Colorado
School of Mines
2010–2011
Graduate Bul etin

To Mines Graduate Students:
This Bulletin is for your use as a source of continuing
reference. Please save it.
Published by
Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401
Address correspondence to:
Office of Graduate Studies
Colorado School of Mines
1500 Illinois Street
Golden, CO 80401-1887
Main Telephone: 303-273-3247
Toll Free: 800-446-9488
grad-school@mines.edu
2
Colorado School of Mines   Graduate Bul etin   2010–2011

Table of Contents
Academic Calendar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Auditing Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
University Administration / Useful Contacts . . 5
Off Campus Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Office of Graduate Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
General Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Student Housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Graduate School Bulletin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Curriculum Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
International Student Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
General Policies of Student Conduct. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Registrar’s Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Student Honor Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Graduate Student Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Academic Integrity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Academic Departments & Divisions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Resolution of Conflicting Bulletin Provisions . . . . . . . . 30
General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Unsatisfactory Academic Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Mission and Goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Exceptions and Appeals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Institutional Values and Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Public Access to the Graduate Thesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
History of CSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Making up Undergraduate Deficiencies. . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Graduate Students in Undergraduate Courses . . . . . . 31
Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Independent Study. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
The Graduate School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Course and Research Grades. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Unique Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Grade Appeal Process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Graduate Degrees Offered . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Graduation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Accreditation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Withdrawing from School. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Admission to the Graduate School . . . . . . . . 11
Nondegree Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Admission Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Veterans’ Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Categories of Admission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Graduate Grading System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Admission Procedure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Electronic Communications (Email) Policy . . . . . . . . . 35
Financial Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Access to Student Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Application Review Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Tuition, Fees, Financial Assistance. . . . . . . . 38
Health Record and Additional Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Graduate Tuition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
International Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Fees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Student Life at CSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Payments and Refunds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Graduate Degrees and Requirements. . . . . . 40
Student Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
I. Professional Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Military Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
II. Master of Science and Engineering Programs . . . . 41
Student Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
III. Doctor of Philosophy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Facilities and Academic Support. . . . . . . . . . 18
IV. Individualized, Interdisciplinary Graduate
Arthur Lakes Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Degrees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Computing, Communications & Information
V. Combined Undergraduate/Graduate Programs . . . . 46
Technologies (CCIT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Graduate Degree Programs and Description
Copy Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
of Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
CSM Alumni Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Chemical Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Environmental Health and Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Chemistry and Geochemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Green Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Economics and Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
LAIS Writing Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Off Campus Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Environmental Science and Engineering. . . . . . . . . . . 88
Office of International Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Geochemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Office of Technology Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Geology and Geological Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Public Relations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Geophysics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Registrar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Hydrologic Sciences and Engineering. . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Research Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Liberal Arts and International Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Office of Strategic Enterprises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Materials Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Special Programs and Continuing Education (SPACE) 21
Mathematical and Computer Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Telecommunications Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Metallurgical and Materials Engineering . . . . . . . . . . 148
Women in Science, Engineering and Mathematics
Mining Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
(WISEM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Nuclear Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Registration and Tuition Classification. . . . . 22
Petroleum Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
General Registration Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Research Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Eligibility for Reduced Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Research Centers and Institutes . . . . . . . . . 182
Graduation Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Directory of the School. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Full-time Status - Required Course Load . . . . . . . . . . 22
Policies and Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Late Registration Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Affirmative Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Leave of Absence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Unlawful Discrimination Policy & Complaint Procedure . 208
Reciprocal Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Sexual Harassment Policy & Complaint Procedure . . . . 211
In-State Tuition Classification Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Personal Relationships Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Dropping and Adding Courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .215
Colorado School of Mines   Graduate Bulletin   2010–2011
3

Academic Calendar
Fall Semester 2010
Confirmation deadline. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aug. 23, Monday
Faculty Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aug. 23, Monday
Classes start (1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aug. 24, Tuesday
Graduate Students—last day to register without late fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aug. 27, Friday
Labor Day (Classes held) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sept. 6, Monday
Last day to register, add or drop courses without a “W” (Census Day). . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sept. 8, Wednesday
Fall Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oct. 18 & 19, Monday & Tuesday
Midterm grades due . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oct. 18, Monday
Last day to withdraw from a course—Continuing students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nov. 2, Tuesday
Priority Registration Spring Semester . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nov. 15-19, Monday–Friday
Non-class day pior to Thanksgiving Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nov. 24, Wednesday
Thanksgiving Break. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nov. 25 –Nov. 26, Thursday–Friday
Last day to withdraw from a course—New students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 3, Friday
Last day to completely withdraw from CSM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 9, Thursday
Classes end. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 9, Thursday
Dead Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 6-Dec. 10, Monday-Friday
Dead Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 10, Friday
Final exams. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 11, 13-16 , Saturday, Monday–Thursday
Semester ends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 17, Friday
Midyear Degree Convocation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 17, Friday
Final grades due . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 20, Monday
Winter Recess . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 18 –Jan. 11, Saturday–Tuesday
Spring Semester 2011
Confirmation deadline. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jan. 11, Tuesday
Classes start (1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jan. 12, Wednesday
Grad Students—last day to register without late fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jan. 14, Friday
Last day to register, add or drop courses without a “W” (Census Day) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jan. 27, Thursday
Non-class day - Presidents’ Day. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feb. 21, Monday
Midterms grades due. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 7, Monday
Spring Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 14-18, Monday-Friday
Last day to withdraw from a course—Continuing students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 29, Tuesday
E-Days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 31-April 2, Thursday–Saturday
Priority Registration, Field, Summer and Fall Term. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 11-15, Monday–Friday
Last day to withdraw from a course—New students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 29, Friday
Last day to completely withdraw from CSM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 5, Thursday
Classes end . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 5, Thursday
Dead Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 2-May 6, Monday-Friday
Dead Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 6, Friday
Final exams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 7, May 9-12 Saturday, Monday–Thursday
Semester ends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 13, Friday
Commencement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 13, Friday
Final grades due . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 16, Monday
Summer Sessions 2011
Summer I - First Day of Class, Registration (1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 16, Monday
Summer I (Census Day). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 20, Friday
Memorial Day (Holiday—No classes held). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 30, Monday
Last day to withdraw from Summer I Term (all students) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 10, Friday
Summer I ends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 24, Friday
Summer I grades due . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 27, Monday
Summer II First Day of Class, Registration (1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 27, Monday
Independence Day (Holiday—No classes held). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 4, Monday
Summer II Census Day. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 5, Tuesday
Last day to withdraw from Summer II Term (all students) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aug. 5, Friday
Summer II ends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aug. 19, Friday
Summer II grades due . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aug. 22, Monday
(1) Petition for changes in tuition classification due in the Registrar’s office for this term.
4
Colorado School of Mines   Graduate Bul etin   2010–2011

University Administration / Useful Contacts
Office of Graduate Studies
Registrar’s Office
Mailing address
Registrar
303-273-3200
1500 Illinois Street
Graduate Student Association
Golden, CO 80401-1887
Daniel Baker
303 273-2101
Telephone
FAX
President
303 273-3247
303 273-3244
Academic Departments & Divisions
Thomas M. Boyd
303-273-3020
The address for all CSM academic departments
Dean of Graduate Studies
and divisions is
Jahi Simbai
303-384-2221
1500 Illinois Street
Director of Graduate Recruiting
Golden, Colorado 80401-1887
and Admissions
World Wide Web address: http://www.mines.edu/
jsimbai@mines.edu
Academic department and division telephone numbers are
Linda L. Powell
303-273-3348
Graduate Admissions Officer
Chemical Engineering
lpowell@mines.edu
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3720
Brenda Neely
303-273-3412
Chemistry and Geochemistry
Student Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3610
bneely@mines.edu
Economics and Business
Kay Leaman
303-273-3249
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3482
Admissions Coordinator
grad-app@mines.edu
Engineering
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3650
Diane Mee
303-273-3627
Reception and Student Services
Environmental Science and Engineering
dmee@mines.edu
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3427
Office of Vice President for Research
Geology and Geological Engineering
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3800
and Technology Transfer
John Poate
303-384-2375
Geophysics
Vice President for Research and
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3450
Technology Transfer
Liberal Arts and International Studies
John G. Speer
303-273-3897
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3750
Associate Vice President for
Materials Science
Research and Technology Transfer
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3660
William Vaughan
303-384-2555
Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Director of Technology Transfer
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3860
Lisa Kinzel
303-384-2470
Executive Assistant to the Vice
Metal urgical and Materials Engineering
President for Research and
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3770
Technology Transfer
Mining Engineering
Student Housing
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3701
Kathy Rice
303-273-3351
Nuclear Engineering
Apartment Housing Coordinator
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303-273-3618
Financial Aid
Petroleum Engineering
Christina Jensen
303-273-3229
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3740
Graduate Student Financial Aid Advisor
Physics
International Student Services
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 273-3830
Brandon Samter
303-273-3589
International Student Advisor
Colorado School of Mines   Graduate Bul etin   2010–2011
5

General Information
Mission and Goals
The Colorado School of Mines is consequently committed
Colorado School of Mines is a public research university
to serving the people of Colorado, the nation, and the global
devoted to engineering and applied science related to re-
community by promoting stewardship of the Earth upon
sources. It is one of the leading institutions in the nation and
which all life and development depend. (Colorado School of
the world in these areas. It has the highest admission stan-
Mines Board of Trustees, 2000)
dards of any university in Colorado and among the highest of
Institutional Values and Principles
any public university in the U.S. CSM has dedicated itself to
Graduate Education
responsible stewardship of the earth and its resources. It is
The Colorado School of Mines is dedicated to serving the
one of a very few institutions in the world having broad ex-
people of Colorado, the nation and the global community by
pertise in resource exploration, extraction, production and
providing high quality educational and research experiences
utilization which can be brought to bear on the world's press-
to students in science, engineering and related areas that sup-
ing resource-related environmental problems. As such, it oc-
port the institutional mission. Recognizing the importance of
cupies a unique position among the world's institutions of
responsible earth stewardship, CSM places particular empha-
higher education.
sis on those fields related to the discovery, production and
The school's role and mission has remained constant and is
utilization of resources needed to improve the quality of life
written in the Colorado statutes as: The Colorado School of
of the world's inhabitants and to sustain the earth system
Mines shall be a specialized baccalaureate and graduate re-
upon which all life and development depend. To this end,
search institution with high admission standards. The Col-
CSM is devoted to creating a learning community which pro-
orado School of Mines shall have a unique mission in energy,
vides students with perspectives informed by the humanities
mineral, and materials science and engineering and associ-
and social sciences, perspectives which also enhance stu-
ated engineering and science fields. The school shall be the
dents' understanding of themselves and their role in contem-
primary institution of higher education offering energy, min-
porary society. CSM therefore seeks to instill in all graduate
eral and materials science and mineral engineering degrees
students a broad class of developmental and educational at-
at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. (Colorado re-
tributes:
vised Statutes, Section 23-41-105)
uAn in-depth knowledge in an area of specialization, en-
Throughout the school's history, the translation of its mis-
hanced by hands-on experiential learning, and breadth in
sion into educational programs has been influenced by the
allied fields, including:
needs of society. Those needs are now focused more clearly
1. the background and skills to be able to recognize, define
than ever before. We believe that the world faces a crisis in
and solve problems by applying sound scientific and en-
balancing resource availability with environmental protection
gineering principles, and
and that CSM and its programs are central to the solution to
2. for thesis-based students, experience in conducting orig-
that crisis. Therefore the school's mission is elaborated upon
inal scientific research and engineering design at the
as follows:
forefront of their particular area of specialization.
Colorado School of Mines is dedicated to educating stu-
uThe ability to function effectively in an information-based
dents and professionals in the applied sciences, engineering,
economy and society, including:
and associated fields related to
1. written, oral and graphical communications skills that
uthe discovery and recovery of the Earth's resources,
enable effective transmission of concepts and ideas as
u their conversion to materials and energy,
well as technical information, and
utheir utilization in advanced processes and products,
2. expertise in finding, retrieving, evaluating, storing and
and
disseminating information in ways that enhance their
uthe economic and social systems necessary to ensure
leadership role in society and their profession.
their prudent and provident use in a sustainable global
uPreparation for leadership in a team-based milieu, includ-
society.
ing:
This mission will be achieved by the creation, integration,
1. the flexibility to adjust to an ever-changing professional
and exchange of knowledge in engineering, the natural sci-
environment and to appreciate diverse approaches to un-
ences, the social sciences, the humanities, business and their
derstanding and solving professional and societal prob-
union to create processes and products to enhance the qual-
lems,
ity of life of the world's inhabitants.
2. the creativity, resourcefulness, receptivity and breadth
of interests to think critically about a wide range of
cross-disciplinary issues,
6
Colorado School of Mines   Graduate Bul etin   2010–2011

3. a strong work ethic that inspires commitment and loy-
uThe State requires all public colleges and universities in
alty on the part of colleagues,
Colorado, in concert, to provide appropriate educational
4. interpersonal skills and attitudes which promote cooper-
opportunities in rural areas which are under-served by
ation and enable leadership, and
traditional residential institutions.
5. acceptance of responsibility for their own growth
In addition to these philosophical goals, Professional Out-
through life-long learning.
reach can make an important pragmatic contribution to the
university by:
uThe capability of adapting to, appreciating and working ef-
fectively in an international environment, including:
uDeveloping and sustaining programs which address the
lifelong education needs of individuals in professions
1. being able to succeed in an increasingly interdependent
associated with science, mathematics, engineering, and
world where borders between cultures and economies
technology.
are becoming less distinct, and
uRecruiting high-quality students for the traditional resi-
2. appreciating the traditions and languages of other cul-
dential programs
tures, as well as valuing and supporting diversity in their
own society.
uSpreading and enhancing the reputation of Mines
throughout the world
uHigh standards of integrity expressed through ethical be-
havior and acceptance of the obligation to enhance their
uGenerating revenues that help support the residential
profession and society through service and leadership.
and research missions of the university
Professional Education
Research
A central purpose of a university is the widespread and
The creation and dissemination of new knowledge are pri-
open distribution of the special knowledge created by, and
mary responsibilities of all members of the university com-
reposing in, the expertise of the faculty. At CSM, that special
munity. Public institutions have an additional responsibility
knowledge falls into several broad categories:
to use that knowledge to contribute to the economic growth
and public welfare of the society from which they receive
uA mature body of knowledge, in areas of historic leader-
their charter and support. As a public institution of higher ed-
ship, which is of great value to professionals in those
ucation, a fundamental responsibility of CSM is to provide
fields throughout the world.
an environment which enables contribution to the public
uCreative advances in emerging fields of science and en-
good by encouraging creative research and ensuring the free
gineering, developed in Mines' leading-edge research
exchange of ideas, information, and results. To that end, the
laboratories, which can contribute to the economic and
institution acknowledges the following responsibilities:
physical well-being of people in Colorado and the na-
uTo insure that these activities are conducted in an envi-
tion.
ronment of minimum influence and bias, it is essential
uExpertise in problem-solving methodologies, including
that CSM protect the academic freedom of all members
engineering design and structured decision-making,
of its community.
which is of growing importance in all technical-social-
uTo provide the mechanisms for creation and dissemina-
political realms as our global society becomes increas-
tion of knowledge, the institution recognizes that access
ingly complex and interdependent.
to information and information technology (e.g. library,
uLeadership in the development of innovative educa-
computing and internet resources) are part of the basic
tional tools and techniques which can help people-
infrastructure support to which every member of the
young and old-to be better prepared to succeed in
community is entitled.
advanced education, productive careers, and satisfying
uTo promote the utilization and application of knowl-
personal lives.
edge, it is incumbent upon CSM to define and protect
Additional outreach responsibilities are imposed by the
the intellectual-property rights and responsibilities of
special role and nature of Mines:
faculty members, students, as well as the institution.
uCSM is committed to inculcating in its traditional resi-
The following principles derive from these values and re-
dential undergraduate and graduate students an appreci-
sponsibilities:
ation for and commitment to life-long learning and
uThe institution exists to bring faculty and students to-
inquiry. This imposes on Mines a responsibility to create
gether to form a community of scholars.
and support Professional Outreach programs that will
expose students to self-directed learning experiences
uFaculty members have unique relationship with the in-
while still in residence, and provide opportunities for
stitution because of their special responsibility to create
continued intellectual growth after they graduate.
and disseminate knowledge independent of oversight or
direction from the institution.
Colorado School of Mines   Graduate Bul etin   2010–2011
7

uStudents have a dual role as creators and recipients of
uThe institution exists to bring faculty and students to-
knowledge.
gether to form a community of scholars.
uThe institution and the faculty share responsibility for
uFaculty members have a unique relationship with the in-
facilitating the advancement of students in their chosen
stitution because faculty create and disseminate knowl-
discipline.
edge independent of oversight or direction from the
uThe institution and the faculty are mutually dependent
institution.
upon each other, and share the responsibility for the rep-
uFaculty activities must be driven by academic needs re-
utation of both the university and the individual.
lating to the creation and dissemination of knowledge
uAlthough research objectives should be informed by the
rather than commercial opportunities.
institution's responsibility (as a public institution) to
uThe institution and the faculty share responsibility for
contribute to economic growth and societal well-being,
facilitating the advancement of students in their chosen
research priorities must be driven by academic needs re-
discipline. Students are the independent creators of the
lating to the creation, development and dissemination of
expression of ideas in their theses, but may have a dual
knowledge.
role as both an independent creator of an expression of
uResearch policies and practices must conform to the
ideas and as directed employees.
state non-competition law which requires that all re-
uThe institution and the faculty are mutually dependent
search projects have an educational component through
upon each other, and share the responsibility for the rep-
the involvement of students and/or post-doctoral fel-
utation of both the university and the individual.
lows.
uBoth the creator and the institution have an interest in,
uBoth the creator and the institution have interest in, and
and a responsibility to promote, the dissemination and
a responsibility to promote, the dissemination and uti-
utilization of knowledge for the public good.
lization of new knowledge for public good through pub-
uAlthough commercialization is not a primary responsi-
lication and commercialization.
bility of the university community, it is sometimes the
uAlthough commercialization is not a primary responsi-
result of technology transfer.
bility of the university community, it is a common result
uThe creator and the institution should share in the poten-
of technology transfer. The creator and the institution
tial benefits and risks in proportion to their contributions
may each have an interest in the commercialization of
and/or agreed assumption of benefits and risks.
intellectual property and should share in the potential
benefits and risks based on their contributions.
uAll members of the CSM community will demonstrate
the highest level of integrity in their activities associated
Intel ectual Property
with intellectual property.
The creation and dissemination of knowledge are primary
responsibilities of all members of the university community.
As an institution of higher education, a fundamental mission
of CSM is to provide an environment that motivates the fac-
ulty and promotes the creation, dissemination, and applica-
tion of knowledge through the timely and free exchange of
ideas, information, and research results for the public good.
To insure that these activities are conducted in an environ-
ment of minimum influence and bias, so as to benefit society
and the people of Colorado, it is essential that CSM protect
the academic freedom of all members of its community. It is
incumbent upon CSM to help promote the utilization and ap-
plication of knowledge by defining and protecting the rights
and responsibilities of faculty members, students and the in-
stitution, with respect to intellectual property which may be
created while an individual is employed as a faculty member
or enrolled as a student. The following principles, derived
from these responsibilities and values, govern the develop-
ment and implementation of CSM's Intellectual Property
Policies.
8
Colorado School of Mines   Graduate Bul etin   2010–2011

History of CSM
Location
In 1865, only six years after gold and silver were discov-
Golden, Colorado, has always been the home of CSM. Lo-
ered in the Colorado Territory, the fledgling mining industry
cated in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains 20 minutes
was in trouble. The nuggets had been picked out of streams
west of Denver, this community of 15,000 also serves as
and the rich veins had been worked, and new methods of ex-
home to the Coors Brewing Company, the National Renew-
ploration, mining, and recovery were needed.
able Energy Laboratory, and a major U.S. Geological Survey
Early pioneers like W.A.H. Loveland, E.L. Berthoud,
facility that also contains the National Earthquake Center.
Arthur Lakes, George West and Episcopal Bishop George M.
The seat of government for Jefferson County, Golden once
Randall proposed a school of mines. In 1874 the Territorial
served as the territorial capital of Colorado. Skiing is an hour
Legislature appropriated $5,000 and commissioned Loveland
away to the west.
and a Board of Trustees to found the Territorial School of
Administration
Mines in or near Golden. Governor Routt signed the Bill on
By State statute, the school is managed by a seven-mem-
February 9, 1874, and when Colorado became a state in
ber board of trustees appointed by the governor, and the stu-
1876, the Colorado School of Mines was constitutionally es-
dent and faculty bodies elect one nonvoting board member
tablished. The first diploma was awarded in 1883.
each The school is supported financially by student tuition
As CSM grew, its mission expanded from the rather nar-
and fees and by the State through annual appropriations.
row initial focus on nonfuel minerals to programs in petro-
These funds are augmented by government and privately
leum production and refining as well. Recently it has added
sponsored research, and private gift support from alumni,
programs in materials science and engineering, energy and
corporations, foundations and other friends.
environmental engineering, and a broad range of other engi-
neering and applied science disciplines. CSM sees its mis-
sion as education and research in engineering and applied
science with a special focus on the earth science disciplines
in the context of responsible stewardship of the earth and its
resources.
CSM long has had an international reputation. Students
have come from nearly every nation, and alumni can be
found in every corner of the globe.
Colorado School of Mines   Graduate Bul etin   2010–2011
9

The Graduate School
Unique Programs
Accreditation
Because of its special focus, Colorado School of Mines
Colorado School of Mines is accredited through the level of
has unique programs in many fields. For example, CSM is
the doctoral degree by the Higher Learning Commission of the
the only institution in the world that offers doctoral programs
North Central Association, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400,
in all five of the major earth science disciplines: Geology and
Chicago, Illinois 60602-2504 - telephone (312) 263-0456.
Geological Engineering, Geophysics, Geochemistry, Mining
The Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accredita-
Engineering, and Petroleum Engineering. It also has one of
tion Board for Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Place,
the few Metallurgical and Materials Engineering programs in
Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 - telephone (410) 347-
the country that still focuses on the complete materials cycle
7700, accredits undergraduate degree programs in chemical en-
from mineral processing to finished advanced materials.
gineering, engineering, engineering physics, geological
In addition to the traditional programs defining the institu-
engineering, geophysical engineering, metallurgical and materi-
tional focus, CSM is pioneering both undergraduate and
als engineering, mining engineering and petroleum engineering.
graduate interdisciplinary programs. The School understands
The American Chemical Society has approved the degree pro-
that solutions to the complex problems involving global
gram in the Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry.
processes and quality of life issues require cooperation
among scientists, engineers, economists, and the humanities.
Degree Programs
Prof. M.S. M.E. Ph.D.
CSM offers interdisciplinary programs in areas such as
Applied Physics
n
n
materials science, environmental science and engineering,
Chemical Engineering
n
n
management and public policy, hydrology, and geochemistry.
Chemistry
n
These programs make interdisciplinary connections between
traditional fields of engineering, physical science and social
Applied Chemistry
n
science, emphasizing a broad exposure to fundamental prin-
Engineering
n
n
ciples while cross-linking information from traditional disci-
Engineering & Technology
n
plines to create the insight needed for breakthroughs in the
Management
solution of modern problems.
Environmental Geochemistry
n
When the need arises, CSM also offers interdisciplinary,
Environmental Science &
n
n
non-thesis Professional Master degrees to meet the career
Engineering
needs of working professionals in CSM's focus areas.
Geochemistry
n
n
Coordinated by the several departments involved, these in-
Geological Engineering
n
n
n
terdisciplinary programs contribute to CSM's leadership role
in addressing the problems and developing solutions that will
Geology
n
n
enhance the quality of life for all of earth's inhabitants in the
Geophysical Engineering
n
n
next century.
Geophysics
n
n
Graduate Degrees Offered
Hydrology
n
n
CSM offers professional masters, master of science
International Political Economy
(M.S.), master of engineering (M.E.) and doctor of philoso-
o
& Resources
phy (Ph.D.) degrees in the disciplines listed in the chart at
Materials Science
n
n
right.
Mathematical & Computer
In addition to masters and Ph.D. degrees, departments and
n
n
Science
divisions can also offer graduate certificates. Graduate cer-
Metallurgical & Materials
tificates are designed to have selective focus, short time to
n
n
n
Engineering
completion and consist of course work only.
Mineral Economics
n
n
Mineral Exploration & Mining
n
Geosciences
Mining & Earth Systems
n
n
n
Engineering
Nuclear Engineering
n
n
Petroleum Engineering
n
n
n
Petroleum Reservoir Systems
n
o Master of International Political Economy of Resources
10
Colorado School of Mines   Graduate Bul etin   2010–2011

Admission to the Graduate School
Admission Requirements
who subsequently decides to pursue a regular degree pro-
The Graduate School of Colorado School of Mines is open
gram must apply and gain admission to the Graduate School.
to graduates from four-year programs at recognized colleges
All credits earned as a nondegree student may be transferred
or universities. Admission to all graduate programs is com-
into the regular degree program if the student's graduate
petitive, based on an evaluation of prior academic perform-
committee and department head approve.
ance, test scores and references. The academic background of
Combined Undergraduate/Graduate Programs
each applicant is evaluated according to the requirements of
Several degree programs offer CSM undergraduate stu-
each department outlined later in this section of the Bulletin.
dents the opportunity to begin work on a Graduate Certifi-
To be a candidate for a graduate degree, students must
cate, Professional Degree, or Master Degree while
have completed an appropriate undergraduate degree pro-
completing the requirements for their Bachelor Degree.
gram. Undergraduate students in the Combined Degree Pro-
These programs can give students a head start on graduate
gram may, however, work toward completion of graduate
education. An overview of these combined programs and de-
degree requirements prior to completing undergraduate de-
scription of the admission process and requirements are
gree requirements. See the Combined Undergraduate/Gradu-
found in the Graduate Degrees and Requirements section of
ate Degree section of the Graduate Bulletin for details of this
this Bulletin.
program.
Admission Procedure
Categories of Admission
Applying for Admission
There are three categories of admission to graduate studies
Apply electronically for admission on the World Wide
at Colorado School of Mines: regular, provisional, and spe-
Web. Our Web address is
cial graduate nondegree.
http://www.mines.edu/graduate_admissions
Regular Degree Students
Follow the procedure outlined below.
Applicants who meet all the necessary qualifications as de-
1. Application: Go to the online application form at
termined by the program to which they have applied are ad-
http://www.mines.edu/gradschoolapp/onlineapp.html. You
mitted as regular graduate students.
may download a paper copy of the application from our web-
Provisional Degree Students
site or contact 303-273-3247 or grad-school@Mines.edu to
Applicants who are not qualified to enter the regular de-
have one sent my mail. Students wishing to apply for gradu-
gree program directly may be admitted as provisional degree
ate school should submit completed applications by the fol-
students for a trial period not longer than 12 months. During
lowing dates:
this period students must demonstrate their ability to work
for Fall admission*
for an advanced degree as specified by the admitting degree
program. After the first semester, the student may request
January 15 - Priority consideration for financial support
that the department review his or her progress and make a
April 1 - International student deadline
decision concerning full degree status. With department ap-
July 1 - Domestic student deadline
proval, the credits earned under the provisional status can be
applied towards the advanced degree.
for Spring Admission
International Special Graduate Students
September 1 - International student deadline
Applicants who wish to study as non-degree students for
November 1 - Domestic student deadline
one or two semesters may apply for Special Graduate status.
*March 1 for Chemistry and Applied Chemistry, and Pe-
Special Graduate student status is available to a limited num-
troleum Engineering applicants
ber of applicants from abroad. All such students who attend
class or audit courses at Colorado School of Mines must reg-
*March 15 for Geology and Geological Engineering appli-
ister and pay the appropriate nonresident tuition and fees for
cants
the credits taken.
Students wishing to submit applications beyond the final
Nondegree Students
deadline should make a request to the individual academic
Practicing professionals may wish to update their profes-
department.
sional knowledge or broaden their areas of competence with-
2. Transcripts: Send to the Graduate School two official
out committing themselves to a degree program. They may
transcripts from each school previously attended. The tran-
enroll for regular courses as nondegree students. Inquiries
scripts may accompany the application or may be sent di-
and applications should be made to the Registrar's Office,
rectly by the institution attended. International students'
CSM, Golden, CO 80401-0028. Phone: 303-273-3200; FAX
transcripts must be in English or have an official English
303-384-2253. A person admitted as a nondegree student
translation attached.
Colorado School of Mines   Graduate Bul etin   2010–2011
11

3. Letters of Recommendation: Three (3) letters of recom-
Financial Assistance
mendation are required. Individuals who know your personal
To apply for CSM financial assistance, check the box in
qualities and scholastic or professional abilities can use the
the Financial Information section of the online graduate ap-
online application system to submit letters of recommenda-
plication or complete the Financial Assistance section on the
tion on your behalf. Letters can also be mailed directly to the
paper application.
Graduate School. At least two letters should be from individ-
Application Review Process
uals acquainted with your scholastic abilities.
When application materials are received by the Graduate
4. Graduate Record Examination: Most departments re-
School, they are processed and sent to the desired degree
quire the General test of the Graduate Record Examination
program for review. The review is conducted according to
for applicants seeking admission to their programs. Refer to
the process developed and approved by the faculty of that de-
the section Graduate Degree Programs and Courses by De-
gree program. The degree program transmits its decision to
partment or the Graduate School application packet to find
the Dean of the Graduate School, who then notifies the appli-
out if you must take the GRE examination. For information
cant. The decision of the degree program is final and may not
about the test, write to Graduate Record Examinations, Edu-
be appealed.
cational Testing Service, PO Box 6000, Princeton, NJ 08541-
Health Record and Additional Steps
6000 (Telephone 609-771-7670), or visit online at
When students first enroll at CSM, they must complete the
www.gre.org.
student health record form which is sent to them when they
5. English Language Requirements: Applicants whose na-
are accepted for enrollment. Students must submit the stu-
tive language is not English must prove proficiency. Lan-
dent health record, including health history, medical exami-
guage examination results must be sent to the Graduate
nation, and record of immunization, in order to complete
School as part of the admission process. The institution has
registration.
minimum English proficiency requirements - learn more at:
Questions can be addressed to the Coulter Student Health
http://www.mines.edu/Intl_GS.
Center, 1225 17th Street, Golden, CO 80401-1869. The
English proficiency may be proven by achieving one of
Health Center telephone numbers are 303-273-3381 and 303-
the following:
279-3155.
a) A TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) min-
International Students
imum score of 550 on the paper-based test, or a computer-
Qualifying international students (see Admission Require-
based score of 213, or a score of 79 on the internet Based
ments above) apply for graduate study by following steps
TOEFL (iBT).
one through six listed above.
b) At IELTS (International English Language Testing Sys-
tem) Score of 6.5, with no band below a 6.0.
c) A PTE A (Pearson test of English) score of 70 or
higher.
d) Independent evaluation and approval by the admission-
granting department.
6. Additional instructions for admission to graduate school
specific to individual departments are contained in the appli-
cation for admission.
12
Colorado School of Mines   Graduate Bul etin   2010–2011

Student Life at CSM
Housing
games or watching television. In addition to housing the Out-
Mines Park
door Recreation Program as well as the Intramurals and Club
The Mines Park apartment complex is located west of the
Sports Programs, the Center serves as the competition venue for
6th Avenue and 19th Street intersection on 55 acres owned
the Intercollegiate Men and Women's Basketball Programs, the
by CSM. The complex houses upper class students, graduate
Intercollegiate Volleyball Program and the Men and Women's In-
students, families, and some freshmen. Residents must be
tercollegiate Swimming and Diving Program.
full-time students.
Office for Student Development and Academic
Units are complete with refrigerators, stoves, dishwashers,
Services
cable television wired and wireless internet connections, and
The Student Development and Academic Services Office
an optional campus phone line for an additional fee. There
(SDAS), located in the Student Center, serves as the per-
are two community centers which contain the laundry facili-
sonal, academic and career counseling center for all students
ties, recreational/study space, and a convenience store.
enrolled in four credit hours or more or any student that has
2010-2011 rates are as follows:
paid the Student Services Fee. Through its various services,
the center acts as a comprehensive resource for the personal
Family Housing
growth and life skills development of our students. SDAS
1 bedroom
$717/mo
houses a library of over 200 books and other materials for
2 bedroom
$828/mo
checkout, and is home to Mine's Engineers Choosing Health
Options (ECHO) program, promoting wise and healthy deci-
Apartment Housing
sion making regarding students' use of alcohol and other
1 bedroom
$717/mo
drugs. Please visit http://counseling.mines.edu for more in-
2 bedroom
$972/mo
formation.
3 bedroom
$1,299/mo
Counseling: Experienced, professional counselors offer
Tenant pays gas and electric utilities. A Mines Park park-
assistance in a variety of areas. Personal counseling for stress
ing pass is included.
management, relationship issues, wellness education and/or
For a Mines Park application, please contact the housing
improved self image are a few of the areas often requested.
office at (303) 273-3350 or visit the Student Life office in the
Assertiveness, stress management, time management, gender
Ben Parker Student Center, Room 218.
issues, the MBTI, and career assessments are also popular in-
teractive presentations. SDAS works closely with other stu-
Student Services
dent life departments to address other issues.
Ben H. Parker Student Center
Academic Services: The staff conducts workshops in
The Ben H. Parker Student Center contains the offices for the
areas of interest to college students, such as time manage-
Vice President of Student Life and Dean of Students, Associate
ment, learning skills, test taking, preparing for finals and col-
Dean of Students, Housing, Student Activities and Greek Life,
lege adjustment One-on-one academic counseling with
Student Government (ASCSM), Admissions and Financial Aid,
assessment of individual learning skills is also available. Ad-
Cashier, Student Development and Academic Services, Services
ditional learning resources are provided on the department
for Students with Disabilities, International Student Services,
website. Please visit http://academicservices.mines.edu for
Career Services, Registrar, Blastercard, Conferences Services,
more information about tutoring programs, and academic
and student organizations. The Student Center also contains the
counseling.
student dining hall (known as the Slate Café), food court, book-
store, student lounges, meeting rooms, and banquet facilities.
Tutoring and Academic Excellence Workshops: Gradu-
ate students are welcome to avail themselves of free walk-in
Student Recreation Center
tutoring and/or weekly workshops in introductory calculus,
Completed in May, 2007, the 108,000 square foot Student
chemistry, and physics.
Recreation Center, located at the corner of 16th and Maple
Streets in the heart of campus, provides a wide array of facilities
Disability Services: This office serves students with doc-
and programs designed to meet students’ recreational and leisure
umented disabilities who are seeking academic accommoda-
needs while providing for a healthy lifestyle. The Center con-
tions or adjustments. Disability Services coordinates CSM's
tains a state-of-the-art climbing wall, an eight-lane, 25 meter
efforts to comply with the broad mandates of Section 504 of
swimming and diving pool, a cardiovascular and weight room,
the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Dis-
two multi-purpose rooms designed and equipped for aerobics,
abilities Act Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAAA). . Further
dance, martial arts programs and other similar activities, a com-
information, application and documentation guidelines can
petition gymnasium containing three full-size basketball courts
be found on the Disability Services website http://disabili-
as well as seating for 2500 people, a separate recreation gymna-
ties.mines.edu.
sium designed specifically for a wide variety of recreational pro-
grams, extensive locker room and shower facilities, and a large
lounge and juice bar facility intended for relaxing, playing
Colorado School of Mines   Graduate Bul etin   2010–2011
13

