Colorado School of Mines
Financial Statements and Independent Accountants’ Reports
Financial Audit
Years Ended June 30, 2011 and 2010

Colorado School of Mines
Years Ended June 30, 2011 and 2010


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Independent Accountants’ Report on Financial
Statements and Supplementary Information ............................................................. 1

Management’s Discussion and Analysis ....................................................................... 3

Financial Statements
Statements of Net Assets ............................................................................................................ 17
Statements of Revenues, Expenses and Changes in Net Assets ................................................. 18
Statements of Cash Flows .......................................................................................................... 19
Notes to Financial Statements .................................................................................................... 21



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Independent Accountants’ Report on Financial Statements
and Supplementary Information



Members of the Legislative Audit Committee:


We have audited the accompanying financial statements of the business-type activities and the
discretely presented component unit of the Colorado School of Mines (the School), a component unit
of the State of Colorado, as of and for the years ended June 30, 2011 and 2010, which collectively
comprise the School’s basic financial statements as listed in the table of contents. These financial
statements are the responsibility of the School’s management. Our responsibility is to express
opinions on these financial statements based on our audits. We did not audit the financial statements
of the Colorado School of Mines Foundation, Incorporated, the discretely presented component unit
of the School. Those statements were audited by other accountants whose report thereon has been
furnished to us, and our opinions, insofar as they relate to the amounts included for the Colorado
School of Mines Foundation, Incorporated, are based solely on the report of the other accountants.

We conducted our audits in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United
States of America. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable
assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes
examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial
statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates
made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe
that our audits and the report of the other accountants provide a reasonable basis for our opinions.

In our opinion, based on our audits and the report of the other accountants, the financial statements
referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the respective financial position of the
business-type activities and the discretely presented component unit of the Colorado School of Mines
as of June 30, 2011 and 2010, and the respective changes in financial position and cash flows, where
applicable, for the years then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in
the United States of America.

The accompanying management’s discussion and analysis as listed in the table of contents is not a
required part of the basic financial statements but is supplementary information required by the
Governmental Accounting Standards Board. We and the other accountants have applied certain
limited procedures, which consisted principally of inquiries of management regarding the methods of
measurement and presentation of the required supplementary information. However, we did not audit
the information and express no opinion on it.



November 23, 2011



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2

Colorado School of Mines
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
(Unaudited)
Year Ended June 30, 2011



We are pleased to present this financial discussion and analysis of the Colorado School of Mines
(the School). It is intended to make the School’s financial statements easier to understand and
communicate our financial situation in an open and accountable manner. It provides an objective
analysis of the School’s position and results of operations as of and for the years ended June 30,
2011 and 2010 (Fiscal Years 2011 and 2010, respectively) with comparative information for Fiscal
Year 2009. School management is responsible for the completeness and fairness of this discussion
and analysis and the financial statements, as well as the underlying system of internal controls.
Understanding the Financial Statements
Financial highlights are presented in this discussion and analysis to help your assessment of the
School’s financial activities. Since the presentation includes highly summarized data, it should be
read in conjunction with the financial statements, which have the following five additional parts:
Independent Accountants’ Report presents an unqualified opinion prepared by our
auditors, an independent certified public accounting firm, on the fairness, in all material
respects, of our financial statements.
Statements of Net Assets present the assets, deferred outflows, liabilities, deferred
inflows, and net assets of the School at a point in time (June 30, 2011 and 2010). Their
purpose is to present a financial snapshot of the School. They aid readers in determining
the assets available to continue the School’s operations; how much the School owes to
employees, vendors and investors; and a picture of net assets and their availability for
expenditure by the School.
Statements of Revenues, Expenses and Changes in Net Assets present the total revenues
earned and expenses incurred by the School for operating, nonoperating and other related
activities during a period of time (the years ended June 30, 2011 and 2010). Their purpose
is to assess the School’s operating and nonoperating activities.
Statements of Cash Flows present the cash receipts and disbursements of the School
during a period of time (the years ended June 30, 2011 and 2010). Their purpose is to
assess the School’s ability to generate net cash flows and meet its obligations as they come
due.
Notes to the Financial Statements present additional information to support the financial
statements and are commonly referred to as “Notes”. Their purpose is to clarify and
expand on the information in the financial statements. Notes are referenced in this
discussion and analysis to indicate where details of the financial highlights may be found.
3

Colorado School of Mines
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
(Unaudited)
Year Ended June 30, 2011



We suggest that you combine this financial discussion and analysis with relevant nonfinancial
indicators to assess the overall health of the School. Examples of nonfinancial indicators include
trend and quality of student applicants, incoming class size and quality, student retention, building
condition and campus safety. Information about nonfinancial indicators is not included in this
discussion and analysis but may be obtained from the School’s Integrated Marketing
Communications Office. It should be noted that the School’s financial statements include the
presentation of a discretely presented component unit, the Colorado School of Mines Foundation,
Incorporated (the Foundation), which is a required presentation by accounting standards.
Financial Highlights
Sustained increases in net assets over time are one indicator of financial health. For the past three
years, the School has had increases in its total net assets. For Fiscal Years 2011, 2010, and 2009
the School’s net assets increased by approximately $35,547,000, $19,334,000, and $9,275,000,
respectively. The net increases are primarily due to the School’s increased operating revenues,
including tuition and fees and sponsored project activity, and management’s continued cost
containment measures. In addition, the School continues to experience consistent gift revenues,
primarily from the Colorado School of Mines Foundation, and positive realized and unrealized
investment income.
The School experienced operating income in Fiscal Year 2011 of $5,400,000 compared to operating
losses in Fiscal Years 2010 and 2009 of $17,352,000 and $11,960,000, respectively. The increase
in operating income from Fiscal Year 2010 to Fiscal Year 2011 is primarily attributed to increased
tuition and fee revenues and an increase in state funding from the College Opportunity Fund (COF)
in the form of fee-for-service contracts. The increase in fee-for-service contracts is offset by a
decrease in State Fiscal Stabilization Fund revenues received from the State as part of the American
Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. The increase in operating losses from Fiscal Year 2009
to Fiscal Year 2010 was primarily attributed to a decrease in state funding from the COF with an
equal increase in funding from the State Fiscal Stabilization Fund. The funding from the State
Fiscal Stabilization Fund is reported as nonoperating revenues and ended in the first quarter of
Fiscal Year 2011. The following sections provide further explanations of these drivers of the
School’s financial health.
Statements of Net Assets
Table 1 - Condensed Statements of Net Assets demonstrates that the School has grown over the
past three years. Analysis of the School’s deferred outflows, deferred inflows, capital assets and
related debt is included in the section titled Capital Assets and Debt Management, while this section
provides analysis of the School’s noncapital assets and other liabilities.
4

Colorado School of Mines
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
(Unaudited)
Year Ended June 30, 2011




Table 1 - Condensed Statements of Net Assets as of June 30, 2011, 2010 and 2009 (all dollars in thousands)




Increase (Decrease)




2011 vs 2010
2010 vs 2009

2011 2010
2009
Amount
Percent
Amount
Percent
Assets







Cash and Restricted Cash
$135,304
144,461
85,326
$ (9,157)
(6.3%)
$ 59,135
69.3%
Other Noncapital Assets
43,655
37,977 31,638
5,678 15.0%
6,339 20.0%
Net Capital Assets
232,546
184,871
175,437
47,675
25.8%
9,434
5.4%
Total Assets
$ 411,505
367,309
292,401
$ 44,196
12.0%
$ 74,908
25.6%
Deferred Outflows
$ -
7,778
7,462
$ (7,778)
(100.0%)
$ 316
4.2%
Liabilities







Nondebt Liabilities
$ 55,437
52,293
42,958
$ 3,144
6.0%
$ 9,335
21.7%
Debt Liabilities
157,482
161,761
115,206 (4,279) (2.6%) 46,555 40.4%
Total Liabilities
$ 212,919
214,054
158,164
$ (1,135)
(0.5%)
$ 55,890
35.3%
Deferred Inflows
$ 2,006
-
-
$ 2,006
100%
-
-
Net Assets







Invested in Capital Assets Net
of Related Debt
$ 117,322
102,274
102,095
$ 15,048
14.7%
$ 179
0.2%
Restricted:
Nonexpendable Purposes
2,493
2,025
1,386
468
23.1%
639
46.1%
Expendable Purposes
17,497
10,490
8,659 7,007 66.8% 1,831
21.1%
Unrestricted
59,268
46,244
29,559
13,024
28.2%
16,685
56.4%
Total Net Assets
$ 196,580
161,033
141,699
$ 35,547
22.1%
$ 19,334
13.6%

In analyzing the School’s noncapital assets and liabilities, cash and restricted cash comprises
approximately 75.6 percent and 79.2 percent of the School’s total noncapital assets as of June 30,
2011 and 2010, respectively. The restricted cash primarily represents unspent revenue bond
proceeds that will be used for capital related activity. The Statements of Cash Flows provide
additional information on where cash is received and how it is used by the School. The School’s
nondebt related liabilities totaling $55,437,000 and $52,293,000 as of June 30, 2011 and 2010,
respectively, comprise 26.0 percent and 24.4 percent, respectively, of the total liabilities. The
largest three categories of nondebt related liabilities are payables to vendors, accrued salaries and
benefits, and deferred grants and contracts revenue. Accrued salaries and benefits represent
amounts earned by School employees, primarily for June payroll, but not paid as of fiscal year-end.
Deferred grants and contracts revenue represents amounts paid by grantors and contractors for
which the School has not met all of the requirements for revenue recognition. These amounts will
be recognized as revenue in future periods after all requirements have been satisfied. See Notes 5
and 6 for additional information.
5

