical education requirements.
completion of any course fulfills one semester of physical education
Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1 semester hour.
requirements. Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1 semester hour.
PAGN201. PERSONAL WELLNESS. 1.0 Hour.
PAGN157. VARSITY CROSS COUNTRY. 1.0 Hour.
(Not repeatable for credit) Provides an overview of the 5 Dimensions of
Instruction and practice in fundamentals and mechanics of cross country
Wellness: Physical, Social, Emotional, Intellectual and Spiritual. Students
in preparation for collegiate competition. Satisfactory completion of
will take a proactive approach to developing strategies for optimum
any course fulfills one semester of physical education requirements.
wellness including goal setting and application of wellness principles
Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1 semester hour.
through assignments and group in-class work. Prerequisites: PAGN101
and PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2 hours lecturer; 1
PAGN159. VARSITY FOOTBALL. 1.0 Hour.
semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
Instruction and practice in fundamentals and mechanics of football
in preparation for collegiate competition. Satisfactory completion of
PAGN202. INDOOR SOCCER. 0.5 Hours.
any course fulfills one semester of physical education requirements.
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1 semester hour.
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
PAGN161. VARSITY GOLF. 1.0 Hour.
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
Instruction and practice in fundamentals and mechanics of golf in
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
preparation for collegiate competition. Satisfactory completion of
any course fulfills one semester of physical education requirements.
PAGN203. TECHNIQUES OF RELAXATION. 0.5 Hours.
Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1 semester hour.
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
PAGN167. VARSITY MEN’S SOCCER. 1.0 Hour.
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
Instruction and practice in fundamentals and mechanics of men’s soccer
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
in preparation for collegiate competition. Satisfactory completion of
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
any course fulfills one semester of physical education requirements.
Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1 semester hour.

Colorado School of Mines 179
PAGN204. FLY FISHING. 0.5 Hours.
PAGN212. INTERMEDIATE SWIMMING. 0.5 Hours.
PAGN202 through PAGN280. (Students enrolling in these courses may
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
be required to furnish their own equipment.) Classes will be offered
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
on Monday and Wednesday for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
or Thursday for 1.5 hours. Prerequisite: PAGN101 and PAGN102
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
or consent of Department Head. 2 hours activity; .5 semester hour.
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
Repeatable. May be applied to free elective credits based on academic
policy.
PAGN221. BEGINNING WEIGHT TRAINING. 0.5 Hours.
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
PAGN205. BEGINNING KARATE. 0.5 Hours.
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
PAGN222. ADVANCED WEIGHT TRAINING. 0.5 Hours.
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
PAGN206. INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED KARATE. 0.5 Hours.
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
PAGN223. DISTANCE RUNNING. 0.5 Hours.
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
PAGN207. TRAIL RUNNING. 0.5 Hours.
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
PAGN232. YOGA. 0.5 Hours.
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
PAGN208. KAYAKING. 0.5 Hours.
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
PAGN235. AEROBICS. 0.5 Hours.
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
PAGN209. AIKIDO. 0.5 Hours.
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
PAGN241. WOMEN’S WEIGHT TRAINING. 0.5 Hours.
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
PAGN210. HIKING. 0.5 Hours.
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
PAGN242. WOMEN’S RAQUETBALL. 0.5 Hours.
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
PAGN211. BEGINNING SWIMMING. 0.5 Hours.
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
PAGN251. GOLF. 0.5 Hours.
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.

180 Undergraduate Programs and Departments
PAGN255. MOUNTAIN BIKING. 0.5 Hours.
PAGN279. HANDBALL. 0.5 Hours.
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
PAGN257. INTRODUCATION TO ROCK CLIMBING. 0.5 Hours.
PAGN280. CLUB SPORTS. 0.5 Hours.
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
PAGN258. WOMEN’S ROCK CLIMBING. 0.5 Hours.
PAGN281. ADVANCED HANDBALL. 0.5 Hours.
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
(I, II) PAGN202 through PAGN280. (Students enrolling in these courses
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
may be required to furnish their own equipment.) Classes will be offered
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
on Monday and Wednesday for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday,
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
Thursday or Saturday for 1.5 hours. Prerequisite: PAGN101 and
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2 hours activity; .5 semester
hour. Repeatable for credit.