International Student Services
Health Center fee if they are part-time. Also, they must have
International student advising and international student
a completed Health History form on file at the Health Center.
services are the responsibility of International Student and
Supervised by the Director of Student Services. Phone: (303)
Scholar Services, located in the Student Center. The Interna-
273-3381; FAX: (303) 279-3155.
tional Student and Scholar Services Office coordinates the
Mandatory Health Insurance
Friendship Family Program. Orientation programs for new
Colorado School of Mines requires that all degree-seeking
international students are held at the beginning of each se-
students who are U. S. Citizens or permanent residents, and
mester. Visas and work permits are processed through the In-
all international students regardless of degree-seeking status
ternational Student Advisor at the International Student and
have health insurance that meets or exceeds CSM's coverage
Scholar Services Office.
requirements. Please see http://healthcenter.mines.edu/Insur-
For more information, call the International Student and
ance-Informationfor current information. Enrollment in the
Scholar Services office at 303-273-3210 or FAX 303-273-
Student Health Benefit Plan is automatic, and students' ac-
3099.
counts will be charged for the Student Health Benefit Plan
Identification Cards (BLASTER CARD)
premium unless a waiver is completed. Domestic students
Blaster cards are made in the Student Activities Office in
must complete an online enrollment/waiver process prior to
the Parker Student Center, and all new students must have a
Census Date. Students participating in NCAA-sanctioned in-
card made as soon as possible after they enroll. Each semes-
tercollegiate sports must complete a paper waiver and submit
ter the Student Activities Office issues RTD Bus Pass stickers
it to the Head Athletic Trainer before Census date each aca-
for student ID's. Students can replace lost, stolen, or damaged
demic year. International students must complete a paper
Blaster Cards for a small fee.
waiver and submit it to the International Student and Scholar
Services Office prior to Census Date each academic year.
The Blaster Card can be used as a debit card to make pur-
chases at all campus food service facilities, to check material
Immunizations
out of the CSM Library, to make purchases at the campus
A health history form with immunization record confirm-
residence halls, and may be required to attend various CSM
ing proof of immunity to measles, mumps, rubella (MMR's)
campus activities.
is required for all students enrolled in four credit hours or
more or any student that has paid the Student Health Center
Please visit the website at http://www.is.mines.edu/
fee. The health history form will be sent to students after
BlasterCard for more information.
they are accepted for admission and have stated their intent
Student Health Center
to enroll. It must be returned to the Student Health Center
The Student Health Center, located at 17th and Elm, pro-
prior to arriving on campus
vides primary health care to CSM students and their spouses.
Proof of immunity consists of an official Certificate of Im-
Students pay a Student Health Center fee each semester
munization signed by a physician, nurse, or public health of-
which entitles them to unlimited visits with a healthcare
ficial which documents two doses of each (measles, mumps,
provider as well as certain prescriptions and over-the-counter
and rubella). The Certificate must specify the type of vac-
medications. Spouses of enrolled students may also pay the
cine and the dates (month, day, and year) of administration or
fee and receive services except for dental services. The
written evidence of laboratory tests showing immunity to
health center provides wellness education, immunizations, al-
measles, mumps, and rubella. Failure to meet the immuniza-
lergy shots, flu shots, nutrition counseling and information
tion requirement will result in a hold on students' registration
regarding a wide range of health concerns. Staff members are
until this information is received by the Student Health Cen-
available to provide health-promotion events for students
ter.
groups and residence hall programming.
The completed health history form is confidential and will
The Student Health Center is open Monday through Friday
be a student's medical record while at CSM. This record will
8 A.M.-12 P.M. and 1-4:45 P.M. It is staffed by Nurse Practi-
be kept in the Student Health Center. The record will not be
tioners and RN's throughout the day. A physician is on cam-
released unless the student signs a written release.
pus daily from 3-4:45 pm during the academic year, they are
available for telephone consultation evenings and weekends.
Motor Vehicle Parking
All motor vehicles on campus must be registered with the
Dental services are provided to students at the Student
campus Facilities Management Division of Parking Services,
Health Center. Services are provided by a dentist, dental hy-
1318 Maple Street, and must display a CSM parking permit.
gienist, and dental assistant, and are available by appoint-
ment 3 days per week, four hours per day. Services include
Vehicles must be registered at the beginning of each semes-
x-rays, cleanings, fillings, and simple extractions. Referrals
ter or upon bringing your vehicle on campus, and updated
to local specialists are made if necessary.
whenever you change your address.
To be eligible for care at the Health Center, students must
be enrolled in four or more credit-hours, or have paid the
14
Colorado School of Mines   Graduate Bul etin   2010–2011

Public Safety
t "Career Manual" online - resume writing, resume and
The Colorado School of Mines Department of Public
cover letter examples, and job search tips
Safety is a full service, community oriented law enforcement
t Job Search Workshops - successful company research,
agency, providing 24/7 service to the campus. It is the mis-
interviewing, business etiquette, networking skills
sion of the Colorado School of Mines Police Department to
t Salary and overall outcomes information
make the Mines campus the safest campus in Colorado.
t Company contact information
The department is responsible for providing services such
as:
t Grad school information
uProactive patrol of the campus and its facilities;
t Career resource library
uInvestigation and reporting of crimes and incidents;
Job Resources
uMotor vehicle traffic and parking enforcement;
t Career Day (Fall and Spring)
uCrime and security awareness programs;
t Online summer, part-time, and full-time entry-level
uAlcohol / Drug abuse awareness / education;
job postings at http://diggernet.net
uSelf defense classes;
uConsultation with campus departments for safety and
t Virtual Career Fairs and special recruiting events
security matters;
t On-campus interviewing - industry and government rep-
uAdditional services to the campus community such as:
resentatives visit the campus to interview students and
vehicle unlocks and jumpstarts, community safe walks
explain employment opportunities
(escorts), authorized after-hours building and office ac-
t General employment board
cess, and assistance in any medical, fire, or other emer-
t Resume referrals
gency situation.
The police officers employed by the Department of Public
t Employer searching resource
Safety are fully trained police officers in accordance with
t Continued services up to 24 months after graduation
the Peace Officer Standards and Training (P.O.S.T.) Board
Oredigger Student Newspaper
and the Colorado Revised Statute.
The Oredigger student newspaper, published on a regular
Career Center
basis during the school year, contains news, features, sports,
The CSM Career Center mission is to assist students in de-
letters, and editorials of interest to students, faculty, and the
veloping, evaluating, and/or implementing career, education,
Golden community.
and employment decisions and plans. Career development is
Veterans' Benefits
integral to the success of CSM graduates and to the mission
The Registrar's Office offers veterans counseling services
of CSM. All Colorado School of Mines graduates will be
for students attending the School and using educational bene-
able to acquire the necessary job search and professional de-
fits from the Veterans Administration.
velopment skills to enable them to successfully take personal
responsibility for the management of their own careers. Serv-
ices are provided to all students and for all recent graduates,
up to 24 months after graduation. Students must adhere to the
ethical and professional business and job searching practices
as stated in the Career Center Student Policy, which can be
found in its entirety on the Student's Homepage of Digger-
Net.
In order to accomplish our mission, we provide a compre-
hensive array of career services:
Career Advice and Counseling
t Resources to help choose a major
t Individual resume and cover letter critiques
t Individual job search advice
t Practice video-taped interviews
Career Planning Services
t Online resources for exploring careers and employers at
http://careers.mines.edu
t "Career Digger" online - short bios describe what recent
grads are doing on their jobs
Colorado School of Mines   Graduate Bul etin   2010–2011
15

Military Science Army ROTC (AROTC)
to improve the quality of a graduate education, offer aca-
The Military Science Program at the Colorado School of
demic support for graduate students, and provide social inter-
Mines (CSM) is offered in conjunction with the University of
action.
Colorado at Boulder (CU-B). The Department of Military
GSA takes an active role in university affairs and promotes
Science offers programs leading to an officer's commission
the rights and responsibilities of graduate students. GSA also
in the active Army, Army Reserve, or National Guard in con-
serves to develop university responsibility to non-academic
junction with an undergraduate or graduate degree. Military
concerns of graduate students. GSA is funded through and
Science courses are designed to supplement a regular degree
works with Associated Students of the Colorado School of
program by offering practical leadership and management
Mines and is presently represented on the Faculty Senate
experience. Students attend classes at the Colorado School of
Graduate Council and Associated Students of CSM. Phone:
Mines in Golden.
303-273-3094.
Two-Year Program
The Mines Activity Council (MAC) serves the ASCSM as
The two-year program consists of the advanced course,
the campus special events board. Most student events on
preceded by attending the Leaders Training Course (a four-
campus are planned by the MAC committees. Committees
week summer ROTC basic course at Fort Knox, Kentucky).
are the Friday Afternoon Club (FAC) committee, which
Veterans or Active Army Reserve/Army National Guard Sol-
brings comedians and other performers to campus on most
diers, are eligible to enroll in the advanced course without at-
Fridays in the academic year; the Special Events committee,
tending the Leaders Training Course. Inquiries on advanced
which coordinates events like Discount Sport Nights at pro-
placement should be directed to the Department of Military
fessional sporting events and one-time specialty entertain-
Science. Advanced course students must obtain permission to
ment; Movies Committee; the E-Days committee; and the
enroll from the Professor of Military Science (PMS) at 303-
Homecoming committee.
492-6495.
Special Events
Registration and AROTC Course Credit
Research Fair: GSA presently sponsors a graduate re-
Army ROTC serves as elective credit in most departments.
search fair each Spring semester. The fair is designed to give
Elective course credit toward your degree for AROTC
graduate students the opportunity to make formal research
classes will be determined by your individual academic advi-
presentations in a professional conference setting. At the con-
sor. AROTC classes begin with the MSGN prefix.
clusion of the event, cash prizes are awarded to graduate stu-
For more information about the Army ROTC program and
dents whose presentations exhibit outstanding contributions
scholarships, contact the CU-Boulder Army ROTC Enroll-
to their areas of study.
ment and Scholarship Officer at 303-492-3549 or 303-492-
International Day is planned and conducted by the Inter-
6495. You can also go to http://www.colorado.edu/AROTC.
national Student Organization. It includes exhibits and pro-
For information specifically about Army ROTC at CSM, call
grams designed to further the cause of understanding among
303-273-3398 or 303-273-3380.
the countries of the world. The international dinner, including
Student Activities
entertainment and samples of foods from countries all over
Student government committees, professional societies,
the world, is one of the top campus social events of the year.
living group organizations, special events, honor societies,
Winter Carnival, sponsored by Blue Key, is an all-school
and interest group organizations add a balance to the CSM
ski day held each year at one of the nearby ski slopes.
community and offer participants the chance to develop lead-
ership and management skills. The Student Activities office
Homecoming weekend is one of the high points of the en-
can give you an up-to-date list of recognized campus organi-
tire year's activities. Events include a football rally and game,
zations and more information about them.
campus decorations, election of Homecoming queen and
beast, parade, burro race, and other contests.
Student Government
The Associated Students of the Colorado School of Mines
Engineer Days are held each spring. The three-day affair
(ASCSM) works to advance the interest and promote the
is organized entirely by students. Contests are held in
welfare of CSM and of all students, and to foster and main-
drilling, hand-spiking, mucking, oil-field olympics, and soft-
tain harmony among those connected with or interested in
ball, to name a few. Additional events include a fireworks
the school, including students, alumni, faculty, trustees, and
display, an E-Day concert, and the traditional orecart pull.
friends.
GSA Fall and Spring Blowout: GSA sponsors parties
Through funds collected as student fees, ASCSM strives to
twice a year for graduate students. Held in the late spring and
ensure a full social and academic life for all students with its
early fall at local parks, they let graduate students take a
organization, publications, and social events.
break from studying.
The Graduate Student Association was formed in 1991 and
is recognized by CSM and the National Association of Grad-
uate-Professional Students (NSGPS). GSA's primary goal is
16
Colorado School of Mines   Graduate Bul etin   2010–2011

Honor Societies
Professional Societies
Honor societies recognize the outstanding achievements of
Professional societies are generally student chapters of the
their members in scholarship, leadership, and service. Each
national professional societies. As student chapters, the pro-
of the CSM honor societies recognizes different achieve-
fessional societies offer a chance for additional professional
ments by our students.
development outside the classroom through guest speakers,
Interest Organizations
trips, and interactive discussions about the current activities
Interest organizations meet the special and unique needs of
in the profession. Many of the organizations also offer intern-
the CSM student body by providing specific co-curricular ac-
ships, fellowships, and scholarships.
tivities.
Recreational Organizations
International & Minority Organizations
Recreational organizations give students with similar
International and minority organizations provide the op-
recreational interests the chance to participate as a group in
portunity to experience different cultures while at Mines and
the activities. Most of the recreational organizations compete
help the students from those cultures adjust to Mines campus
on both the local and regional levels at tournaments during
life.
the school year.
Please visit the Student Activities Office or http://studen-
tactivities.mines.edu/ for a complete list of currently active
student organizations.
Colorado School of Mines   Graduate Bul etin   2010–2011
17

Facilities and Academic Support
Arthur Lakes Library
Campus Computing, Communications, & Information
JOANNE V. LERUD-HECK, Librarian and Library Director
Technologies (CCIT) provides computing and networking
LISA G. DUNN, Librarian
services to meet the instructional, research, administrative,
LAURA A. GUY, Librarian
and networking infrastructure needs of the campus. CCIT
LISA S. NICKUM, Associate Librarian
manages and operates campus networks along with central
CHRISTOPHER THIRY, Associate Librarian
academic and administrative computing systems, telecommu-
HEATHER L. WHITEHEAD, Associate Librarian
nication systems, a high performance computing cluster for
PATRICIA E. ANDERSEN, Assistant Librarian
the energy sciences (see http://geco.mines.edu), and com-
CHRISTINE BAKER, Assistant Librarian
puter classrooms and workrooms in several locations on
PAMELA M. BLOME, Assistant Librarian
MEGAN TOMEO, Assistant Librarian
campus. CCIT’s customer services and support group also
JULIE CARMEN, Research Librarian
provides direct support for most electronic classrooms, de-
Arthur Lakes Library is a regional information center for
partmental laboratories and desktops throughout the campus.
engineering, energy, minerals, materials, and associated engi-
Central computing accounts and services are available to
neering and science fields. The Library supports university
registered students and current faculty and staff members. In-
education and research programs and is committed to meet-
formation about hours, services, and the activation of new
ing the information needs of the Mines community and all li-
accounts is available on the web site at http://ccit.mines.edu/,
brary users.
directly from the Help Desk in the Computer Commons (in
The Library has over 140,000 visitors a year and is a cam-
CTLM 156), or by calling (303) 273-3431.
pus center for learning, study and research. Facilities include
Workrooms in several locations on campus contain net-
meeting space, a campus computer lab, and individual and
worked PCs and workstations. Printers, scanners, digitizers,
group study space. We host many cultural events during the
and other specialized resources are available for use in some
year, including concerts and art shows.
of the locations.
The librarians provide personalized help and instruction,
In addition to central server and facilities operations, serv-
and assist with research. The Library's collections include
ices supported for the campus community include e-mail,
more than 500,000 books; thousands of print and electronic
wired and wireless network operation and support, access to
journals; hundreds of databases; one of the largest map col-
the commodity Internet, Internet 2, and National Lambda
lections in the West; an archive on Colorado School of Mines
Rail, network security, volume and site licensing of software,
and western mining history; and several special collections.
on-line training modules, videoconferencing, student regis-
The Library is a selective U.S. and Colorado state depository
tration, billing, and other administrative applications, campus
with over 600,000 government publications.
web sites and central systems administration and support.
The Library Catalog provides access to Library collections
CCIT also manages and supports the central learning man-
and your user account. Our databases allow users to find
agement system (Blackboard), printing, short-term equip-
publications for classroom assignments, research or personal
ment loan, and room scheduling for some general computer
interest. Students and faculty can use most of the Library's
teaching classrooms.
electronic databases and publications from any computer on
All major campus buildings are connected to the comput-
the campus network, including those in networked Mines
ing network operated by CCIT and most areas of the campus
residential facilities. Dial-up and Internet access are available
are covered by the wireless network. All residence halls and
out of network.
the Mines Park housing complex are wired for network ac-
Arthur Lakes Library is a member of the Colorado Al-
cess and some fraternity and sorority houses are also directly
liance. Students and faculty can use their library cards at
connected to the network.
other Alliance libraries, or can order materials directly using
All users of Colorado School of Mines computing and net-
Prospector, our regional catalog. Materials can also be re-
working resources are expected to comply with all policies
quested from anywhere in the world through interlibrary
related to the use of these resources. Policies are available
loan.
via the web pages at http://ccit.mines.edu.
Computing, Communications, &
Copy Center
Information Technologies (CCIT)
Located on the first floor of Guggenheim Hall, the Copy
DEREK WILSON, CIO
Center offers on-line binding, printed tabs, transparencies
PHIL ROMIG, III, CISO & Director, Computing & Networking
and halftones. Printing can be done on 8 ½"x 11", 11"x14"
Infrastructure
and 11"x17" paper sizes from odd-sized originals. Some of
GINA BOICE, Director, Customer Services & Support
the other services offered are GBC and Velo Binding, fold-
TIM KAISER, Director, High Performance and Research Computing
ing, sorting and machine collating, reduction and enlarge-
DAVID LEE, Director, Enterprise Systems
ment, two sided copying, and color copying. We have a
GEORGE FUNKEY, Director, Policy, Planning, & Integration Services
variety of paper colors, special resume paper and CSM wa-
18
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010-2011

termark for thesis copying. These services are available to
Environmental Health and Safety
students, faculty, and staff. The Copy Center campus exten-
The Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) Department
sion is 3202.
is located in Chauvenet Hall room 194. The Department pro-
CSM Alumni Association
vides a variety of services to students, staff and faculty mem-
(CSMAA) The Colorado School of Mines Alumni Associ-
bers. Functions of the Department include: hazardous waste
ation, established in 1895, is a separate nonprofit that serves
collection and disposal; chemical procurement and distribu-
the Colorado School of Mines and more than 22,000 alumni.
tion; chemical spill response; assessment of air and water
While all alumni are included in the reach of the CSMAA, it
quality; fire safety; laboratory safety; industrial hygiene; ra-
is a membership-based organization reliant upon membership
diation safety; biosafety; and recycling. Staff is available to
funds for much of its budget. Other sources of funding in-
consult on issues such as chemical exposure control, hazard
clude the School, Foundation, merchandise sales and rev-
identification, safety systems design, personal protective
enue-sharing partnerships. Services and benefits of
equipment, or regulatory compliance. Stop by our office or
membership include:
call 303 273-3316. The EHS telephone is monitored nights
and weekends to respond to spills and environmental emer-
l Mines, a quarterly publication covering campus and
gencies.
alumni news;
l an online directory of all Mines alumni for networking
Green Center
purposes;
Completed in 1971, the Cecil H. and Ida Green Graduate
l online job listings for alumni two years out of school;
and Professional Center is named in honor of Dr. and Mrs.
l an online community with shared-interest groups;
Green, major contributors to the funding of the building.
l section activities that provide social and networking
Bunker Memorial Auditorium, which seats 1,386, has a large
connections to the campus and Mines alumni around the
stage that may be used for lectures, concerts, drama productions,
world;
or for any occasion when a large attendance is expected.
l alumni gatherings (meetings, reunions, golf tournaments
Friedhoff Hall contains a dance floor and an informal
and other special events) on and off campus;
l
stage. Approximately 600 persons can be accommodated at
alumni recognition awards;
l
tables for banquets or dinners. Auditorium seating can be
CSM library privileges for Colorado residents;
l
arranged for up to 450 people.
discounts with national vendors through the new Aben-
ity discount program for local and national retailers.
Petroleum Hall and Metals Hall are lecture rooms seating
Benefits for current Colorado School of Mines students in-
123 and 310, respectively. Each room has audio visual equip-
clude:
ment. In addition, the Green Center houses the Department
l
of Geophysics.
Legacy Grants for children or grandchildren of alumni;
l the Student Financial Assistance Program;
For more information visit www.greencenter.mines.edu.
l recognition banquets for graduating seniors/ graduate
LAIS Writing Center
students;
Located on the third floor of Stratton Hall (phone: 303-
l the CSMAA Mentorship program, pairing students with
273-3085), the LAIS Writing Center is a teaching facility
alumni for professional development;
providing all CSM students, faculty, and staff with an oppor-
l assistance and support of School events such as Home-
tunity to enhance their writing abilities. The LAIS Writing
coming;
Center faculty are experienced technical and professional
l alumni volunteer assistance in student recruiting;
writing instructors who are prepared to assist writers with
l Order of the Engineer ceremonies;
everything from course assignments to theses and disserta-
l and various other programs that enrich students' lives
tions, to scholarship and job applications. This service is free
via alumni involvement.
to CSM students, faculty, and staff and entails one-to-one tu-
Students can join the CSMAA for $20/year and be a part
toring and online resources (at http://www.mines.edu/acade-
of its "M-ulator" Program. Benefits include pairing with a
mic/lais/wc/).
mentor, special and exclusive events, exclusive access to pro-
gram presenters, the Abenity discount program for national
Off-Campus Study
retailers, a goodie bag, and a sense of pride in being part of
A student must enroll in an official CSM course for any
the powerful and successful alumni (alumni-to-be) commu-
period of off-campus, course-related study, whether U.S. or
nity.
foreign, including faculty-led short courses, study abroad, or
For further information, call 303-273-3295, FAX 303-273-
any off-campus trip sponsored by CSM or led by a CSM fac-
3583, e-mail csmaa@mines.edu, or write Mines Alumni As-
ulty member. The registration must occur in the same term
sociation, Coolbaugh House, P.O. Box 1410, Golden, CO
that the off-campus study takes place. In addition, the stu-
80402-1410.
dent must complete the necessary release, waiver, and emer-
gency contact forms, transfer credit pre-approvals, and
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
19

FERPA release, and provide adequate proof of current health
(5) Utilize OTT opportunities to advance high-quality
insurance prior to departure. For additional information con-
faculty and students;
cerning study abroad requirements, contact the Office of In-
(6) Provide a return on investment on CSM inventions
ternational Programs at (303) 384-2121; for other
which is used to expand the school's research and
information, contact the Registrar’s Office.
education missions.
Office of International Programs
Public Relations
The Office of International Programs (OIP) fosters and
The communications staff in the President's Office is re-
facili tates international education, research and outreach at
sponsible for public relations and marketing initiatives at
CSM. OIP is administered by the Office of Academic Affairs.
Mines. For information about the school's publications
OIP is located in 204 Thomas Hall. For more specific
guidelines, including the use of Mines logos and for media-
infor mation about study abroad and other international
related requests, contact Marsha Williams, Director of Inte-
programs, contact OIP at 384-2121 or visit the OIP web page
grated Marketing Communications, at 303-273-3326 or
(http://OIP.mines.edu).
marswill@mines.edu; or Karen Gilbert, Public Relations
The office works with the departments and divisions of the
Specialist, at 303-273-3541 or Karen.Gilbert@is.mines.edu.
School to: (1) help develop and facilitate study abroad oppor-
Registrar
tunities for CSM undergraduate and graduate students and
LARA MEDLEY, Registrar
serve as an informational and advising resource for them;
DAHL GRAYCKOWSKI, Associate Registrar
(2) assist in attracting new international students to CSM;
DIANA ANGLIN, Assistant Registrar
(3) serve as an information resource for faculty and scholars
JUDY WESTLEY, Records Specialist
of the CSM community, promoting faculty exchanges and
TABATHA GRAYCKOWSKI, Registration Specialist
the pursuit of collaborative international research activities;
KRISTI PUNCHES, Reporting Specialist
(4) foster international outreach and technology transfer pro-
MARGARET KENNEY, Administrative Assistant
grams; (5) facilitate arrangements for official international
The Office of the Registrar supports the academic mission
visitors to CSM; and (6) in general, help promote the interna-
of the Colorado School of Mines by providing service to our
tionalization of CSM’s curricular programs and activities.
current and former students, faculty, staff, and administra-
Graduate students may apply for participation in dual de-
tion. These services include maintaining and protecting the
gree programs offered by CSM and its partners. Generally
integrity and security of the official academic record, regis-
these programs require the preparation and defense of one
tration, degree verification, scheduling and reporting. Our
jointly supervised thesis project and the completion of degree
office routinely reviews policy, makes recommendations for
requirements at each participating university
change, and coordinates the implementation of approved pol-
(http:/OIP.mines.edu/studentabroad/schol.html).
icy revisions.
Office of Technology Transfer
The Office of the Registrar seeks to fulfill this mission
through a commitment to high quality service provided in a
TThe purpose of the Office of Technology Transfer (OTT)
professional, efficient and courteous manner. Our specific
is to reward innovation and entrepreneurial activity by stu-
services include but are not limited to:
dents, faculty and staff, recognize the value, preserve owner-
ship of CSM's intellectual property, and contribute to local
l Enrollment and degree verifications
and national the economic growth. OTT reports directly to
l Transcripts
the Vice President of Research and Technology Transfer and
l Degree auditing and diplomas (undergraduate)
works closely with the school's offices of Legal Services and
l Transfer credit entry and verification
Research Administration to coordinate activities. With sup-
l Veteran's Administration Certifying Official services
port from its external Advisory Board, OTT strives to:
l Registration setup and execution
l Course and room scheduling
(1) Initiate and stimulate entrepreneurship and develop-
l Academic and enrollment reporting
ment of mechanisms for effective investment of
l Residency for current students
CSM’s intellectual capital;
l Grade collection, reporting and changes
(2) Secure CSM’s intellectual properties generated by
faculty, students, and staff;
Management of the Registrar's Office adheres to the guide-
(3) Contribute to the economic growth of the communi-
lines on professional practices and ethical standards devel-
ty, state, and nation through facilitating technology
oped by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars
transfer to the commercial sector;
and Admissions Officers (AACRAO). Our office also com-
plies with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of
(4) Retain and motivate faculty by rewarding entrepre-
1974 (FERPA), Colorado Department of Higher Education
neurship;
20
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010-2011

rules and policies, and the Colorado School of Mines policies
for international corporations and governments through the
on confidentiality and directory information.
International Institute for Professional Advancement and
The Registrar's Office is located in the Student Center,
hosts the Mine Safety and Health Training Program. A sepa-
rate bulletin lists the educational programs offered by the
Room 31. Hours of operation are Monday/Tuesday/Thurs-
SPACE Office, CSM, 1600 Arapahoe St., Golden, CO
day/Friday, 9am-5pm; Wednesday 10am-5pm. The office
80401. Phone: 303 273-3321; FAX 303 273-3314; email
phone number is (303) 273-3200. The fax number is (303)
space@mines.edu; website
384-2253. Lara Medley represents Colorado School of
www.mines.edu/Educational_Outreach.
Mines as the Registrar. She is normally available on a walk-
in basis (when not in meetings) if a student or other client has
Telecommunications
an issue that needs special attention. Appointments are also
The Telecommunications Office is located in the CTLM
welcomed.
building 2nd floor east end room 256 and provides telephone
Research Administration
services to the campus. The Office is open 8:00am to
4:00pm Monday through Friday, and can be reached by call-
The Office of Research Administration (ORA), under the
ing (303) 273-3122 or via the web at
Vice President for Finance and Administration, provides ad-
http://www.mines.edu/academic/computer/telecom/.
ministrative support in proposal preparation and contract and
grant administration, which includes negotiation, account set-
Courtesy phones are provided on each floor of the tradi-
up, and close out of expired agreements. Information on any
tional residence halls and Weaver Towers as well as School
of these areas of research and specific forms can be accessed
owned fraternities and sororities. In-room phones are avail-
on our web site at www.is.mines.edu/ora.
able to students living in Mines Park for $18.50 per month.
Students wishing to take advantage of in-room phones in
Office of Strategic Enterprises
Mines Park should contact the Telecommunications office to
NIGEL MIDDLETON, Senior Vice President
arrange for service. Telephone sets are not provided by the
The mission of the Office of Strategic Enterprises (OSE) is
Telecommunications office.
to bring Mines' educational and intellectual resources to the
Students wishing to make long distance calls from any
world and enable professionals, corporate entities, and uni-
CSM provided phone need to obtain a long distance account
versities from around the globe to interact with Mines. The
goal is a distinctive "anywhere, anytime" approach to learn-
code from the Telecommunications office or use a third party
ing in a fast-paced, changing world. Initiatives include exec-
"calling card". Rates on the school's long distance accounts
utive and corporate training, non-degree courses, and
are currently 5 cents per minute, 24 hours a day, seven days a
summer intensives. Professionals needing continuing educa-
week. International rates are available at the Telecommunica-
tion can find short-term and part-time offerings, targeted
tions Office or through the web. Monthly and/or long dis-
training, off-campus programs and certificate courses. OSE
tance charges are assessed to the student accounts by the 5th
also reaches out to prospective universities on different conti-
of each month for calls made the prior month, and invoices
nents to initiate partnerships that could benefit from Mines'
are mailed directly to students at their campus address.
academic capabilities in resource or energy development.
Advancing Mines' global mission in other countries, OSE in-
Women in Science, Engineering and
creases opportunities for international researchers to study at
Mathematics (WISEM) Program
Mines, and for Mines researchers to work at international fa-
cilities. The Office of Special Programs and Continuing Ed-
The mission of WISEM is to enhance opportunities for
ucation (SPACE) reports to OSE and administers most of the
women in science and engineering careers, to increase reten-
programmatic offerings. For further information about OSE,
tion of women at CSM, and to promote equity and diversity
visit inside.mines.edu/Educational_Outreach.
in higher education. The office sponsors programs and serv-
ices for the CSM community regarding gender and equity is-
Special Programs and Continuing
sues. For further information, contact: Debra K. Lasich,
Education (SPACE)
Executive Director of Women in Science, Engineering and
GARY BAUGHMAN, Director, SPACE
Mathematics, Colorado School of Mines, 1710 Illinois Street,
The SPACE Office administers short courses, special
Golden, CO 80401-1869. Phone (303) 273-3097; email dla-
programs, and professional outreach programs to practicing
sich@mines.edu; website http://wisem.mines.edu/.
engineers and other working professionals. Short courses,
offered both on the CSM campus and throughout the US,
provide con centrated instruction in specialized areas and are
taught by faculty members, adjuncts, and other experienced
profes sionals. The Office offers a broad array of program-
ming for K-12 teachers and students through its Teacher
Enhancement Program, and the Denver Earth Science
Project. The Office also coordinates educational programs
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
21