Colorado School of Mines
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
(Unaudited)
Year Ended June 30, 2011



The School’s net assets may have restrictions imposed by external parties, such as donors, or by
their nature are invested in capital assets (property, plant and equipment). To help understand these
restrictions, the School’s net assets are shown in three categories.
• The largest category of the net assets relates to the School’s investment in capital assets,
net of the related debt issued to fund the purchase or construction of those assets. This
category comprises 59.7 percent and 63.5 percent of net assets for Fiscal Years 2011 and
2010, respectively. These net capital assets represent investments in campus facilities and
equipment, net of related accumulated depreciation, necessary to carry out the teaching and
research mission of the School.
• Restricted nonexpendable net assets represent gift funds received from donors whereby the
donor has specified the original principal be set aside for perpetual investment
(endowment). The majority of the endowment assets benefiting the School are held and
managed by the Colorado School of Mines Foundation, Incorporated (the Foundation),
which is a discretely presented component unit (Note 1). The Foundation’s net assets are
not included in the above table.
• Restricted expendable net assets represent funds received for specific purposes, but allow
the School to fully expend those funds in accordance with the purposes identified by the
entity providing the funds. These net assets also include investment earnings on
endowments. Over the past three fiscal years, the School’s nonexpendable and expendable
net assets have increased 99 percent. The increase in restricted for expendable purposes in
Fiscal Year 2011 is primarily related to sponsored project activity while the increase in
Fiscal Year 2010 was primarily the result of one large estate gift received for $1,387,000.
The unrestricted net assets represent the amount available for spending for any lawful purpose and
under the full discretion of management. In some instances, management or the board has placed
internal designations on the use of these funds.
Statements of Revenues, Expenses and Changes in Net Assets
Table 2 - Condensed Statements of Revenues, Expenses and Changes in Net Assets present the
financial activity of the School during the fiscal year. A key component of these statements is the
differentiation between operating and nonoperating activities. Operating revenues are earned by
providing goods and services to the various students and constituencies of the School. Operating
expenses are incurred to acquire or produce goods and services necessary to carry out the mission
of the School for which the School earns operating revenues. Nonoperating revenues are received
when goods and services are not provided.
6

Colorado School of Mines
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
(Unaudited)
Year Ended June 30, 2011




Table 2 - Condensed Statements of Revenues, Expenses and Changes in Net Assets for Years Ended June 30, 2011, 2010 and 2009
(all dollars in thousands)




Increase (Decrease)




2011 vs 2010
2010 vs 2009

2011 2010
2009
Amount
Percent
Amount
Percent
Operating Revenues
$ 168,916
139,227
133,909
$ 29,689
21.3%
$ 5,318
4.0%
Operating Expenses
163,516
156,579
145,869
6,937
4.4%
10,710
7.3%
Operating Income ( Loss)
5,400 (17,352) (11,960)
22,752
131.1% (5,392)
(45.1%)
Net Nonoperating Revenues
15,117
26,290
12,620
(11,173)
42.5%
13,670
108.3%
Income before Other Revenues
20,517 8,938 660 11,579
129.5% 8,278
1254.2%
Other Revenues
15,030
10,396
8,615
4,634
44.6%
1,781
20.7%
Increase in Net Assets
35,547
19,334
9,275
16,213
83.9%
10,059
108.5%
Net Assets, Beginning of Year
161,033
141,699
132,424
19,334
13.6%
9,275
7.0%
Net Assets, End of Year
$ 196,580
161,033
141,699
$ 35,547
22.1%
$ 19,334
13.6%

Table 3 - Operating and Nonoperating Revenues for the Years Ended June 30, 2011, 2010 and 2009
provides gross operating and nonoperating (noncapital) revenues by major sources. As Table 3
shows, the School’s total operating revenues increased 21.3 percent and 4.0 percent for Fiscal Years
2011 and 2010, respectively. The School has experienced increases in all sources of operating
revenues for the past three years except for the fee-for-service contracts. The increase in student
tuition and fees reflects a combination of increases in enrollment and tuition rates as shown in
Tables 11 and 12 below.
Funding of the School’s research enterprise increased by 18.0 percent and 11.3 percent over the last
two years and reflects the School’s commitment to increase its focus and national role as a research
institution. Revenue from the Federal government represents approximately 61.9 percent and 63.5
percent of total grants and contracts revenue for Fiscal Years 2011 and 2010, respectively. These
sources also benefit the School in that the contracts generally allow for reimbursement of most of
its related administrative and facility overhead costs. In Fiscal Years 2011 and 2010, the School
received approximately $10,238,000 and $9,712,000 respectively, of such administrative and
facility overhead costs reimbursements. The School pledges this reimbursement along with other
auxiliary revenues to satisfy its bond obligations, which are commonly referred to as pledged
revenues. The School’s research awards of $46,700,000 in Fiscal Year 2011 represents a decrease
from the record research award volume in Fiscal Years 2010 and 2009 of $53,600,000 and
$51,400,000, respectively, which surpassed the School’s Strategic Plan goal of $50 million by
Fiscal Year 2014. The decrease in funding experienced during Fiscal Year 2011 is attributed to
funding decreases caused by the federal budget negotiations and a decrease in new American
Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) awards.
The School receives funding from The College Opportunity Fund (COF) in two ways; (1) fee-for-
service contracts with the Department of Higher Education and (2) stipends to qualified
undergraduate students used to pay a portion of tuition. Funding in Fiscal Year 2011 related to fee-
for-service contracts increased by $8,699,000, or 127.0 percent. Funding in Fiscal Year 2010
decreased by $6,420,000, or 48.4 percent, as a result of overall State cuts in funding to higher
education.
7

Colorado School of Mines
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
(Unaudited)
Year Ended June 30, 2011



The anticipated COF funding related to student stipends is incorporated into the School’s student
tuition and fees rates. In Fiscal Years 2011, 2010, and 2009, the School applied $5,039,000,
$3,746,000, and $7,413,000, respectively, of COF stipends against student bills. The increase from
2010 to 2011 reflects the increase in the per credit hour stipend allotted per student from $44 in
Fiscal Year 2010 to $62 in Fiscal Year 2011. During Fiscal Year 2010, the COF per credit hour
stipend allotted per student was reduced from $68 to $44. During Fiscal Year 2009, the COF per
credit hour stipend allotted per student was reduced from $92 to $68. Under State statutes, the
School was not permitted to bill students for mid-year decreases in COF funding.
The fluctuations in total State funding from COF each year corresponds with fluctuations in
funding from the Federal State Fiscal Stabilization Fund. On February 17, 2009, the ARRA was
signed into law. ARRA is a $787 billion economic package designed to stimulate the national
economy out of a continued recession. Included in the package was $144 billion of federal funds
allocated to State governments, via the State Fiscal Stabilization Fund (SFSF) to mitigate the
impacts of cuts to the State’s budgets as a result of the recession. The State of Colorado received
$760 million from SFSF over a three year period, of which $622 million was allocated for
education stabilization. For Fiscal Years 2009, 2010 and 2011, the School received $4,444,000,
$12,643,000 and $870,000, respectively, to replace an equal amount of State funding cuts from
COF in the form of student stipends and fee-for-service contracts. State funding from COF and
SFSF funds totaled $25,124,000, $23,237,000 and $21,456,000 for Fiscal Years 2009, 2010, and
2011, respectively.
During Fiscal Year 2011, gifts for noncapital purposes, received primarily from the School’s
Foundation, totaled $10,312,000 which was an increase of 5.2 percent from Fiscal Year 2010. This
compares to a decline of 9.1 percent between Fiscal Year 2009 and Fiscal Year 2010.
Federal nonoperating revenues consist of interest subsidies received for taxable Build America
Bonds (BAB) issued by the School and financial aid received under the Pell program. The School
received $1,080,000 in federal interest subsidies in Fiscal Year 2011 compared to $500,000
received in Fiscal Year 2010. The increase is due to receiving a full year’s worth of interest
subsidy in Fiscal Year 2011, compared to a half year in Fiscal Year 2010, combined with the
School issuing a second BAB taxable bond issue during Fiscal Year 2011. Revenues from the Pell
program have increased during the past three years from $1,640,000 in Fiscal Year 2009 to
$3,066,000 in Fiscal Year 2011.
8

Colorado School of Mines
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
(Unaudited)
Year Ended June 30, 2011




Table 3 - Operating and Nonoperating Revenues for Years Ended June 30, 2011, 2010, and 2009 (all dollars in thousands)





Increase (Decrease)




2011 vs 2010
2010 vs 2009

2011 2010 2009
Amount
Percent
Amount
Percent
Operating
Revenues

Student Tuition and Fees
$ 79,763
68,122
62,776
$ 11,641
17.1%
$ 5,346
8.5%
Grants and Contracts
56,955
48,285
43,400
8,670
18.0%
4,885
11.3%
Fee for Service
15,547
6,848
13,268
8,699
127.0%
(6,420)
(48.4%)
Auxiliary Enterprises, Net
13,805
13,145
12,544
660
5.0%
601
4.8%
Other Operating
2,846
2,827
1,921
19
0.7%
906
47.2%
Total Operating Revenues
168,916
139,227
133,909
29,689
21.3%
5,318
4.0%
Nonoperating Revenues







Gifts
10,312
9,798
10,775
514
5.2%
(977)
(9.1%)
Investment Income (Loss), Net
4,350
5,684 (104)
(1,334)
(23.5%) 5,788
5565.4%
State Fiscal Stabilization Funds
870
12,643 4,444
(11,773)
(93.1%) 8,199
184.5%
Federal Nonoperating
4,145
3,149 1,639