PAGN271. BEGINNING BADMINTON. 0.5 Hours.
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
PAGN298. SPECIAL TOPICS. 0.5-6 Hour.
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
PAGN272. ADVANCED BADMINTON. 0.5 Hours.
PAGN398. SPECIAL TOPICS. 0.5-6 Hour.
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours.
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
Repeatable for credit under different titles.
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
PAGN273. BEGINNING BASKETBALL. 0.5 Hours.
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
PAGN274. ADVANCED BASKETBALL. 0.5 Hours.
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
PAGN275. VOLLEYBALL. 0.5 Hours.
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.
PAGN277. BEGINNING RACQUETBALL. 0.5 Hours.
(Students enrolling in these courses may be required to furnish their
own equipment.) Classes will be offered on Monday and Wednesday
for 50 minutes each day or on Tuesday or Thursday for 1.5 hours.
Prerequisite: PAGN101 or PAGN102 or consent of Department Head. 2
hours activity; .5 semester hour. Repeatable for credit.

Colorado School of Mines 181
Bioengineering and Life Sciences
https://nextbulletin.mines.edu/undergraduate/undergraduateinformation/
specialprograms/minorasi/
Programs Offered
Minor in Bioengineering and Life Sciences
• Minor in Bioengineering and Life Sciences
The Minor in BELS requires a minimum of 18 semester hours of
• Area of Special Interest in Bioengineering and Life Sciences
acceptable coursework, as outlined under the Required Curriculum
section that follows.
Program Description
The Area of Special Interest (ASI) in BELS requires a minimum of
The interdisciplinary program in Bioengineering and Life Sciences (BELS)
12 semester hours of acceptable coursework, as outlined under the
is administered by the Chemical and Biological Engineering Department.
Required Curriculum section that follows.
Participating departments are listed below:
Enrollments in the BELS Minor and ASI are approved by the Director or
• Chemical and Biological Engineering
Associate Director, who monitor progress and completion.
• Chemistry and Geochemistry
Required Curriculum
• Civil and Environmental Engineering
Both the Minor and the ASI require one core course (3 semester hours).
• Liberal Arts and International Studies
The minor requires at least 6 additional credit hours from the Basic Life
• Mathematical and Computer Science
Science course list, and additional BELS-approved courses to make up
• Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
a total of at least 18 credit hours. The ASI requires at least 3 additional
• Physics
credit hours from the Life Science course list, and additional BELS-
approved courses to make up a total of at least 12 credit hours.
All departments are represented on the Curriculum and Research
Committee, which is responsible for the delivery and new course
Core course
development for the program.
BELS301
GENERAL BIOLOGY I
3.0
The mission of the BELS program is to offer Minors and Areas of
Basic Life Science courses
Special Interest (ASI) at the undergraduate level, and support areas
BELS303
GENERAL BIOLOGY II
3.0
of specialization at the graduate level, as well as to enable research
BELS311
GENERAL BIOLOGY I LABORATORY
1.0
opportunities for CSM students in bioengineering and the life sciences.
BELS313
GENERAL BIOLOGY II LABORATORY
1.0
Bioengineering and the Life Sciences (BELS) are becoming increasingly
BELS321
INTRO TO GENETICS
4.0
significant in fulfilling the role and mission of the Colorado School of
BELS402
CELL BIOLOGY AND PHYSI OLOGY
3.0
Mines. Many intellectual frontiers within the fields of environment, energy,
BELS404
ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY
3.0
materials, and their associated fields of science and engineering , are
being driven by advances in the biosciences and the application of
BELS405
ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY LAB
1.0
engineering to living processes.
CHGN428
BIOCHEMISTRY
3.0
Program Requirements
CHGN462/
MICROBIOLOGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
3.0
CHGC562
Required Curriculum:
CHGC563/
ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY
2
ESGN582
Both the Minor and the ASI require one core course (3 semester hours).