Registration and Tuition Classification
General Registration Requirements
work. Students registered for research during the summer se-
The normal full load for graduate students is 9 credit hours
mester and working on campus must pay regular tuition and
per term. Special cases outlined below include first-year in-
thesis research fees for summer semester.
ternational students who must receive special instruction to
Eligibility for Reduced Registration
improve their language skills, and students who have com-
Students enrolled in thesis-based degree programs who
pleted their credit-hour requirements and are working full
have completed the minimum course and research require-
time on their thesis.
ments for their degree are eligible to continue to pursue their
Full-time graduate students may register for an overload of
graduate program full time at a reduced registration level. In
up to 6 credit hours (up to 15 credit hours total) per term at
order to be considered for this reduced, full-time registration
no increase in tuition. Subject to written approval by their
category, students must satisfy the following require ments:
advisor and department head or division director, students
1. For M.S./M.E. students, completion of 36 hours of eligi-
may register for more than 15 credit hours per term by pay-
ble course, research and transfer credits combined
ing additional tuition at the regular part-time rate for all
hours over 15. The maximum number of credits for which a
2. For Ph.D. students, completion of 72 hours of eligible
student can register during the summer is 12.
course, research, and transfer credits combined
Except for students meeting any of the following condi-
3. For all students, an approved Admission to Candidacy
tions, students may register at less than the required full-time
form must be on file in the Graduate Office within the first
registration.
week of the semester you are applying for reduced thesis
registra tion.
u International students subject to immigration require-
ments. This applies to international students holding
4. Candidates may not count more than 12 credit hours per
J-1 and F-1 visas.
semester in determining eligibility for reduced, full-time reg-
istration.
u Students receiving financial assistance in the form of
graduate teaching assistantships, research assistant-
Students who are eligible for reduced, full-time registra-
ships, fellowships or hourly contracts.
tion are considered full time if they register for 4 credit hours
of research under course numbers 704 (M.E.), 705 (M.S.) or
u Students enrolled in academic programs that require
706 (Ph.D.) as appropriate.
full-time registration. Refer to the degree program sec-
tions of this bulletin to see if this applies to a particular
Graduation Requirements
program.
To graduate, students must be registered during the term in
Students for whom any one of these conditions apply must
which they complete their program. In enforcing this regis-
register at the appropriate full-time credit hour requirement.
tration requirement, the Graduate School allows students to
complete their checkout requirements past the end of the
To remain in good standing, students must register contin-
semester. Late checkout is accepted by the Graduate School
uously each fall and spring semester. If not required to regis-
through the last day of registration in the term immediately
ter full-time, part-time students may register for any number
following the semester in which a student has completed his
of credit hours less than the full-time credit hour load.
or her academic degree requirements; the Spring for Fall
Summer registration is not required for students to remain
completion, the Field for Spring completion, and Fall for
in good standing. Students who continue to work on degree
Summer completion. Students not meeting this check out
programs and utilize CSM facilities during the summer, how-
deadline are required to register for an additional semester
ever, must register. Students registered during the summer
before the Graduate School will process their checkout re-
are assessed regular tuition and fees.
quest. Refer to page 31 for additional information or
Research Registration
http://inside.mines.edu/admiss/grad/graduation_rqmts.htm.
In addition to completing prescribed course work and
Full-time Status - Required
defend ing a thesis, students in thesis-based degree programs
Course Load
must complete a research or engineering design experience
To be deemed full-time during the fall and spring semesters,
under the direct supervision of their faculty advisor. Master
students must register for at least 9 credit hours. However,
students must complete a minimum of 6 hours of research
international students need only register for 6 credit hours
credit, and doctoral students must complete a minimum of 24
per semester during their first year, if they are required to
hours of research credit at CSM. While completing this
take special language instruction or are accepted in Provi-
experi ence, students register for research credit under course
sional Status. In the event a thesis-based student has com-
numbers 704 (M.E.), 705 (M.S.) or 706 (Ph.D.) as appro -
pleted his or her required course work and research credits
priate. Faculty assign grades indicating satisfactory or unsat-
and is eligible for reduced, full-time registration, the student
isfactory progress based on their evaluation of the student’s
22
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010-2011

will be deemed full-time if he or she is registered for at least
Courses completed under the reciprocal agreement may be
4 credit hours of research credit.
applied to a student's degree program. These are, however,
To be deemed full-time during the summer semester, stu-
applied as transfer credit into the degree program. In doing
dents must register for a minimum of 3 credit hours.
so, they are subject to all the limitations, approvals and re-
quirements of any regularly transferred course.
Late Registration Fee
Students must complete their registration by the date
In-State Tuition Classification Status
speci fied in the Academic Calendar. Students who fail to
General Information
complete their registration during this time will be assessed
The State of Colorado partially subsidizes the cost of tui -
a $100 late registration fee and will not receive any tuition
tion for all students whose domicile, or permanent legal resi-
fellow ships for which they might otherwise be eligible.
dence, is in Colorado. Each CSM student is classified as
either an “in-state resident” or a “non-resident” at the time
Leave of Absence
of matriculation. These classifications, which are governed
Leaves of absence are granted only when unanticipated
by Colorado law, are based upon information furnished by
circumstances make it temporarily impossible for students to
each student on his or her application for admission to CSM.
continue to work toward a degree. Leave of absence requests
A student who willfully furnishes incorrect information to
for the current semester must be received by the Dean of
CSM to evade payment of non-resident tuition shall be sub-
Graduate Studies prior to the last day of classes. Leave of
ject to serious disciplinary action.
absence requests for prior semesters will not be considered.
It is in the interest of each graduate student who is a U.S.
Any request for a leave of absence must have the prior
citizen and who is supported on an assistantship or fellow-
approval of the student’s faculty advisor, the department
ship to become a legal resident of Colorado at the earliest
head or division or program director and the Dean of Gradu-
oppor tunity. Typically, tuition at the non-resident rate will
ate Studies. The request for a leave of absence must be in
be paid by CSM for these students during their first year of
writing and must include (1) the reasons why the student
study only. After the first year of study, these students may
must interrupt his or her studies and (2) a plan (including a
be responsible for paying the difference between resident and
timeline and deadlines) for resuming and completing the
non-resident tuition.
work toward the degree in a timely fashion.
Requirements for Establishing In-State Residency
Students on leaves of absence remain in good standing
The specific requirements for establishing residency for
even though they are not registered for any course or re-
tuition classification purposes are prescribed by state law
search credits.
(Colorado Revised Statutes, Title 23, Article 7). Because
Thesis-based students will not have access to CSM resources
Colorado residency status is governed solely by Colorado
while on a leave of absence. This includes, but is not limited
law, the fact that a student might not qualify for in-state
to, office space, computational facilities, library and faculty.
status in any other state does not guarantee in-state status in
Students who fail to register and who are not on approved
Colorado. The tuition classification statute places the burden
leaves of absence have their degree programs terminated.
of proof on the student to provide clear and convincing evi-
Students who wish to return to graduate school after an
dence of eligibility.
unauthorized leave of absence must apply for readmission
In-state or resident status generally requires domicile in
and pay a $200 readmission fee.
Colorado for the year immediately preceding the beginning
The financial impact of requesting a leave of absence for
of the semester in which in-state status is sought. “Domicile”
the current semester is covered in the section on “Payments
is “a person’s true, fixed and permanent home and place of
and Refunds” on page 37.
habitation.” An unemancipated minor is eligible for in-state
status if at least one parent (or his or her court-appointed
Reciprocal Registration
guardian) has been domiciled in Colorado for at least one
Under the Exchange Agreement Between the State Sup-
year. If neither of the student’s parents are domiciliaries of
ported Institutions in Northern Colorado, CSM graduate
Colorado, the student must be a qualified person to begin the
students who are paying full-time tuition may take courses at
one-year domiciliary period. A “qualified person” is someone
Colorado State University, University of Northern Colorado,
who is at least twenty-two years old, married, or emanci-
and University of Colorado (Boulder, Denver, Colorado
pated. A student may prove emancipation if: (1) the student’s
Springs, and the Health Sciences Center) at no charge by
parents have entirely surrendered the right to the student’s
completing the request form and meeting the required con -
custody and earnings; (2) the student’s parents are no longer
ditions on registration and tuition, course load, and course
under any duty to financially support the student; and (3) the
and space availability. Request forms are available from the
student’s parents have made no provision for the continuing
Registrar’s office.
support of the student.
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
23

To begin the one-year domiciliary period, a qualified per-
Dropping and Adding Courses
son must be living in Colorado with the present intention to
Students may drop or add courses through web registra-
reside permanently in Colorado. Although none of the follow -
tion without paying a fee during the first 11 school days of a
ing indicia are determinative, voter registration, driver’s
regular semester, the first four school days of a six-week
license, vehicle registration, state income tax filings, real
field course, or the first six school days of an eight-week
property interests, and permanent employment (or acceptance
summer term.
of future employment) in Colorado will be considered in de-
After the 11th day of classes through the 10th week, con-
termining whether a student has the requisite intention to per-
tinuing students may drop any course for any reason with a
manently reside in Colorado. Once a student’s legal residence
grade of “W”. Graduate students in their first semester at
has been permanently established in Colorado, he or she may
CSM have through the 14th week of that semester to drop a
continue to be classified as a resident student so long as such
course. A student must process a dorp-add form and pay a
residence is maintained, even though circumstances may re-
$4.00 fee for any change in class schedule after the first 11
quire extended temporary absences from Colorado.
days of class, except in cases beyond the student’s control or
For more information about the requirements for establish-
withdrawal from school. Forms are available in the Regis-
ing in-state residency, please contact the Registrar’s Office.
trar’s Office.
Petitioning for In-State Tuition Classification
After the 10th (or 14th) week, no drops are permitted
A continuing, non-resident student who believes that he
except in case of withdrawal from school or for extenuating
or she has become eligible for in-state resident tuition due to
circum stances. To request consideration of extenuating cir-
events that have occurred subsequent to his or her initial en-
cumstances, a student must submit a written request to the
rollment may file a Petition for In-State Tuition Classifica-
Graduate Dean, which includes the following:
tion with the Registrar’s Office. This petition is due in the
1. A list of the courses from which they wish to with-
Registrar’s Office no later than the first day of the semester for
draw. This must include all courses for which they are
which the student is requesting in-state resident status. Upon
registered.
receipt of the petition, the Registrar will initially decide
whether the student should be granted in-state residency sta-
2. Documentation of the problem which is the basis for
tus. The Registrar’s decision may be appealed by petition to
the request.
the Tuition Classification Review Committee. For more in-
3. If the problem involves a medical condition, the docu-
formation about this process, please contact the Registrar’s
mentation must be signed by a licensed medical doctor
Office.
or a representative of the CSM Counseling Office.
In-State Tuition Classification for WICHE Program
4. Signatures indicating approval by the student’s advisor
Participants
and department head or division director.
WICHE, the Western Interstate Commission for Higher
A student who is allowed to withdraw from courses under
Education, promotes the sharing of higher education re-
this policy will receive a grade of “W” for each course and
sources among the participating western states. Under this
will be placed on automatic leave of absence. In order to
program, residents of Alaska, Arizona, Hawaii, Idaho, Mon-
resume their graduate program, they must submit a written
tana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South
application that includes documentation that the problems
Dakota, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming who are enrolled
which caused the withdrawal have been corrected. The stu-
in qualifying graduate programs may be eligible for in-state
dent will be reinstated to active status upon approval of their
tuition classification. Current qualifying programs include:
application by their advisor and their department head or di-
Applied Chemistry (Ph.D.)
vision director.
Chemistry (M.S.)
The financial impact of a withdrawal is covered in the sec-
Engineering Systems (M.S. and Ph.D.)
tion on “Payments and Refunds.”
Environmental Science & Engineering (M.S. and Ph.D.)
Geochemistry (M.S. and Ph.D.)
Geological Engineering (M.S., M.E., and Ph.D.)
Hydrology (M.S. and Ph.D.)
Mineral Economics (M.S. and Ph.D.)
Mining and Earth Systems Engineering (M.S. and Ph.D.)
Petroleum Engineering (M.S. and Ph.D.)
Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more informa-
tion about WICHE.
24
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010-2011

Auditing Courses
Off-Campus Study
As part of the maximum of 15 semester hours of graduate
A student must enroll in an official CSM course for any
work, students may enroll for no credit (NC) in a course with
period of off-campus, course-related study, whether U.S. or
the permission of the instructor. Tuition charges are the same
foreign, including faculty-led short courses, study abroad, or
for no credit as for credit enrollment.
any off-campus trip sponsored by CSM or led by a CSM fac-
Students must enroll for no credit before the last day of
ulty member. The registration must occur in the same term
registration. The form to enroll for a course for no credit is
that the off-campus study takes place. In addition, the stu-
available in the Registrar’s Office. NC designation is awarded
dent must complete the necessary release, waiver, and emer-
only if all conditions stipulated by course instructors are met.
gency contact forms, transfer credit pre-approvals, and
FERPA release, and provide adequate proof of current health
Mines requires that all U.S. students who are being sup-
insurance prior to departure. For additional information con-
ported by the institution register full time, and federal finan-
cerning study abroad requirements, contact the Office of In-
cial aid regulations prohibit us from counting NC registration
ternational Programs at (303) 384-2121; for other
in determining financial aid eligibility. In addition, the INS
information, contact the Registrar’s Office.
requires that international students register full time, and re-
cent anti-terrorism proposals discourage us from counting
NC registration toward that requirement. Furthermore, there
are no consistent standards for expectations of students who
register for NC in a course. Therefore, in order to treat all
CSM students consistently, NC registration will not count
toward the minimum number of hours for which students are
required to register. This includes the minimum continuous
registration requirement of part-time students and the 3-, or
9-hour requirement for students who must register full time.
The reduced registration policy is based on the principle
that the minimum degree requirement (36 or 72 hours) would
include only the credits applied toward that degree. Defi-
ciency and extra courses are above and beyond that mini-
mum. NC courses fall into the latter category and may not be
applied toward the degree. Therefore, NC registration will
not count toward the number of hours required to be eligible
for reduced thesis registration.
NC registration may involve additional effort on the part
of faculty to give and/or grade assignments or exams, so it is
the institution’s policy to charge tuition for NC courses.
Therefore, NC registration will count toward the maximum
number of credits for which a graduate student may be al-
lowed to register. This includes a tuition surcharge for credits
taken over 15.
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
25

General Regulations
Graduate School Bulletin
Drug Use
It is the responsibility of the graduate student to become
Recognizing the threat to health and welfare from the use
informed and to observe all regulations and procedures
of illegal drugs. this policy requires CSM students to obey all
required by the program the student is pursuing. Ignorance
Colorado and Federal laws concerning the manufacture, pos-
of a rule does not constitute a basis for waiving that rule.
session, sale, and use of drugs.
The Graduate Bulletin current when a graduate student first
Drug Free Schools & Communities Act
enrolls gives the academic requirements the student must
This policy informs CSM students of community stan-
meet to graduate. However, with department consent, a stu-
dards and potential consequences (the legal sanctions) for
dent can change to the require ments in a later catalog pub-
using alcohol or drugs illegally.
lished while the student is enrolled in the graduate school.
Changes to administrative policies and procedures become
Firearms, Explosives, and Other Weapons
effective for all students as soon as the campus community is
Covered in this policy are the general ban on campus of
notified of the changes.
firearms, explosives, and other weapons, exceptions to the
ban, and the firearm storage procedures.
The Graduate Bulletin is available to students in both print
and electronic forms. Print bulletins are updated annually.
Distribution of Literature
Electronic versions of the Graduate Bulletin may be updated
Given in this policy are the restrictions on distributing
more frequently to reflect changes approved by the campus
(includ ing the selling of) literature, newspapers, and maga-
community. As such, students are encouraged to refer to the
zines on school property; the limit on distributing advertising
most recently available electronic version of the Graduate
or commercial material (for example, handbills); the require-
Bulletin. This version is available at the CSM website. The
ments for soliciting and vending on school property; and the
electronic version of the Graduate Bulletin is considered the
right to picket or demonstrate on campus.
official version of this document. In case of disagreement be-
Student Honor Code
tween the electronic and print versions, the electronic version
The Associated Students of the Colorado School of Mines
takes precedence.
(ASCSM) passed the new CSM Student Honor Code in a
Curriculum Changes
vote held in March 2003.
The CSM Board of Trustees reserves the right to change
Preamble
any course of study or any part of the curriculum to respond
The students of Colorado School of Mines have adopted
to educational and scientific developments. No statement in
the following Student Honor Code in order to establish a
this Bulletin or in the registration of any student shall be con-
high standard of student behavior at CSM. The Honor Code
sidered as a contract between Colorado School of Mines and
may only be amended through a student referendum sup-
the student.
ported by a majority vote of the Mines student body.
General Policies of Student Conduct
Code
In addition to the student conduct policies described in
Mines students believe it is our responsibility to promote
detail in this section of the Graduate Bulletin, the Colorado
and maintain high ethical standards in order to ensure our
School of Mines has a number of policies which govern stu-
safety, welfare, and enjoyment of a successful learning envi-
dent behavior on campus. Following is a list of those impor-
ronment. Each of us, under this Code, shall assume responsi-
tant policies with a brief definition or description of each.
bility for our behavior in the area of academic integrity. As a
Copies of the complete text describing each policy are avail-
Mines student, I am expected to adhere to the highest stan-
able from the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs.
dards of academic excellence and personal integrity regard-
Campus Security
ing my schoolwork, exams, academic projects, and research
This policy is intended to improve security and reduce
endeavors. I will act honestly, responsibly, and above all,
crime on campus. It includes the publishing of campus crime
with honor and integrity in all aspects of my academic en-
statistics and procedures for reporting crimes.
deavors at Mines. I will not misrepresent the work of others
as my own, nor will I give or receive unauthorized assistance
Alcohol Use
in the performance of academic coursework. I will conduct
This policy conforms to state and local laws on alcohol
myself in an ethical manner in my use of the library, comput-
use, distribution, and consumption. The text restates the legal
ing center, and all other school facilities and resources. By
drinking age, designates campus locations for consuming
practicing these principles, I will strive to uphold the princi-
alco holic beverages, explains procedures for planning stu-
ples of integrity and academic excellence at Mines. I will not
dent events at which alcohol is served, and gives the penal-
participate in or tolerate any form of discrimination or mis-
ties for violating the policy.
treatment of another individual.
26
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010-2011

Academic Integrity
Policy on Violation of Student Academic
Academic Integrity
Misconduct
The Colorado School of Mines affirms the principle that
Academic misconduct is the intentional act of fraud, in
all individuals associated with the Mines academic commu-
which an individual seeks to claim credit for the work and ef-
nity have a responsibility for establishing, maintaining and
forts of another without authorization, or uses unauthorized
fostering an understanding and appreciation for academic in-
materials or fabricated information in any academic exercise.
tegrity. In broad terms, this implies protecting the environ-
Student Academic Misconduct arises when a student violates
ment of mutual trust within which scholarly exchange
the principle of academic integrity. Such behavior erodes
occurs, supporting the ability of the faculty to fairly and ef-
mutual trust, distorts the fair evaluation of academic achieve-
fectively evaluate every student's academic achievements,
ments, violates the ethical code of behavior upon which edu-
and giving credence to the university's educational mission,
cation and scholarship rest, and undermines the credibility of
its scholarly objectives and the substance of the degrees it
the university. Because of the serious institutional and indi-
awards. The protection of academic integrity requires there
vidual ramifications, student misconduct arising from viola-
to be clear and consistent standards, as well as confrontation
tions of academic integrity is not tolerated at Mines. If a
and sanctions when individuals violate those standards. The
student is found to have engaged in such misconduct sanc-
Colorado School of Mines desires an environment free of
tions such as change of a grade, loss of institutional privi-
any and all forms of academic misconduct and expects stu-
leges, or academic suspension or dismissal may be imposed.
dents to act with integrity at all times.
As a guide, some of the more common forms of academic
misconduct are noted below. This list is not intended to be
Student Honor Code
all inclusive, but rather to be illustrative of practices the
Colorado School of Mines students also feel strongly
Mines faculty have deemed inappropriate:
about academic integrity. The students independently wrote
and approved an Honor Code promoting high academic stan-
1. Dishonest Conduct – general conduct unbecoming a
dards and zero tolerance of academic misconduct.
scholar. Examples include issuing misleading statements;
withholding pertinent information; not fulfilling, in a
Preamble: The students of Colorado School of Mines
timely fashion, previously agreed to projects or activities;
(Mines) have adopted the following Student Honor Code
and verifying as true, things that are known to the student
(Code) in order to establish a high standard of student behav-
not to be true or verifiable.
ior at Mines. The Code may only be amended through a stu-
dent referendum supported by a majority vote of the Mines
2. Plagiarism – presenting the work of another as one's own.
student body. Mines students shall be involved in the en-
This is usually accomplished through the failure to ac-
forcement of the Code through their participation in the Stu-
knowledge the borrowing of ideas, data, or the words of
dent Judicial Panel.
others. Examples include submitting as one's own work
the work of another student, a ghost writer, or a commer-
Code: Mines students believe it is our responsibility to
cial writing service; quoting, either directly or para-
promote and maintain high ethical standards in order to en-
phrased, a source without appropriate acknowledgment;
sure our safety, welfare, and enjoyment of a successful learn-
and using figures, charts, graphs or facts without appro-
ing environment. Each of us, under this Code, shall assume
priate acknowledgment. Inadvertent or unintentional mis-
responsibility for our behavior in the area of academic in-
use or appropriation of another's work is nevertheless
tegrity. As a Mines student, I am expected to adhere to the
plagiarism.
highest standards of academic excellence and personal in-
tegrity regarding my schoolwork, exams, academic projects,
3. Falsification/Fabrication – inventing or altering informa-
and research endeavors. I will act honestly, responsibly, and
tion. Examples include inventing or manipulating data or
above all, with honor and integrity in all aspects of my aca-
research procedures to report, suggest, or imply that par-
demic endeavors at Mines. I will not misrepresent the work
ticular results were achieved from procedures when such
of others as my own, nor will I give or receive unauthorized
procedures were not actually undertaken or when such re-
assistance in the performance of academic coursework. I will
sults were not actually supported by the pertinent data;
conduct myself in an ethical manner in my use of the library,
false citation of source materials; reporting false informa-
computing center, and all other school facilities and re-
tion about practical, laboratory, or clinical experiences;
sources. By practicing these principles, I will strive to uphold
submitting false excuses for absence, tardiness, or missed
the principles of integrity and academic excellence at Mines.
deadlines; and, altering previously submitted examina-
I will not participate in or tolerate any form of discrimination
tions.
or mistreatment of another individual.
4. Tampering – interfering with, forging, altering or attempt-
ing to alter university records, grades, assignments, or
other documents without authorization. Examples include
using a computer or a false-written document to change a
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
27

recorded grade; altering, deleting, or manufacturing any
spective prior to making an official decision. It also al-
academic record; and, gaining unauthorized access to a
lows the faculty member to educate the student on inap-
university record by any means.
propriate behavior.
5. Cheating – using or attempting to use unauthorized mate-
2. A) In the case of an allegation of academic misconduct
rials or aid with the intent of demonstrating academic per-
associated with regular coursework, if after talking with
formance through fraudulent means. Examples include
the student, the faculty member feels the student is re-
copying from another student's paper or receiving unau-
sponsible for academic misconduct the faculty member
thorized assistance on a homework assignment, quiz, test
should:
or examination; using books, notes or other devices such
u Assign a grade of "F" in the course to the student(s)
as calculators, PDAs and cell phones, unless explicitly au-
that committed academic misconduct. A faculty mem-
thorized; acquiring without authorization a copy of the
ber may impose a lesser penalty if the circumstances
examination before the scheduled examination; and copy-
warrant, however the typical sanction is a grade of "F".
ing reports, laboratory work or computer files from other
students. Authorized materials are those generally re-
u Contact the Associate Dean of Students and his/her De-
garded as being appropriate in an academic setting, unless
partment Head/Division Director to officially report the
specific exceptions have been articulated by the instruc-
violation in writing within 5 business days of the
tor.
charge of academic misconduct. The Associate Dean
of Students will communicate the final resolution in
6. Impeding – negatively impacting the ability of other stu-
writing to the student, the faculty member, the Office
dents to successfully complete course or degree require-
of Academic Affairs, the Office of Graduate Studies
ments. Examples include removing pages from books and
and the student's advisor. The Associate Dean of Stu-
removing materials that are placed on reserve in the Li-
dents will also keep official records on all students with
brary for general use; failing to provide team members
academic misconduct violations.
necessary materials or assistance; and, knowingly dissem-
inating false information about the nature of a test or ex-
Prescribed disciplinary action for misconduct associated
amination.
with regular coursework:
7. Sharing Work – giving or attempting to give unauthorized
1st Offense:
- A grade of "F" in the course
materials or aid to another student Examples include al-
2nd Offense:
- A grade of "F" in the course
lowing another student to copy your work; giving unau-
- One-year academic
thorized assistance on a homework assignment, quiz, test
suspension
or examination; providing, without authorization, copies
- Permanent notation of
of examinations before the scheduled examination; post-
Academic Misconduct on
ing work on a website for others to see; and sharing re-
the student's transcript
ports, laboratory work or computer files with other
B) In the case of an allegation of academic misconduct
students.
associated with activities not a part of regular coursework
Procedures for Addressing Academic Misconduct
(e.g., an allegation of cheating on a comprehensive exam-
Faculty members and thesis committees have discretion to
ination), if after talking with the student, faculty mem-
address and resolve misconduct matters in a manner that is
ber(s) feel the student is responsible for misconduct the
commensurate with the infraction and consistent with the
faculty should:
values of the Institution. This includes imposition of appro-
u Assign an outcome to the activity that constitutes fail-
priate academic sanctions for students involved in academic
ure. If appropriate, the student's advisor may also as-
misconduct. However, there needs to be a certain amount of
sign a grade of "PRU" for research credits in which the
consistency when handling such issues, so if a member of the
student is enrolled. Regular institutional procedures re-
Mines community has grounds for suspecting that a student
sulting from either of these outcomes are then fol-
or students have engaged in academic misconduct, they have
lowed. Faculty members may impose a lesser penalty if
an obligation to act on this suspicion in an appropriate fash-
the circumstances warrant, however, the typical sanc-
ion. The following procedure will be followed:
tion is failure.
1. The faculty member or thesis committee informs the stu-
u Contact the Associate Dean of Students, Graduate Dean
dent(s) of the allegations and charge of academic miscon-
and the student's Department Head/Division Director to
duct within 10 business days. This involves both verbal
officially report the violation in writing within 5 busi-
and written communication to the student(s). A conversa-
ness days of the charge of misconduct. The Associate
tion regarding the incident should take place between the
Dean of Students will communicate the final resolution
faculty member/thesis committee and student. This con-
in writing to the student, the faculty member, the Office
versation allows faculty members to get the student's per-
of Graduate Studies and the student's advisor. The As-
28
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010-2011

sociate Dean of Students will also keep official records
The letter of appeal must be received by the Vice President
on all students with academic misconduct violations.
for Student Life within 7 business days of the date of the
C) In the case of an allegation of academic misconduct
written notice of a violation from the Associate Dean of Stu-
associated with research activities, investigation and reso-
dents. Once an appeal request is received, the Vice President
lution of the misconduct is governed by the Institution's
for Student Life will forward it on to one of the Appeal Re-
Research Integrity Policy. The Research Integrity Policy
view Administrators. The Appeal Review Administrator will
is available as section 10.11 of the Faculty Handbook. If,
review the written request to determine if the acceptable
after talking with the student, the faculty member feels
grounds for an appeal are met and if the appeal is timely
the student is responsible for misconduct of this type, the
filed. After review of the request, the Appeal Review Ad-
faculty member should proceed as indicted in the Re-
ministrator will take one of the following actions:
search Integrity Policy. If appropriate, the student's advi-
a. Deny the appeal. If the appeal is denied, the decision is
sor may also assign a grade of "PRU" for research credits
final and considered binding upon all involved, from
in which the student is enrolled. Regular institutional pro-
which no additional appeals are permitted.
cedures resulting from this grade assignment are then fol-
b. Proceed with the appeal by notifying the student and sub-
lowed.
mitting all the details and the evidence to the Student Ap-
Students who suspect other students of academic miscon-
peals Committee for resolution.
duct should report the matter to the appropriate faculty mem-
If the appeal request is granted, the Student Appeals Com-
ber, the appropriate Department Head/Division/Program
mittee will review the case within 15 days. Please see the
Director, the Dean of Undergraduate Studies, the Dean of
Student Handbook for more information on the Student Ap-
Graduate Studies or the Associate Dean of Students. The in-
peals Committee. The Student Appeals Committee may do
formation is then provided to the faculty member concerned.
any or all of the following during the review: interview with
Appeal Process for Student Academic Misconduct
the faculty member; interview with the student(s); interview
Students charged with academic misconduct must be af-
any appropriate witnesses; and/or review the student file in-
forded a fair opportunity for an appeal. For those alleged to
cluding any homework, tests, quizzes or other assignments
have engages in research misconduct, the appeal procedure is
that were involved in the alleged misconduct. At the conclu-
defined in the Faculty Handbook section 10.11. For all other
sion of the review, the Student Appeals Committee will make
charges of academic misconduct, upon notification of a find-
one of the following decisions:
ing of academic misconduct and the associated penalties, the
a. Reverse the decision of the faculty member and withdraw
student may appeal the decision of the faculty member for
the charge from the student's record.
one of the following grounds for appeal only:
b. Affirm the decision of the faculty member and uphold the
u The student believes his/her due process rights were vi-
sanction(s).
olated as the student was not allowed to present rele-
c. Forward the case to the Office of Academic Affairs for
vant information.
further consideration: the Student Appeals Committee be-
u The student can provide evidence that academic mis-
lieves that additional considerations should be made
conduct did not occur and the faculty member abused
which could include increasing or decreasing the sanc-
his/her authority and/or made an arbitrary decision
tions imposed or addressing additional issues that arose
without fully considering the information presented.
through the appeal process. Recommendations for appro-
u There is new information to consider that, if true,
priate sanctions should be made by the Student Appeals
would be sufficient to alter the faculty member's deci-
Committee to the Office of Academic Affairs. The addi-
sion. Such information must not have been known by
tional consideration will be conducted by the Dean of Un-
the student appealing at the time of the original meet-
dergraduate Studies or Dean of Graduate Studies,
ing with the faculty member.
depending on the academic standing of the student re-
To appeal the decision, the student must submit a written
questing the appeal. The Office of Academic Affairs staff
request in the form of a letter to the Vice President for Stu-
member will make a final decision that will be communi-
dent Life. The letter of appeal should provide a thorough ex-
cated to the student within 10 business days.
planation of the following:
The decision issued by the Student Appeals Committee or
1. Under what grounds (see list above) is the appeal being
the Office of Academic Affairs (in matters that are forwarded
requested?
for further consideration) is final and shall be considered
binding upon all involved, from which no additional appeals
2. How does the appeal request fit the selected grounds for
are permitted.
appeal?
3. What specific aspect of the decision is being appealed?
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
29

Resolution of Conflicting Bulletin
which must be approved by the student’s faculty advisor and
Provisions
the department head, division or program director, shall be
submitted to the Dean no later than 15 business days from
If a conflict or inconsistency is found to exist between
the date of official notification to the student of the potential
these policies and any other provision of the CSM Graduate
discretionary dismissal. If the Dean concludes that the reme-
Bulletin, the provisions of these policies shall govern the
dial plan is likely to lead to successful completion of all de-
reso lu tion of such conflict or inconsistency.
gree requirements within an acceptable time frame, the Dean
Unsatisfactory Academic Performance
may halt the discretionary dismissal process and allow the
Unsatisfactory Academic Progress Resulting in
student to continue working toward his or her degree. If the
Probation or Discretionary Dismissal
Dean concludes that the remedial plan is inadequate, or that
A student’s progress toward successful completion of a
it is unlikely to lead to successful completion of all degree
graduate degree shall be deemed unsatisfactory if any of the
requirements within an acceptable time frame, the Dean shall
following conditions occur:
notify the student of his or her discretionary dismissal and in-
form the student of his or her right to appeal the dismissal as
u Failure to maintain a cumulative grade point average of
outlined below.
3.0 or greater (see Grading System section);
Unsatisfactory Academic Performance Resulting
u Receipt of an “In-Progress-Unsatisfactory” grade for
research; or
in Mandatory Dismissal
Unsatisfactory performance as gauged by any of the
u Receipt of an “Unsatisfactory Progress” recommenda-
follow ing measures shall result in immediate, mandatory
tion from: (1) the head or director of the student’s home
dismissal of a graduate student: (1) failure to successfully
department or division, (2) the student’s thesis commit-
defend the thesis after two attempts; (2) failure to be admit-
tee, or (3) a departmental committee charged with the
ted to candidacy; or (3) failure by a student subject to discre-
responsibility of monitoring the student’s progress.
tionary dismissal to achieve a performance milestone or meet
Unsatisfactory academic progress on the part of a graduate
a deadline contained in his or her remedial plan. The Dean of
student shall be reported to the Dean of Graduate Studies in a
Graduate Studies shall be notified promptly of any situation
timely manner. Students making unsatisfactory progress by
that may subject a student to mandatory dismissal. In this
any of the measures listed above shall be placed on academic
event, the Dean shall notify the student of his or her dis-
probation upon the first occurrence of such indication. Upon
missal and inform the student of his or her right to appeal the
the second occurrence of an unsatisfactory progress indica-
dismissal as outlined below.
tion, the Dean shall notify the student that he or she is subject
Students who have been notified of mandatory dismissal
to discretionary dismissal according to the procedure out-
will be placed in non-degree status. They may request re -
lined below.
admission to either the same or a different degree program by
In addition, students in thesis-based degree programs who
submitting a full application for admission to the Graduate
are not admitted to candidacy within the time limits specified
Office. The application will be reviewed through the normal
in this Bulletin may be subject to immediate mandatory dis-
admission process.
missal according to the procedure outlined below. Failure to
If a student who has been reinstated or readmitted to his or
fulfill this requirement must be reported to the Dean of Grad-
her former degree program and is subsequently found to be
uate Studies in a timely manner by the department head or
making unsatisfactory progress, the student will immediately
division/program director.
be subject to mandatory dismissal.
Probation and Discretionary Dismissal
Appeal Procedures
Procedures
Both mandatory and discretionary dismissals may be ap-
If a student is subject to academic probation as a result of
pealed by a graduate student pursuant to this procedure. To
an initial indication of unsatisfactory academic progress, the
trigger review hereunder, an appeal must: (1) be in writing;
Dean of Graduate Studies shall notify the student of his or
(2) contain a succinct description of the matter being appealed;
her probationary status in a timely manner.
and (3) be filed with the Office of the Dean of Graduate
If a student is subject to discretionary dismissal by one of
Studies no later than 20 business days from the date upon
the mechanisms defined above, the Dean shall notify the
which the student received official notification from the
student and invite him or her to submit a written remedial
Dean regarding his or her dismissal.
plan, including performance milestones and deadlines, to
Upon receipt of a timely appeal of a discretionary or
correct the deficiencies that caused or contributed to the stu-
mandatory dismissal, the Dean shall appoint a review com-
dent’s unsatisfactory academic progress. The remedial plan,
mittee composed of three tenured faculty members who are
not members of the student’s home or minor department or
division. The review committee shall review the student’s
30
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010-2011

appeal and issue a written recommendation thereon to the
to the issue under consideration and render a decision.
Dean within 20 business days. During the course of perform-
The decision of the Provost is final.
ing this function, the committee may: (1) interview the stu-
5. At the next graduate Council meeting, the Dean will
dent, the student’s advisor, and, if appropriate, the student’s
notify the Graduate Council of the request, the decision
thesis committee; (2) review all documentation related to the
and the reasons for the decision. If the Graduate Council
appeal under consideration; (3) secure the assistance of out-
endorses the decision, then any other student in the same
side expertise, if needed; and (4) obtain any other relevant in-
situation having the same justification can expect the
formation necessary to properly consider the appeal.
same decision.
The authority to render a final decision regarding all grad-
Public Access to the Graduate Thesis
uate student appeals filed hereunder shall rest with the Dean
of Graduate Studies.
The award of a thesis-based graduate degree is conditioned
on the student’s deposit of his or her completed thesis in the
Exceptions and Appeals
CSM library to ensure its availability to the public. Although
Academic Policies and Requirements
the student retains the copyright in the thesis, by depositing
Academic policies and requirements are included in the
the thesis with the library, the student assigns a perpetual,
Bulletin on the authority of the CSM Board of Trustees as
non-exclusive, royalty-free license to CSM to permit CSM to
delegated to the Faculty Senate. These include matters such
copy the thesis and allow the public reasonable access to it.
as degree requirements, grading systems, thesis and disserta-
Under special circumstances, CSM may agree to include
tion standards, admission standards and new and modified
proprietary research in a graduate student’s thesis. The nature
degree programs, certificates, minors and courses. No CSM
and extent of the proprietary research reported in the thesis
administrator, faculty or staff member may change, waive or
must be agreed upon in writing by the principal investigator,
grant exceptions to such academic policies and requirements
student and Dean of Graduate Studies. In some cases, the
without approval of the Graduate Council, the Senate and/or
proprietary nature of the underlying research may require
the Board of Trustees as appropriate.
the school to delay public access to the completed thesis for
Administrative Policies and Procedures
a limited period of time. In no case will public access to the
Administrative Policies and Procedures are included in
thesis be denied for more than12 months from the date the
this Bulletin on the authority of the CSM Board of Trustees
Statement of Work Completion form is submitted to the
as delegated to the appropriate administrative office. These
Graduate School.
include (but are not limited to) matters such as student record
Making up Undergraduate Deficiencies
keeping, thesis and dissertation formats and deadlines, regis-
If the department or division decides that new students do
tration requirements and procedures, assessment of tuition
not have the necessary background to complete an advanced
and fees, and allocation of financial aid. The Dean of Gradu-
degree, they will be required to enroll in courses for which
ate Studies may waive or grant exceptions to such adminis-
they will receive no credit toward their graduate degree, or
trative policies and procedures as warranted by the
complete supervised readings, or both. Students are notified
circumstances of individual cases.
of their apparent deficiency areas in their acceptance letter
Any graduate student may request a waiver or exception
from the Graduate School or in their first interview with their
by the following process:
department advisor.
1. Contact the Graduate Office to determine whether a stan-
Graduate students must attain a B average in deficiency
dard form exists. If so, complete the form. If a standard
courses, and any student receiving a grade of D in a defi-
form does not exist, prepare a memo with a statement of
ciency course will be required to repeat the course. Grades
the request and a discussion of the reasons why a waiver
for these deficiency courses are recorded on the student’s
or exception would be justified.
transcript, become part of the student’s permanent record,
2. Have the memo or the form approved by the student’s
and are calculated into the overall GPA. Students whose under -
advisor and department head or division director, then
graduate records are deficient should remove all deficiencies
submit it to the Dean of Graduate Studies.
as soon as possible after they enroll for graduate studies.
3. If the request involves academic policies or requirements,
Graduate Students in Undergraduate
the Dean of Graduate Studies will request Graduate Coun-
Courses
cil approval at the Council’s next regularly scheduled
Students may apply toward graduate degree requirements
meeting.
a maximum of nine semester hours of department-approved
4. The Dean of Graduate Studies will notify the student of
400-level course work not taken to remove deficiencies upon
the decision. The student may file a written appeal with
the recommendation of the graduate committee and the ap-
the Provost within 10 business days of being notified of
proval of the Graduate Dean.
the decision. The Provost will investigate as appropriate
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
31