996 31.6% 1,510
92.1%
Other Nonoperating, net
85
52
358
33
63.5%
(306)
(85.5%)
Total Nonoperating Revenues
19,762
31,326
17,112
(11,564)
(32.3%)
14,214
69.5%
Total Revenues (noncapital)
$ 188,678
170,553
151,021
$ 18,125
10.6%
$ 19,532
12.9%

The School continues to experience fluctuations in investment revenue due primarily to the ongoing
uncertainty in the financial markets resulting in changes in the fair market value of the School’s
investments held by the Foundation and amounts held by the State Treasury. The School
experienced unrealized gains of $606,000 and $3,695,000 in Fiscal Years 2011 and 2010,
respectively and unrealized losses of $1,656,000 in Fiscal Year 2009. The realized investment
earnings in Fiscal Years 2011, 2010 and 2009 were $3,744,000, $1,989,000 and $1,552,000,
respectively.
The programmatic uses of resources displayed in Table 4 - Operating Expenses by Function
demonstrate that the focus of the School has not changed over the past three years. Operating
expenses increased overall by 4.4 percent from Fiscal Year 2010 to Fiscal Year 2011 and by 7.3
percent from Fiscal Year 2009 to Fiscal Year 2010. The majority of the increase in Fiscal Year
2011 is attributed to increases in support of the teaching and research missions of the School. The
increase in Fiscal Year 2010 was associated with research activity and operation and maintenance
of plant, which is primarily due to certain renovations and necessary land improvements. The
School’s other functional operating expenses have remained relatively flat or have decreased. This
is in line with the management’s continuing cost containment efforts. Recognizing the state of the
national and Colorado economies, in early Fiscal Year 2009 and continuing through Fiscal Year
2011, the School put in place cost containment measures in order to protect the School’s financial
position from the anticipated budget cuts. These measures included a hiring freeze, salary freezes,
travel restrictions, as well as restrictions on any non-mandatory spending.
9

Colorado School of Mines
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
(Unaudited)
Year Ended June 30, 2011





Table 4 - Operating Expenses by Function for Years Ended June 30, 2011, 2010, and 2009 (all dollars in thousands)




Increase (Decrease)




2011 vs 2010
2010 vs 2009
Functional Expense
2011
2010
2009
Amount
Percent
Amount
Percent
Education and General







Instruction
$ 51,288
48,356
48,229
$ 2,932
6.0%
$ 127
0.3%
Research
40,962
38,970
34,335
1,992
5.1%
4,635
13.5%
Public Service
119
69
-
50
72.5%
69
-
Academic Support
11,508
10,498
10,418
1,010
9.6%
80
0.8%
Student Services
4,067
3,755
3,456
312
8.3%
299
8.7%
Institutional Support
9,610
9,854
11,499
(244)
(2.5%)
(1,645)
(14.3%)
Operation and Maintenance of Plant
17,351
17,998
12,079
(647)
(3.6%)
5,919
49.0%
Scholarships and Fellowships
1,008
833
549
175
21.0%
284
51.7%
Total Education and General
135,913
130,333 120,565
5,580
4.3%
9,768
8.1%
Auxiliary Enterprises
15,483
15,814
15,445
(331)
(2.1%)
369
2.4%
Depreciation and amortization
12,120
10,432 9,859 1,688 16.2%
573
5.8%
Total Operating Expenses
$ 163,516
156,579
145,869
$ 6,937
4.4%
$ 10,710
7.3%

Research expenses (excluding capital purchases) increased 5.1 percent and 13.5 percent in Fiscal
Year 2011 and 2010, respectively, which was a direct result of increased research activity on
campus. Institutional support decreased in Fiscal Years 2011 and 2010 by 2.5 percent and 14.3
percent, respectively, which reflects the School’s aforementioned cost containment measures
undertaken in Fiscal Year 2010 that continued into Fiscal Year 2011. Operation and maintenance
of plant decreased by 3.6 percent from Fiscal Year 2010 to 2011 compared to an increase of 49.0
percent from Fiscal Year 2009 to 2010. In Fiscal Year 2010, the School recorded $1,779,000 of
expenses associated with the environmental assessment and response at the Colorado School of
Mines Research Institute (CSMRI) site south of Clear Creek and the remainder is primarily
associated with various campus funded controlled maintenance projects. The amounts shown for
scholarships and fellowships do not reflect the actual resources dedicated to student aid. The
majority of the School’s student aid resources are being applied to the student’s accounts and netted
against tuition and fee revenue as scholarship allowance. The School’s scholarship allowance was
$18,092,000 and $16,723,000 in Fiscal Years 2011 and 2010, respectively.
Table 5 – Operating Expenses by Natural Classification summarizes operating expenses into five
categories. As demonstrated, salary expenses have increased by 3.5 percent and 2.7 percent in
Fiscal Years 2011 and 2010, respectively. This increase is attributable to the continued growth of
the School’s instruction and research activity, as shown in Table 4, resulting in the hiring of
additional graduate research and teaching assistants. Benefits costs have increased by 18.0 percent
and 4.3 percent in Fiscal Years 2011 and 2010, respectively. The increases in benefits are primarily
related to graduate tuition assistance which increased by $2,491,000 and $2,645,000 in Fiscal Years
2011 and 2010, respectively. The increase also reflects legislation passed in 2011 that shifted 2.5
percent of the required retirement contribution from the School to the employees, which reduced
the School’s contribution by $756,000 in Fiscal Year 2011. The increase in supplies and other
operating expenses from Fiscal Year 2009 to Fiscal Year 2010 is attributable to one-time costs
10

Colorado School of Mines
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
(Unaudited)
Year Ended June 30, 2011



related to pollution remediation clean-up being performed by the School and various other building
repair and maintenance costs. The increase in depreciation expense from Fiscal Year 2010 to Fiscal
Year 2011 is the result of the completion of several large construction projects, including Brown
Hall and Maple Hall, during the year.

Table 5 – Operating Expenses by Natural Classification (all dollars in thousands)




Increase (Decrease)




2011 vs 2010
2010 vs 2009
Natural Classification
2011
2010
2009 Amount Percent Amount Percent
Salaries
$ 76,622
73,996
72,029
$ 2,626
3.5%
$ 1,967
2.7%
Benefits 30,671
25,995
24,925
4,676
18.0%
1,070
4.3%
Supplies and Other Operating Expenses
40,384
42,451 35,376
(2,067) (4.9%)
7,075 20.0%
Utilities 3,719
3,705
3,680
14
0.4%
25
0.7%
Depreciation
12,120 10,432 9,859 1,688 16.2%
573 5.8%
Total Operating Expenses
$ 163,516
156,579
145,869
$ 6,937
4.4%
$ 10,710
7.3%









Capital Assets and Debt Management
As indicated in Table 6 - Capital Asset Categories, the School’s capital assets consist of land,
construction in progress, buildings and improvements, equipment, library materials, and intangible
assets with a gross book value of $370,507,000, $313,095,000 and $294,271,000 at June 30, 2011,
2010 and 2009, respectively, offset by accumulated depreciation of $137,961,000, $128,224,000
and $118,834,000, respectively. The Fiscal Year 2010 increase in construction in progress of
$11,266,000 and subsequent decrease in Fiscal Year 2011 of $8,680,000 is primarily due to
planning and construction costs incurred for several large construction projects that were underway
in Fiscal Year 2010 and completed in Fiscal Year 2011.

Table 6 - Capital Asset Categories (before depreciation) as of June 30, 2011, 2010 and 2009 (all dollars in thousands)




Increase (Decrease)




2011 vs 2010
2010 vs 2009

2011 2010 2009
Amount
Percent
Amount
Percent
Land
$ 4,274
3,257
3,224
$ 1,017
31.2%
$ 33
1.0%
Construction in Progress
12,741
21,421
10,155
(8,680)
(40.5%)
11,266
110.9%
Land Improvements
17,477
15,007
9,771
2,470
16.5%
5,236
53.6%
Buildings & Improvements
281,847
223,185
222,780
58,662
26.3%
405
0.2%
Software 1,409
1,283
-
126
9.8%
1,283
-
Equipment
39,751
35,930
35,436
3,821
10.6%
494
1.4%
Library & Other Collections
12,408
12,412
12,305
(4)
(0.0%)
107
0.9%
Intangible
600
600
600
-
-
-
-
Total Capital Assets
$ 370,507
313,095
294,271
$ 57,412
18.3%
$ 18,824
6.4%








11

Colorado School of Mines
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
(Unaudited)
Year Ended June 30, 2011



Several other large construction projects are continuing into Fiscal Year 2012 as detailed in Table 7
- Current Capital Construction Projects. The increase in buildings and improvements of
$58,662,000 in Fiscal Year 2011 is the result of the completion of several construction projects,
namely the Brown Hall addition and Maple Hall. The increase in land improvements of $5,236,000
in Fiscal Year 2010 is the result of the completion of improvements to the Creekside athletic fields.
Further detail regarding capital asset activity can be found in Note 4.