The minor requires at least 6 additional credit hours from the Basic Life
BELS-approved Elective courses (including, but not limited to)
Science course list, and additional BELS approved courses to make up
BELS/LAIS320
INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS
3.0
a total of at least 18 credit hours. The ASI requires at least 3 additional
BELS/PHGN333 INTRODUCTION TO BIOPHYSICS
3.0
credit hours from the Life Science course list, and additional BELS
BELS350
HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
1-3
approved courses to make up a total of at least 12 credit hours.
BELS351
HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
1-3
Premedical Students
BELS/CHEN415 POLYMER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
3.0
While medical college admissions requirements vary, most require a
BELS/CHEN432 TRANSPORT PHENOMENA IN BIOLOGICAL
3.0
minimum of:
SYSTEMS
BELS450
HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
1-3
• two semesters of General Chemistry with lab
BELS451
HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
1-3
• two semesters of Organic Chemistry with lab
BELS325
INTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICAL
3.0
• two semesters of Calculus
ENGINEERING
• two semesters of Calculus-based Physics
BELS425
MUSCULOSKELETAL BIOMECHANICS
3.0
• two semesters of English Literature and Composition
BELS428
COMPUTATIONAL BIOMECHANICS
3.0
• two semesters of General Biology with lab.
BELS453
WASTEWATER ENGINEERING
3.0
CSM currently offers all of these requirements. CSM also has a
BELS470
INTRODUCTION TO MICROFLUIDICS
3.0
premedical student society. See http://stulife.mines.edu/premed for more
BELS/EGGN525 MUSCULOSKELETAL BIOMECHANICS
3.0
information.
BELS527
PROSTHETIC AND IMPLANT ENGINEERING
3.0
General CSM Minor/ASI requirements can be found at:
BELS528
COMPUTATIONAL BIOMECHANICS
1-3
BELS530
BIOMEDICAL
3.0

182 Interdisciplinary Minors
BELS541
BIOCHEMICAL TREATMENT PROCESSES
3.0
BELS431
IMMUNOLOGY FOR ENGINEERS AND
3
CHGN422
POLYMER CHEMISTRY LABORATORY
1.0
SCIENTISTS
CHGN508
ANALYTICAL SPECTROSCOPY
3.0
BELS432
TRANSPORT PHENOMENA IN BIOLOGICAL
3
SYSTEMS
MLGN523
APPLIED SURFACE AND SOLUTION
3.0
CHEMISTRY
BELS450
HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
1-3
ESGN401
FUNDAMENTALS OF ECOLOGY
3.0
BELS451
HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
1-3
BELS/ESGN544 AQUATIC TOXICOLOGY
3.0
BELS/ESGN453 WASTEWATER ENGINEERING
3
BELS545
ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY
3.0
BELS454
APPLIED BIOINFORMATICS
3
BELS596
MOLECULAR ENVIRONMENTAL
3.0
BELS/CHEN470 INTRODUCTION TO MICROFLUIDICS
3
BIOTECHNOLOGY
BELS498
SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOENGINEERING AND
1-6
ESGN586
MOLECULAR MICROBIAL ECOLOGY AND THE 3.0
LIFE SCIENCES
ENVIRONMENT
BELS/EGGN525 MUSCULOSKELETAL BIOMECHANICS
3
CHGN221
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I
3.0
BELS526
MODELING AND SIMULATION OF HUMAN
3
CHGN222
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II
3.0
MOVEMENT
BELS/MTGN/
INTRO TO BIOCOMPATIBILITY
3.0
BELS/EGGN527 PROSTHETIC AND IMPLANT ENGINEERING
3
MLGN570
BELS528
COMPUTATIONAL BIOMECHANICS
1-3
BELS/EGGN530 BIOMEDICAL
3
*
Note: Only 3 hours of Organic Chemistry course credit may be
applied toward the BELS minor or ASI. See General rules for
BELS531
IMMUNOLOGY FOR SCIENTISTS AND
3
Minor Programs and Areas of Special Interest (bulletin.mines.edu/
ENGINEERS
undergraduate/sectionundergraduateinformation/specialprograms).
BELS/EGGN541 BIOCHEMICAL TREATMENT PROCESSES
3
Note, however, t