Students may apply toward graduate degree requirements
of proof on the student. For a grade to be revised by the Fac-
300-level courses only in those programs which have been
ulty Affairs Committee, the student must demonstrate that
recommended by the department and have been approved by
the grading decision was unfair by documenting that one or
the Graduate Council before the student enrolls in the course.
more of the following conditions applied:
In that case a maximum of nine total hours of 300- and 400-
1. The grading decision was based on something other than
level courses will be accepted for graduate credit.
course performance; unless the grade was a result of
Independent Study (X99)
penalty for academic dishonesty or the grade was WI
For each semester credit hour awarded for independent
(withdrawn involuntarily).
study a student is expected to invest approximately the same
2. The grading decision was based on standards that were
effort that would be required for an equivalently credited tra-
unreasonably different from those applied to other stu-
ditional course. To register for independent study or for a
dents in the same section of that course.
"special topics" course, a student should get from the Regis-
3. The grading decision was based on standards that differed
trar's Office the form provided for that purpose, have it com-
substantially and unreasonably from those previously ar-
pleted by the instructor involved and appropriate
ticulated by the instructor.
department/division head, and return it to the Registrar's Of-
fice.
To appeal a grade, the student must proceed as follows:
Course and Research Grades
1. The student must prepare a written appeal of the grade re-
ceived in the course. This appeal must clearly define the
All candidates for graduate degrees must maintain a cumu-
basis for the appeal and must present all relevant evidence
lative grade point average of at least 3.0 in all courses taken
supporting the student’s case.
after acceptance into a degree program. This includes both
graduate and undergraduate courses. Any grade lower than
2. After preparing the written appeal, the student must de-
“C-” is not acceptable for credit toward graduate degree re-
liver this appeal to the course instructor and attempt to re-
quirements or graduate deficiencies.
solve the issue directly with the instructor. Written grade
appeals must be delivered to the instructor no later than
For research credits, students receive either an “In
10 business days after the start of the regular (fall or
Progress-Satisfactory” or an “In Progress-Unsatisfactory”
spring) semester immediately following the semester in
grade based on their faculty advisor’s evaluation of their
which the contested grade was received. In the event that
work. Research grades do not enter into the calculation of the
the course instructor is unavailable, the course coordina-
student’s grade point average.
tor (first) or the Department Head/Division Director (sec-
Students who fail to maintain a grade point average of at
ond) will represent the instructor.
least 3.0, or who receive an In Progress-Unsatisfactory re-
3. If after discussion with the instructor, the student is still
search grade are placed on academic probation by the Gradu-
dissatisfied, he or she can proceed with the appeal by sub-
ate Dean and may be subject to discretionary dismissal as
mitting three copies of the written appeal plus three
defined by the Unsatisfactory Academic Performance section
copies of a summary of the instructor/student meetings
of this Bulletin (see page 28).
held in connection with the previous step to the President
Grade Appeal Process
of the Faculty Senate. These must be submitted to the
CSM faculty have the responsibility, and sole authority
President of the Faculty Senate no later than 25 business
for, assigning grades. As instructors, this responsibility in-
days after the start of the regular semester immediately
cludes clearly stating the instructional objectives of a course,
following the semester in which the contested grade was
defining how grades will be assigned in a way that is con -
received. The President of the Faculty Senate will for-
sistent with these objectives, and then assigning grades. It is
ward the student's appeal and supporting documents to
the student’s responsibility to understand the grading criteria
the Faculty Affairs Committee, the course instructor's De-
and then maintain the standards of academic performance
partment Head/Division Director, and the instructor.
estab lished for each course in which he or she is enrolled.
4. The Faculty Affairs Committee will request a response to
If a student believes he or she has been unfairly graded,
the appeal from the instructor and begin an investigation
the student may appeal the grade to the Faculty Affairs Com-
of the student's allegations and basis for appealing the
mittee of the Faculty Senate. The Faculty Affairs Committee
grade. During the course of performing its investigation,
is the faculty body authorized to review and modify course
the Committee may: 1) interview the student, the student's
grades, in appropriate circumstances. Any decision made by
advisor, the course instructor and other witnesses deemed
the Faculty Affairs Committee is final. In evaluating a grade
relevant to the investigation; 2) review all documentation
appeal, the Faculty Affairs Committee will place the burden
related to the appeal under consideration; 3) secure the as-
32
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010-2011

sistance of outside expertise, if needed; and 4) obtain any
The awarding of a degree is contingent upon the student’s
other information deemed necessary to consider and re-
successful completion of all program requirements with at
solve the appeal.
least a 3.000 GPA before the date of graduation. Students
Upon request, the Faculty Affairs Committee may share
who fail to graduate at the time originally anticipated must
summaries of testimony and other information examined
re apply for the next graduation before the appropriate dead-
by the Committee with both the student and the instructor.
line date stated in the Graduate Handbook.
Certain information, however, may be redacted from ma-
Students who have completed all of their degree require-
terials forwarded to the student and instructor to maintain
ments before the specific graduation date, but who have not
other students' rights subject to protection under the Fam-
applied for graduation can, if necessary, request a letter from
ily Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), or other
the Graduate Office certifying the completion of their pro-
state and federal law.
grams. The student should apply for the next graduation, and
Based on its investigation, the Faculty Affairs Committee
the diploma will show the date of that graduation.
will determine whether the grade should be revised. The
Graduation exercises are held in December and May.
decision rendered will be either: 1) the original grading
Students eligible to graduate at these times are expected to
decision is upheld, or 2) sufficient evidence exists to indi-
attend their respective graduation exercises. Students in
cate a grade has been assigned unfairly. In this latter case,
thesis-based degree programs may not, under any circum-
the Faculty Affairs Committee will assign the student a
stances, attend graduation exercises before completing all
new grade for the course. The Committee's written deci-
degree requirements.
sion and supporting documentation will be delivered to
Diplomas, transcripts, and letters of completion will not
the President of the Faculty Senate, the office of the
be released by the School for any student or graduate who
EVPAA, the student, the instructor, and the instructor's
has an unsettled obligation of any kind to the School.
Department Head/Division Director no later than 25 busi-
ness days following the Senate's receipt of the grade ap-
Withdrawing from School
peal. The Faculty Affairs Committee's decision shall
To officially withdraw from CSM, a graduate student
constitute the final decision of the grade appeal. There is
must communicate directly with the Graduate Dean or
no further internal appeal available to the parties.
process a withdrawal form through the Graduate Office.
The schedule, but not the process, outlined above may be
When the form is completed, the student will receive grades
modified upon mutual agreement of the student, the instruc-
of W in courses in progress. If the student does not officially
tor, and the Faculty Affairs Committee
withdraw the course grades are recorded as F’s. Leaving
school without having paid tuition and fees will result in the
Graduation
encumbrance of the transcript. Federal aid recipients shuld
Al students expecting to graduate must submit a
check with the financial aid office to determine what impact
graduation application to the Office of Graduate
a withdrawal may have on current or future aid.
Studies.
Nondegree Students
Graduation application deadlines are scheduled well in
A nondegree student is one who has not applied to pursue a
advance of the date of Commencement to allow time for or-
degree program at CSM but wishes to take courses regularly
dering diploma covers and for printing graduation invitations
offered on campus. Nondegree students register for courses
and programs. Students who submit applications after the
through the Registrar’s office after degree students have reg-
stated deadline cannot be guaranteed a diploma dated for that
istered. Such students may take any course for which they
graduation, and cannot be assured inclusion in the graduation
have the prerequisites as listed in the CSM Bulletin or have
program or ceremony. Graduation applications are accepted
the permission of the instructor. Transcripts or evidence of
only for students who have previously submitted to, and had
the prerequisites are required. Nondegree students pay all
approved by the Office of Graduate Studies, the appropriate
applicable tuition, but do not pay student fees except for the
Advisor/Thesis Committee and Admission to Candidacy
technology fee.
forms as applicable to the degree sought.
Veterans’ Benefits
All graduating students must officially check out of their
degree program, including paying the mandatory graduation
Colorado School of Mines is approved by the Colorado
fee. Checkout cards may be obtained from the Graduate
State Approving Agency for Veteran Benefits under chapters
Office and must be completed and returned by the estab-
30, 31, 32, 35, and 1606. Graduate students must register for
lished deadline. Students must register for the next term
and maintain nine hours of graduate work in any semester to
unless the graduation checkout process is completed by the
be certified as a full-time student for full-time benefits. Any
last day of registration for the following semester.
hours taken under the full-time category will decrease the
benefits to 3/4 time, 1/2 time, or tuition payment only.
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
33

Students receiving benefits must report all changes in
Incomplete Grade
hours, addresses, marital status, or dependents to the Veter-
If a graduate student fails to complete a course because of
ans’ Counseling Office located in the Registrar’s Office as
illness or other reasonable excuse, the student receives a
soon as possible to avoid overpayment or underpayment.
grade of Incomplete, a temporary grade which indicates a de-
Veterans must see the Veterans’ Counselor each semester to
ficiency in the quantity of work done. A graduate student
be certified for any benefits for which they may be eligible.
must remove all Incomplete grades within the first four
In order for veterans to continue to receive benefits, they
weeks of the first semester of attendance following that in
must make satisfactory progress as defined by CSM.
which the grade was received. If not removed within the four
Graduate Grading System
weeks, the Incomplete will become an F.
Grades
Satisfactory Progress Grades
When a student registers in a graduate (500 and 600 level )
A graduate student may receive a grade of Satisfactory
course, one of the following grades will appear on the aca-
Progress, PRG, in either one of two possible situations: 1) as
demic record. Grades are based on the level of performance
a grade for a course extending more than one semester and 2)
and represent the extent of the student's demonstrated mas-
as a grade indicating completion of research credit hours.
tery of the material listed in the course outline and achieve-
For students completing independent study, or seminar
ment of the stated course objectives. These are CSM's grade
courses that extend for more than one semester, the progress
symbols and their qualitative interpretations:
grade has no point value and is used only for multi-semester
A
Excellent
courses, or for special sections of one-semester courses that
A-
are spread over two terms. In such cases, the student receives
B+
a grade of PRG, which indicates that the work is not com-
B
Acceptable for Graduate credit
pleted. This grade is replaced by a letter grade when the
B-
course work is completed.
C+
The student must register again in the same course in the
C
May be acceptable for Graduate
next semester of attendance. If a progress grade is received
credit
for a course taken in the second semester of the school year,
C-
the student may, with the permission of the department head,
D+
re-register in that course in the summer session, in which
D
Not acceptable for graduate
case the letter grade must be given at the end of the summer
credit
session.
D-
When applied to research credits, the Satisfactory Progress
F
Failed
grade, PRG, also has no point value toward a student's GPA,
S Satisfactory
C- or better, used only as a
but indicates satisfactory progress toward completion of the
mid-term grade
research component of a student's thesis-based degree pro-
U
Unsatisfactory below C-,
gram. In this situation, a grade of PRU, Unsatisfactory
used only as a mid-term grade
Progress, may be given, and if given, indicates that a student
INC
Incomplete
has not made satisfactory progress toward the research com-
PRG
Satisfactory Progress
ponent of a thesis-based degree program. In this case, receipt
PRU
Unsatisfactory Progress
of a grade of PRU may trigger academic disciplinary pro-
ceedings as described in the Unsatisfactory Academic Per-
Graduate students enrolled in undergraduate-level courses
formance portion of this Bulletin (see page 28).
(400-level and below) are graded using the undergraduate
grading system. See the CSM Undergraduate Bulletin for a
Unless faculty submit change of grade forms to the Regis-
description of this system.
trar, grades of PRU delivered for unsatisfactory research per-
In addition to these performance symbols, the following is
formance, are not changed to PRG upon the successful
a list of additional registration symbols that may appear on a
completion of a student's degree program.
CSM transcript.
NC Grade
WI
Involuntarily Withdrawn
For special reasons and with the instructor's permission, a
W
Withdrew, No Penalty
student may register in a course for no credit (NC). To have
T
Transfer Credit
the grade NC appear on the transcript, the student must enroll
NC
Not for Credit
at registration time as a NC student in the course and comply
Z
Grade not yet Submitted
with all conditions stipulated by the course instructor. If a
student registered as NC fails to satisfy all conditions, no
record of this registration in the course will be made.
Quality Hours and Quality Points
For graduation a student must successfully complete a cer-
tain number of required semester hours and must maintain
34
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010-2011

grades at a satisfactory level. Numerical values assigned to
Overal Grade-Point Average
each letter grade are given in the table below.
The overall grade-point average includes all attempts at
courses taken at Colorado School of Mines with the excep-
Numerical
tion of courses which fall under the repeat policy imple-
Grade
Value
mented during the 2007-2008 academic year.
A
4.000
If a course completed during the Fall 2007 term or after is
a repeat of a course completed in any previous term and the
A-
3.700
course is not repeatable for credit, the grade and credit hours
B+
3.300
earned for the most recent occurrence of the course will
B
3.000
count toward the student's grade-point average and the stu-
B-
2.700
dent's degree requirements. The most recent course occur-
C+
2.300
rence must be an exact match to the previous course
completed (subject and number). The most recent grade will
C
2.000
be applied to the overall grade-point average even if the pre-
C-
1.700
vious grade is higher.
D+
1.300
Courses from other institutions transferred to Colorado
D
1.000
School of Mines are not counted in any grade-point average,
D-
0.700
and cannot be used under this repeat policy. Only courses
originally completed and subsequently repeated at Colorado
F
0.000
School of Mines during Fall 2007 or after with the same sub-
ject code and number apply to this repeat policy.
The number of quality points earned in any course is the
For courses that may be repeated for credit such as special
number of semester hours assigned to that course multiplied
topics courses, credit is awarded and grades are counted in
by the numerical value of the grade received. The quality
the grade-point average up to the maximum hours allowed
hours earned are the number of semester hours in which
for the course.
grades are awarded. To compute a grade-point average, the
All occurrences of every course taken at Colorado School
number of cumulative quality hours is divided into the cumu-
of Mines will appear on the official transcript along with the
lative quality points earned. Grades of W, WI, INC, PRG,
associated grade.
PRU, or NC are not counted in quality hours.
Electronic Communications (Email) Policy
Semester Hours
The number of times a class meets during a week (for
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE
lecture, recitation, or laboratory) determines the number of
Communication to students at the Colorado School of
semester hours assigned to that course. Class sessions are
Mines (Mines) is an important element of the official busi-
normally 50 minutes long and represent one hour of credit
ness of the university. It is vital that Mines have an efficient
for each hour meeting. Two to four hours of laboratory work
and workable means of getting important and timely infor-
per week are equivalent to 1-semester hour of credit. For the
mation to students. Examples of communications that re-
average student, each hour of lecture and recitation requires
quire timely distribution include information from Fiscal
at least two hours of preparation.
Services, the Registrar's Office, or other offices on campus
that need to deliver official and time-sensitive information to
Grade-Point Averages
students. (Please note that emergency communications may
Grade-Point Averages shall be specified, recorded, re-
occur in various forms based on the specific circumstances).
ported, and used to three figures following the decimal point
Electronic communication through e-mail and Trailhead
for any and all purposes to which said averages may apply.
Portal announcements provides a rapid, efficient, and effec-
All graduate degree programs require students have a min-
tive form of communication. Reliance on electronic commu-
imum overall grade point average of 3.000 in order to be eli-
nication has become the accepted norm within the Mines
gible to receive the degree. All courses (including deficiency
community. Additionally, utilizing electronic communica-
courses) taken at the Colorado School of Mines after first en-
tions is consistent with encouraging a more environmentally-
rolling in a graduate degree program are included in the cal-
conscious means of doing business and encouraging
culation of the overall grade point average for that program.
continued stewardship of scarce resources. Because of the
Grades for courses applied to a degree program as transfer
wide-spread use and acceptance of electronic communica-
credit are not included in any grade point average calcula-
tion, Mines is adopting the following policy regarding elec-
tion. Specifics in calculating the overall, and other grade
tronic communications with students.
point averages are defined below.
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
35

POLICY
RESPONSIBLE PARTIES
It is the policy of the Colorado School of Mines that offi-
Questions about this policy may be directed as follows:
cial university-related communications with students will be
Registrar's Office
sent via Mines' internal e-mail system or via campus or tar-
Phone: 303-273-3200 or
geted Trailhead announcements. All students will be as-
E-mail: registrar@mines.edu
signed a Mines e-mail address and are expected to
periodically check their Mines assigned e-mail as well as
Academic Computing and Networking
their Trailhead portal page. It is also expected that e-mail
Phone: 303-273-3431 or
sent to students will be read in a timely manner. Communi-
Complete a request form at the
cations sent via e-mail to students will be considered to have
Mines Help Center (http://helpdesk.mines.edu/)
been received and read by the intended recipients.
Access to Student Records
PROCEDURES
Students at the Colorado School of Mines are protected by
1.
All students will be given an EKey, which is an ac-
the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as
tivation code that offers access to electronic resources at
amended. This Act was designed to protect the privacy of
Mines. With their EKey, students must activate their as-
edu cation records, to establish the right of students to inspect
signed Mines e-mail address.
and review their education records, and to provide guidelines
for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through
2.
Once their e-mail address is activated, students are
informal and formal hearings. Students also have the right to
expected to check their Mines e-mail inbox on a frequent and
file complaints with The Family Educational Rights and Pri-
consistent basis and have the responsibility to recognize that
vacy Act Office (FERPA) concerning alleged failures by the
certain communications from the university may be time-
institution to comply with the Act. Copies of local policy can
critical. As such, students also are responsible for respond-
be found in the Registrar’s Office. Contact information for
ing in a timely manner to official communications from the
FERPA complaints is
university when a response is requested.
Family Policy Compliance Office
3.
The policy does not prevent students from using a
U.S. Department of Education
personal e-mail address for university-related communica-
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
tions and purposes. If a student chooses to use a personal e-
Washington, D. C. 20202-4605
mail address as his or her address of choice for receiving
university-related communications, he or she must forward e-
Directory Information. The School maintains lists of in-
mail from the Mines assigned e-mail address to the personal
formation which may be considered directory information as
e-mail address. However, if a student chooses to forward
defined by the regulations. This information includes name,
communications to a personal e-mail address, she or he must
current and permanent addresses and phone numbers, date of
be aware that Mines personnel may not be able to assist in re-
birth, major field of study, dates of attendance, part or full-
solving technical difficulties with personal e-mail accounts.
time status, degrees awarded, last school attended, participa-
Furthermore, forwarding communications to a personal e-
tion in officially recognized activities and sports, class, and
mail address does not absolve a student from the responsibil-
academic honors. Students who desire that this information
ities associated with communication sent to his or her official
not be printed or released must so inform the Registrar before
Mines e-mail address. Please note: If a student changes his
the end of the first two weeks of the fall semester for which
or her official Mines e-mail address to a personal address, it
the student is registered. Information will be withheld for the
will be changed back to the Mines assigned e-mail address.
entire academic year unless the student changes this request.
Students have the option to forward their Mines e-mail to a
The student’s signature is required to make any changes for
personal address to avoid this problem. Should a student
the current academic year. The request must be renewed each
choose the forwarding option, he or she must ensure that
fall term for the upcoming year. The following student
SPAM filters will not block e-mail coming from the
records are maintained by Colorado School of Mines at the
mines.edu address.
various offices listed below:
4.
Nothing in these procedures should be construed as
1. General Records: Registrar and Graduate Dean
prohibiting university -related communications being sent via
2. Transcript of Grades: Registrar
traditional means. Use of paper-based communication may
3. Computer Grade Lists: Registrar
be necessary under certain circumstances or may be more ap-
propriate to certain circumstances. Examples of such com-
4. Encumbrance List: Controller and Registrar
munications could include, but not be limited to disciplinary
5. Academic Probation/Suspension List: Graduate Dean
notices, fiscal services communications, graduation informa-
6. Advisor File: Academic Advisor
tion and so forth.
36
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010-2011

7. Option/Advisor/Enrolled/ Minority/Foreign List:
5. In compliance with a judicial order or lawfully issued
Registrar, Dean of Students, and Graduate Dean
subpoena after the student has been notified of the in-
8. Externally Generated SAT/GRE Score Lists:
tended compliance.
Graduate Dean
6. Any institutional information for statistical purposes
which is not identifiable with a particular student.
9. Financial Aid File: Financial Aid (closed records)
7. In compliance with any applicable statue now in effect
10. Medical History File: School Physician (closed records)
or later enacted. Each individual record (general, tran-
Student Access to Records. The graduate student wishing
script, advisor, and medical) will include a log of those
access to his or her educational records will make a written
persons not employed by Colorado School of Mines
request to the Graduate Dean. This request will include the
who have requested or obtained access to the student
student’s name, date of request and type of record to be re-
record and the legitimate interest that the person has in
viewed. It will be the responsibility of the Dean to arrange a
making the request.
mutually satisfactory time for review. This time will be as
soon as practical but is not to be later than 30 business days
The School discloses education records without a student's
from receipt of the request. The record will be reviewed in
prior written consent under the FERPA exception for disclo-
the presence of the Dean or designated representative. If the
sure to school officials with legitimate educational interests.
record involves a list including other students, steps will be
A school official is a person employed by the School in an
taken to preclude the viewing of the other student name and
administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support
information.
staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and
health staff); a person or company with whom the School has
Challenge of the Record. If the student wishes to chal-
contracted as its agent to provide a service instead of using
lenge any part of the record, the Dean will be so notified in
School employees or officials (such as an attorney, auditor,
writing. The Dean may then (l) remove and destroy the dis-
or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of
puted document, or (2) inform the student that it is his deci-
Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such
sion that the document represents a necessary part of the
as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another
record; and, if the student wishes to appeal, (3) convene a
school official in performing his or her tasks.
meeting of the student and the document originator (if rea-
sonably available) in the presence of the Executive Vice
A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the
President for Academic Affairs as mediator, whose decision
official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill
will be final.
his or her professional responsibilities for the School.
Destruction of Records. Records may be destroyed at any
time by the responsible official if not otherwise precluded by
law except that no record may be destroyed between the
dates of access request and the viewing of the record. If dur-
ing the viewing of the record any item is in dispute, it may
not be destroyed.
Access to Records by Other Parties. Colorado School of
Mines will not permit access to student records by persons
outside the School except as follows:
1. In the case of open record information as specified in
the section under Directory Information.
2. To those people specifically designated by the student.
Examples would include request for transcript to be
sent to graduate school or prospective employer.
3. Information required by a state or federal agency for
the purpose of establishing eligibility for financial aid.
4. Accreditation agencies during their on-campus review.
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
37

Tuition, Fees, Financial Assistance
Tuition and fees are established by the Board of Trustees
The amount of tuition and fee assessment is based pri -
of the Colorado School of Mines following the annual budget
marily on each student’s enrolled courses. In the event a
process and action by the Colorado General Assembly and
student withdraws from a course or courses, assessments
Governor.
will be adjusted as follows:
Graduate Tuition
P If the withdrawal is made prior to the end of the
The official tuition and approved charges for the 2010-
add/drop period for the term of enrollment, as deter-
2011 academic year will be available prior to the start of the
mined by the Registrar, tuition and fees will be ad-
2010-2011 academic year located at
justed to the new course level without penalty.
http://www.is.mines.edu/budget/budget_current/tuition_rates.pdf
P If the withdrawal from a course or courses is made
Fees
after the add/drop period, and the student does not of-
ficially withdraw from school, no adjustment in
The official fees, approved charges, and fee descriptions
charges will be made.
for the 2009-2010 academic year will be available prior to
the start of the 2009-2010 academic year and can be found
P If the withdrawal from courses is made after the
at: http://www.is.mines.edu/budget/budget_current/fees.pdf
add/drop period, and the student withdraws from
school, tuition and fee assessments will be reduced ac-
Please note that graduate students who register for under-
cording to the following schedule:
graduate courses to satisfy deficiencies may be assessed the
same fee that an undergraduate student would pay.
P Within the 7 calendar days following the end of
the add/drop period, 60 percent reduction in
Payments and Refunds
charges.
Payment Information
P Within the next following 7 calendar days, a 40
A student is expected to complete the registration process,
percent reduction in charges.
including the payment of tuition and fees, before attending
class. Students should mail their payments to: Cashier
P Within the next following 7 calendar days, a 20
Colorado School of Mines 1500 Illinois St. Golden, CO
percent reduction in charges.
80401-1869 or pay at the Cashier’s Office in The Ben Parker
P After that period, no reduction of charges will be
Student Center. Please write your student ID on payment.
made.
Late Payment Penalties
The schedule above applies to the Fall and Spring semes-
A penalty will be assessed against a student if payment is
ters. The time periods for the Summer sessions - Field and
not received in full by the official day of registration. The
Summer - will be adjusted in proportion to the reduced num-
penalty is described in the schedule of courses for each
ber of days in these semesters.
semester. If payment is not completed by the sixth week of
Room and board refunds are pro-rated to the date of
class, the student may be officially withdrawn from classes.
checkout from the Residence Hall. Arrangements must be
Financial Responsibility
made with the Housing Office. Student health insurance
Registration for classes at CSM implies an obligation by
charges are not refundable. The insurance remains in effect
the student to meet all related financial responsibilities in a
for the entire semester.
timely manner. Students who do not fulfill their financial
PLEASE NOTE: Students receiving federal financial aid
obli gations according to published deadlines are subject to
under the Title IV programs may have a different refund de-
the following: late payment penalties accrued on any out-
termined as required by federal law or regulations.
standing balance, and the withholding of transcripts. Past due
accounts will be turned over to Colorado Central Collection
Financial Assistance for Graduate Studies
Services in accordance with Colorado law. Collection costs
Graduate study is a considerable investment of time,
will be added to the student’s account, and delinquencies
energy, and money by serious students who expect a substan-
may be reported to national credit bureaus.
tial return not only in satisfaction but also in future earnings.
Applicants are expected to weigh carefully the investment
Encumbrances
they are willing to make against expected benefits before
A student will not be permitted to register for future
apply ing for admission.
classes, to graduate, or to get an official transcript of his
Students are also expected to make full use of any resources
academic record while indebted in any way to CSM.
available, including personal and loan funds, to cover expenses,
Refunds
and the School can offer some students financial aid through
Refunds for tuition and fees are made according to the
graduate research and teaching assistantships and through
follow ing policy:
industry, state, and federal fellowships.
38
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010-2011

Purpose of Financial Aid
Aid Application Forms
The Graduate School’s limited financial aid is used
New students interested in applying for financial aid are
1. To give equal access to graduate study by assisting stu-
encouraged to apply early. Financial aid forms are included
dents with limited personal resources;
in Graduate School application packets and may be filled out
and returned with the other application papers.
2. To compensate graduate students who teach and do re-
search;
Graduate Fel owships
The departments and divisions award Colorado Fellow-
3. To give an incentive to exceptional students who can
ships based on the student’s academic performance.
provide academic leadership for continually improving grad-
uate programs.
Graduate Student Loans
Employment Restrictions and Agreements
Need-based federal student loans are available for gradu-
ate students who need additional funding beyond their own
Students who are employed full time or who are enrolled
resources and any assistantships or fellowships they may re-
part time are not eligible for financial aid through the Gradu-
ceive. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid
ate School.
(FAFSA) must be completed to apply for these loan funds.
Students who are awarded assistantships must sign an
Students must be degree seeking and attending at least part-
appoint ment agreement, which gives the terms of appoint-
time (4.5 hrs) per semester to be eligible. Degree seeking
ment and specifies the amount and type of work required.
students who are approved for reduced registration (4 hrs/se-
Graduate assistants who hold regular appointments are ex-
mester) are also eligible.
pected to devote all of their efforts to their educational pro-
Specific information and procedures for filing the FAFSA
gram and may not be otherwise employed without the written
can be found on the Financial Aid Office web site at http://fi-
permission of their supervisor and the Graduate Dean. Stu-
naid.mines.edu/Grad_TOC.html. The Financial Aid Office
dents with assistant ships during the academic year must be
telephone number is 303-273-3220, and the e-mail address is
registered as full time. During the summer session they must
finaid@mines.edu.
be registered for a minimum of three credit hours, unless
they qualify for the summer research registration exception.
Satisfactory Academic Progress for Federal
Please see http://www.mines.edu/graduate_admissions for
Student Loans
details on summer registration exception eligibility.
To maintain eligibility for federal student loans, students
are expected to achieve a minimum 3.000 cumulative grade
average at the end of each semester. In addition, if students
enroll full time (9 credits or more) they must pass at least 9
credits. If enrolled for fewer than 9 credits, students must
pass all of the credits for which they are registered. If this is
not done, the student will be given a financial aid probation-
ary semester, after which the student must return to satisfac-
tory academic standing to maintain eligibility.
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
39