Table 7 - Current Capital Construction Projects (in thousands)
Project Description
Financing Sources
Budget
Marquez Hall and Academic Wing
Gifts and Bond proceeds
$ 36,600
Weaver Towers renovation
Bond proceeds
10,000
Student Health & Wellness Center Bond
proceeds
2,800
Energy conservation improvements
Bond proceeds
2,744
Campus fire safety improvements
State capital appropriations
1,015
Replace failed corroded piping
State capital appropriations
953
Hill Hall REMRSEC renovation
Campus cash resources
803
Brown Hall HVAC replacement
Campus cash resources
750
Alderson Hall roof replacement
State capital appropriations
599
Steam Infrastructure improvements
Campus cash resources
515
Creekside parking lot
Campus cash resources
500
USGS data center remodel
Campus cash resources
456
Processing Lab Clean Room expansion
Campus cash resources
450
Dining Hall renovation
Auxiliary cash resources
400




In addition to operating and nonoperating revenues, the School received capital revenues in the
amount shown in Table 8 – Capital Revenues. The variances in capital contributions from the State
over the past three years are primarily related to the construction of Brown Hall. In Fiscal Year
2008, the State issued certificates of participation, for the benefit of several institutions of higher
education. The School received a total of $6,748,000 from the State towards the construction of
Brown Hall. Increases in capital grants and gifts in Fiscal Year 2011 and Fiscal Year 2010 are
attributed to $11,938,000 and $1,387,000, respectively, in capital gifts, received primarily from the
Foundation, to be used towards the construction of the School’s new petroleum engineering
building, Marquez Hall.

Table 8 – Capital Revenues for the Years Ended June 30, 2011, 2010 and 2009 (all dollars in thousands)




Increase (Decrease)




2011 vs 2010
2010 vs 2009
Natural Classification
2011
2010
2009 Amount Percent Amount Percent
Capital appropriations from the State
$ 818
800
3,510
$ 18
2.3%
$ (2,710)
(77.2%)
Capital contributions from the State
811
5,260 1,186 (4,449)
(84.6%)
4,074
343.5%
Capital grants and gifts
13,367
3,671
2,159
9,696
264.1%
1,512
70.0%
Total Capital Revenues
$ 14,996
9,731
6,855
$ 5,265
54.1%
$ 2,876
42.0%









12

Colorado School of Mines
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
(Unaudited)
Year Ended June 30, 2011



The School’s long-term obligations, as shown in Table 9 – Long-Term Debt Categories, are
comprised principally of various revenue bonds issued to finance construction of the capital assets
discussed above. As of June 30, 2011, 2010 and 2009, net revenue bonds payable of $156,731,000,
$160,951,000 and $109,810,000, respectively, were outstanding. During Fiscal Year 2011, the
School refinanced $42,860,000 of variable rate debt, backed with a letter of credit that was due to
expire, with an equal amount of new variable rate debt through a direct purchase by a financial
institution. The School also issued $11,195,000 of Taxable Build America Bonds (BAB) under the
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to be used to construct, improve, renovate and
equip a new academic wing to Marquez Hall. The School also issued $2,800,000 of taxable
Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECB) to be used to finance one or more qualified energy
conservation improvement projects. The QECB also qualified as BAB. During Fiscal Year 2010,
the School issued $68,005,000 of new and refunding debt. The proceeds of the debt issuance are
being used to finance construction activity across the campus and to refinance existing variable rate
debt to fixed rate debt and terminate an interest rate swap agreement associated with the variable
rate debt. Of the debt issued in Fiscal Year 2010, $42,860,000 qualified as BAB. As qualified
BAB, the School expects to receive a cash subsidy payment from the United States Treasury,
referred to as Federal Direct Payments, equal to a percentage of the interest payable on the bonds
on or around each interest payment date.

Table 9 – Long-Term Debt Categories at June 30, 2011, 2010, and 2009 (all dollars in thousands)




Increase (Decrease)




2011 vs 2010
2010 vs 2009
Debt
Type
2011
2010
2009 Amount Percent Amount Percent
Revenue bonds
$ 156,731
160,951
109,810
$ (4,220)
(2.6%)
$ 51,141
46.6%
Capital
leases
319 98
4,402 221
225.5%
(4,304)
(97.8%)
Note
payable
432 712 993 (280)
(39.3%) (281)
(28.3%)
Total Long Term Debt
$ 157,482
161,761
115,205
$ (4,279)
(2.6%)
$ 46,556
40.4%









In accordance with accounting standards, the School is required to separately identify the change in
the fair market value of derivative instruments in separate sections called Deferred Outflows or
Deferred Inflows, depending on the fair market value of the derivative instrument. As discussed
more fully in Note 8, the School had entered into two interest rate swap agreements associated with
the Series 2008A and 2008B variable rate debt to hedge against possible future increases in debt
service cash flow requirements resulting from interest rate increases. When the School refinanced
the Series 2008A Bonds in Fiscal Year 2011, the swap agreement associated with the Series 2008A
bonds was reassigned to the new Series 2010A Bonds. There was no cost to the School to change
the association of the swap agreement to the new bonds. At the time of the refunding, the swap had
a fair market value of ($8,301,000). In accordance with applicable accounting standards, the fair
market value of the swap at the time of the refunding of the Series 2008A bonds was included in the
calculation of the deferred gain or loss on refunding of the 2008A bonds. Accordingly, as of June
30, 2011, $8,301,000 is included as a deferred loss on refunding and is being amortized over the life
of the 2010A bonds. The change in fair market value of the derivative instrument from the time of
the refunding to June 30, 2011 is recorded as a deferred inflow on the Statement of Net Assets. As
of June 30, 2011 and 2010, the outstanding swap had a fair market value of ($6,182,000) and
($7,778,000), respectively. During Fiscal Year 2010, the School issued new fixed rate revenue
13

Colorado School of Mines
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
(Unaudited)
Year Ended June 30, 2011



bonds with a portion of the proceeds being used to make a $2,444,000 payment to terminate the
swap associated with the Series 2008B bonds. Further detail regarding the School’s long-term
liabilities can be found in Note 8.
Factors Impacting Future Periods
The School’s ability to maintain and improve the quality of academic programs, undertake new
initiatives, and meet its core mission and ongoing operational needs are impacted by many factors:
principally, by student enrollment and the resulting tuition and fees revenue, research volume, the
level of state support, and the School’s largest expense, compensation costs. As tuition and fees
revenue is the School’s single largest revenue source, it continues to be vital for the School to have
the ability to set tuition at a level which will support the cost of educating a Colorado School of
Mines student.
The challenges facing the State’s budget will continue to impact the School in Fiscal Years 2012,
2013 and likely beyond. While the School’s total operating revenue continues to increase each
year, actual state funding, in the form of direct State General Fund appropriations, student stipends,
fee-for-service revenues, and funding from the State Fiscal Stabilization Fund, has decreased in
each of the last two fiscal years and is expected to decrease further in Fiscal Year 2012 as shown in
Table 10 - State Operating Support.

Table 10 - State Operating Support (all dollars in thousands)





% of Total State



Total State
Total
Operating Support
Fiscal
Amount of State
State Fiscal
Operating
Operating
to Total
Year
Support *
Stabilization Funds
Support
Revenues
Operating Revenues
2012**
$ 16,254
-
16,254
-
-
2011
20,585
870 21,456 168,916 12.7%
2010
10,594
12,643 23,237 139,227 16.7%
2009
20,680
4,444 25,124 133,909 18.8%
* State support includes direct state appropriations and student stipends and a fee-for-service contract funded from the College
Opportunity Fund.
**Fiscal Year 2012 based on amounts included in the State’s Long Appropriation Act (Long Bill).


To offset the continued and further anticipated decreases in State funding, the School increased
tuition in Fiscal Year 2011 by 9.0 percent for residents and 5.0 percent for non-residents. Table 11
- Full Time Tuition and Room and Board Charges per Year, provides a trend of tuition and room
and board charges for the past four academic years.

Table 11 - Full Time Tuition and Room and Board Charges per Year

Annual Full-time Tuition Rates
Annual Room and Board (avg.)
Academic
Year Residents
Non-residents Double Single
Meal
Plan
2012 $

12,585
27,270
4,638
5,486
4,250
2011
11,550
25,980
4,385
5,192
3,926
2010 10,590 24,750
4,176
4,945
3,775
2009 9,810 23,820
3,996
4,732
3,630






14

Colorado School of Mines
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
(Unaudited)
Year Ended June 30, 2011



The increase in tuition rates combined with enrollment changes have a significant impact on the
School’s ability to provide the quality of education expected by our students. Table 12 - Fall
Enrollment Trends presents undergraduates, graduate and combined enrollments for each of the last
three years. Table 13 - Fall Semester Undergraduate Admissions Trends highlights the School’s
ability to attract freshmen students. As demonstrated by the two tables below, the School has been
successful in attracting new students and retaining existing students.

Table 12 - Fall Enrollment Trends





Undergraduates Graduate
Studies
Total
Academic
Non-
Non-
Non-
Year Residents
residents Total Residents
residents Total
Residents residents Total
2011 2,867

1,141
4,008 513 323 836 3,380 1,464 4,844
2010 2,866

1,043
3,909 473 293 766 3,339 1,336 4,675
2009 2,744
936
3,680 400 245 645 3,144 1,181 4,325

Table 13 - Fall Semester Undergraduate Admissions Trends
Number of
Number
Percent
Number
Percent
Fall of Year
Applicants
Accepted
Accepted
Committed
Committed
2011 11,117
4,730
42.5%
969
20.6%
2010 10,436
4,709
45.1%
957
20.3%
2009 7,710
4,704
61.0%
975
20.7%