Graduate Degrees and Requirements
Colorado School of Mines offers post-baccalaureate pro-
Programs and Description of Courses” portion of this Bul-
grams leading to the awarding of Graduate Certificates, Pro-
letin.
fessional Masters degrees, thesis and non-thesis Master of
1. Academic Requirements
Science and Master of Engineering degrees, and Doctor of
Each Graduate Certificate requires a minimum of 12 total
Philosophy degrees. This section describes these degrees and
credit hours. No more than 3 credit hours at the 400 level
explains the minimum institutional requirements for each.
may be applied toward the minimum credit-hours require-
Students may apply to, and be admitted in, multiple grad -
ment. All other credits must be at or above the 500 level.
uate degrees simultaneously. In this case, a student may
Students may not, on an individual basis, request credit hours
use the same graduate course credits to satisfy the degree
be transferred from other institutions as part of the Certificate
require ments for each degree. Before the Graduate School
requirements. Some Graduate Certificates, however, may
will count these credits toward each degree requirement,
allow the application of specific, pre-approved transfer
however, the student must obtain written permission to do so
credits, or credits from other institutions with whom CSM
from each department, division or program granting degree.
has formal agreements for this purpose toward fulfilling the
This permission should be submitted with the student’s Ad-
requirements of the Certificate. All courses applied to a
mission to Candidacy forms and should clearly indicate that
Graduate Certificate are subject to approval by the program
each degree program is aware that credits are being counted
offering the certificate.
toward the requirements of multiple degrees. For thesis-based
If a student has earned a Graduate Certificate and subse-
students this permission should be provided by the student’s
quently applies, and is accepted into a Master's or PhD pro-
thesis committee. For non-thesis and certificate programs,
gram at CSM, credits earned in the Certificate Program may,
permission should be obtained from program coordinators or
with the approval of the advanced degree program, be ap-
department/division chairs.
plied to the advanced degree subject to all the applicable re-
I. Responsible Conduct of Research
strictions on credit hours that may be applied toward
Requirement
fulfilling the requirements of the advanced degree.
All students supported at any time in their graduate career
2. Admission to Candidacy
through the National Science Foundation (NSF), as research
Full-time students must complete the following require-
assistants, hourly employees or fellowship awardees, must
ments within the first semester after enrolling into a Graduate
complete training in the responsible conduct of research
Certificate degree program.
(RCR). This requirement is in addition to all other institu-
u complete all prerequisites and core curriculum course
tional and program requirements described below and in the
requirements of their program, and
appropriate program sections of this Bulletin.
u be admitted into full candidacy for the certificate.
To satisfy the RCR requirement students must as a mini-
A list of prerequisites and core curriculum requirements
mum complete the one credit hour course; SYGN502, or an
for Graduate Certificate degrees is published by each pro-
equivalent. This may be done at any time prior a student's
gram. When a student is admitted with deficiencies, the
formal Admission to Candidacy. Equivalent programs may
appro priate department head, division director or program
include alternative RCR training options offered by individ-
director will provide the student with a written list of courses
ual degree programs. To apply toward meeting this require-
required to remove these deficiencies. This list will be given
ment, these must have been formally approved by the Ethics
to the student no later than one week after the start of classes
Across the Curriculum Committee. Refer to the individual
of his/her first semester in order to allow for adding/dropping
program sections of this Bulletin for a description of equiva-
courses as necessary.
lent means of satisfying the RCR requirement that may exist
within individual degree programs.
Upon completion of the above-defined requirements, a
student must submit an Admission to Candidacy and a State-
Students and advisors are required to certify successful
ment of Work Completion forms documenting satisfactory
completion of the NSF-RCR requirement as part of the Ad-
completion of the prerequisites and core curriculum require-
mission to Candidacy process described in the sections
ments. The form must have the written approval of the pro-
below.
gram offering the Graduate Certificate.
II. Professional Programs
B. Professional Master’s Program
A. Graduate Certificate Program
CSM awards specialized, career-oriented non-thesis Master
Graduate Certificate Programs at CSM are designed to
degrees with the title of “Professional Master (descriptive
have selective focus, short time to completion and consist
title).” These are custom-designed, interdisciplinary degrees,
of course work only. For more information about specific
each with a curriculum meeting the career advancement needs
professional programs, please refer to the “Graduate Degree
of a particular group of professionals in a field that is part of
CSM’s role and mission. For more information about these
40
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010-2011

programs, please refer to the “Graduate Degree Programs and
1. Academic Requirements
Description of Courses” portion of this Bulletin.
A Master’s degree at CSM requires a minimum of 30 total
1. Academic Requirements
credit hours. As part of this 30 hours, departments and divi-
Each Professional Master’s degree consists of a minimum
sions are required to include a research or design experience
of 30 total credit hours. Students must complete at least 21
supervised by CSM faculty. For more information about the
credit hours at CSM in the degree program. The remaining
specific research/design requirements, please refer to the ap-
hours may be transfered into the program. Requests for
propriate department/division section of the “Graduate
transfer credit must be approved by the faculty according to a
Degree Programs and Description of Courses” portion of this
process defined by the student’s home department or divi-
Bulletin.
sion. Transfer credits must not have been used as credit to-
For non-thesis Master's degrees, students must complete at
ward a Bachelor degree. The transfer limit includes CSM
least 21 credit hours at CSM in the degree program. All other
distance learning courses. Up to six credit hours of Special
credits may be completed as transfer credits into the degree
Topic or Independent Study may be in the form of project
of coursework program. For thesis Master's degrees, no more
credits done on the job as an employee or as a graduate in-
than 9 credits may transfer. The transfer credit limit includes
tern. If project credits are to be used, the project proposal and
CSM distance learning courses. Transfer credits must not
final report must be approved by a CSM faculty advisor, al-
have been used as credit toward a Bachelor degree. Requests
though direct supervision may be provided by the employer.
for transfer credit must be approved by the faculty according
Students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of
to the process defined by a student's home department or di-
3.0 or better in CSM course work.
vision. All credits applied toward degree, except transfer
2. Admission to Candidacy
credits, must be earned on campus. Students must maintain a
Full-time students must complete the following require-
cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better in CSM
ments within the first calendar year after enrolling into a
course work.
Profes sional Master's degree program.
Students are normally admitted into the Master of Science
u complete all prerequisite and core curriculum course
degree program in the department/division to which they
requirements of their program, and
have applied. If, however, a candidate would like to obtain
the Master of Engineering degree, the candidate must, in
u be admitted into full candidacy for the degree.
addi tion to the requirements described above, either have
Each program publishes a list of prerequisites and core
a Bachelor’s degree in engineering, or complete no fewer
curriculum requirements for Professional Master's degrees.
than 16 credit hours of engineering courses as part of their
When a student is admitted with deficiencies, the appropriate
Master’s program. Courses satisfying the engineering course
department head, division director or program director will
requirement are determined by the department/division host-
provide the student with a written list of courses required
ing the degree.
to remove these deficiencies. This list will be given to the
2. Minor Programs
student no later than one week after the start of classes of
Students may choose to have a minor program or pro-
his/her first semester in order to allow for adding/dropping
grams at the Master’s level. A minor program may not be
courses as necessary.
taken in the student’s major area of study. A designated
Upon completion of the above-defined requirements, a
minor requires a minimum of 9 semester hours of course
student must submit an Admission to Candidacy form docu-
work and must be approved by the student’s advisor, home
menting satisfactory completion of the prerequisites and
department head, and a faculty representative of the minor
core curriculum requirements. The form must have the writ-
area of study.
ten approval of the program offering the Professional Mas-
3. Admission to Candidacy
ters degree.
Full-time students must complete the following require-
III. Master of Science and Engineering
ments within the first calendar year after enrolling into the
Programs
Master’s degree program.
A. General Requirements
u have a thesis committee appointment form on file in
Graduate study at CSM can lead to one of a number of the-
the Graduate Office;
sis and non-thesis based Master’s degrees, depending on the
u complete all prerequisite and core curriculum course
interests of the student. All Master’s degree programs share
requirements of their department, division or program;
the same academic requirements for grades, definition of
and
minor programs, and the need to apply for admission to can-
u be admitted into full candidacy for the degree.
didacy.
Each degree program publishes a list of prerequisite and
core curriculum requirements for that degree. If students are
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
41

admitted with deficiencies, the appropriate department heads,
sistant professor, research professor, associate research pro-
division directors or program directors will provide the stu-
fessor or assistant research professor. Upon approval by the
dents written lists of courses required to remove the deficien-
Graduate Dean, adjunct professors and off-campus represen-
cies. These lists will be given to the students no later than
tatives may be designated co-advisors. When appropriate and
one week after the start of classes of their first semester in
upon approval by the Graduate Dean, faculty members out-
order to allow them to add/drop courses as necessary.
side the student’s home department may serve as the student’s
Upon completion of the above defined requirements, stu-
faculty co-advisor. In either of these cases, a co-advisor must
dents must submit an Admission to Candidacy form docu-
be selected from the student’s home department.
menting satisfactory completion of the prerequisite and core
2. Thesis Committee
curriculum requirements and granting permission to begin
The Graduate Dean appoints a Thesis Committee whose
Master’s level research. The form must have the written ap-
members have been recommended by the student, the stu-
proval of all members of the advisor and thesis committee, if
dent’s faculty advisor, and the student’s department head.
appropriate.
Students should have a thesis committee appointed by the
B. Non-thesis Option
end of their second semester. This Committee will have a
Non-thesis Master’s degrees are offered by a number of
minimum of three voting members, including the student’s
departments, divisions and programs. In lieu of preparing a
advisor, who are familiar with the student’s area of study. Of
thesis, non-thesis master’s program students are required to
these Committee members, two must be from the home de-
complete a research or design experience taken as a special
partment or, in the case of interdisciplinary degree programs,
problem or as an independent study course. See the depart-
an allied department. Off-campus members can be assigned
ment/division section of the “Graduate Degree Programs and
to the Committee to serve either with full voting status or in a
Description of Courses” portion of this Bulletin for more
non-voting capacity. Off-campus members with voting status
infor mation. Although non-thesis master’s students are not
assume all of the responsibilities of on-campus Committee
assigned a Thesis Committee, students in this program do
members with respect to attendance of Committee meetings,
select a faculty advisor, subject to the approval of the stu-
review of thesis drafts and participation in oral examinations
dent’s home department.
and thesis defense sessions. If a thesis co-advisor is assigned,
an additional faculty member from the home or allied depart-
C. Thesis Option
ment must be added to the committee. Students who choose
Thesis-based Master of Science and Master of Engineering
to have a minor program at the Master’s level must select a
degrees require completion of a satisfactory thesis and suc-
representative from their minor area of study to serve on the
cessful oral defense of this thesis. Academic credit toward
Thesis Committee. Minor representatives must be full-time
completion of the thesis must include successful completion
members of the CSM faculty.
of no fewer than 6 credit hours of masters-level research
A Thesis Committee Chairperson is designated by the
credit. The Master of Science thesis is expected to report on
student at the time he/she requests the formation of his/her
original research that results in new knowledge and/or tech-
thesis committee. The chairperson is responsible for leading
niques. The Master of Engineering thesis is expected to re-
all meetings of the thesis committee and for directing the
port on creative engineering design that applies
student’s thesis defense. In selecting a Thesis Committee
state-of-the-art knowledge and techniques to solve an impor-
chairperson, the following guidelines must be met: 1) the
tant problem. In both cases, the thesis should be an exem-
chairperson cannot be the student’s advisor or co-advisor and
plary product that meets the rigorous scholarship standards of
2) the chairperson must be a full-time CSM faculty member.
the Colorado School of Mines. The student's faculty advisor
and the Master's Thesis Committee must approve the pro-
Shortly after its appointment, the Committee will meet
gram of study and the topic for the thesis. The format of the
with the student to hear a presentation of the proposed course
thesis must comply with the appropriate guidelines promul-
of study and thesis topic. The Committee and the student
gated by the Graduate School.
must agree on a satisfactory program and the student must
obtain the Committee approval of the written thesis proposal
1. Faculty Advisor Appointment
at least one semester prior to the thesis defense. The student’s
Each thesis-based Master’s student must select a faculty
faculty advisor assumes the primary responsibility for moni-
advisor to provide advice regarding the student’s thesis direc-
toring the program and directing the thesis work. The award
tion, research and selection of courses by the middle of their
of the thesis-based Master’s degree is contingent upon the
second semester at CSM. The faculty advisor will serve as a
student’s researching and writing a thesis acceptable to the
voting member of the student’s Thesis Committee. The stu-
student’s faculty advisor and Thesis Committee.
dent’s department head or division director and the Graduate
Dean must approve all faculty advisor appointments.
3. Thesis Defense
The student submits an initial draft of his or her thesis to
Advisors must be full-time members of the CSM faculty
the faculty advisor, who will work with the student on neces-
and must hold the rank of professor, associate professor, as-
sary revisions. Upon approval of the student’s advisor, the
42
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010-2011

revised thesis is circulated to the Thesis Committee members
gram, that candidate must formally reapply for readmission.
at least one week prior to the oral defense of the thesis. The
The program has full authority to determine if readmission is
oral defense of the thesis is scheduled during the student’s
to be granted and, if granted to fully re-evaluate the Candi-
final semester of study. Students must be registered to de-
date's work to date and determine its applicability to the new
fend. This defense session, which may include an examina-
degree program.
tion of material covered in the student’s course work, will be
IV. Doctor of Philosophy
open to the public.
A. Credits, Academic and Campus Residence
Following the defense, the Thesis Committee will meet
Requirements
privately to vote on whether the student has successfully de-
The Doctor of Philosophy degree requires completion of a
fended the thesis. Three outcomes are possible: the student
minimum of 72 semester hours beyond the Bachelor degree.
may pass the oral defense; the student may fail the defense;
At least 24 semester hours must be research credits earned
or the Committee may vote to adjourn the defense to allow
under the supervision of a CSM faculty advisor and at least
the student more time to address and remove weaknesses or
18 credit hours of course work must be applied to the degree
inadequacies in the thesis or underlying research. Two nega-
program. Course requirements for each department or divi-
tive votes will constitute a failure regardless of the number
sion are contained in the "Graduate Degree Programs and
of Committee members present at the thesis defense. In the
Description of Courses" section of this Bulletin.
event of either failure or adjournment, the Chair of the Thesis
Committee will prepare a written statement indicating the
The degree also requires completion of a satisfactory doc-
reasons for this action and will distribute copies to the stu-
toral thesis and successful oral defense of this thesis. The
dent, the Thesis Committee members, the student’s depart-
Doctoral Thesis is expected to report on original research
ment head and the Graduate Dean. In the case of failure or
that results in a significant contribution of new knowledge
adjournment, the student may request a re-examination,
and/or techniques. The student’s faculty advisor and the Doc-
which must be scheduled no less than one week after the
toral Thesis Committee must approve the program of study
original defense. A second failure to defend the thesis satis-
and the topic for the thesis.
factorily will result in the termination of the student’s gradu-
Doctoral students must complete at least two semesters of
ate program.
full-time residence at CSM (as defined in the Registration
Upon passing the oral defense of thesis or report, the stu-
and Residency section above) during the course of their grad-
dent must make any corrections in the thesis required by the
uate studies.
Thesis Committee. The final, corrected copy and an executed
B. Transfer of Credits
signature page indicating approval by the student’s advisor
Up to 24 semester hours of graduate-level course work
and department head must be submitted to the Office of
may be transferred from other institutions toward the PhD
Graduate Studies for format approval. (Format instructions
degree subject to the restriction that those courses must not
are available in the Office of Graduate Studies and should be
have been used as credit toward a Bachelor degree. Requests
obtained before beginning work on the thesis.)
for transfer credit must be approved by the faculty according
4. Time Limitations
to a process defined by the student’s home department or di-
A candidate for a thesis-based Masters degree must com-
vision. Transfer credits are not included in calculating the
plete all requirements for the degree within five years of the
student’s grade point average at CSM.
date of admission into the degree program. Time spent on ap-
In lieu of transfer credit for individual courses, students
proved leaves of absence is included in the
who enter the PhD program with a thesis-based master de-
five-year time limit. Candidates not meeting the time limi-
gree from another institution may transfer up to 36 semester
tation will be notified and withdrawn from their degree pro-
hours in recognition of the course work and research com-
grams.
pleted for that degree. The request must be approved by the
faculty according to a process defined by the student’s home
Candidates may apply for a one-time extension of this
department or division.
time limitation. This application must be made in writing and
approved by the candidate's advisor, thesis committee, de-
C. Faculty Advisor Appointments
partment and Dean of Graduate Studies. The application
Each doctoral student must select a faculty advisor to ad-
must include specific timelines and milestones for degree
vise with respect to the student’s thesis direction and research
completion. If an extension is approved, failure to meet any
and selection of courses by the middle of their second semes-
timeline or milestone will trigger immediate withdrawal from
ter at CSM. The faculty advisor will serve as a voting mem-
the degree program.
ber of the student’s Doctoral Thesis Committee. The student’s
If a candidate is withdrawn from a degree program
department head and the Graduate Dean must approve all
through this process and wishes to reenter the degree pro-
faculty advisor appointments.
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
43

Advisors must be full-time members of the CSM faculty
tiple minor programs are being pursued, each must
and must hold the rank of professor, associate professor, as-
have a committee representative as defined above.
sistant professor, research professor, associate research pro-
6. The fourth “additional” committee member must be
fessor or assistant research professor. Upon approval by the
from outside the home and allied departments or divi-
Graduate Dean, adjunct professors and off-campus represen-
sions and the minor field if applicable.
tatives may be designated co-advisors. When appropriate and
upon approval by the Graduate Dean, faculty members out-
7. If off-campus members are nominated for voting status,
side the student’s home department may serve as the student’s
the committee request form must include a brief resume
faculty co-advisor. In either of these cases, a co-advisor must
of their education and/or experience that demonstrates
be selected from the student’s home department.
their competence to judge the quality and validity of
the thesis. Such members also must agree to assume
D. Minor Programs
the same responsibilities expected of on-campus
Students may choose a minor program or programs at the
Committee members including, but not limited to,
PhD level consisting of 12 course credits in the minor pro-
atten dance at Committee meetings, review of thesis
gram. The student's faculty advisor and Doctoral Thesis
proposals and drafts, and participation in oral exami-
Committee, including an appropriate minor committee mem-
nations and defenses.
ber as described below, approve the course selection and se-
A Thesis Committee Chairperson is designated by the stu-
quence in the selected minor program. Students may choose
dent at the time he/she requests the formation of his/her the-
to complete multiple minor programs. Each program must
sis committee. The chairperson is responsible for leading all
consist of at least 12 credit hours approved by the faculty ad-
meetings of the thesis committee and for directing the stu-
visor and Doctoral Thesis Committee, including the appro-
dent's thesis defense. In selecting a Thesis Committee chair-
priate minor committee members.
person, the following guidelines must be met: 1) the
E. Doctoral Thesis Committees
chairperson cannot be the student's advisor or co-advisor, 2)
The Graduate Dean appoints a Doctoral Thesis Committee
the chairperson must be a full-time CSM faculty member,
whose members have been recommended by the student’s
and 3) the chairperson must be from outside the student's
home department or division. Students should have a thesis
home department, division or program and, if possible,
committee appointed by the end of their second semester.
should not be a representative of a minor program of study.
This Committee must have a minimum of five voting mem-
Shortly after its appointment, the Doctoral Thesis Commit-
bers that fulfill the following criteria:
tee meets with the student to hear a presentation of the pro-
1. The Committee must include an advisor who is assigned
posed course of study and thesis topic. The Committee and
responsibility for directing the research. If two advisors
student must agree on a satisfactory program. The student’s
are appointed, they both shall be considered co-advisors
faculty advisor then assumes the primary responsibility for
and shall be voting members of the Committee.
monitoring the program, directing the thesis work, arranging
2. Either the advisor or at least one co-advisor must be a
qualifying examinations, and scheduling the thesis defense.
full-time permanent faculty member, as defined above,
F. Admission to Candidacy
in the home department, division or program in order to
Full-time students must complete the following require-
ensure compliance with degree requirements.
ments within the first two calendar years after enrolling into
3. The Committee must have at least four other voting
the PhD program.
members in addition to the advisor and co-advisors,
u have a thesis committee appointment form on file in
and a majority of the voting members (including the
the Graduate Office;
advisor or co-advisors) must be full-time permanent
u complete all prerequisite and core curriculum course
CSM faculty members.
requirements of their department, division or program;
4. At least two of the “additional” committee members
u demonstrate adequate preparation for, and satisfactory
must be knowledgeable in the technical areas of the
ability to conduct, doctoral research; and
thesis, and at least one of them must be a member of
the student’s home or allied department, division or
u be admitted into full candidacy for the degree.
program.
Each degree program publishes a list of prerequisite and
5. If a minor field is designated, the third "additional"
core curriculum requirements for that degree. If students are
committee member must be an expert in that field. In
admitted with deficiencies, the appropriate department heads,
the case of an interdisciplinary degree, the third com-
division directors or program directors will provide the stu-
mittee member must be an expert in one of the fields
dents written lists of courses required to remove the deficien-
represented in the research. Minor representatives
cies. These lists will be given to the students no later than
must be full-time members of the CSM faculty. If mul-
one week after the start of classes of their first semester in
order to allow them to add/drop courses as necessary. Each
44
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010-2011

program also defines the process for determining whether its
bers, the student’s department head and the Graduate Dean.
students have demonstrated adequate preparation for, and
In the case of failure, the student may request a re-examina-
have satisfactory ability to do, high-quality, independent doc-
tion, which must be scheduled no less than one week after
toral research in their specialties. These requirements and
the original defense. A second failure to defend the thesis sat-
processes are described under the appropriate program head-
isfactorily will result in the termination of the student’s grad-
ings in the section of this Bulletin on Graduate Degree Pro-
uate program.
grams and Description of Courses.
Upon passing the oral defense of thesis, the student must
Upon completion of these requirements, students must
make any corrections in the thesis required by the Doctoral
submit an Admission to Candidacy form documenting satis-
Thesis Committee. The final, corrected copy and an executed
factory completion of the prerequisite and core curriculum
signature page indicating approval by the student’s advisor
requirements and granting permission to begin doctoral re-
and department head must be submitted to the Office of
search. The form must have the written approval of all mem-
Graduate Studies for format approval.
bers of the Ph.D. Committee.
H. Time Limitations
G. Thesis Defense
A candidate for a thesis-based Masters degree must com-
The doctoral thesis must be based on original research
plete all requirements for the degree within nine years of the
of excellent quality in a suitable technical field, and it must
date of admission into the degree program. Time spent on ap-
exhibit satisfactory literary merit. In addition, the format of
proved leaves of absence is included in the nine-year time
the thesis must comply with guidelines promulgated by the
limit. Candidates not meeting the time limitation will be noti-
Office of Graduate Studies. (Students should obtain a copy
fied and withdrawn from their degree programs.
of these guidelines from the Office of Graduate Studies be-
Candidates may apply for a one-time extension of this
fore beginning work on the thesis.)
time limitation. This application must be made in writing and
The thesis topic must be submitted in the form of a written
approved by the candidate's advisor, thesis committee, de-
proposal to the student’s faculty advisor and the Committee.
partment and Dean of Graduate Studies. The application
The Committee must approve the proposal at least one year
must include specific timelines and milestones for degree
before the thesis defense.
completion. If an extension is approved, failure to meet any
The student’s faculty advisor is responsible for supervising
timeline or milestone will trigger immediate withdrawal from
the student’s research work and consulting with other Doc-
the degree program.
toral Thesis Committee members on the progress of the
If a candidate is withdrawn from a degree program
work. The advisor must consult with the Committee on any
through this process and wishes to reenter the degree pro-
significant change in the nature of the work. The student sub-
gram, that candidate must formally reapply for readmission.
mits an initial draft of his or her thesis to the advisor, who
The program has full authority to determine if readmission is
will work with the student on necessary revisions. Upon ap-
to be granted and, if granted to fully re-evaluate the Candi-
proval of the student’s advisor, the revised thesis is distrib-
date's work to date and determine its applicability to the new
uted to the other members of the Committee at least one
degree program.
week prior to the oral defense of the thesis.
V. Combined Undergraduate/Graduate
The student must pass an oral defense of his or her thesis
Degree Programs
during the final semester of studies. Students must be regis-
tered to defend. This oral defense may include an examina-
A. Overview
tion of material covered in the student’s course work. The
Many degree programs offer CSM undergraduate students
defense will be open to the public.
the opportunity to begin work on a Graduate Certificate,
Profes sional Master’s Degree, or Master’s Degree while
Following the defense, the Doctoral Thesis Committee
completing the requirements for their Bachelor’s Degree.
will meet privately to vote on whether the student has suc-
These combined Bachelors-Masters programs have been
cessfully defended the thesis. Three outcomes are possible:
created by CSM faculty in those situations where they have
the student may pass the oral defense; the student may fail
deemed it academically advantageous to treat BS and MS
the defense; or the Committee may vote to adjourn the de-
degree programs as a continuous and integrated process.
fense to allow the student more time to address and remove
These are accelerated programs that can be valuable in fields
weaknesses or inadequacies in the thesis or underlying re-
of engineering and applied science where advanced educa-
search. Two negative votes will constitute a failure regardless
tion in technology and/or management provides the opportu-
of the number of Committee members present at the thesis
nity to be on a fast track for advancement to leadership
defense. In the event of either failure or adjournment, the
positions. These programs also can be valuable for students
Chair of the Doctoral Thesis Committee will prepare a writ-
who want to get a head start on graduate education.
ten statement indicating the reasons for this action and will
distribute copies to the student, the Thesis Committee mem-
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
45

The combined programs at CSM offer several advantages
graduate degree program, students may enroll in 500-level
to students who choose to enroll in them:
courses and apply these directly to their graduate degree. To
1. Students can earn a graduate degree in their undergrad-
apply, students must submit the standard graduate application
uate major or in a field that complements their under-
package for the graduate portion of their Combined Degree
graduate major.
Program. Upon admission into a graduate degree program,
students are assigned graduate advisors. Prior to registration
2. Students who plan to go directly into industry leave
for the next semester, students and their graduate advisors
CSM with additional specialized knowledge and skills
should meet and plan a strategy for completing both the
which may allow them to enter their career path at a
under graduate and graduate programs as efficiently as pos -
higher level and advance more rapidly. Alternatively,
sible. Until their undergraduate degree requirements are com-
students planning on attending graduate school can get
pleted, students continue to have undergraduate advisors in
a head start on their graduate education.
the home department or division of their Bachelor’s Degrees.
3. Students can plan their undergraduate electives to sat-
C. Requirements
isfy prerequisites, thus ensuring adequate preparation
Combined Degree Program students are considered under-
for their graduate program.
graduate students until such time as they complete their
4. Early assignment of graduate advisors permits students
under graduate degree requirements. Combined Degree Pro-
to plan optimum course selection and scheduling in
gram students who are still considered undergraduates by this
order to complete their graduate program quickly.
definition have all of the privileges and are subject to all ex-
5. Early acceptance into a Combined Degree Program
pectations of both their undergraduate and graduate programs.
leading to a Graduate Certificate, Professional Mas-
These students may enroll in both undergraduate and gradu-
ter’s Degree, or Non-Thesis Master’s Degree assures
ate courses (see section D below), may have access to depart-
students of automatic acceptance into full graduate
mental assistance available through both programs, and may
status if they maintain good standing while in early-
be eligible for undergraduate financial aid as determined by
acceptance status.
the Office of Financial Aid. Upon completion of their under-
graduate degree requirements, a Combined Degree Program
6. In many cases, students will be able to complete both
student is considered enrolled full-time in his/her graduate
Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees in five years of total
program. Once having done so, the student is no longer eligi-
enrollment at CSM.
ble for undergraduate financial aid, but may now be eligible
Certain graduate programs may allow Combined Degree
for graduate financial aid. To complete their graduate degree,
Program students to fulfill part of the requirements of their
each Combined Degree Program student must register as a
graduate degree by including up to six hours of specified
graduate student for at least one semester.
course credits which also were used in fulfilling the require-
Once fully admitted into a graduate program, under -
ments of their undergraduate degree. These courses may only
graduate Combined Program students must maintain good
be applied toward fulfilling Master's degree requirements be-
standing in the Combined Program by maintaining a mini-
yond the institutional minimum Master's degree requirement
mum semester GPA of 3.0 in all courses taken. Students not
of 30 credit hours. Courses must meet all requirements for
meeting this requirement are deemed to be making unsatis-
graduate credit, but their grades are not included in calculat-
factory academic progress in the Combined Degree Program.
ing the graduate GPA. Check the departmental section of the
Students for whom this is the case are subject to probation
Bulletin to determine which programs provide this opportu-
and, if occurring over two semesters, subject to discretionary
nity.
dismissal from the graduate portion of their program as de-
B. Admission Process
fined in the Unsatisfactory Academic Performance section of
A student interested in applying into a graduate degree
this Bulletin.
program as a Combined Degree Program student should first
Upon completion of the undergraduate degree requirements,
contact the department or division hosting the graduate de-
Combined Degree Program students are subject to all require -
gree program into which he/she wishes to apply. Initial in-
ments (e.g., course requirements, departmental approval of
quiries may be made at any time, but initial contacts made
transfer credits, research credits, minimum GPA, etc.) appro-
soon after completion of the first semester, Sophomore year
priate to the graduate program in which they are enrolled.
are recommended. Following this initial inquiry, departments/
divisions will provide initial counseling on degree applica-
D. Enrol ing in Graduate Courses as a Senior in a
tion procedures, admissions standards and degree completion
Combined Program
requirements.
As described in the Undergraduate Bulletin, seniors may
Admission into a graduate degree program as a Combined
enroll in 500-level courses. In addition, undergraduate sen-
Degree Program student can occur as early as the first semes-
iors who have been granted admission through the Combined
ter, Junior year, and must be granted no later than the end of
Degree Program into thesis-based MS degree programs may,
registration, last semester Senior year. Once admitted into a
with graduate advisor approval, register for 700-level research
credits appropriate to Masters-level degree programs. With
46
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010-2011

this single exception, while a Combined Degree Program
student is still completing his/her undergraduate degree, all
of the conditions described in the Undergraduate Bulletin for
undergraduate enrollment in graduate-level courses apply.
700-level research credits are always applied to a student’s
graduate degree program.
If an undergraduate Combined Degree Program student
would like to enroll in a 500-level course and apply this
course directly to his/her graduate degree, he/she must notify
the Registrar of the intent to do so at the time of enrollment
in the course. The Registrar will forward this information to
Finan cial Aid for appropriate action. Be aware that courses
taken as an undergraduate student but applied directly toward
a graduate degree are not eligible for undergraduate financial
aid or the Colorado Opportunity Fund. If prior consent is not
received, all 500-level graduate courses taken as an under-
graduate Combined Degree Program student will be applied
to the student’s undergraduate degree transcript. If these are
not used toward an undergraduate degree requirement, they
may, with program consent, be applied to a graduate degree
program as transfer credit. All regular regulations and limita-
tions regarding the use of transfer credit to a graduate degree
program apply to these credits.
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
47

48
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010-2011

Graduate Degree Programs and
Description of Courses
In addition to the general degree requirements described in
Prerequisites:
the previous pages, the following specific department, divi-
The program outlined here assumes that the candidate for
sion, or program requirements must also be met:
an advanced degree has a background in chemistry, mathe-
Chemical Engineering
matics, and physics equivalent to that required for the B.S.
degree in Chemical Engineering at the Colorado School of
DAVID W. M. MARR, Professor and Head of Department
ANTHONY M. DEAN, W. K. Coors Distinguished Professor
Mines. Undergraduate course deficiencies must be removed
JOHN R. DORGAN, Professor
prior to enrollment in graduate coursework.
JAMES F. ELY, Professor
The essential undergraduate courses include ChEN201,
RONALD L. MILLER, Professor
ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN357, ChEN375, and ChEN418.
E. DENDY SLOAN, Jr., Professor
J. DOUGLAS WAY, Professor
Required Curriculum:
COLIN A. WOLDEN, Weaver Distinguished Professor
Master of Science Program:
ANDREW M. HERRING, Associate Professor
Students entering the Master of Science (with thesis) pro-
CAROLYN A. KOH, Associate Professor
gram with an acceptable undergraduate degree in chemical
DAVID T. WU, Associate Professor (also Chemistry)
engineering are required to take a minimum of 18 semester
SUMIT AGARWAL, Assistant Professor
hours of coursework. All students must complete the four
MATTHEW W. LIBERATORE, Assistant Professor
chemical engineering core graduate courses (ChEN507,
C. MARK MAUPIN, Assistant Professor
ChEN509, ChEN516, and ChEN518) and an additional six
KEITH B. NEEVES, Assistant Professor
AMADEAU K. SUM, Assistant Professor
hours of approved electives. In addition, students must take a
NING WU, Assistant Professor
minimum of 6 research credits, complete, and defend an ac-
HUGH KING, Senior Lecturer
ceptable Masters dissertation. Between coursework and re-
TRACY Q. GARDNER, Lecturer
search credits a student must earn a minimum of 30 total
RACHEL MORRISH, Lecturer
semester hours. Full-time Masters students must enroll in
CYNTHIA NORRGRAN, Lecturer
graduate colloquium (ChEN605) each semester that they are
PAUL D. OGG, Lecturer
in residence.
JOHN M. PERSICHETTI, Lecturer
ANGEL ABBUD-MADRID, Research Associate Professor
Students entering the Master of Science (non-thesis) pro-
HANS HEINRICH-CARSTENSEN, Research Associate Professor
gram with an acceptable undergraduate degree in chemical
GLENN MURRAY, Research Assistant Professor
engineering are required to take a minimum of 30 semester
WAYNE ROMONCHUK, Research Assistant Professor
hours of coursework. All students must complete the four
ROBERT M. BALDWIN, Professor Emeritus
chemical engineering core graduate courses (ChEN507,
ANNETTE L. BUNGE, Professor Emerita
ChEN509, ChEN516, and ChEN518) and at least an addi-
JAMES H. GARY, Professor Emeritus
tional 12 hours of approved electives. Students may complete
JOHN O. GOLDEN, Professor Emeritus
an acceptable engineering report for up to six hours of aca-
ARTHUR J. KIDNAY, Professor Emeritus
demic credit. Full-time Masters students must enroll in grad-
J. THOMAS MCKINNON, Professor Emeritus
VICTOR F. YESAVAGE, Professor Emeritus
uate colloquium (ChEN605) each semester they are in
residence.
Degrees Offered:
CSM undergraduates enrolled in the combined BS/MS de-
Master of Science (Chemical Engineering)
gree program must meet the requirements described above
Doctor of Philosophy (Chemical Engineering)
for the MS portion of their degree (both thesis and non-the-
sis). Students accepted into the combined program may take
Program Description:
graduate coursework and/or research credits as an undergrad-
The program of study for an advanced degree in chemical
uate and have them applied to their MS degree.
engineering is selected by the student in consultation with
his/her advisor and with the approval of the thesis committee.
Doctor of Philosophy Program:
Upon approval of the thesis committee, graduate credit may
The course of study for the Ph.D. degree consists of a min-
be earned for selected 400-level courses. All full-time gradu-
imum of 30 semester hours of coursework. All Ph.D. students
ate students are required to enroll for colloquium (ChEN605)
must complete the four core courses (ChEN507, ChEN509,
for each semester that they are in residence at CSM.
ChEN518, and ChEN516) and an additional 18 hours of ap-
proved electives. In addition, students must complete and de-
Program Requirements:
fend an acceptable Doctoral dissertation. Full-time Ph.D.
See Required Curriculum below.
students must enroll in graduate colloquium (ChEN605) each
semester they are in residence.
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
49

Students in the Ph.D. program are required to pass both a
dation of the student’s thesis committee. In such cases, a
Qualifying Exam and the Ph.D. Proposal Defense. After suc-
student must submit a written request for postponement that
cessful completion of 30 semester hours of coursework and
describes the circumstances and proposes a new date. Requests
completion of the Ph.D, proposal defense, Ph.D. candidates
for postponement must be presented to the thesis committee
will be awarded a non-thesis Master of Science Degree. The
no later than two weeks before the end of the semester in
additional requirements for the Ph.D. program are described
which the exam would normally have been taken.
below.
Description of Courses
Ph.D. Qualifying Examination
ChEN402. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN Process
The Ph.D. qualifying examination will be offered twice
simulation and process optimization. Prerequisite: ChEN201,
each year, at the start and end of the Spring semester. All
ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN357, ChEN375, ChEN418, or con-
students who have entered the Ph.D. program must take the
sent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
qualifying examination at the first possible opportunity. A
ChEN403. PROCESS DYNAMICS AND CONTROL Mathe-
student may retake the examination once if he/she fails the
matical modeling and analysis of transient systems. Applications
first time; however, the examination must be retaken at the
of control theory to response of dynamic chemical engineering
next regularly scheduled examination time. Failure of the
systems and processes. Prerequisite: ChEN307, ChEN308,
Ph.D. qualifying examination does not disqualify a student
ChEN375, MATH225, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
for the M.S. degree, although failure may affect the student’s
semester hours.
financial aid status.
ChEN408. NATURAL GAS PROCESSING Application of
The qualifying examination will cover the traditional areas
chemical engineering principles to the processing of natural gas.
of Chemical Engineering, and will consist of two sections: a
Emphasis on using thermodynamics and mass transfer opera-
written section and an oral section. The written section will
tions to analyze existing plants. Relevant aspects of computer-
contain six questions, three at the undergraduate level (cover-
aided process simulation. Prerequisites: ChEN201, ChEN307,
ing fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and mass transfer/material
ChEN308, ChEN357, ChEN375, or consent of instructor. 3
and energy balances) and three at the graduate level (cover-
hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
ing applied engineering mathematics, reaction kinetics, and
thermodynamics). The qualifying examination is open-book
ChEN409. PETROLEUM PROCESSES Application of chemi-
and students are free to use any reference books or course
cal engineering principles to petroleum refining. Thermodynam-
notes during the written examination. The oral examination
ics and reaction engineering of complex hydrocarbon systems.
will consist of a presentation by the student on a technical
Relevant aspects of computer-aided process simulation for com-
paper from the chemical engineering literature. Students will
plex mixtures. Prerequisite: CHGN221, CHGN351 and 353,
choose a paper in one of four areas (thermodynamics, kinetics,
ChEN201, ChEN357, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
transport, and materials) from a list determined by the faculty.
semester hours.
The student is required to present an oral critique of the
ChEN415. POLYMER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
paper of approximately 20 minutes followed by questions
Chemistry and thermodynamics of polymers and polymer solu -
from the faculty. Papers for the oral examination will be dis-
tions. Reaction engineering of polymerization. Characterization
tributed well in advance of the oral portion of the exam so
techniques based on solution properties. Materials science of
students have sufficient time to prepare their presentations.
polymers in varying physical states. Processing operations for
Ph.D. Proposal Defense
polymeric materials and use in separations. Prerequisite:
After passing the Qualifying Exam, all Ph.D. candidates
CHGN221, MATH225, ChEN357, or consent of instructor. 3
are required to prepare a detailed written proposal on the sub-
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ject of their Ph.D. research topic. An oral examination con-
ChEN416. POLYMER ENGINEERING AND TECH NOLOGY
sisting of a defense of the thesis proposal must be completed
Polymer fluid mechanics, polymer rheological response, and
within approximately one year of passing the Qualifying
polymer shape forming. Definition and measure ment of material
Exami nation. Written proposals must be submitted to the
properties. Interrelationships between response functions and
student’s thesis committee no later than one week prior to
correlation of data and material response. Theoretical approaches
the scheduled oral examination.
for prediction of polymer properties. Processing operations for
Two negative votes from the doctoral committee members
polymeric materials; melt and flow instabilities. Prerequisite:
are required for failure of the Ph.D. Proposal Defense. In the
ChEN307, MATH225, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
case of failure, one re-examination will be allowed upon peti-
semester hours.
tion to the Department Head. Failure to complete the Ph.D.
ChEN418. REACTION ENGINEERING Applications of the
Proposal Defense within the allotted time without an approved
fundamentals of thermodynamics, physical chemistry, and or-
postponement will result in failure. Under extenuating cir-
ganic chemistry to the engineering of reactive processes. Reactor
cumstances a student may postpone the exam with approval
design; acquisition and analysis of rate data; heterogeneous
of the Graduate Affairs committee, based on the recommen-
catalysis. Relevant aspects of computer-aided process simula-
50
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011

tion. Prerequisite: ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN357, MATH225,
algebra, ordinary differential equations, and special emphasis on
CHGN221, CHGN353, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture;
partial differential equations. Emphasis on application of numer-
3 semester hours.
ical methods to chemical engineering problems which cannot be
ChEN420. MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN CHEMICAL EN-
solved by analytical methods. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
GINEERING Formulation and solution of chemical engineering
3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
problems using exact analytical solution methods. Set-up and so-
ChEN507. APPLIED MATHEMATICS IN CHEMICAL ENGI -
lution of ordinary and partial differential equations for typical
NEERING This course stresses the application of mathematics
chemical engineering systems and transport processes. Prerequi-
to problems drawn from chemical engineering fundamentals
site: MATH225, ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN375, or consent of
such as material and energy balances, transport phenomena and
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
kinetics. Formulation and solution of ordinary and partial differ-
ChEN421. ENGINEERING ECONOMICS Economic analysis
ential equations arising in chemical engi neering or related
of engineering processes and systems. Interest, annuity, present
processes or operations are discussed. Mathematical approaches
value, depreciation, cost accounting, investment accounting and
are restricted to analytical solutions or techniques for producing
financing of engineering enterprises along with taxation, market
problems amenable to analytical solutions. Prerequisite: Under-
evaluation and break-even analysis. Prerequi site: consent of in-
graduate differential equations course; undergraduate chemical
structor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
engineering courses covering reaction kinetics, and heat, mass
and momentum transfer. 3 hours lecture-discussion; 3 semester
ChEN430. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA Theory and chemical
hours.
engineering applications of momentum, heat, and mass transport.
Set up and solution of problems involving equations of motion
ChEN508. ADVANCED FLUID MECHANICS Development
and energy. Prerequisite: ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN357,
of basic conservation equations for momentum transfer. Consti-
ChEN375, MATH225, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
tutive equations for Newtonian and elementary non-Newtonian
semester hours.
fluids. Exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. Ordering
and approximations. Applications to low and high Reynolds
ChEN440. MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVES IN CHEMICAL
number flows. Prerequisite: ChEN516 or consent of instructor. 3
ENGINEERING Applications of statistical and quantum me-
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
chanics to understanding and prediction of equilibrium and
transport properties and processes. Relations between micro-
ChEN509. ADVANCED CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THER-
scopic properties of materials and systems to macroscopic be-
MODYNAMICS Extension and amplification of under graduate
havior. Prerequisite: ChEN307, ChEN308, ChEN357, ChEN375,
chemical engineering thermodynamics. Topics will include the
CHGN351 and 353, CHGN221 and 222, MATH225, or consent
laws of thermodynamics, thermodynamic properties of pure flu-
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ids and fluid mixtures, phase equilibria, and chemical reaction
equilibria. Prerequisite: ChEN357 or equivalent or consent of in-
Graduate Courses
structor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
500-level courses are open to qualified seniors with permis-
sion of the department and the Dean of the Graduate School.
ChEN510. CHEMICAL REACTOR ANALYSIS AND DESIGN
Non-ideal flow effects on reactor design. Stability of stirred tank
The 600-level courses are open only to students enrolled in
and tubular flow reactors. Mass and heat transfer effects. Model-
the Graduate School.
ing of heterogeneous chemical reactors. Fluidized bed reactors.
ChEN501. ADVANCED HEAT TRANSFER Formulation of
Prerequisite: ChEN418 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
the laws governing the transport of energy. Transient and steady-
hours.
state analysis for heat conduction. The transport of thermal en-
ChEN511. INDIVIDUAL STUDIES Individual theoretical or
ergy in fluids in motion; free and forced convection in laminar
experimental studies under the direction of a department faculty
and turbulent flow over surfaces and within conduits. Prerequi-
member, but not leading to a thesis. Course may be repeated for
site: ChEN516 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture-discus-
credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours;
sion; 3 semester hours.
6 semester hours maximum credit. Repeatable for credit to a
ChEN504. ADVANCED PROCESS ENGINEERING ECO-
maximum of 6 hours.
NOMICS Advanced engineering economic principles applied to
ChEN513. SELECTED TOPICS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEER-
original and alternate investments. Analysis of chemical and pe-
ING Selected topics chosen from special interests of instructor
troleum processes relative to marketing and return on invest-
and students. Course may be repeated for credit on different top-
ments. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
ics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours lec-
semester hours.
ture/discussion; 1 to 3 semester hours.
ChEN505. NUMERICAL METHODS IN CHEMICAL ENGI -
ChEN514. ADVANCED STAGED SEPARATIONS Principles
NEERING Engineering applications of numerical methods. Nu-
of stagewise separations with major emphasis on multicompo-
merical integration, solution of algebraic equations, matrix
nent processes for distillation, absorption, and extraction. Topics
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
51

include brief review of ideal phase separations, classical stage-
ChEN521. CRYOGENIC ENGINEERING Thermodynamic
by-stage multicomponent methods, modern successive approxi-
analysis of cryogenic systems. Survey of the properties of cryo-
mation methods for multicomponents, general short-cut
genic fluids. Analysis of heat transfer, fluid flow, and separation
methods, tray hydraulics and efficiency. Prerequisite: ChEN375
processes at low temperatures. Introduction to super conductivity
or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
and superfluidity. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
ChEN515. ADVANCED MASS TRANSFER Fundamental
lecture; 3 semester hours.
principles of mass transfer with application to design of mass
ChEN523. ENGINEERING AND THE ENVIRONMENT Dis-
transfer processes. Theory of diffusion in gases and liquids for
cussion of the many engineering problems that arise when man
single and multicomponent species. Mass transfer in laminar and
interacts with his environment. Comprehensive treatment of top-
turbulent flows. Transport analogies, simultaneous heat and mass
ics such as pollution, thermal pollution, treatment of industrial
transfer, with examples of drying and humidi fication processes.
and municipal wastes, solid waste treatment, and the disposal of
Mass transfer with chemical reaction; examples of slow, inter-
radioactive wastes. Economic and legislative aspects of these
mediate, and fast reactions with application to design of mass
problems will also be considered. Prerequisite: Consent of in-
contractors. Interfacial mass transfer and mass transfer in two-
structor. 3 semester hours.
phase flows. Design of packed beds and columns, gas-sparged
ChEN524. COMPUTER-AIDED PROCESS SIMULATION
reactors. Prerequisite: Graduate course in transport phenomena
Advanced concepts in computer-aided process simulation are
(ChEN516). 3 hours lecture-discussion; 3 semester hours.
covered. Topics include optimization, heat exchanger networks,
ChEN516. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA Principles of momen-
data regression analysis, and separations systems. Use of indus-
tum, heat, and mass transfer with application to chemical
try-standard process simulation software (Aspen Plus) is
processes. Flow in ducts and around submerged objects. Heat
stressed. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
conduction and molecular diffusion. Convective heat and mass
semester hours.
transfer. Heat- and mass-transfer coefficients. Transport analo-
ChEN525. SELECTED TOPICS IN EMERGING CHEMICAL
gies and correlations. Prerequisite: ChEN507. 3 hours lecture-
ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY An introduction to new
discussion; 3 semester hours.
chemical engineering technologies. Current examples include
ChEN517. PETROLEUM REFINERY PROCESSING Composi-
biotechnology, supercritical fluid extraction and biomedical en-
tion and evaluation of petroleum crude oils and other hydro -
gineering. Emphasis is on providing students with appropriate
carbons. Basic refinery processes, including operating
terminologies, identifying new applications of chemical engi-
conditions, chemical reactions, catalysts, economics, and pollu -
neering principles and potential areas of research. Prerequisite:
tion control. Emphasis on needs for refinery processes, such as:
Consent of instructor. Lecture and/or laboratory; 1 to 3 semester
distillation, desulfurization, coking, solvent extraction, hydrofin-
hours.
ing, hydrocracking, catalytic cracking, reforming, isomerization,
ChEN527. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY This course pro-
polymerization. New process requirements for meeting fuel
vides students the opportunity to explore technical aspects of
specifications. Prerequisite: ChEN409 or consent of instructor. 3
many important recent topics in air pollution. The course in-
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
cludes the chemistry, monitoring, health and environmental ef-
ChEN518. REACTION KINETICS AND CATALYSIS Homo -
fects of air pollution including ozone layer depletion, acid rain,
geneous and heterogeneous rate expressions. Fundamental theo-
and global climate change. Technical aspects of environmental
ries of reaction rates. Analysis of rate data and complex reaction
regulations and policy are included along with interpretation of
networks. Properties of solid catalysts. Mass and heat transfer
laboratory experiments, field measurements, and computer mod-
with chemical reaction. Hetero geneous non-catalytic reactions.
eling. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 se-
Prerequisite: ChEN418 or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
mester hours.
hours.
ChEN535/PHGN535/MLGN535. INTERDISCIPLINARY MI-
ChEN519. SYNTHETIC FUEL PROCESSES Processes that
CROELECTRONICS PROCESSING LABORATORY (II) Ap-
generate hydrocarbons from coal, tar sands, and oil shale. Other
plication of science and engineering principles to the design,
energy sources as well as direct conversion processes will also
fabrication, and testing of microelectronic devices. Emphasis on
be considered in view of supply and economics. Prerequisite:
specific unit operations and the interrelation among processing
Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
steps. Consent of instructor 1 hour lecture, 4 hours lab; 3 semes-
ChEN520. THERMODYNAMICS OF PHASE EQUI LIBRIA
ter hours.
Application of current theories in multicomponent phase equilib-
ChEN545. SIMULATION AND MODELING IN CHEMICAL
ria to the solution of engineering problems. Topics include: in-
PROCESS INDUSTRIES Application of basic principles of
troduction to the theory of intermolecular forces, theory of
physics, chemistry, transport phenomena and reaction kinetics to
corresponding states, fugacities in gas and liquid mixtures, intro-
real systems. The philosophy of process modeling at different
duction to the theory of liquids. Pre requisite: ChEN509 or con-
levels of complexity is developed and numerous examples based
sent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
on the chemical process industry and naturally occurring
52
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011

processes are used. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
ChEN601. ADVANCED TOPICS IN HEAT TRANSFER In-
lecture; 3 semester hours.
depth analysis of selected topics in heat transfer with special em-
ChEN550. MEMBRANE SEPARATION TECHNOLOGY This
phasis on chemical engineering applications. Prerequisite:
course is an introduction to the fabrication, characteri zation, and
ChEN501 or consent of instructor. 1 to 3 hours lecture-
application of synthetic membranes for gas and liquid separa-
discussion; 1 to 3 semester hours.
tions. Industrial membrane processes such as reverse osmosis,
ChEN604. TOPICAL RESEARCH SEMINARS Lectures, re-
filtration, pervaporation, and gas separations will be covered as
ports, and discussions on current research in chemical engineer -
well as new applications from the research literature. The course
ing, usually related to the student’s thesis topic. Sections are
will include lecture, experimental, and computational (molecular
operated independently and are directed toward different re-
simulation) laboratory components. Prerequisites: ChEN375,
search topics. Course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite:
ChEN430 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
Consent of instructor. 1 hour lecture-discussion; 1 semester hour.
hours.
Repeatable for credit to a maximum of 3 hours.
ChEN568. INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
ChEN605. COLLOQUIUM Students will attend a series of lec-
RESEARCH Students will be expected to apply chemical engi-
tures by speakers from industry, academia, and government. Pri-
neering principles to critically analyze theoretical and experi-
mary emphasis will be on current research in chemical
mental research results in the chemical engineering literature,
engi neering and related disciplines, with secondary emphasis on
placing it in the context of the related literature. Skills to be de-
ethical, philosophical, and career-related issues of importance to
veloped and discussed include oral presentations, technical writ-
the chemical engineering profession. Prerequisite: Graduate sta-
ing, critical reviews, ethics, research documentation (the
tus. 1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour. Repeatable for credit to a
laboratory notebook), research funding, types of research, devel-
maximum of 10 hours.
oping research, and problem solving. Students will use state-of-
ChEN607. ADVANCED TOPICS IN CHEMICAL
the-art tools to explore the literature and develop
ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS In-depth analysis of selected
well-documented research proposals and presentations. Prerequi-
topics in applied mathematics with special emphasis on chemical
site: Graduate student in Chemical Engineering in good standing
engineering applications. Prerequisite: ChEN507 or consent of
or consent of instructor. 3 semester hours.
instructor. 1 to 3 hours lecture-discussion; 1 to 3 semester hours.
ChEN580 NATURAL GAS HYDRATES The purpose of this
ChEN608. ADVANCED TOPICS IN FLUID MECHANICS In-
class is to learn about clathrate hydrates, using two of the in-
depth analysis of selected topics in fluid mechanics with special
structor's books, (1) Clathrate Hydrates of Natural Gases, Third
emphasis on chemical engineering applications. Prerequisite:
Edition (2008) co-authored by C.A.Koh, and (2) Hydrate Engi-
ChEN508 or consent of instructor. 1 to 3 hours lecture-
neering, (2000). Using a basis of these books, and accompany-
discussion; 1 to 3 semester hours.
ing programs, we have abundant resources to act as professionals
who are always learning. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.
ChEN609/MLGN634. ADVANCED TOPICS IN THERMODY -
NAMICS Advanced study of thermodynamic theory and appli -
ChEN584/CHGN584. FUNDAMENTALS OF CATALYSIS The
cation of thermodynamic principles. Possible topics include
basic principles involved in the preparation, charac terization,
stability, critical phenomena, chemical thermodynamics, thermo -
testing and theory of heterogeneous and homo geneous catalysts
dynamics of polymer solutions and thermodynamics of aqueous
are discussed. Topics include chemisorption, adsorption
and ionic solutions. Prerequisite: Consent of in structor. 1 to 3 se-
isotherms, diffusion, surface kinetics, promoters, poisons, cata-
mester hours.
lyst theory and design, acid base catalysis and soluble transition
metal complexes. Examples of important industrial applications
ChEN610. APPLIED STATISTICAL THERMODYNAMICS
are given. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
Principles of relating behavior to microscopic properties. Topics
semester hours.
include element of probability, ensemble theory, appli cation to
gases and solids, distribution theories of fluids, and transport
ChEN597. SUMMER PROGRAMS
properties. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3
ChEN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
semester hours.
Pilot course of special topics course. Topics chosen from special
ChEN611. APPLIED STATISTICAL MECHANICS Con -
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is of-
tinuation of ChEN610. Advanced applications of statistical ther-
fered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit;
modynamics and statistical mechanics including perturbation
1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.
and integral equation theory, computer simulation and theory of
ChEN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY Individual research or
electrolytes. Introduction to theory of nonequilibrium systems
special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also,
including Chapman-Enskog, Brownian motion and time correla-
when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content,
tion functions. Prerequisite: ChEN610 or equivalent; ChEN507
and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form must
or equivalent; ChEN509. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to
6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
53

ChEN612. ADVANCED INDIVIDUAL STUDIES Advanced
ChEN698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
theoretical or experimental studies on chemical engineering sub-
Pilot course of special topics course. Topics chosen from special
jects not currently covered in other department courses. Course
interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Pre requi site: Instructor
may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1
consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for
to 3 semester hours. Repeatable for credit to a maximum of 6
credit under different titles.
hours.
ChEN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY Individual research or
ChEN615. ADVANCED TOPICS IN MASS TRANSFER In-
special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also,
depth analysis of selected topics in mass transfer with special
when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content,
emphasis on chemical engineering applications. Possible topics
and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study” form must
include ion-exchange or adsorption chromatog raphy, theories of
be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to
interfacial mass transfer, mass transfer with reaction, and simul-
6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
taneous heat and mass transfer. Prerequisite: Graduate mass
ChEN705. GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT: MASTER OF
transfer course (ChEN515). 1 to 3 hours lecture-discussion; 1 to
SCIENCE Research credit hours required for completion of the
3 semester hours.
degree Master of Science - thesis. Research must be carried out
ChEN618. ADVANCED TOPICS IN REACTION KINETICS
under the direct supervision of the graduate student’s faculty ad-
Fundamental theories of reaction rates. Basic principles of chem-
visor. Repeatable for credit.
ical kinetics in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems. Reac-
ChEN706. GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT: DOCTOR OF
tions in solution, reactions on surfaces, and composite reactions.
PHILOSOPHY Research credit hours required for completion
Homogeneous catalysis, and isotope effects in reaction dynam-
of the degree Doctor of Philosophy. Research must be carried
ics. Photochemical reactions. Prerequisite: Graduate reaction en-
out under direct supervision of the graduate student’s faculty ad-
gineering course (ChEN518). 1 to 3 hours lecture-discussion; 1
visor. Repeatable for credit.
to 3 semester hours.
ChEN625/CHGN625/MLGN625. MOLECULAR SIMULA-
TION Principles and practice of modern computer simulation
techniques used to understand solids, liquids, and gases. Review
of the statistical foundation of thermodynamics followed by in-
depth discussion of Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics tech-
niques. Discussion of intermolecular potentials, extended
ensembles, and mathematical algorithms used in molecular sim-
ulations. ChEN509 or equivalent; ChEN610 or equivalent rec-
ommended. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ChEN690. SUPERVISED TEACHING OF CHEMICAL ENGI-
NEERING Individual participation in teaching activities. Dis-
cussion, problem review and development, guidance of
laboratory experiments, course development, supervised practice
teaching. Course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Gradu-
ate standing, appointment as a graduate student instructor, or
consent of instructor. 6 to 10 hours supervised teaching; 2 se-
mester hours.
54
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011

Chemistry and Geochemistry
chemistry degrees, please consult the Geochemistry section of
DANIEL M. KNAUSS, Professor and Department Head
the bulletin.
MARK E. EBERHART, Professor
Prerequisites:
PATRICK MACCARTHY, Professor
A candidate for an advanced degree in the chemistry pro-
KENT J. VOORHEES, Professor
SCOTT W. COWLEY, Associate Professor
gram should have completed an undergraduate program in
KEVIN W. MANDERNACK, Associate Professor
chemistry which is essentially equivalent to that offered by
JAMES F. RANVILLE, Associate Professor
the Department of Chemistry & Geochemistry at the Col-
RYAN RICHARDS, Associate Professor
orado School of Mines. Undergraduate deficiencies will be
E. CRAIG SIMMONS, Associate Professor
determined by faculty in the Department of Chemistry &
BETTINA M. VOELKER, Associate Professor
Geochemistry through interviews and/or placement examina-
KIM R. WILLIAMS, Associate Professor
tions at the beginning of the student's first semester of gradu-
DAVID T. WU, Associate Professor
ate work.
STEPHEN G. BOYES, Assistant Professor
MATTHEW C. POSEWITZ, Assistant Professor
Required Curriculum:
ARNOLD B. TAMAYO, Assistant Professor
Chemistry:
YONGAN YANG, Assistant Professor
A student in the chemistry program, in consultation with
MARK SEGER, Lecturer
the advisor and thesis committee, selects the program of
EDWARD A. DEMPSEY, Instructor
study. Initially, before a thesis advisor and thesis committee
YUAN YANG, Research Assistant Professor
have been chosen, the student is advised by a temporary ad-
RAMON E. BISQUE, Professor Emeritus
visor and by the Graduate Affairs Committee in the Depart-
STEPHEN R. DANIEL, Professor Emeritus
ment of Chemistry & Geochemistry. The following four
DEAN W. DICKERHOOF, Professor Emeritus
KENNETH W. EDWARDS, Professor Emeritus
graduate courses are designated as core courses in the De-
GEORGE H. KENNEDY, Professor Emeritus
partment of Chemistry and Geochemistry: CHGN502 (inor-
RONALD W. KLUSMAN, Professor Emeritus
ganic), CHGN503 (physical), CHGN505 (organic), and
DONALD LANGMUIR, Professor Emeritus
CHGN507 (analytical).
GEORGE B. LUCAS, Professor Emeritus
M.S. Degree (chemistry, thesis option): The program of
DONALD L. MACALADY, Professor Emeritus
study includes the four core courses: (CHGN502, CHGN503,
MICHAEL J. PAVELICH, Professor Emeritus
MAYNARD SLAUGHTER, Professor Emeritus
CHGN505, and CHGN507), the M.S.-level seminar
THOMAS R. WILDEMAN, Professor Emeritus
(CHGN560), research, and the preparation and oral defense
JOHN T. WILLIAMS, Professor Emeritus
of an MS thesis based on the student’s research. Students
ROBERT D. WITTERS, Professor Emeritus
must be enrolled in CHGN560 for each Fall and Spring
CHARLES W. STARKS, Associate Professor Emeritus
semester that they are in residence at CSM. A minimum of
Degrees Offered:
36 semester hours, including at least 24 semester hours of
Master of Science (Chemistry; thesis and non-thesis option)
course work, are required. At least 15 of the required 24 se-
mester hours of course work must be taken in the Department
Doctor of Philosophy (Applied Chemistry)
of Chemistry & Geochemistry at CSM. The student’s thesis
Master of Science (Geochemistry; thesis)
committee makes decisions on transfer credit. Up to 9 semes-
Professional Masters in Environmental Geochemistry
ter hours of graduate courses may be transferred from other
(non-thesis)
institutions, provided that those courses have not been used
as credit toward a Bachelor degree.
Doctor of Philosophy (Geochemistry)
Research-Intensive MS Degree: CSM undergraduates who
All graduate degree programs in the Department of Chem-
enter the graduate program through the combined BS/MS
istry & Geochemistry have been admitted to the Western
program may use this option (thesis-based MS) to acquire a
Regional Graduate Program (WICHE). This program allows
research-intensive MS degree by minimizing the time spent
residents of Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Mon-
on coursework. This option requires a minimum of 12 hours
tana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South
of coursework up to six hours of which may be double
Dakota, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming to register at Col-
counted from the student's undergraduate studies at CSM
orado resident
(see below).
tuition rates.
M.S. Degree (chemistry, non-thesis option): The non-the-
Program Description:
sis M.S. degree requires 36 semester hours of course credit,
The Department of Chemistry & Geochemistry offers grad-
composed of 30 semester hours of course work and 6 hours
uate degrees in chemistry and in geochemistry. This section of
of independent study. The program of study includes the four
the Bulletin only describes the chemistry degrees. For geo-
core courses: (CHGN502, CHGN503, CHGN505, and
CHGN507), the M.S.-level seminar (CHGN560), independ-
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
55

ent study on a topic determined by the student and the stu-
taken: (i) solely within the Department of Chemistry & Geo-
dent’s faculty advisor, and the preparation of a report based
chemistry, (ii) solely within another department or division
on the student’s study topic. Students must be enrolled in
outside of the Department of Chemistry & Geochemistry, or
CHGN560 for each Fall and Spring semester that they are in
(iii) from a combination of departments/divisions, including
residence at CSM. At least 21 of the required 36 semester
transfer credit from another institution. In all cases the minor
hours of course work must be taken as a registered master’s
must constitute a coherent set of courses that supports, and
degree student at CSM. The student’s committee makes deci-
adds breadth to, the student's principal research interests. Up
sions on courses to be taken, transfer credit, and examines
to two, but no more than two, of the core courses may, with
the student’s written report. Up to 15 semester hours of grad-
thesis committee approval, be used to fulfill the minor re-
uate courses may be transferred into the degree program, pro-
quirement. The student's thesis committee must approve the
vided that those courses have not been used as credit toward
combination of courses that constitutes the minor. The com-
a Bachelor degree.
prehensive examination comprises a written non-thesis pro-
CSM undergraduates entering a combined B.S./M.S. pro-
posal wherein the student prepares an original proposal on a
gram in chemistry may double-count six hours from their un-
chemistry topic distinctly different from the student's princi-
dergraduate studies toward the M.S. degree. The
pal area of research. The student must orally defend the non-
undergraduate courses that are eligible for dual counting to-
thesis proposal before the thesis committee. The non-thesis
ward the M.S. degree are: CHGN401, CHGN410,
proposal requirement must be completed prior to the end of
CHGN403, CHGN422, CHGN428, CHGN430, CHGN475,
the student's second year of graduate studies. A student's the-
and CHGN498 (with approval of faculty advisor and com-
sis committee may, at its discretion, require additional com-
mittee). Any 500 level lecture course taken as an undergradu-
ponents to the comprehensive examination process such as
ate may also be counted as part of the six hours from the
inclusion of cumulative examinations, or other examinations.
undergraduate program (with approval of faculty advisor and
Geochemistry:
committee).
Please see the Geochemistry section of the bulletin for in-
Ph.D. Degree (Applied Chemistry): The program of study
formation on Geochemistry degree programs.
for the Ph.D. degree in Applied Chemistry includes the de-
Fields of Research:
partmental core courses (CHGN502, CHGN503, CHGN505,
Analytical and bioanalytical chemistry. Separation and char-
and CHGN507), the M.S.-level seminar (CHGN560), the
acterization techniques for polymers, biopolymers, nano-
Ph.D.-level seminar (CHGN660), a minor, a comprehensive
particles and natural colloids. Biodetection of pathogens.
examination, research, and the preparation and oral defense
Energy sciences. Alternative fuels. New materials for solar
of a Ph.D. thesis based on the student's research. The total
energy conversion.
hours of course work required for the Ph.D. degree is deter-
mined on an individual basis by the student's thesis commit-
Environmental chemistry. Detection and fate of anthro-
tee. Up to 24 semester hours of graduate-level course work
pogenic contaminants in water, soil, and air. Acid mine
may be transferred from other institutions toward the Ph.D.
drainage. Ecotoxicology. Environmental photochemistry.
degree provided that those courses have not been used by the
Geochemistry and biogeochemistry. Microbial and chemical
student toward a Bachelor's degree. The student's thesis com-
processes in global climate change, biomineralization,
mittee may set additional course requirements and will make
metal cycling, medical and archeological geochemistry,
decisions on requests for transfer credit. Ph.D. students may
humic substances.
base their M.S.-level seminar on any chemistry-related topic
Inorganic Chemistry. Synthesis, characterization, and appli-
including the proposed thesis research. The M.S.-level semi-
cations of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles.
nar requirement must be completed no later than the end of
the student's second year of graduate studies at CSM. After
Nanoscale materials. Design, synthesis and characterization
completion of the CHGN560 seminar, students must enroll in
of new materials for catalysis, energy sciences, spectro-
CHGN660. Students must be enrolled in either CHGN560 or
scopic applications and drug delivery. Environmental fate
CHGN660 for each Fall and Spring semester that they are in
of nanoparticles.
residence at CSM. The Ph.D.-level seminar must be based on
Organic Chemistry. Polymer design, synthesis and character-
the student's Ph.D. research and must include detailed re-
ization. Catalysis. Alternative fuels.
search findings and interpretation thereof. This CHGN 660
Physical and Computational Chemistry. Computational
seminar must be presented close to, but before, the student's
chemistry for polymer design, energy sciences, and mate-
oral defense of the thesis. The minor requirement consists of
rials research. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.
a minimum of 12 hours of graduate courses intended to pro-
Eberhart, Wu
vide a breadth of knowledge in support of the student's prin-
cipal research interests. The minor may comprise courses
56
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011