The School is preparing and planning for additional cuts in the State’s budget for Fiscal Year 2012
as the State continues to experience budget shortfalls. The School, even in this time of economic
volatility, is financially well-positioned. Over the past few years, the School has ended the year
with an operating surplus primarily due to strong enrollment and deliberate measures taken to
contain costs. The School continues to experience strong enrollment, which resulted in record
applications and freshmen enrollment for the previous and current academic year. Fiscal Year 2009
had been the School’s highest research award volume at $51,400,000. That was surpassed in Fiscal
Year 2010 by $2,200,000 to $53,600,000. While the award volume declined in Fiscal Year 2011 to
$46,700,000, the School anticipates an award volume of around $50,000,000 in Fiscal Year 2012.
The growth in research is having a direct and positive impact on graduate student enrollment,
research expenditures, as well as indirect costs recovered from these expenditures.
Additionally, the School must ensure that the physical infrastructure accommodates student
enrollment, optimizes the academic and social life of the student, fosters growth in research, and
supports a world-class institution. The ability to obtain and devote resources to support the
physical infrastructure is a high priority of the School, especially in this time when the State has not
been able to provide funding for higher education capital needs. In recent bond issues, the School
exercised its ability to pledge tuition for the repayment of debt; however, the School is not utilizing
tuition revenue to repay debt. The School intends to utilize the broader pledge base to support any
future debt obligations. Given that the School’s debt capacity is limited even with the expanded
15

Colorado School of Mines
Management’s Discussion and Analysis
(Unaudited)
Year Ended June 30, 2011



pledge ability, utilizing a diverse source of funds will be critical to meet our growing infrastructure
needs.
As the State continues its attempt to manage the State budget and identify additional funding
sources for higher education, the School is assessing the implications on the long-term health and
maintenance of the School and its ability to attract high quality students by providing high quality
academic programs. To that end, management is working towards the goal of strengthening the
School’s financial position and obtaining additional operating and financial flexibility in this
environment of limited state support. The School continues to position itself to fully implement its
strategic plan and in doing so must continually work to secure the financial and human resources
needed to fulfill the School’s mission.
Requests for Information
This financial report is designed to provide a general overview of the Colorado School of Mines’
finances for all those with an interest in the School’s finances. Questions concerning any other
information provided in this report or requests for additional financial information should be
addressed to the Department of Finance and Administration, 1500 Illinois Street, Golden, Colorado
80401-1887.


16

Colorado School of Mines
Statements of Net Assets
June 30, 2011 and 2010 (in thousands)


2011 2010
Component
Component
School
Unit School Unit
Assets




Current Assets




Cash and cash equivalents
$ 61,925
6,197
52,914
10,808
Accounts & loans receivable, net 19,167
3,129
18,863
7,890
Inventories 110
-
104
-
Other assets
870
-
171
-
Total Current Assets
82,072 9,326 72,052 18,698
Noncurrent Assets




Restricted cash and cash equivalents
73,379
146
91,547
952
Investments 14,628
216,059
12,314
181,752
Loans receivable
4,932 10,958
5,106 11,808
Deferred charges and other assets
3,948
536
1,419
615
Capital assets, net
232,546
26
184,871
40
Total Noncurrent Assets
329,433
227,725
295,257
195,167
Total Assets
$ 411,505
237,051
367,309
213,865
Total Deferred Outflows
$ -
-
7,778
-
Liabilities



Current Liabilities




Accounts payable and accrued liabilities
$ 23,180
1,967
16,879
1,284
Accrued compensated absences
441
-
429
-
Deferred revenue
16,786
-
18,221
-
Bonds, notes, & leases payable
4,155
-
4,483
-
Other liabilities
1,467
-
2,331
-
Total Current Liabilities
46,029
1,967
42,343 1,284
Noncurrent Liabilities




Accrued compensated absences
4,401
-
4,273
-
Bonds, notes, & leases payable
153,327
-
157,278
-
Other liabilities
9,162
25,754
10,160
23,407
Total Noncurrent Liabilities
166,890
25,754
171,711
23,407
Total Liabilities
$ 212,919
27,721
214,054
24,691
Total Deferred Inflows
$ 2,006
-
-
-
Net Assets




Invested in capital assets, net of related debt
$ 117,322
26
102,274
40
Restricted for nonexpendable purposes




Scholarships and fellowships
1,623
75,430
1,385
65,250
Other 870
62,857
640
55,618
Total restricted for nonexpendable purposes
2,493
138,287
2,025
120,868
Restricted for expendable purposes




Scholarships and fellowships
2,806
11,460
2,351
7,445
Loans 5,441
1,481
4,821
1,178
Research 5,098
1,415
310
1,177
Capital projects
2,290
5,067
1,387
10,171
Other 1,862
27,844
1,621
30,250
Total restricted for expendable purposes
17,497
47,267
10,490
50,221
Unrestricted 59,268
23,750
46,244
18,045
Total Net Assets
$ 196,580
209,330
161,033
189,174
The accompanying notes are an integral part of the financial statements 17

Colorado School of Mines
Statements of Revenues, Expenses and Changes in Net Assets
Years Ended June 30, 2011 and 2010 (in thousands)

2011
2010
Component
Component
School
Unit School
Unit
Operating Revenues




Tuition and fees, (net of scholarship allowance of
$17,858 in 2011 and $16,445 in 2010)
$ 79,763
-
68,122
-
Fee for Service
15,547
-
6,848
-
Federal grants and contracts
35,233
-
30,651
-
State grants and contracts
2,996
-
2,584
-
Nongovernmental grants and contracts
18,726
-
15,050
-
Auxiliary enterprises, (net of scholarship allowance of
$234 in 2011 and $278 in 2010)
13,805
-
13,145
-
Contributions -
11,384
-
13,606
Other operating revenues
2,846
194
2,827
250
Total Operating Revenues
168,916
11,578
139,227
13,856
Operating Expenses




Education and General




Instruction 51,288
-
48,356

-
Research 40,962
-
38,970

-
Public service
119
-
69
-
Academic support
11,508
-
10,498
-
Student services
4,067
-
3,755
-
Institutional support
9,610
26,658
9,854
13,592
Operation and maintenance of plant
17,351
-
17,998
-
Scholarships and fellowships
1,008
-
833
-
Total Education and General
135,913
26,658
130,333
13,592
Auxiliary enterprises
15,483
-
15,814
-
Depreciation and amortization
12,120
23
10,432
25
Total Operating Expenses
163,516
26,681
156,579
13,617
Operating Income (Loss)
5,400
(15,103)
(17,352)
239





Nonoperating Revenues (Expenses)




Contributions from the Foundation
9,837
-
9,212
-
Contributions 475
-
586

-
Investment income
4,350
35,259
5,684
19,332
Interest on debt
(4,282)
-
(4,575)
-
Amortization of bond costs
(252)

(431)

Loss on disposal of assets
(111)
-
(30)
-
Federal state fiscal stabilization funds
870
-
12,643
-
Federal nonoperating revenue
4,145
-
3,149
-
Other nonoperating revenue
85
-
52
-
Net Nonoperating Revenues
15,117
35,259
26,290
19,332
Income Before Other Revenues
20,517
20,156
8,938
19,571
Capital appropriations from state
818
-
800
-
Capital contributions from state
811
-
5,260
-
Capital grants and gifts
13,367
-
3,671
-
Additions to permanent endowments
34
-
665
-
Total Other Revenues
15,030
-
10,396 -
Increase in Net Assets
35,547 20,156 19,334 19,571
Net Assets, Beginning of Year
161,033 189,174 141,699

169,603
Net Assets, End of Year
$ 196,580
209,330
161,033
189,174
The accompanying notes are an integral part of the financial statements 18

Colorado School of Mines
Statements of Cash Flows
Years Ended June 30, 2011 and 2010 (in thousands)

2011
2010
Cash Flows from Operating Activities:


Tuition and fees
$ 80,497
69,255
Grants and contracts
70,242
53,198
Collection of loans to students
1,280
1,098
Sales of services from auxiliary enterprises
13,796
13,052
Rental income
1,318
1,469
Other operating receipts
1,532
932
Payments to suppliers
(30,386)
(28,932)
Scholarships disbursed
(773)
(568)
Payments to employees
(76,606)
(73,923)
Payments for employee benefits
(30,655)
(28,180)
Loans issued to students
(1,135)
(1,025)
Payments for auxiliary enterprises
(13,090)
(12,889)
Net cash provided by (used for) operating activities
16,020
(6,513)
Cash Flows from Noncapital Financing Activities:


Receipts from the Foundation 9,590
8,792
Gifts and grants for other than capital purposes
846
1,523
Additions to permanent endowments
34
665
Proceeds from noncapital debt
2,800
-
Endowment funds invested with the Foundation
(302)
(2,116)
Federal state fiscal stabilization funds
870
12,643
Federal nonoperating revenue
3,066
2,649
Direct lending receipts 22,241
16,529
Direct lending disbursements
(22,290)
(16,546)
Agency inflows
7,579
3,147
Agency outflows
(7,499)
(3,197)
Net cash provided by noncapital financing activities
16,935
24,089
Cash Flows from Capital & Related Financing Activities:


Capital gifts
13,314
3,625
Bond issuance and other loan costs
(313)
(576)
Acquisition and construction of capital assets
(50,002)
(8,347)
Proceeds from capital debt and refinancing 53,974
68,540
Principal payments on capital debt and leases
(53,995)
(20,307)
Interest payments on capital debt and leases
(7,932)
(3,764)
Federal subsidy on Build America Bonds
1,080
500
Swap termination payment
-
(2,444)
Proceeds from insurance recovery
22
31
Net cash provided by (used for) capital
and related financing activities
(43,853)
37,258
Cash Flows from Investing activities:


Interest and dividends on investments
1,741
4,301
Net cash provided by investing activities
1,741
4,301
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
(9,157)
59,135
Cash and cash equivalents, July 1
144,461
85,326
Cash and cash equivalents, June 30
$ 135,304
144,461

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the financial statements 19

Colorado School of Mines
Statements of Cash Flows
Years Ended June 30, 2011 and 2010 (in thousands)



2011 2010
Reconciliation of Operating Income (Loss) to Net Cash Provided by
(Used for) Operating Activities:


Operating income ( loss)
$ 5,400
(17,352)
Adjustments to reconcile operating income (loss) to net cash provided
by (used for) operating activities


Depreciation and amortization expense
12,120
10,432
Insurance recoveries
(22)
(30)
Other noncash operating expenses
1,037
175
Receipts of items classified as nonoperating revenues
85
52
Changes in assets and liabilities


Accounts and loans receivables 170
(2,870)
Inventories (6)
4
Other assets
(3,283)
(135)
Loans to students
179
-
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities
2,212
218
Deferred revenue
(1,435)
2,551
Accrued compensated absences
140
108
Other liabilities
(577)
334
Net cash provided by (used for) operating activities
$ 16,020
(6,513)



Noncash Investing, Capital and Financing Activities:


Capital assets acquired by donations, state funded, and payable
increases
$ 11,227
12,171
Deferred loss on refunding
8,499
118
Fair value change in interest rate swap
1,596
2,209
Unrealized gains/losses on investments
2,383
1,383
Accretion of interest on deep discount debt
483
459
Amortization of premiums/discounts
153
36
Amortization of bond issue costs
174
443
Amortization of deferred losses and swap termination
605
258


The accompanying notes are an integral part of the financial statements 20

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010



Note 1: Basis of Presentation and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Governance
Colorado School of Mines (the School) is a public institution of higher education with a primary
emphasis in engineering and science education and research. The School is governed by a nine member
Board of Trustees. Seven voting members are appointed by the Governor of the State of Colorado with
the consent of the Colorado Senate. Two non-voting members, representing the faculty and students of
the School, are voted in by the respective constituents.
Financial Reporting Entity and Basis of Presentation
The School’s financial reporting entity includes the operations of the School and all related entities for
which the School is financially accountable or that provide services to the School, referred to as blended
component units. Financial accountability may stem from the School’s ability to appoint a majority of
the governing board of the related organization, its ability to impose its will on the related organization,
its ability to access assets, or its responsibility for debts of the related organization. The School includes
the following blended component units:
• Colorado School of Mines Building Corporation was established in June 1976 as a separate
corporation under the laws of the State of Colorado. The purpose of the corporation was to
build a facility that would house the United States Geological Survey. Upon dissolution, subject
to certain provisions, any assets remaining shall be transferred to the School. Separate financial
statements are not prepared.
• Colorado School of Mines Development Corporation was established in September 2001 as a
separate corporation under the laws of the State of Colorado. The corporation was formed for
the purpose of issuing obligations for or assisting in the financing of capital expenditures on
behalf of or for the benefit of the Colorado School of Mines. Upon dissolution, subject to
certain provisions, any assets remaining shall be transferred to the School. Separate financial
statements are not prepared.
• Mines Applied Technology Transfer Inc. (MATTI) was established in 2002 as a separate
corporation under the laws of the State of Colorado with a December 31 year end. The purpose
of MATTI, a not-for-profit 501(c)(3), is to further the education, research, development and
public services objectives of the School and to further the transfer of newly created technologies
from the School to the private sector. The corporation shall be operated exclusively for the
benefit of the School. Upon dissolution, subject to certain provisions, any assets remaining shall
be transferred to the School. Separate financial statements are not prepared.

21

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010




Discretely Presented Component Unit
The School’s financial statements include one supporting organization as a discretely presented
component unit (DPCU) of the School.
Colorado School of Mines Foundation, Incorporated (the Foundation) is a legally separate entity
incorporated under Article 40, Title 7 of the Colorado Revised Statutes of 1973. The Foundation was
established in 1928 to promote the welfare, development and growth of the School. The Foundation has
a determination letter from the Internal Revenue Service stating it qualifies under Section 501(c)(3) of
the Internal Revenue Code as a public charity. Although the School does not control the timing of
receipts from the Foundation, the majority of resources, or income thereon, that the Foundation
holds and invests are restricted to the activities of the School by the donors. Because these
restricted resources held by the Foundation can only be used by, or for the benefit of, the
School, the Foundation is considered a component unit of the School and is discretely presented
in the School’s financial statements. Separately issued financial statements are available by
contacting the Foundation at PO Box 4005, Golden, Colorado, 80401-0005.
Related Organizations
The Colorado School of Mines Research Institute (CSMRI), a not-for-profit corporation, was established
in 1949 as a separate corporation under the laws of the State of Colorado. The purpose of CSMRI is to
promote, encourage and aid scientific and technological investigation and research.
CSMRI ceased active operations during 1987 and sold most of its real estate in 1988. CSMRI once held
a lease on property owned by the School. Funds remaining from the proceeds of the sales and
satisfaction of indebtedness are to be applied to rehabilitation costs of the property leased to CSMRI and
the remaining property owned by CSMRI. Although CSMRI is not controlled by the School, upon
dissolution, subject to certain provisions, any assets remaining shall be transferred to the School.
Relationship to State of Colorado
Article VIII, Section 5 of the Colorado Constitution declares the School to be a state institution. Thus,
for financial reporting purposes, the School is included as part of the State’s primary government.
Basis of Accounting and Presentation
For financial reporting purposes, the School is considered a special-purpose government engaged only in
business-type activities. Accordingly, the School’s financial statements have been prepared using the
economic resources measurement focus and the accrual basis of accounting. Under the accrual basis of
accounting, revenues are recognized when earned, and expenses are recorded when an obligation is
incurred.
The School applies all applicable Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) pronouncements.
The School has the option to apply all Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) pronouncements
that were issued after November 30, 1989, unless the FASB pronouncement conflicts with or contradicts
a GASB pronouncement. The School has elected not to apply FASB pronouncements issued after the
applicable date.

22

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010



The Foundation reports under FASB standards, including FASB Statement No. 117, Financial Reporting
for Not-for-Profit Organizations. As such, certain revenue recognition criteria and presentation features
are different from GASB revenue recognition criteria and presentation features. Modifications have
been made to the Foundation’s financial information in the School’s financial reporting entity for these
differences.
Significant Accounting Policies
Cash and Cash Equivalents
The School and the Foundation consider all highly liquid investments with original maturities of three
months or less to be cash equivalents. Cash equivalents consist primarily of funds invested through the
State Treasurer’s Cash Management Program and money market funds with brokers.
Restricted Cash and Cash Equivalents
Restricted cash and cash equivalents include amounts whose use is constrained either through external
party restrictions or imposition by law. Restricted purposes include gifts, endowments, debt funded
project construction and bond debt service reserves.
Investments and Investment Income
Investments in equity and debt securities are carried at fair value. Fair value is determined using quoted
market prices. Investments include, but are not limited to, funds managed by the Foundation on behalf
of the School.
Investment income consists of interest and dividend income and the net change for the year in the fair
value of investments carried at fair value.
Accounts and Loans Receivables
Accounts and loans receivables consist of tuition and fee charges to students, charges for auxiliary
enterprise services provided to students, faculty and staff, reimbursements outstanding on research
contracts and grants, and short- and long-term loans issued to students under various federal and other
loan programs to cover tuition and fee charges. Receivables are recorded net of estimated uncollectible
amounts. The School also administers student loans on behalf of the discretely presented component
unit. The student loans administered by the School are recorded as a receivable from the student,
included with loans to students in the statement of net assets, and a liability to the component unit.
Inventories
Inventories are stated at the lower of cost, determined using the FIFO (first-in, first-out) method, or
market.
Bond Issuance Costs
Bond issuance costs incurred on the revenue bond issues have been deferred and are being amortized on
an effective interest basis over the life of the bonds.

23

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010



Capital Assets
Capital assets are recorded at cost at the date of acquisition, or fair value at the date of donation, if
acquired by gift. Depreciation is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated useful life
of each asset. The following estimated useful lives are being used by the School:
Land improvements
20 years
Buildings and improvements
20 – 40 years
Equipment
3 – 10 years
Library materials
10 years

For equipment, the capitalization policy includes all items with a value of $5,000 or more, and an
estimated useful life of greater than one year.
Renovations to buildings and other improvements that significantly increase the value or extend the
useful life of the structure are capitalized. For renovations and improvements, the capitalization policy
includes items with a value of $50,000 or more. Routine repairs and maintenance are charged to
operating expense. Major outlays for capital assets and improvements are capitalized as construction in
progress throughout the building project. Interest incurred during the construction phase is included as
part of the value of the construction in progress.
Assets recorded under capital lease agreements are recorded at the present value of future minimum lease
payments and are amortized over either the term of the lease or the estimated useful life of the asset,
whichever period is shorter. Such amortization is included as depreciation expense in the accompanying
financial statements.
Intangible assets are carried at cost and are comprised of an indefeasible right to use certain fiber optic
cables. Intangible assets are being amortized over 20 years.
Compensated Absences
School policies permit most employees to accumulate vacation and sick leave benefits that may be
realized as paid time-off or, in limited circumstances, as a cash payment. Expense and the related
liabilities that are recognized as vacation benefits are earned whether the employee is expected to realize
the benefit as time-off or in cash. Expense and the related liability for sick leave benefits are recognized
when earned to the extent the employee is expected to realize the benefit in cash determined using the
termination payment method. Sick leave benefits expected to be realized as paid time-off are recognized
as expense when the time-off occurs and no liability is accrued for such benefits employees have earned
but not yet realized. Compensated absence liabilities are computed using the regular pay and termination
pay rates in effect at the statements of net assets date plus an additional amount for compensation-related
payments such as Social Security and Medicare taxes computed using rates in effect at that date.
Deferred Revenue – Tuition, Fees and Grants
Deferred revenue represents unearned student tuition and fees, for which the School has not provided the
associated services, and advances on grants and contract awards for which the School has not met all of
the applicable eligibility requirements or services provided.