Polymers. New techniques for controlling polymer architec-
CHGN495. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (I, II, S) Indi -
ture and composition. Theory and simulation. Separation
vidual research project under direction of a member of the De-
and characterization.
partmental faculty. Prerequisites: Completion of chemistry
Description of Courses
curriculum through the junior year or permission of the depart-
ment head. 1-6 credit hours.
CHGN401. THEORETICAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (II)
Periodic properties of the elements. Bonding in ionic
CHGN497. INTERNSHIP (I, II, S) Individual internship experi-
and metallic crystals. Acid-base theories. Inorganic stereochem-
ence with an industrial, academic, or governmental host super-
istry. Nonaqueous solvents. Coordination chemistry and ligand
vised by a Departmental faculty member. Prerequisites:
field theory. Prerequisite: CHGN341 or consent of instructor. 3
Completion of chemistry curriculum through the junior year or
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
permission of the department head. 1-6 credit hours.
CHGN402. BONDING THEORY AND SYMMETRY (II) In-
CHGN498. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (I, II) Topics
troduction to valence bond and molecular orbital theories, sym-
chosen from special interests of instructor and students. Prerequi-
metry; introduction to group theory; applications of group theory
site: Consent of head of department. 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeat-
and symmetry concepts to molecular orbital and ligand field the-
able for credit under different titles.
ories. Prerequisite: CHGN401 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
CHGN499. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (I, II) Individ-
lecture; 3 semester hours.
ual investigational problems under the direction of members of
CHGN410/MLGN510. SURFACE CHEMISTRY (II) Introduc-
the chemistry staff. Written report on research required for
tion to colloid systems, capillarity, surface tension and contact
credit. Prerequisite: Consent of head of department. 1 to 3 se-
angle, adsorption from solution, micelles and micro emulsions,
mester hours. Repeatable for credit.
the solid/gas interface, surface analytical techniques, van der
Graduate Courses
Waal forces, electrical properties and colloid stability, some spe-
The following courses are offered at the graduate level. They
cific colloid systems (clays, foams and emulsions). Students en-
will be given if sufficient qualified students register. Some 500-
rolled for graduate credit in MLGN510 must complete a special
level courses are open to qualified seniors with the permission of
project. Prerequisite: DCGN209 or consent of instructor. 3 hours
the department and Dean of the Graduate School. 600-level
lecture; 3 semester hours.
courses are open only to students enrolled in the Graduate
CHGN422. POLYMER CHEMISTRY LABORATORY (I) Pre-
School. Geochemistry courses are listed after Chemistry courses.
requisites: CHGN221. 3 hours lab; 1 hour credit.
Chemistry Courses
CHGN428. INTRODUCTORY BIOCHEMISTRY (II) Introduc-
CHGN502. ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (II) De-
tory study of the major molecules of biochemistry, including
tailed examination of topics such as ligand field theory, reaction
amino acids, proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, lipids, and sac-
mechanisms, chemical bonding, and structure of inorganic com-
charides- their structure, chemistry, biological function, and
pounds. Emphasis is placed on the correlations of the chemical
biosynthesis. Stresses bioenergetics and the cell as a biological
reactions of the elements with periodic trends and reactivities.
unit of organization. Discussion of classical genetics, molecular
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
genetics, and protein synthesis. Prerequisite: CHGN221 or per-
hours.
mission of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CHGN503. ADVANCED PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I (II)
CHGN430/MLGN530. INTRODUCTION TO POLYMER
Quantum chemistry of classical systems. Principles of chemical
SCIENCE (I) An introduction to the chemistry and physics of
thermodynamics. Statistical mechanics with statistical calcula-
macromolecules. Topics include the properties and statistics of
tion of thermodynamic properties. Theories of chemical kinetics.
polymer solutions, measurements of molecular weights, molecular
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 4 hours lecture; 4 semester
weight distributions, properties of bulk polymers, mechanisms of
hours.
polymer formation, and properties of thermosets and thermoplas-
CHGN505. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (I)
tics including elastomers. Prerequisite: CHGN221 or permission
Detailed discussion of the more important mechanisms of
of instructor. 3 hour lecture, 3 semester hours.
organic reaction. Structural effects and reactivity. The applica-
CHGN475. COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY (II) Pre -
tion of reaction mechanisms to synthesis and structure proof.
requisites: CHGN351, CHGN402. 3 hours lecture; 3 credit
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
hours.
hours.
CHGN490. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION (S)
CHGN507. ADVANCED ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY (I) Re-
Advanced methods of organic and inorganic synthesis; high-tem-
view of fundamentals of analytical chemistry. Literature of ana-
perature, high-pressure, inert-atmosphere, vacuum-line, and elec-
lytical chemistry and statistical treatment of data. Manipulation
trolytic methods. Prerequisites: CHGN323, CHGN341. 6-week
of real substances; sampling, storage, decomposition or dissolu-
summer field session; 6 credit hours.
tion, and analysis. Detailed treatment of chemical equilibrium as
related to precipitation, acid-base, complexation and redox titra-
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
57

tions. Potentiometry and UV-visible absorption spectrophotome-
tendance at all departmental seminars are required. Prerequisite:
try. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semes-
Graduate student status. 1 semester hour.
ter hours.
CHGN580/MLGN501. STRUCTURE OF MATERIALS (II)
CHGN508. ANALYTICAL SPECTROSCOPY (II) Detailed
Application of X-ray diffraction techniques for crystal and mo-
study of classical and modern spectroscopic methods; emphasis
lecular structure determination of minerals, inorganic and
on instrumentation and application to analytical chemistry prob-
organometallic compounds. Topics include the heavy atom
lems. Topics include: UV-visible spectroscopy, infrared spec-
method, data collection by moving film techniques and by dif-
troscopy, fluorescence and phosphorescence, Raman
fractometers, Fourier methods, interpretation of Patterson maps,
spectroscopy, arc and spark emission spectroscopy, flame meth-
refinement methods, direct methods. Prerequisite: Consent of in-
ods, nephelometry and turbidimetry, reflectance methods,
structor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate
Fourier transform methods in spectroscopy, photoacoustic spec-
years.
troscopy, rapid-scanning spectroscopy. Prerequisite: Consent of
CHGN581. ELECTROCHEMISTRY (I) Introduction to theory
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate
and practice of electrochemistry. Electrode potentials, reversible
years.
and irreversible cells, activity concept. Interionic attraction the-
CHGN510. CHEMICAL SEPARATIONS (II) Survey of separa-
ory, proton transfer theory of acids and bases, mechanisms and
tion methods, thermodynamics of phase equilibria, thermody-
fates of electrode reactions. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3
namics of liquid-liquid partitioning, various types of
hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
chromatography, ion exchange, electrophoresis, zone refining,
CHGN583/MLGN583. PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS
use of inclusion compounds for separation, application of sepa-
OF SURFACE ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES (II) Instru mental
ration technology for determining physical constants, e.g., stabil-
techniques for the characterization of surfaces of solid materials;
ity constants of complexes. Prerequisite: CHGN507 or consent of
Applications of such techniques to polymers, corrosion, metal-
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate
lurgy, adhesion science, microelectronics. Methods of analysis
years.
discussed: x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), auger elec-
CHGN515/MLGN503. CHEMICAL BONDING IN
tron spectroscopy (AES), ion scatter ing spectroscopy (ISS), sec-
MATERIALS (I) Introduction to chemical bonding theories and
ondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), Rutherford
calculations and their applications to solids of interest to
backscattering (RBS), scanning and transmission electron mi-
materials science. The relationship between a material’s proper-
croscopy (SEM, TEM), energy and wavelength dispersive x-ray
ties and the bonding of its atoms will be examined for a variety
analysis; principles of these methods, quantification, instrumen-
of materials. Includes an introduction to organic polymers. Com-
tation, sample preparation. Prerequisite: B.S. in Metallurgy,
puter programs will be used for calculating bonding parameters.
Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Physics, or consent of in-
Prerequisite: Consent of department. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
structor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
hours.
CHGN584/ChEN584. FUNDAMENTALS OF CATALYSIS (II)
CHGN523/MLGN509. SOLID STATE CHEMISTRY (I) De-
The basic principles involved in the preparation, characteriza-
pendence of properties of solids on chemical bonding and struc-
tion, testing and theory of heterogeneous and homo geneous cata-
ture; principles of crystal growth, crystal imperfections,
lysts are discussed. Topics include chemisorption, adsorption
reactions and diffusion in solids, and the theory of conductors
isotherms, diffusion, surface kinetics, promoters, poisons, cata-
and semiconductors. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
lyst theory and design, acid base catalysis and soluble transition
lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
metal complexes. Examples of important industrial applications
CHGN536/MLGN536. ADVANCED POLYMER SYNTHESIS
are given. Prerequisite: CHGN222 or consent of instructor. 3
(II) An advanced course in the synthesis of macromolecules.
hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Various methods of polymerization will be discussed with an
CHGN585. CHEMICAL KINETICS (II) Study of kinetic phe-
emphasis on the specifics concerning the syntheses of different
nomena in chemical systems. Attention devoted to various theo-
classes of organic and inorganic polymers. Prerequisite:
retical approaches. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours
CHGN430, ChEN415, MLGN530 or consent of instructor. 3
lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
hours lecture, 3 semester hours
CHGN598. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (I, II) Pilot
CHGN560. GRADUATE SEMINAR, M.S. (I, II) Required for
course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special inter-
all candidates for the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in chemistry and
ests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered
geochemistry. M.S. students must register for the course during
only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6
each semester of residency. Ph.D. students must register each se-
credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.
mester until a grade is received satisfying the prerequisites for
CHGN660. Presentation of a graded non-thesis seminar and at-
58
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011

CHGN599. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual research
environmental science and engineering. 2 hours lecture; 2 se-
or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member,
mester hours.
also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter,
CHGC505. INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL
content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study”
CHEMISTRY (II) Processes by which natural and anthro-
form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable
pogenic chemicals interact, react, and are transformed and redis -
credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
tributed in various environmental compartments. Air, soil, and
CHGN660. GRADUATE SEMINAR, Ph.D. (I, II) Required of
aqueous (fresh and saline surface and groundwaters) environ-
all candidates for the doctoral degree in chemistry or geochem-
ments are covered, along with specialized environments such as
istry. Students must register for this course each semester after
waste treatment facilities and the upper atmosphere. Meets with
completing CHGN560. Presentation of a graded nonthesis semi-
CHGN403. CHGN403 and CHGC505 may not both be taken for
nar and attendance at all department seminars are required. Pre-
credit. Prerequisites: SYGN101, CHGN 124 and DCGN209 or
requisite: CHGN560 or equivalent. 1 semester hour.
permission of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
CHGN698. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (I, II) Pilot
CHGC506. WATER ANALYSIS LABORATORY (I) Instrumen-
course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special inter-
tal analysis of water samples using spectroscopy and chromatog-
ests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered
raphy. Methods for field collection of water samples and field
only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6
measurements. The development of laboratory skills for the use
credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.
of ICP-AES, HPLC, ion chromatography, and GC. Laboratory
CHGN699. INDEPENDENT STUDY (I, II) Individual research
techniques focus on standard methods for the measurement of
or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member,
inorganic and organic constituents in water samples. Methods of
also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter,
data analysis are also presented. Prerequisite: Introductory chem-
content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: “Independent Study”
istry, graduate standing or consent of instructor. 3 hour labora-
form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable
tory, 1 hour lecture, 2 semester hours.
credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.
CHGC509/GEGN509. INTRODUCTION TO AQUEOUS
CHGN705. GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT: MASTER OF
GEOCHEMISTRY (I) Analytical, graphical and interpretive
SCIENCE Research credit hours required for completion of the
methods applied to aqueous systems. Thermodynamic properties
degree Master of Science - thesis. Research must be carried out
of water and aqueous solutions. Calculations and graphical ex-
under the direct supervision of the graduate student’s faculty ad-
pression of acid-base, redox and solution-mineral equilibria. Ef-
visor. Repeatable for credit.
fect of temperature and kinetics on natural aqueous systems.
Adsorption and ion exchange equilibria between clays and oxide
CHGN706. GRADUATE RESEARCH CREDIT: DOCTOR OF
phases. Behavior of trace elements and complexation in aqueous
PHILOSOPHY Research credit hours required for completion
systems. Application of organic geochemistry to natural aqueous
of the degree Doctor of Philosophy. Research must be carried
systems. Light stable and unstable isotopic studies applied to
out under direct supervision of the graduate student’s faculty ad-
aqueous systems. Prerequisite: DCGN209 or equivalent, or con-
visor. Repeatable for credit.
sent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
Geochemistry Courses
CHGC511. GEOCHEMISTRY OF IGNEOUS ROCKS (II) A
CHGC503. INTRODUCTION TO GEOCHEMISTRY (I)
survey of the geochemical characteristics of the various types of
A comprehensive introduction to the basic concepts and princi-
igneous rock suites. Application of major element, trace element,
ples of geochemistry, coupled with a thorough overview of the
and isotope geochemistry to problems of their origin and modifi-
related principles of thermodynamics. Topics covered include:
cation. Prerequisite: Undergraduate mineralogy and petrology or
nucleosynthesis, origin of earth and solar system, chemical
consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered
bonding, mineral chemistry, elemental distributions and geo-
alternate years.
chemical cycles, chemical equilibrium and kinetics, isotope sys-
tematics, and organic and biogeochemistry. Prerequisite:
CHGC527/GEGN527. ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY OF FOS-
Introductory chemistry, mineralogy and petrology, or consent of
SIL FUELS AND ORE DEPOSITS (II) A study of organic car-
instructor. 4 hours lecture, 4 semester hours.
bonaceous materials in relation to the genesis and modification
of fossil fuel and ore deposits. The biological origin of the or-
CHGC504. METHODS IN GEOCHEMISTRY (II) Sampling of
ganic matter will be discussed with emphasis on contributions of
natural earth materials including rocks, soils, sediments, and wa-
microorganisms to the nature of these deposits. Biochemical and
ters. Preparation of naturally heterogeneous materials, diges-
thermal changes which convert the organic compounds into pe-
tions, and partial chemical extractions. Principles of instru mental
troleum, oil shale, tar sand, coal and other carbonaceous matter
analysis including atomic spectroscopy, mass separations, and
will be studied. Principal analytical techniques used for the char-
chromatography. Quality assurance and quality control. Interpre-
tation and assessment of geochemical data using statistical meth-
ods. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geochemistry or
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
59

acterization of organic matter in the geosphere and for evaluation
in weathering of rocks and the early diagenesis of sediments, and
of oil and gas source potential will be discussed. Laboratory ex-
the origin of petroleum, oil shale, and coal. Prerequisite: Consent
ercises will emphasize source rock evaluation, and oil-source
of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
rock and oil-oil correlation methods. Prerequisite: CHGN221,
CHGC610. NUCLEAR AND ISOTOPIC GEOCHEMISTRY
GEGN438, or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab;
(II) A study of the principles of geochronology and stable iso-
3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
tope distributions with an emphasis on the application of these
CHGC555. ENVIRONMENTAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (II)
principles to important case studies in igneous petrology and the
A study of the chemical and physical interactions which deter-
formation of ore deposits. U, Th, and Pb isotopes, K-Ar, Rb-Sr,
mine the fate, transport and interactions of organic chemicals in
oxygen isotopes, sulfur isotopes, and carbon isotopes included.
aquatic systems, with emphasis on chemical transformations of
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester
anthropogenic organic contaminants. Prerequisites: A course in
hours Offered alternate years.
organic chemistry and CHGN503, Advanced Physical Chemistry
CHGC699A. SELECTED TOPICS IN GEOCHEMISTRY (I, II)
or its equivalent, or consent of instructor. Offered in alternate
Detailed study of a geochemical topic under direction of a mem-
years. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
ber of the staff. Work on the same or a different topic may be
CHGC562/CHGN462. MICROBIOLOGY AND THE
continued through later semesters and additional credits earned.
ENVIRONMENT (II) This course will cover the basic funda-
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
mentals of microbiology, such as structure and function of pro-
CHGC699B. SPECIAL TOPICS IN AQUEOUS AND
caryotic versus eucaryotic cells; viruses; classification of
SEDIMENTARY GEOCHEMISTRY (I, II) Detailed study of a
micro-organisms; microbial metabolism, energetics, genetics,
specific topic in the area of aqueous or sedimentary geochem-
growth and diversity; microbial interactions with plants, animals,
istry under the direction of a member of the staff. Work on the
and other microbes. Additional topics covered will include vari-
same or a different topic may be continued through later semes-
ous aspects of environmental microbiology such as global bio-
ters and additional credits earned. Prerequisite: Consent of in-
geochemical cycles, bioleaching, bioremediation, and
structor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
wastewater treatment. Prerequisite: ESGN301 or consent of In-
structor.
CHGC699C. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ORGANIC AND
3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
BIOGEOCHEMISTRY (I, II) Detailed study of a specific topic
in the areas of organic geochemistry or biogeochemistry under
CHGC563. ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY (I)
the direction of a member of the staff. Work on the same or a dif-
An introduction to the microorganisms of major geochemical
ferent topic may be continued through later semesters and addi-
importance, as well as those of primary importance in water pol-
tional credits earned. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to 3
lution and waste treatment. Microbes and sedimentation, micro-
semester hours.
bial leaching of metals from ores, acid mine water pollution, and
the microbial ecology of marine and freshwater habitats are cov-
CHGC699D. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PETROLOGIC
ered. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours
GEOCHEMISTRY (I, II) Detailed study of a specific topic in
lab; 2 semester hours. Offered alternate years.
the area of petrologic geochemistry under the direction of a
member of the staff. Work on the same or a different topic may
CHGC564. BIOGEOCHEMISTRY AND GEOMICRO -
be continued through later semesters and additional credits
BIOLOGY (I) Designed to give the student an understanding of
earned. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.
the role of living things, particularly microorganisms,
in the shaping of the earth. Among the subjects will be the as-
pects of living processes, chemical composition and characteris-
tics of biological material, origin of life, role of micro organisms
60
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011

Economics and Business
investment analysis, exploration economics, decision analy-
RODERICK G. EGGERT, Professor and Division Director
sis, utility theory, and corporate risk policy.
JOHN T. CUDDINGTON, William J. Coulter Professor
Mineral and Energy Economics Program
CAROL A. DAHL, Professor
Requirements:
GRAHAM A. DAVIS, Professor
MICHAEL R. WALLS, Professor
M.S. Degree Students choose from either the thesis or
EDWARD J. BALISTRERI, Associate Professor
non-thesis option in the Master of Science (M.S.) Program
MICHAEL B. HEELEY, Associate Professor
and are required to complete a minimum total of 36 credits
ALEXANDRA M. NEWMAN, Associate Professor
(a typical course has 3 credits). Initial admission is only to
JOY M. GODESIABOIS, Assistant Professor
the non-thesis program. Admission to the thesis option re-
DANIEL KAFFINE, Assistant Professor
quires subsequent application after at least one full-time
STEFFEN REBENNACK, Assistant Professor
equivalent semester in the program. Coursework is valid for
SCOTT HOUSER, Lecturer
seven years towards the M.S. degree; any exceptions must be
JOHN M. STERMOLE, Lecturer
approved by the division director and student advisor.
ANN DOZORETZ, Instructor
FRANKLIN J. STERMOLE, Professor Emeritus
Non-thesis option
JOHN E. TILTON, University Emeritus Professor
18 credits of core courses
ROBERT E. D. WOOLSEY, Professor Emeritus
12 credits from one or both specializations
Degrees Offered:
6 credits of approved electives or a minor from another
Master of Science (Mineral and EnergyEconomics)
department
Doctor of Philosophy (Mineral and Energy Economics)
Thesis option
18 credits of core courses
Master of Science (Engineering and Technology
12 research credits
Management)
6 credits from one or both specializations
Mineral and Energy Economics Program
Ph.D. Degree Doctoral students develop a customized
Description:
curriculum to fit their needs. The degree requires a minimum
In an increasingly global and technical world, government
of 72 graduate credit hours that includes course work and a
and industry leaders in the mineral and energy areas require a
thesis. Coursework is valid for ten years towards a Ph.D. de-
strong foundation in economic and business skills. The Divi-
gree; any exceptions must be approved by the division direc-
sion of Economics and Business offers such skills in unique
tor and student advisor.
programs leading to M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Mineral and
Course work
Energy Economics. Course work and research in Mineral and
24 credits of core courses
Energy Economics emphasize the application of economic
12 credits from one or both specializations
principles and business methods to mineral, energy, and re-
12 credits in a minor
lated environmental and technological issues.
Research credits
Students in the Mineral and Energy Economics Program
24 research credits. The student’s faculty advisor and the
select from one of two areas of specialization: Economics
doctoral thesis committee must approve the student’s pro-
and Public Policy (E&PP) or Quantitative Business Meth-
gram of study and the topic for the thesis.
ods/Operations Research (QBM/OR). The E&PP specializa-
tion focuses on the optimal use of scarce energy and mineral
Qualifying Examination Process
resources with a global perspective. It provides institutional
Upon completion of the core course work, students must
knowledge coupled with economics, mathematical and statis-
pass qualifying written examinations to become a candidate
tical tools to analyze and understand how the world of energy
for the Ph.D. degree. The qualifying exam is given in two
and minerals works to guide and shape industry change. The
parts in summer. Once qualified, the Ph.D. student is then re-
QBM/OR specialization emphasizes the application of quan-
quired to complete an additional written and oral examina-
titative business methods such as optimization, simulation,
tion. This exam is prepared and administered by the student’s
decision analysis, and project management to minerals and
thesis committee and is generally related to the student’s the-
energy related manufacturing, exploration, resource alloca-
sis topic and the student’s minor field.
tion, and other decision-making processes.
Minor from Another Department
Fields of Research
Non-thesis M.S. students may apply six elective credits
Faculty members carry out applied research in a variety of
towards a nine hour minor in another department. A minor is
areas including international trade, resource economics, envi-
ideal for those students who want to enhance or gain knowl-
ronmental economics, industrial organization, metal market
edge in another field while gaining the economic and busi-
analysis, energy economics, applied microeconomics, applied
ness skills to help them move up the career ladder. For
econometrics, management theory and practice, finance and
example, a petroleum, chemical, or mining engineer might
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
61

want to learn more about environmental engineering, a geo-
t
Masters of Science in Mineral and Energy
physicist or geologist might want to learn the latest tech-
Economics from CSM and
niques in their profession, or an economic policy analyst
t
Diplôme D'Ingénieur or Mastère Spécialisé from
might want to learn about political risk. Students should
IFP
check with the minor department for the opportunities and
requirements for a minor.
Important: Applications for admission to the joint degree
program should be submitted for consideration by March 1st
Transfer Credits
to begin the program the following fall semester in August. A
Non-thesis M.S. students may transfer up to 6 credits
limited number of students are selected for the program each
(9 credits for a thesis M.S.). The student must have achieved
year.
a grade of B or better in all graduate transfer courses and the
transfer credit must be approved by the student’s advisor and
Prerequisites for the Mineral and Energy
the Division Director. Students who enter the Ph.D. program
Economics Programs:
may transfer up to 24 hours of graduate-level course work
Students must have completed the following undergradu-
from other institutions toward the Ph.D. degree subject to the
ate prerequisite courses with a grade of B or better:
restriction that those courses must not have been used as
1. Principles of Microeconomics;
credit toward a Bachelor degree. The student must have
2. One semester of college-level Calculus;
achieved a grade of B or better in all graduate transfer
courses and the transfer must be approved by the student’s
3. Probability and Statistics
Doctoral Thesis Committee and the Division Director.
Students entering in the fall semester must have completed
Unsatisfactory Progress
the microeconomics and calculus prerequisites prior to start-
In addition to the institutional guidelines for unsatisfactory
ing the program; probability and statistics must be completed
progress as described elsewhere in this bulletin: Unsatisfac-
no later than the first semester of the graduate program and
tory progress will be assigned to any full-time student who
not as an overload course (maximum 12 credit hours). Stu-
does not pass the core courses EBGN509 and EBGN510 in
dents will only be allowed to enter in the spring semester if
first fall semester of study and EBGN511 and EBGN590 in
they have completed all three prerequisites courses previ-
the first spring semester of study. Unsatisfactory progress
ously, as well as undergraduate courses in mathematical eco-
will also be assigned to any students who do not complete re-
nomics and natural resource economics.
quirements as specified in their admission letter. Part-time
Required Course Curriculum in Mineral and
students develop an approved course plan with their advisor.
Energy Economics:
Combined BS/MS Program
All M.S. and Ph.D. students in Mineral and Energy Eco-
Students enrolled in CSM’s Combined Undergraduate/
nomics are required to take a set of core courses that provide
Graduate Program may double count 6 hours from their
basic tools for the more advanced and specialized courses in
under graduate course-work towards the non-thesis graduate
the program.
program provided the courses satisfy the M.S. requirements.
1. M.S. Curriculum
Dual Degree
a. Core Courses (18 credits)
The M.S. degree may be combined with a second degree
from the IFP School (Paris, France) in Petroleum Economics
EBGN509 Mathematical Economics
and Management (see http://www.ifp.fr). This dual-degree
EBGN510 Natural Resource Economics
program is geared to meet the needs of industry and govern-
EBGN511 Microeconomics
ment. Our unique program trains the next generation of tech-
EBGN512 Macroeconomics
nical, analytical and managerial professionals vital to the
EBGN525 Operations Research Methods
future of the petroleum and energy industries
EBGN590 Econometrics and Forecasting
These two world-class institutions offer a rigorous and
b. Area of Specialization Courses (12 credits for M.S.
challenging program in an international setting. The program
non-thesis option or 6 credits for M.S. thesis option)
gives a small elite group of students a solid economics foun-
Economics & Public Policy
dation combined with quantitative business skills, the histori-
EBGN495 Economic Forecasting
cal and institutional background, and the interpersonal and
EBGN530 Economics of International Energy Markets
intercultural abilities to in the fast paced, global world of oil
EBGN535 Economics of Metal Industries and Markets
and gas.
EBGN536 Mineral Policies and International Investment
Degrees: After studying in English for only 16 months (8
EBGN541 International Trade
months at CSM and 8 months at IFP) the successful student
EBGN542 Economic Development
of Petroleum Economics and Management (PEM) receives
EBGN570 Environmental Economics
not 1 but 2 degrees:
EBGN610 Advanced Natural Resources
62
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011

EBGN611 Advanced Microeconomics
EBGN504 Economic Evaluation and Investment Decision
EBGN690 Advanced Econometrics
Methods
Quantitative Business Methods/Operations Research
EBGN505 Industrial Accounting
EBGN525 Operations Research Methods
EBGN504 Economic Evaluation and Investment Decision
EBGN528 Industrial Systems Simulation
Methods
EBGN545 Corporate Finance
EBGN505 Industrial Accounting
EBGN546 Investments and Portfolio Management
EBGN528 Industrial Systems Simulation
EBGN547 Financial Risk Management
EBGN545 Corporate Finance
EBGN552 Nonlinear Programming
EBGN546 Investments and Portfolio Management
EBGN555 Linear Programming
EBGN547 Financial Risk Management
EBGN556 Network Models
EBGN552 Nonlinear Programming
EBGN557 Integer Programming
EBGN555 Linear Programming
EBGN559 Supply Chain Management
EBGN556 Network Models
EBGN560 Decision Analysis
EBGN557 Integer Programming
EBGN561 Stochastic Models in Management Science
EBGN559 Supply Chain Management
EBGN575 Advanced Mining and Energy Valuation
EBGN560 Decision Analysis
EBGN580 Exploration Economics
EBGN561 Stochastic Models in Management Science
EBGN650 Advanced Mathematical Programming
EBGN575 Advanced Mining and Energy Valuation
EBGN580 Exploration Economics
Engineering and Technology Management
EBGN650 Advanced Mathematical Programming
Program Description:
EBGN690 Advanced Econometrics
The Division also offers an M.S. degree in Engineering and
Technology Management (ETM). The ETM degree program
2. Ph.D. Curriculum
is designed to integrate the technical elements of engineering
a. Common Core Courses (15 credits)
practice with the managerial perspective of modern engineer-
EBGN509 Mathematical Economics
ing and technology management. A major focus is on the busi-
EBGN510 Natural Resource Economics
ness and management principles related to this integration.
EBGN511 Microeconomics
The ETM Program provides the analytical tools and manage-
EBGN590 Econometrics and Forecasting
rial perspective needed to effectively function in a highly com-
EBGN695 Research Methodology
petitive and technologically complex business economy.
b. Extended Core Courses - Economics (9 credits)
Students in the ETM Program may select from one of two
EBGN611 Advanced Microeconomics
areas of degree specialization: Operations/Engineering Man-
EBGN600-level course*
agement or Strategy and Innovation. The Operations/Engi-
EBGN600-level course*
neering Management specialization emphasizes valuable
techniques for managing large engineering and technical
*EBGN695 not eligible
projects effectively and efficiently. In addition, special em-
phasis is given to advanced operations research, optimiza-
Students who have not taken and passed a course in macro-
tion, and decision making techniques applicable to a wide
economics at any level are also required to take EBGN512
array of business and engineering problems. The Strategy
Macroeconomics or equivalent.
and Innovation specialization teaches the correct match be-
tween organizational strategies and structures to maximize
d. Area of Specialization Courses (12 credits)
the competitive power of technology. This specialization has
Economics & Public Policy
a particular emphasis on management issues associated with
the modern business enterprise.
EBGN495 Economic Forecasting
EBGN530 Economics of International Energy Markets
Engineering and Technology Management
EBGN535 Economics of Metal Industries and Markets
Program Requirements:
EBGN536 Mineral Policies and International Investment
Students choose either the thesis or non-thesis option and
EBGN541 International Trade
complete a minimum of 30 credit hours. Initial admission is
EBGN542 Economic Development
only to the non-thesis program. Admission to the thesis op-
EBGN570 Environmental Economics
tion requires subsequent application after at least one full-
EBGN610 Advanced Natural Resources
time equivalent semester in the program. Coursework is valid
Quantitative Business Methods/Operations Research
for seven years towards the M.S. degree in ETM; any excep-
tions must be approved by the division director and student
advisor.
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
63

Non-thesis option
Required Curriculum M.S. Degree Engineering
18 credits of core courses
and Technology Management
12 credits from one or both specializations
Thesis and non-thesis students are required to complete the
Thesis option
following 18 hours of core courses:
18 credits of core courses
a. Core Courses (18 credits)
6 research credits
6 credits from one or both specializations
EBGN505 Industrial Accounting
EBGN515 Economics and Decision Making
Students must receive approval from their advisor in order
EBGN525 Operations Research Methods
to apply non-EB Division courses towards their ETM degree.
EBGN545 Corporate Finance
Thesis students are required to complete 6 credit hours of
EBGN563 Management of Technology
thesis credit and complete a Master’s level thesis under the
EBGN585 Engineering and Technology Management Cap-
direct supervision of the student’s faculty advisor.
stone (to be taken during the final semester of coursework)
Further Degree Requirements
b. Areas of Specialization (12 credits required for non-
All thesis and non-thesis ETM Program students have two
thesis option or 6 credits required for thesis option)
additional degree requirements: (1) the “Executive-in-
Residence” seminar series; and (2) the ETM Communica-
Operations/Engineering Management:
tions Seminar. All students are required to attend the ETM
EBGN528 Industrial Systems Simulation
Program “Executive-in-Residence” seminar series during at
EBGN552 Nonlinear Programming
least one semester of their attendance at CSM. The “Execu-
EBGN553 Project Management
tive-in-Residence” series features executives from industry
EBGN555 Linear Programming
who pass on insight and knowledge to graduate students
EBGN556 Network Models
preparing for positions in industry. This series facilitates ac-
EBGN557 Integer Programming
tive involvement in the ETM program by industry executives
EBGN559 Supply Chain Management
through teaching, student advising activities and more. Every
EBGN560 Decision Analysis
fall semester the “Executive-in-Residence will present 5-7
EBGN561 Stochastic Models in Management Science
one hour seminars on a variety of topics related to leadership
EBGN568 Advanced Project Analysis
and strategy in the engineering and technology sectors. In ad-
EBGN650 Advanced Mathematical Programming
dition, all students are required to attend a two-day Commu-
Strategy and Innovation:
nications Seminar in their first fall semester of study in the
EBGN564 Managing New Product Development
ETM Program. The seminar will provide students a compre-
EBGN565 Marketing for Technology-Based Companies
hensive approach to good quality communication skills, in-
EBGN566 Technology Entrepreneurship
cluding presentation proficiency, organizational skills,
EBGN567 Business Law and Technology
professional writing skills, meeting management, as well as
EBGN569 Business and Leadership Ethics
other professional communication abilities. The Communica-
EBGN571 Marketing Research
tions Seminar is designed to better prepare students for the
EBGN572 International Business Strategy
ETM learning experience, as well as their careers in industry
EBGN573 Entrepreneurial Finance
EBGN574 Inventing, Patenting, and Licensing
Transfer Credits
Students who enter the M.S. in Engineering and Technol-
Course Descriptions in the Mineral and Energy
ogy Management program may transfer up to 6 graduate
Economics Program and the Engineering and
course credits into the degree program. The student must
Technology Management Program
have achieved a grade of B or better in all graduate transfer
EBGN504 ECONOMIC EVALUATION AND
courses and the transfer credit must be approved by the stu-
INVESTMENT DECISION METHODS Time value of
dent’s advisor and the Chair of the ETM Program.
money concepts of present worth, future worth, annual
Prerequisites for ETM Program:
worth, rate of return and break-even analysis are applied to
1. Probability and Statistics (MATH323 or MATH530), and
after-tax economic analysis of mineral, petroleum and general
investments. Related topics emphasize proper handling of (1)
2. Engineering Economics (EBGN321 or EBGN504).
inflation and escalation, (2) leverage (borrowed money), (3)
Students not demonstrating satisfactory standing in these
risk adjustment of analysis using expected value concepts,
areas may be accepted; however, they will need to complete
and (4) mutually exclusive alternative analysis and service
the deficiency prior to enrolling in courses that require these
producing alternatives. Case study analysis of a mineral or
subjects as prerequisites. It is strongly suggested that students
petroleum investment situation is required. Students may not
complete any deficiencies prior to enrolling in graduate
take EBGN504 for credit if they have completed EBGN321.
degree course work.
64
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011

EBGN505 INDUSTRIAL ACCOUNTING Concepts from
aries of the modern firm. A framework for analyzing the na-
both financial and managerial accounting. Preparation and
ture and extent of competition in a firm's dynamic business
interpretation of financial statements and the use of this finan -
environment. Developing strategies for creating and sustain-
cial information in evaluation and control of the organization.
ing competitive advantage.
Managerial concepts include the use of accounting informa-
EBGN525 OPERATIONS RESEARCH METHODS The
tion in the development and implementation of a successful
core of this course is a scientific approach to planning and
global corporate strategy, and how control systems enhance
decision-making problems that arise in business. The course
the planning process.
covers deterministic optimization models (linear program-
EBGN509 MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS This course
ming, integer programming and network modeling) and a
reviews and re-enforces the mathematical and computer tools
brief introduction to stochastic (probabilistic) models with
that are necessary to earn a graduate degree in Mineral Eco-
Monte-Carlo simulation. Applications of the models are
nomics. It includes topics from differential and integral cal-
covered using spreadsheets. The intent of the course is to
culus; probability and statistics; algebra and matrix algebra;
enhance logical modeling ability and to develop quantitative
difference equations; and linear, mathematical and dynamic
managerial and spreadsheet skills. The models cover applica-
programming. It shows how these tools are applied in an eco-
tions in the areas of energy and mining, marketing, finance,
nomic and business context with applications taken from the
production, transportation, logistics and work-force scheduling.
mineral and energy industries. It requires both analytical as
Prerequisite: MATH111 or permission of instructor.
well as computer solutions. At the end of the course you will
EBGN528 INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS SIMULATION The
be able to appreciate and apply mathematics for better per-
course focuses on creating computerized models of real or
sonal, economic and business decision making. Prerequisites:
proposed complex systems for performance evaluation. Sim-
Principles of Microeconomics, MATH111; or permission of
ulation provides a cost effective way of pre-testing proposed
instructor.
systems and answering “what-if” questions before incurring
EBGN510 NATURAL RESOURCE ECONOMICS The
the expense of actual implementations. The course is in-
threat and theory of resource exhaustion; commodity analysis
structed in the state-of-the-art computer lab (CTLM), where
and the problem of mineral market instability; cartels and the
each student is equipped with a personal computer and inter-
nature of mineral pricing; the environment; government in-
acts with the instructor during the lecture. Professional version
volvement; mineral policy issues; and international mineral
of a widely used commercial software package, “Arena”, is
trade. This course is designed for entering students in mineral
used to build models, analyze and interpret the results. Other
economics. Prerequisite: Principles of Microeconomics or
business analysis and productivity tools that enhance the
permission of instructor.
analysis capabilities of the simulation software are intro-
EBGN511 MICROECONOMICS The first of two courses
duced to show how to search for optimal solutions within the
dealing with applied economic theory. This part concentrates
simulation models. Both discrete-event and continuous simu-
on the behavior of individual segments of the economy, the
lation models are covered through extensive use of appli -
theory of consumer behavior and demand, the theory of pro-
cations including call centers, various manufacturing
duction and costs, duality, welfare measures, price and out-
operations, production/inventory systems, bulk-material han-
put level determination by business firms, and the structure
dling and mining, port operations, high-way traffic systems
of product and input markets. Prerequisites: Principles of Mi-
and computer networks. Prerequisites: MATH111,
croeconomics, MATH111, EBGN509, EBGN510; or permis-
MATH5301; or permission of instructor.
sion of instructor.
EBGN530 ECONOMICS OF INTERNATIONAL ENERGY
EBGN512 MACROECONOMICS This course will provide
MARKETS Application of models to understand markets
an introduction to contemporary macroeconomic concepts
for oil, gas, coal, electricity, and renewable energy resources.
and analysis. Macroeconomics is the study of the behavior of
Models, modeling techniques, and issues included are supply
the economy as an aggregate. Topics include the equilibrium
and demand, market structure, transportation models, game
level of inflation, interest rates, unemployment and the
theory, futures markets, environmental issues, energy policy,
growth in national income. The impact of government fiscal
energy regulation, input/output models, energy conservation,
and monetary policy on these variables and the business
and dynamic optimization. The emphasis in the course is on
cycle, with particular attention to the effects on the mineral
the development of appropriate models and their application
industry. Prerequisites: Principles of Microeconomics,
to current issues in energy markets. Prerequisites: Principles
MATH111; or permission of instructor.
of Microeconomics, MATH111, EBGN509, EBGN510,
EBGN511; or permission of instructor.
EBGN515 ECONOMICS AND DECISION MAKING The
application of microeconomic theory to business strategy.
EBGN535 ECONOMICS OF METAL INDUSTRIES AND
Understanding the horizontal, vertical, and product bound-
MARKETS Metal supply from main product, byproduct,
and secondary production. Metal demand and intensity of use
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
65

analysis. Market organization and price formation. Public
EBGN546 INVESTMENT AND PORTFOLIO MANAGE-
policy, comparative advantage, and international metal trade.
MENT This course covers institutional information, valua-
Metals and economic development in the developing coun-
tion theory and empirical analysis of alternative financial
tries and former centrally planned economies. Environmental
investments, including stocks, bonds, mutual funds, ETS, and
policy and mining and mineral processing. Students prepare
(to a limited extent) derivative securities. Special attention is
and present a major research paper. Prerequisites: Principles
paid to the role of commodities (esp. metals and energy prod-
of Microeconomics, MATH111, EBGN509, EBGN510,
ucts) as an alternative investment class. After an overview of
EBGN511; or permission of instructor.
time value of money and arbitrage and their application to
EBGN536 MINERAL POLICIES & INTERNATIONAL
the valuation of stocks and bonds, there is extensive treat-
INVEST MENT Identification and evaluation of inter -
ment of optimal portfolio selection for risk averse investors,
national mineral investment policies and company responses
mean-variance efficient portfolio theory, index models, and
using economic, business and legal concepts. Assessment of
equilibrium theories of asset pricing including the capital
policy issues in light of stakeholder interests and needs.
asset pricing model (CAPM) and arbitrage pricing theory
Theoretical issues are introduced and then applied to case
(APT). Market efficiency is discussed, as are its implications
studies, policy drafting, and negotiation exercises to assure
for passive and active approaches to investment manage-
both conceptual and practical understanding of the issues.
ment. Investment management functions and policies, and
Special attention is given to the formation of national policies
portfolio performance evaluation are also considered. Pre-
and corporate decision making concerning fiscal regimes,
requisites: Principles of Microeconomics, MATH111,
project financing, environmental protection, land use and
MATH5301; or permission of instructor.
local community concerns and the content of exploration and
EBGN547 FINANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT Analysis
extraction agreements. Prerequisites: Principles of Microeco-
of the sources, causes and effects of risks associated with
nomics, MATH111, EBGN509, EBGN510, EBGN511; per-
holding, operating and managing assets by individuals and
mission of instructor.
organizations; evaluation of the need and importance of man-
EBGN541 INTERNATIONAL TRADE Theories and evi-
aging these risks; and discussion of the methods employed
dence on international trade and development. Determinants
and the instruments utilized to achieve risk shifting objec-
of static and dynamic comparative advantage. The arguments
tives. The course concentrates on the use of derivative assets
for and against free trade. Economic development in non-
in the risk management process. These derivatives include
industrialized countries. Sectoral development policies and
futures, options, swaps, swaptions, caps, collars and floors.
industrialization. The special problems and opportunities
Exposure to market and credit risks will be explored and
created by extensive mineral resource endowments. The
ways of handling them will be reviewed and critiqued
impact of value-added processing and export diversification
through analysis of case studies from the mineral and energy
on development. Prerequisites: Principles of Microeconom-
industries. Prerequisites: Principles of Microeconomics,
ics, MATH111, EBGN509, EBGN511; or permission of in-
MATH111, MATH5301, EBGN5052; EBGN545 or
structor.
EBGN546; or permission of instructor. Recommended:
EBGN509, EBGN511.
EBGN542 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Role of energy
and minerals in the development process. Sectoral policies
EBGN552 NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING As an ad-
and their links with macroeconomic policies. Special atten-
vanced course in optimization, this course will address both
tion to issues of revenue stabilization, resource largesse
unconstrained and constrained nonlinear model formulation
effects, downstream processing, and diversification.
and corresponding algorithms (e.g., Gradi ent Search and
Prerequisites: Principles of Microeconomics, MATH111,
Newton’s Method, and Lagrange Multiplier Methods and Re-
EBGN509, EBGN511, EBGN512; or permission of
duced Gradient Algorithms, respectively). Applications of
instructor.
state-of-the-art hardware and software will emphasize solv-
ing real-world problems in areas such as mining, energy,
EBGN545 CORPORATE FINANCE The fundamentals of
transportation, and the military. Prerequisite: MATH111;
corporate finance as they pertain to the valuation of invest-
EBGN525 or EBGN555; or permission of instructor.
ments, firms, and the securities they issue. Included are the
relevant theories associated with capital budgeting, financing
EBGN553 PROJECT MANAGEMENT An introductory
decisions, and dividend policy. This course provides an
course focusing on analytical techniques for managing projects
in-depth study of the theory and practice of corporate finan-
and on developing skills for effective project leadership and
cial management including a study of the firm’s objectives,
management through analysis of case studies. Topics include
investment decisions, long-term financing decisions, and
project portfolio management, decomposition of project
working capital management. Prerequisite: EBGN5052 or
work, estimating resource requirements, planning and budget -
permission of instructor.
ing, scheduling, analysis of uncertainty, resource loading and
leveling, project monitoring and control, earned value analy-
sis and strategic project leadership. Guest speakers from in-
66
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011

dustry discuss and amplify the relevance of course topics to
supply of what they produce with the demand for their prod-
their specific areas of application (construction, product de-
ucts. A considerable portion of the course is devoted to math-
velopment, engineering design, R&D, process development,
ematical models that treat uncertainty in the supply-chain.
etc.). Students learn Microsoft Project and complete a course
Topics include managing economies of scale for functional
project using this software, demonstrating proficiency ana-
products, managing market-mediation costs for innovative
lyzing project progress and communicating project informa-
products, make-to order versus make-to-stock systems, quick
tion to stakeholders. Prerequisite: EBGN5043 or permission
response strategies, risk pooling strategies, supply-chain con-
of instructor.
tracts and revenue management. Additional “special topics”
EBGN555 LINEAR PROGRAMMING This course ad-
may be introduced, such as reverse logistics issues in the
dresses the formulation of linear programming models, ex-
supply-chain or contemporary operational and financial hedg-
amines linear programs in two dimensions, covers standard
ing strategies, as time permits. Prerequisites: MATH111,
form and other basics essential to understanding the Simplex
MATH5301; or permission of instructor.
method, the Simplex method itself, duality theory, comple-
EBGN560 DECISION ANALYSIS Introduction to the sci-
mentary slackness conditions, and sensitivity analysis. As
ence of decision making and risk theory. Application of deci-
time permits, multi-objective programming and stochastic
sion analysis and utility theory to the analysis of strategic
programming are introduced. Applications of linear program-
decision problems. Focuses on the application of quantitative
ming models discussed in this course include, but are not
methods to business problems characterized by risk and un-
limited to, the areas of manufacturing, finance, energy, min-
certainty. Choice problems such as decisions concerning
ing, transportation and logistics, and the military. Prerequi-
major capital investments, corporate acquisitions, new prod-
site: MATH111; MATH332 or EBGN509; or permission of
uct introductions, and choices among alternative technolo-
instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.
gies are conceptualized and structured using the concepts
EBGN556 NETWORK MODELS Network models are lin-
introduced in this course. Prerequisite: EBGN5043 or permis-
ear programming problems that possess special mathematical
sion of instructor.
structures. This course examines a variety of network mod-
EBGN561 STOCHASTIC MODELS IN MANAGEMENT
els, specifically, spanning tree problems, shortest path prob-
SCIENCE The course introduces tools of “probabilistic
lems, maximum flow problems, minimum cost flow
analysis” that are frequently used in the formal studies of
problems, and transportation and assignment problems. For
management. We see methodologies that help to quantify the
each class of problem, we present applications in areas such
dynamic relationships of sequences of “random” events that
as manufacturing, finance, energy, mining, transportation and
evolve over time. Topics include static and dynamic Monte-
logistics, and the military. We also discuss an algorithm or
Carlo simulation, discrete and continuous time Markov
two applicable to each problem class. As time permits, we
Chains, probabilistic dynamic programming, Markov deci-
explore combinatorial problems that can be depicted on
sion processes, queuing processes and networks, Brownian
graphs, e.g., the traveling salesman problem and the Chinese
motion and stochastic control. Applications from a wide
postman problem, and discuss the tractability issues associ-
range of fields will be introduced including marketing, fi-
ated with these problems in contrast to “pure” network mod-
nance, production, logistics and distribution, energy and
els. Prerequisites: MATH111; EBGN525 or EBGN555; or
service systems. In addition to an intuitive understanding
permission of the instructor.
of analytical techniques to model stochastic processes, the
EBGN557 INTEGER PROGRAMMING This course ad-
course emphasizes how to use related software packages for
dresses the formulation of linear integer programming mod-
managerial decision-making. Prerequisites: MATH111,
els, examines the standard brand-and-bound algorithm for
MATH5301; or permission of instructor.
solving such models, and covers advanced topics related to
EBGN563 MANAGEMENT OF TECHNOLOGY Case
increasing the tractability of such models. These advanced
studies and reading assignments explore strategies for profit-
topics include the application of cutting planes and strong
ing from technology assets and technological innovation. The
formulations, as well as decomposition and reformulation
roles of strategy, core competencies, product and process
techniques, e.g., Lagrangian relaxation, Benders decomposi-
devel opment, manufacturing, R&D, marketing, strategic
tion, column generation. Prerequisites: MATH111;
partnerships, alliances, intellectual property, organizational
EBGN525 or EBGN555; or permission of instructor.
architectures, leadership and politics are explored in the
EBGN559 SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT The focus of
context of technological innovation. The critical role of orga-
the course is to show how a firm can achieve better “supply-
nizational knowledge and learning in a firm’s ability to lever-
demand matching” through the implementation of rigorous
age technological innovation to gain competitive advantage
mathematical models and various operational/tactical strate-
is explored. The relationships between an innovation, the
gies. We look at organizations as entities that must match the
competencies of the innovating firm, the ease of duplication
of the innovation by outsiders, the nature of complementary
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
67

assets needed to successfully commercialize an innovation
tion of concepts in after-tax environments and look at other
and the appropriate strategy for commercializing the inno -
criteria and their impact in the decision-making and valuation
vation are developed. Students explore the role of network
process. Applications to engineering and technology aspects
effects in commercialization strategies, particularly with re-
will be discussed. Effective presentation of results will be an
spect to standards wars aimed at establishing new dominant
important component of the course. Prerequisite: EBGN5043
designs. Prerequisite: EBGN5043 recommended.
or permission of instructor.
EBGN564 MANAGING NEW PRODUCT DEVELOP-
EBGN569 BUSINESS ETHICS This business and leadership
MENT Develops interdisciplinary skills required for suc-
ethics course is designed to immerse you in organizational
cessful product development in today’s competitive
ethical decision-making processes, issues, organizational
marketplace. Small product development teams step through
control mechanisms, and benefits of developing comprehen-
the new product development process in detail, learning
sive and due diligence ethics programs. As a business practi-
about available tools and techniques to execute each process
tioner, most activities both inside and outside the
step along the way. Each student brings his or her individual
organization have ethical dimensions. Particularly, many
disciplinary perspective to the team effort, and must learn to
business functions represent boundary spanning roles be-
synthesize that perspective with those of the other students in
tween the organization and outside constituents and as such
the group to develop a sound, marketable product. Prerequi-
present challenges in the areas of: honesty and fairness, de-
site: EBGN563 recommended.
ceptive advertising, price fixing and anti-trust, product mis-
EBGN565 MARKETING FOR TECHNOLOGY-BASED
representation and liability, billing issues. This course
COMPANIES This class explores concepts and practices
explores organizational successes and failures to better un-
related to marketing in this unique, fast-paced environment,
derstand how to manage this area. Prerequisite: Permission
including the defining characteristics of high-technology in-
of instructor.
dustries; different types and patterns of innovations and their
EBGN570 ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS The role of
marketing implications; the need for (and difficulties in)
markets and other economic considerations in controlling
adopting a customer-orientation; tools used to gather market-
pollution; the effect of environmental policy on resource
ing research/intelligence in technology-driven industries; use
allo ca tion incentives; the use of benefit/cost analysis in envi-
of strategic alliances and partnerships in marketing technol-
ronmental policy decisions and the associated problems with
ogy; adaptations to the “4 P’s”; regulatory and ethical consid-
measuring benefits and costs. Prerequisites: Principles of
erations in technological arenas. Prerequisite: Permission of
Microeconomics, MATH111, EBGN509, EBGN510; or per-
instructor.
mission of instructor.
EBGN566 TECHNOLOGY ENTREPRENEURSHIP Intro-
EBGN571 MARKETING RESEARCH The purpose of this
duces concepts related to starting and expanding a techno -
course is to gain a deep understanding of the marketing re-
logical-based corporation. Presents ideas such as developing
search decisions facing product managers in technology based
a business and financing plan, role of intellectual property,
companies. While the specific responsibilities of a product
and the importance of a good R&D program. Prerequisite:
manager vary across industries and firms, three main activities
Permission of instructor.
common to the position are: (1) analysis of market informa-
EBGN567 BUSINESS LAW AND TECHNOLOGY Com-
tion, (2) marketing strategy development, and (3) implement-
puter software and hardware are the most complex and
ing strategy through marketing mix decisions. In this course
rapidly developing intellectual creations of modern man.
students will develop an understanding of available market-
Computers provide unprecedented power in accessing and
ing research methods and the ability to use marketing research
manipulating data. Computers work in complex systems that
information to make strategic and tactical decisions. Prerequi-
require standardization and compatibility to function. Each of
site: MATH5301.
these special features has engendered one or more bodies of
EBGN572 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS STRATEGY
law. Complex intellectual creation demands comprehensive
The purpose of this course is to gain understanding of the
intellectually property protection. Computer technology,
complexities presented by managing businesses in an inter-
however, differs fundamentally from previous objects of
national environment. International business has grown
intel lectual property protection, and thus does not fit easily
rapidly in recent decades due to technological expansion,
into traditional copyright and patent law. This course covers
liber alization of government policies on trade and resource
topics that relate to these complex special features of com-
movements, development of institutions needed to support
puter and technology. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
and facilitate international transactions, and increased global
EBGN568 ADVANCED PROJECT ANALYSIS An ad-
competition. Due to these factors, foreign countries increas-
vanced course in economic analysis that will look at more
ingly are a source of both production and sales for domestic
complex issues associated with valuing investments and
companies. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
projects. Discussion will focus on development and applica-
68
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011

EBGN573 ENTREPRENEURIAL FINANCE Entrepreneur-
of strategies; (2) how industry conditions change and the
ial activity has been a potent source of innovation and job
impli cation of those changes for strategic management; and
generation in the global economy. In the U.S., the majority of
(3) how organizations develop and maintain capabilities that
new jobs are generated by new entrepreneurial firms. The fi-
lead to sustained competitive advantage. This course consists
nancial issues confronting entrepreneurial firms are drasti-
of learning fundamental concepts associated with strategic
cally different from those of established companies. The
management process and competing in a web-based strategic
focus in this course will be on analyzing the unique financial
management simulation to support the knowledge that you
issues which face entrepreneurial firms and to develop a set
have developed. Prerequisites: MATH5301, EBGN5043; or
of skills that has wide applications for such situations. Pre-
permission of instructor.
requisites: EBGN505, EBGN545; or permission of instructor.
EBGN590 ECONOMETRICS AND FORECASTING
EBGN574 INVENTING, PATENTING, AND LISCENSING
Using statistical techniques to fit economic models to data.
The various forms of intellectual property, including patents,
Topics include ordinary least squares and single equation
trademarks, copyrights, trade secrets and unfair competition
regres sion models; two stage least squares and multiple equa-
are discussed; the terminology of inventing, patenting and li-
tion econometric models; specification error, serial correla-
censing is reviewed, and an overview of the complete
tion, hetero skedasticity; distributive lag; applications to
process is given; the statutes most frequently encountered in
mineral commodity markets; hypothesis testing; forecasting
dealing with patents (35 USC §101, §102, §103 and §112)
with econometric models, time series analysis, and simula-
are introduced and explained; the basics of searching the
tion. Prerequisites: MATH111, MATH5301, EBGN509; or
prior art are presented; participants 'walk through' case histo-
permission of instructor.
ries illustrating inventing, patenting, licensing, as well as
EBGN598 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS AND
patent infringement and litigation; the importance of proper
BUSINESS Pilot course or special topics course. Topics
documentation at all stages of the process is explained; the
chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s).
"do's" and "don't" of disclosing inventions are presented; var-
Usually the course is offered only once. Repeatable for
ious types of agreements are discussed including license
credit under different titles.
agreements; methods for evaluating the market potential of
new products are presented; the resources available for in-
EBGN599 INDEPENDENT STUDY Individual research or
ventors are reviewed; inventing and patenting in the corpo-
special problem projects supervised by a faculty member
rate environment are discussed; the economic impacts of
when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, con-
patents are addressed. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
tent, and credit hours. Contact the Economics and Business
Offered in Field session and Summer session only.
Division office for credit limits toward the degree.
EBGN575 ADVANCED MINING AND ENERGY VALUA-
EBGN610 ADVANCED NATURAL RESOURCE ECO-
TION The use of stochastic and option pricing techniques in
NOMICS Optimal resource use in a dynamic context using
mineral and energy asset valuation. The Hotelling Valuation
mathematical programming, optimal control theory and game
Principle. The measurement of political risk and its impact
theory. Constrained optimization techniques are used to eval-
on project value. Extensive use of real cases. Prerequisites:
uate the impact of capital constraints, exploration activity
Principles of Microeconomics, MATH111, EBGN5043,
and environmental regulations. Offered when student de-
EBGN5052, EBGN509, EBGN510, EBGN511; or permis-
mand is sufficient. Prerequisites: Principles of Microeconom-
sion of instructor.
ics, MATH111, MATH5301, EBGN509, EBGN510,
EBGN511; or permission of instructor.
EBGN580 EXPLORATION ECONOMICS Exploration
planning and decision making for oil and gas, and metallic
EBGN611 ADVANCED MICROECONOMICS A second
minerals. Risk analysis. Historical trends in exploration ac-
graduate course in microeconomics, emphasizing state-of-
tivity and productivity. Prerequisites: Principles of Micro-
the-art theoretical and mathematical developments. Topics
economics, EBGN510; or permission of instructor. Offered
include consumer theory, production theory and the use of
when student demand is sufficient.
game theoretic and dynamic optimization tools. Prerequi-
sites: Principles of Microeconomics, MATH111, MATH5301,
EBGN585 ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY
EBGN509, EBGN511; or permission of instructor.
MANAGEMENT CAPSTONE This course represents the
culmination of the ETM Program. This course is about the
EBGN650. ADVANCED MATHEMATICAL PROGRAM-
strategic management process – how strategies are developed
MING (II) (WI) As an advanced course in optimization, this
and imple mented in organizations. It examines senior man-
course will summarize and bring together concepts from pre-
agement’s role in formulating strategy and the role that all an
vious optimization courses in linear, integer, nonlinear pro-
organi zation’s managers play in implementing a well thought
gramming, and network models. Specific topics to be
out strategy. Among the topics discussed in this course are
covered include Numerical Stability in Linear Programs, In-
(1) how different industry conditions support different types
terior Point Method, Strong Integer Programming Formula-
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
69

tions, Benders Decomposition, Column Generation, and Sto-
EBGN698 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS AND
chastic Programming. Applications of state-of-the-art hard-
BUSINESS Pilot course or special topics course. Topics
ware and software will emphasize solving real-world
chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s).
problems in areas such as mining, energy, transportation and
Usually the course is offered only once. Repeatable for
the military. Prerequisites: EBGN555, EBGN557; or permis-
credit under different titles.
sion of instructor.
EBGN699 INDEPENDENT STUDY Individual research
EBGN690 ADVANCED ECONOMETRICS A second
or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member
course in econometrics. Compared to EBGN590, this course
when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, con-
provides a more theoretical and mathematical understanding
tent, and credit hours. Contact the Economics and Business
of econometrics. Matrix algebra is used and model construc-
Division office for credit limits toward the degree.
tion and hypothesis testing are emphasized rather than fore-
EBGN705. GRADUATE RESEARCH: MASTER OF
casting. Prerequisites: Principles of Microeconomics,
SCIENCE Research credit hours required for completion of
MATH111, MATH5301, EBGN509, EBGN590; or permis-
the Master of Science with Thesis degree. Research must be
sion of instructor. Recommended: EBGN511.
carried out under the direct supervision of the student’s fac-
EBGN695 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY Lectures
ulty advisor. Variable class and semester hours. Repeatable
provide an overview of methods used in economic research
for credit.
relating to EPP and QBA/OR dissertations in Mineral Eco-
EBGN706. GRADUATE RESEARCH: DOCTOR OF PHI-
nomics and information on how to carry out research and
LOSOPHY Research credit hours required for completion of
present research results. Students will be required to write
the Doctor of Philosophy degree. Research must be carried
and present a research paper that will be submitted for pub -
out under the direct supervision of the student’s faculty advi-
lication. It is expected that this paper will lead to a Ph.D.
sor. Variable class and semester hours. Repeatable for credit.
disser tation proposal. It is a good idea for students to start
thinking about potential dissertation topic areas as they study
for their qualifier. This course is also recommended for stu-
dents writing Master’s thesis or who want guidance in doing
Notes
1
independent research relating to the economics and business
MATH323 may be substituted for MATH530.
2
aspects of energy, minerals and related environmental and
EBGN305 and EBGN306 together may be substituted for
technological topics. Prerequisites: MATH5301, EBGN509,
EBGN505 with permission.
3
EBGN510, EBGN511, EBGN590 or permission of instruc-
EBGN321 may be substituted for EBGN504.
tor.
70
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011

Engineering
Program Overview:
TERENCE E. PARKER, Professor and Division Director
The Engineering Division offers engineering graduate de-
WILLIAM A. HOFF, Associate Professor and Assistant Division
grees with an option to specialize in one of the three disci-
Director
plines-Civil, Electrical or Mechanical Engineering. Students
MARTE S. GUTIERREZ, James R. Paden Chair Distinguished
may also choose a more interdisciplinary degree with a spe-
Professor
cialty title "Engineering Systems." The program demands ac-
KEVIN L. MOORE, Gerard August Dobelman Distinguished Pro-
ademic rigor and depth yet also addresses real-world
fessor
engineering problems. The Division of Engineering has eight
ROBERT J. KEE, George R. Brown Distinguished Professor
D. VAUGHAN GRIFFITHS, Professor
areas of research activity that stem from the core fields of
ROBERT H. KING, Professor
Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering; these areas
NING LU, Professor
are: (1) Geotechnical Engineering and (2) Structural Engi-
NIGEL T. MIDDLETON, Senior Vice President for Strategic
neering which are strongly aligned with the Civil Engineer-
Enterprises, Professor
ing Specialty. (3) Energy Systems and Power Electronics,
MICHAEL MOONEY, Professor
and (4) Sensing, Communications and Control, which are
GRAHAM G. W. MUSTOE, Professor
strongly aligned with the Electrical Engineering Discipline.
PANKAJ K. (PK) SEN, Professor
(5) Bioengineering, (6) Energy Conversion Systems and
JOEL M. BACH, Associate Professor
Thermal Sciences, and (7) Material Mechanics which are
JOHN R. BERGER, Associate Professor
aligned with the Mechanical Engineering specialty. Finally,
CRISTIAN V. CIOBANU, Associate Professor
PANOS D. KIOUSIS, Associate Professor
(8) Robotics includes elements from both the Electrical and
DAVID MUNOZ, Associate Professor
Mechanical disciplines. Note that in many cases, individual
PAUL PAPAS, Associate Professor
research projects encompass more than one research area.
MARCELO GODOY SIMOES, Associate Professor
Geotechnical Engineering has current activity in compu-
CATHERINE K. SKOKAN, Associate Professor
tational and analytical geomechanics, probabilistic geotech-
JOHN P. H. STEELE, Associate Professor
nics, experimental and theoretical investigations into coupled
TYRONE VINCENT, Associate Professor
RAY RUICHONG ZHANG, Associate Professor
flows and unsaturated soil behavior, and intelligent geo-sys-
GREGORY BOGIN, Assistant Professor
tems including geo-construction sensing and automation. The
ROBERT J. BRAUN, Assistant Professor
geotechnical faculty and students work primarily within the
KATHRYN JOHNSON, Clare Boothe Luce Assistant Professor
Civil Specialty of the Engineering graduate programs, how-
SALMAN MOHAGHEGHI, Assistant Professor
ever strong interdisciplinary ties are maintained with other
ANTHONY J. PETRELLA, Assistant Professor
groups in Engineering and with other Departments at CSM.
JASON PORTER, Assistant Professor
Structural Engineering focuses on frontier, multidiscipli-
ANNE SILVERMAN, Assistant Professor
NEAL SULLIVAN, Assistant Professor
nary research in the following areas: high strength and self
CAMERON TURNER, Assistant Professor
consolidating concrete, experimental and computational
MICHAEL WAKIN, Assistant Professor
structural dynamics, vibration control, damage diagnosis, and
JUDITH WANG, Assistant Professor
advanced data processing and analysis for sensory systems,
RAVEL F. AMMERMAN, Senior Lecturer
disaster assessment and mitigation, and structural nonde-
JOSEPH P. CROCKER, Senior Lecturer
structive evaluation.
RICHARD PASSAMANECK, Senior Lecturer
CARA COAD, Lecturer
Energy Systems and Power Electronics is focused on both
JEFFREY SCHOWALTER, Lecturer
fundamental and applied research in the interrelated fields of
CANDACE S. SULZBACH, Lecturer
conventional electric power systems and electric machinery,
ALEXANDRA WAYLLACE, Lecturer
renewable energy and distributed generation, energy eco-
HAROLD W. OLSEN, Research Professor
nomics and policy issues, power quality, power electronics
JINSONG HUANG, Research Associate Professor
and drives. The overall scope of research encompasses a
HUAYANG ZHU, Research Associate Professor
broad spectrum of electrical energy applications including in-
CHRISTOPHER B. DRYER, Research Assistant Professor
vestor-owned utilities, rural electric associations, manufac-
JOAN P. GOSINK, Emerita Professor
turing facilities, regulatory agencies, and consulting
MICHAEL B. McGRATH, Emeritus Professor
engineering firms.
KARL R. NELSON, Emeritus Associate Professor
GABRIEL M. NEUNZERT, Emeritus Associate Professor
Sensing, Communications and Control is an interdiscipli-
Note: Faculty for the environmental engineering specialty are listed in
nary research area that encompasses the fields of control sys-
the Environmental Science and Engineering section of this Bulletin.
tems, wireless communications, signal and image processing,
robotics, and mechatronics. Focus areas include intelligent
Degrees Offered:
and learning control systems, fault detection and system
Master of Science (Engineering)
identification, compressive sensing, wireless communication
Doctor of Philosophy (Engineering)
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011
71

circuits, computer vision and pattern recognition, sensor de-
The Division of Engineering also offers five year com-
velopment, mobile manipulation and autonomous systems.
bined BS/MS degree programs These programs offer an ex-
Applications can be found in renewable energy and power
pedited graduate school application process and allow
systems, materials processing, sensor and control networks,
students to begin graduate coursework while still finishing
bio-engineering, intelligent structures, and geosystems.
their undergraduate degree requirements. This program is
BioEngineering focuses on the application of engineering
described in the undergraduate catalog and is in place for En-
principles to the musculoskeletal system and other connec-
gineering students. In addition, the five year program is of-
tive tissues. Research activities include experimental, com-
fered in collaboration with the Departments of Physics and
putational, and theoretical approaches with applications in
Chemistry and allows students to obtain specific engineering
the areas of computer assisted surgery and medical robotics,
skills that complement their physics or chemistry back-
medical imaging, patient specific biomechanical modeling,
ground. The Physics five-year program offers tracks in Elec-
intelligent prosthetics and implants, bioinstrumentation, and
trical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. Details on
supermolecular biomaterials. The Bioengineering group has
these five-year programs can be found in the CSM Under-
strong research ties with other campus departments, the local
graduate Bulletin. Course schedules for these five-year pro-
medical community, and industry partners.
grams can be obtained in the Engineering, Physics and
Chemistry Departmental Offices.
Energy Conversion Systems and Thermal Sciences is a
research area with a wide array of multidisciplinary applica-
The Ph.D. Engineering degree requires 72 credit hours of
tions including clean energy systems, materials processing,
course work and research credits. Graduate level courses
combustion, and biofuels and renewable energy. Graduate
taken at other universities for which a grade equivalent to a
students in this area typically specialize in Mechanical Engi-
"B" or better was received will be considered for transfer
neering but also have the opportunity to specialize in inter-
credit via a petition to the Division Director (note that these
disciplinary programs such as Materials Science.
courses must not have been used to satisfy the requirements
for an undergraduate degree).
Material Mechanics investigations consider solid-state
material behavior as it relates to microstructural evolution
Students must have an advisor from the Engineering Divi-
and control, nano-mechanics, functionally graded materials,
sion Graduate Faculty to direct and monitor their academic
biomaterial analysis and characterization, artificial bio -
plan, research and independent studies. Master of Science
material design, and fracture mechanics. Research in this
(thesis option) students must have at least three members on
area tends to have a strong computational physics component
their graduate committee, two of whom must be permanent
covering a broad range of length and time scales that embrace
faculty in the Engineering Division. Ph.D. graduate commit-
ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo and
tees must have at least five members; at least three members
continuum modeling. These tools are used to study metallic
must be permanent faculty in the Engineering Division, and
and ceramic systems as well as natural biomaterials. Strong
at least one member must be from the department in which
ties exist between this group and activities within the campus
the student is pursuing a minor program. The minor program
communities of physics, materials science, mathematics and
of study provides breadth in the degree through formal
chemical engineering.
coursework.
Robotics is an emerging area at CSM that merges research
Ph.D. Qualifying Exam. Students wishing to enroll in the
in mechanical design, control systems, sensing, and mecha-
Engineering PhD program will be required to pass a Qualify-
tronics to develop automated and autonomous systems that
ing Exam. Normally, full-time PhD candidates will take the
can be used to carry out tasks that are dirty, dangerous, dull,
Qualifying Exam in their first year, but it must be taken
or difficult.
within three semesters of entering the program. Part-time
candidates will normally be expected to take the Qualifying
Exam within no more than six semesters of entering the pro-
Program Details
gram.
The M.S. Engineering degree (Thesis or Non-Thesis Op-
tion) requires 30 credit hours. Requirements for the thesis
The purpose of the Qualifying Exam is to assess some of
M.S. are 24 hours of coursework and 6 hours of thesis re-
the attributes expected of a successful PhD student. Each
search. The non-thesis option requires 30 hours of course-
specialty area (Civil, Electrical, Mechanical and Engineering
work. For the M.S. degree, a maximum of 9 credits can be
Systems) will administer their own PhD Qualifying Exams;
transferred in from another institution (note that these
however, the agreed objectives are to assess the students in
courses must not have been used to satisfy the requirements
the following three categories.
for an undergraduate degree). Graduate level courses taken at
l
To determine the student's ability to review, synthe-
other universities for which a grade equivalent to a "B" or
size and apply fundamental concepts.
better was received will be considered for transfer credit via
a petition to the Division Director.
72
Colorado School of Mines Graduate Bul etin 2010–2011