24

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010



Bonds, Notes and Leases
For current refundings and advance refundings resulting in defeasance of debt, the difference between
the reacquisition price and the net carrying amount of the old debt is deferred and amortized as a
component of interest expense over the remaining life of the old debt or the life of the new debt,
whichever is shorter. On the statement of net assets, this deferred amount is reported as a deduction
from or an addition to the new debt liability.
The School has an ISDA (International Swaps and Derivatives Association) Master Swap Agreement in
order to convert certain variable rate debt to a fixed rate, thereby economically hedging against changes
in the cash flow requirements of the Schools variable rate debt obligations (Note 8).
Classification of Revenues
The School has classified its revenues as either operating or nonoperating revenues according to the
following criteria:
Operating revenues – Operating revenues include activities that have the characteristics of exchange
or exchange like transactions, program-specific, or government-mandated non-exchange
transactions, such as (1) student tuition and fees, (2) sales and services of auxiliary enterprises, (3)
contracts and grants for research activities and (4) interest on student loans.
Nonoperating revenues – Nonoperating revenues include activities that have the characteristics of
non-exchange transactions, such as gifts and contributions and other revenue sources that are not
deemed operating revenues, including Federal State Fiscal Stabilization Fund (SFSF), Federal Pell
revenue, and interest subsidy payments associated with Build America Bonds.
Scholarship Discounts and Allowances
Student tuition, fee revenues and certain other revenues from students are reported net of scholarship
allowances in the statements of revenues, expenses and changes in net assets. Scholarship allowances
are the difference between the stated charge for goods and services provided by the School and the
amount that is paid by students and/or third-parties making payments on the students’ behalf. Certain
governmental grants, such as Pell grants and other Federal, State or nongovernmental programs are
recorded as either operating or nonoperating revenues in the School’s financial statements. To the extent
that revenues from such programs are used to satisfy tuition and fees and other student charges, the
School has recorded a scholarship allowance.
Donor Restricted Endowments
Disbursements of the net appreciation (realized and unrealized) of investments of endowment gifts are
permitted by state law, except where a donor has specified otherwise. The amount of earnings and net
appreciation available for spending by the School and the Foundation is based on a spending rate set by
the Foundation board on an annual basis. For the years ended June 30, 2011 and 2010, the authorized
spending rate was equal to the 4.5 percent of the rolling 36-month average market value of the
endowment investments. Earnings in excess of the amount authorized for spending are available in
future years and are included in the value of the related investment. Earnings authorized to be spent are
recognized in the School’s financial statements as investment or gift revenue for School or Foundation-
owned endowments, respectively.

25

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010



Application of Restricted and Unrestricted Resources
The School first applies restricted net assets when an expense or outlay is incurred for purposes for
which both restricted and unrestricted net assets are available.
Income Taxes
As a state institution of higher education, the income of the School is generally exempt from federal and
state income taxes under Section 115(a) of the Internal Revenue Code and a similar provision of state
law. However, the School is subject to federal income tax on any unrelated business taxable income.
There was no tax liability related to income generated from activities unrelated to the School’s exempt
purpose as of June 30, 2011 and 2010.
Use of Estimates
The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in
the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the
reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of
the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues, expenses and other changes in net assets
during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.
Reclassifications
Certain 2010 amounts have been reclassified to conform to the 2011 presentation.
Note 2:
Cash and Cash Equivalents and Investments
The School’s and DPCU cash and cash equivalents as of June 30 are detailed in Table 2.1, Cash and
Cash Equivalents.
TABLE 2.1 Cash and Cash Equivalents (in thousands)
Type 2011
2010
School

Cash on hand
$ 15
14
Cash with U.S. financial institutions
6,398
6,448
Cash with State Treasurer
128,891
137,999
Total Cash and Cash Equivalents-School
$ 135,304
144,461
Discretely Presented Component Unit

Cash with U.S. financial institutions
$ 6,343
11,760
Total Cash and Cash Equivalents-DPCU
$ 6,343
11,760

Deposits
The School deposits the majority of its cash with the Colorado State Treasurer pursuant to Colorado
Revised Statutes (C.R.S.). The State Treasurer pools these deposits and invests them in securities
authorized by Section 24-75-601.1, C.R.S. The State Treasury (Treasury) acts as a bank for all state
agencies and most state supported institutions of higher education. Moneys deposited in the Treasury
are invested until the cash is needed. As of June 30, 2011, the School had cash on deposit with the

26

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010



Treasury of $128,891,000 which represented approximately 2.1 percent of the total $6,100.3 million fair
value of deposits in the State Treasury Pool.
For financial reporting purposes all of the Treasury’s investments are reported at fair value, which is
determined based on quoted market prices at fiscal year-end. On the basis of the School’s participation
in the Pool, the School reports as an increase or decrease in cash for its share of the Treasury’s
unrealized gains and losses on the Pool’s underlying investments. The State Treasurer does not invest
any of the Treasury Pool’s resources in any external investment pool, and there is no assignment of
income related to participation in the Pool. The unrealized gains/losses included in income reflect only
the change in fair value for the fiscal year.
Investments in the Treasury’s Pool are exposed to custodial credit risk if the securities are uninsured, are
not registered in the State’s name, and are held by either the counterparty to the investment purchase or
the counterparty’s trust department or agent but not in the State’s name. As of June 30, 2011, none of
the investments in the Treasury’s Pool are subject to custodial credit risk.
Credit quality risk is the risk that the issuer or other counterparty to a debt security will not fulfill its
obligations. This risk is assessed by national rating agencies that assign a credit quality rating for many
investments. Credit quality ratings for obligations of the U.S. government or obligations explicitly
guaranteed by the U.S. government are not reported; however, credit quality ratings are reported for
obligations of U.S. government agencies that are not explicitly guaranteed by the U.S. government.
Based on these parameters, as of June 30, 2011, approximately 86.7 percent of investments of the
Treasury’s Pool are subject to credit quality risk reporting. Except for $18,384,300 of corporate bonds
rated lower medium and $15,015,000 of corporate bonds rated as very speculative, these investments are
rated from upper medium to the highest quality, which indicates that the issuer has strong capacity to
pay principal and interest when due.
Interest rate risk is the risk that changes in the market rate of interest will adversely affect the value of an
investment. In addition to statutory limitations on the types of investments, the State Treasurer’s
investment policy mitigates interest rate risk through the use of maturity limits set to meet the needs of
the individual fund if the Treasurer is investing for a specific fund rather than the Pool. The Treasurer
actively manages the time to maturity in reacting to changes in the yield curve, economic forecasts, and
liquidity needs of the participating funds. The Treasurer further limits investment risk by setting a
minimum/maximum range for the percentage of investments subject to interest rate risk and by
laddering maturities and credit ratings. As of June 30, 2011, the weighted average maturity of
investments in the Treasurer’s Pool is 0.015 years for Commercial Paper (1.3 percent of the Pool), 1.054
years for U.S. Government Securities (81.7 percent of the Pool), 1.06 years for Asset Backed Securities
(6.9 percent of the Pool), and 3.133 years for Corporate Bonds (10.1 percent of the Pool).
The Treasury’s Pool was not subject to foreign currency risk or concentration of credit risk in Fiscal
Year 2010-11.
Additional information on investments of the Treasury’s Pool may be obtained in the State’s
Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for the year ended June 30, 2011.
Deposits not with the State Treasury are exposed to custodial credit risk (the risk that, in the event of the
failure of a depository financial institution, the government would not be able to recover deposits or
would not be able to recover collateral securities that are in the possession of an outside party), if they
are not covered by depository insurance (FDIC) and the deposits are uncollateralized, collateralized with

27

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010



securities held by the pledging financial institution, except for deposits collateralized by certain types of
collateral pools including a single financial institution collateral pool where the fair value of the pool is
equal to or exceeds all uninsured public deposits held by the financial institution (The Public Deposit
Protection Act) or collateralized with securities held by the pledging financial institution’s trust
department or agent but not in the depositor – government’s name. Accordingly, none of the School’s
deposits as of June 30, 2011 and 2010 are deemed to be exposed to custodial credit risk. As of June 30,
2011, the DPCU had cash balances of approximately $80,000 that exceeded federally insured limits.
Investments
The School has authority to invest institutional funds in any investment deemed advisable by the
governing board per section 15-1-1106, C.R.S. The School may legally invest in direct obligations of,
and other obligations guaranteed as to principal by, the U.S. Treasury and U.S. agencies and
instrumentalities and in bank repurchase agreements. It may also invest, to a limited extent, in equity
securities.
Credit Quality Risk – Credit quality risk is the risk that an issuer of an investment will not fulfill its
obligation to the holder of the investment. Credit risk only applies to debt investments. This is
measured by the assignment of a rating by a nationally recognized statistical rating organization
(NRSRO). The School has no investment policy that would further limit its investment choices beyond
those allowed by State statute.
Interest Rate Risk – Interest rate risk is the risk that changes in market interest rates will adversely affect
the fair value of an investment. Interest rate risk only applies to debt investments. Generally, the longer
the maturity of an investment, the greater the sensitivity of its fair value to changes in market interest
rates. Interest rate risk inherent in the School’s investments is measured by monitoring the modified
duration of the overall investments portfolio. Modified duration estimates the sensitivity of the School’s
investments to changes in the interest rates. The School does not have a formal investment policy that
limits investment maturities as a means of managing its exposure to fair value losses arising from
increasing interest rates. The following table presents investment balances by type.
Concentration of Credit Risk – Concentration of credit risk is the risk of loss attributed to the magnitude
of an entity’s investment in a single issuer. At June 30, 2011 and 2010, no single investment of the
School exceeded 5 percent of the total investments.
The School’s and DPCU Investments at June 30 are shown in Table 2.2 Investments.
TABLE 2.2 Investments (in thousands)
Investment Type
2011
2010
School
Cash
$ 604
401
Corporate equity securities
6,001
4,258
Hedge funds
3,268
2,916
Private equity
2,556
2,059
Corporate bonds
2,199
2,680
Total Investments-School
$ 14,628
12,314

28

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010




TABLE 2.2 Investments (continued) (in thousands)
Investment Type
2011
2010
Discretely Presented Component Unit
Cash
$ 8,048
5,251
Corporate equity securities
75,450
52,974
Hedge funds
43,513
38,229
Private equity
34,024
26,995
Corporate bonds
29,274
35,129
Split-interest agreements
10,929
10,244
Gift annuity agreements
5,673
5,207
Beneficial interest investments
9,148
7,723
Total Investments-DPCU
$ 216,059
181,752

The School’s investments are managed by the Colorado School of Mines Foundation, Incorporated, on
behalf of the School and are reflected in its Long-term Investment Pool. The School investments are
under the Foundation’s Long-term Investment Pool (LTIP) policy. This policy requires funds to be
managed in a diversified manner to reduce risks with the goal of providing a steady stream of funding for
the School. The LTIP must be over a broad investment spectrum in order to create a mix of potential
returns that, in the aggregate, would achieve the overall portfolio objectives. This diversification is to
ensure that adverse or unexpected developments arising in one security or asset class will not have a
significant detrimental impact on the entire portfolio. This policy minimizes concentration credit risk.
Table 2.3, Debt Investments, Interest Rate Risk and Credit Quality Risk, presents the School’s rating and
duration for its debt securities.
TABLE 2.3 Debt Investments, Interest Rate and Credit Quality Risk (in thousands)
Investment Type
2011
2010

School


Corporate bonds


Fair Value
$ 2,199
2,680

Standard & Poor’s Rating
AA
AA

Duration (yrs)
5
5

Discretely Presented Component Unit



Bond Mutual Funds



Fair Value
$29,274
*

% of Rated Value by Credit Rating
52% - AA



48% - A+


Duration
1.4 – 4.8



* 2010 information relating to the Foundation is not available.

29

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010



Note 3: Accounts, Contributions and Loans Receivable
Table 3.1, Accounts Receivable, segregates receivables as of June 30, 2011 and 2010, by type.
TABLE 3.1 Accounts Receivable (in thousands)

2011
Net Current
Type of Receivable
Gross Receivables
Allowance
Net Receivable
Portion
School

Student accounts
$ 4,287
1,030
3,257
3,257
Student loans
5,567
154
5,413
481
Federal government
8,536
-
8,536
8,536
Other governments
143
-
143
143
Private sponsors
4,620
271
4,349
4,349
DPCU 1,965
-
1,965
1,965
Other
436
-
436
436
Total Receivable-School
$ 25,554
1,455
24,099
19,167


Discretely Presented Component Unit
Contributions*
$ 11,251
-
11,251
2,008
Due from School
2,836
-
2,836
462
Total Receivable-DPCU
$ 14,087
-
14,087
2,470

2010
Net Current
Type of Receivable
Gross Receivables
Allowance
Net Receivable
Portion
School

Student accounts
$ 4,178
1,028
3,150
3,150
Student loans
5,736
144
5,592
486
Federal government
8,785
63
8,722
8,722
Other governments
301
-
301
301
Private sponsors
4,716
532
4,184
4,184
DPCU 1,430
-
1,430
1,430
Other 590
-
590
590
Total Receivable-School
$ 25,736
1,767
23,969
18,863
Discretely Presented Component Unit

Contributions*
$ 16,878
-
16,878
7,347
Due from School
2,820
-
2,820
543
Total Receivable-DPCU
$ 19,698
-
19,698
7,890
*The allowance on the contributions receivable is comprised of uncollectible and unamortized discounts of $233 and $299,
respectively, for June 30, 2011, and $370 and $462 respectively, as of June 30, 2010.

30

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010



Note 4: Capital Assets
Table 4.1, Capital Assets, presents the changes in capital assets and accumulated depreciation by major
asset category for the years ended June 30, 2011 and 2010.
TABLE 4.1 Capital Assets (in thousands)




Category
Balance 2010
Additions
Deletions
Transfers
Balance 2011
Nondepreciable capital assets

Land
$ 3,257
1,050
33
-
4,274
Construction in progress
21,421
53,924
362
(62,242)
12,741
Total nondepreciable assets
24,678
54,974
395
(62,242)
17,015
Depreciable capital assets

Land improvements
15,007
-
77
2,547
17,477
Buildings and improvements
223,185
641
918
58,939
281,847
Software 1,283
126
-
-
1,409
Equipment 35,930
4,775
1,710
756
39,751
Library materials
12,412
146
150
-
12,408
Intangible assets
600
-
-
-
600
Total depreciable capital assets
288,417
5,688
2,855
62,242
353,492
Less accumulated depreciation





Land improvements
6,533
568
-
-
7,101
Buildings 86,357
8,121
634
-
93,844
Software 578
21
-
-
599
Equipment 23,721
3177
1,599
-
25,299
Library materials
11,002
200
150
-
11,052
Intangible assets
33
33
-
-
66
Total accumulated depreciation
128,224
12,120
2,383
-
137,961
Net depreciable assets
160,193
(6,432)
472
62,242
215,531
Total Net Capital Assets
$ 184,871
48,542
867
-
232,546

31

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010




TABLE 4.1 Capital Assets (continued) (in thousands)
Category
Balance 2009
Additions
Deletions
Transfers
Balance 2010
Nondepreciable capital assets

Land
$ 3,224
33
-
-
3,257
Construction in progress
10,155
18,780
867
(6,647)
21,421
Total nondepreciable assets
13,379
18,813
867
(6,647)
24,678
Depreciable capital assets

Land improvements
9,771
-
-
5,236
15,007
Buildings and improvements
222,780
634
1,450
1,221
223,185
Equipment 35,436
3,329
1,742
190
37,213
Library materials
12,305
109
2
-
12,412
Intangible assets
600
-
-
-
600
Total depreciable capital assets
280,892
4,072
3,194
6,647
288,417
Less accumulated depreciation

Land improvements
6,129
404
-
-
6,533
Buildings 78,731
7,723
97
-
86,357
Equipment 23,187
2,786
1,674
-
24,299
Library materials
10,787
217
2
-
11,002
Intangible assets
-
33
-
-
33
Total accumulated depreciation
118,834
11,163
1,773
-
128,224
Net depreciable assets
162,058
(7,091)
1,421
6,647
160,193
Total Net Capital Assets
$ 175,437
11,722
2,288
-
184,871

The total interest costs related to capital asset debt incurred by the School during the years ended
June 30, 2011 and 2010, was $8,011,000 and $7,475,000, respectively. The School capitalizes interest
costs as a component of construction in progress during the period of construction, based on interest
costs of borrowing specifically for the project, net of interest earned on investments acquired with the
proceeds of the tax-exempt debt. The total amount of interest costs capitalized as part of construction in
progress during the years ended June 30, 2011 and 2010 was $4,649,000 and $2,469,000, respectively.

Note 5:
Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities
Table 5.1, Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities, details the accounts payable and accrued expenses
as of June 30, 2011 and 2010.
TABLE 5.1 Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities (in thousands)
Type 2011
2010
Accounts payable - vendors
$ 12,956
9,203
Accrued salaries and benefits
9,671
7,193
Accrued interest payable
553
483
Total Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities
$ 23,180
16,879


32

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010



The School leases building space under operating lease rental agreements. Operating leases do not give rise to
property rights or meet other capital lease criteria, and therefore, the related assets and liabilities are not
recorded in the accompanying financial statements. For Fiscal Years 2011 and 2010, total rental expense
under these agreements were $55,000 and $0, respectively. Table 5.2, Future Minimum Operating Lease
Payments, details the future minimum operating lease payments.
TABLE 5.2 Future Minimum Operating Lease Payments (in thousands)

Minimum
Years Ending June 30
Lease Payment
2012
$ 73
2013 78
2014 82
2015 72
Total Operating Lease Payments
$ 305

The School leases office space to an unrelated single tenant. The lease term is 10 years and expires in
July 2018. The annual rent payment of $1,287,000 is paid in monthly installments and is recorded as
other operating revenue in the Statement of Revenues, Expenses and Changes in Net Assets.
Note 6: Deferred Revenue
Table 6.1, Deferred Revenue, details the types and amounts of deferred revenue as of June 30, 2011 and
2010.
TABLE 6.1 Deferred Revenue (in thousands)
Type 2011
2010
Tuition and fees
$ 4,876
4,254
Grants and contracts
11,485
13,445
Miscellaneous 425
522
Total Deferred Revenue
$ 16,786
18,221

In June 2001, the School entered into a ten-year agreement to provide development assistance and other
planning activities in connection with the development of a foreign school. Additionally, the School
received a nonrefundable up-front fee for a non-exclusive license to use its trademarks for the term of the
agreement. The trademark license agreement ended in Fiscal Year 2011. Development assistance fees
and trademark license fees were recognized as revenue over the term of the agreement. In Fiscal Year
2009 the development assistance portion of this contract was renegotiated; the opportunity to generate
revenue from this part of the contract has been transitioned to research projects for the School. Deferred
revenue for the trademark license totaled $0 and $458,000 at June 30, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

33

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010



Note 7: Compensated Absences
Table 7.1, Compensated Absences, presents the changes in compensated absences for the years ended
June 30, 2011 and 2010.
TABLE 7.1 Compensated Absences (in thousands)

2011 2010
Beginning of the year
$ 4,702
4,594
Additions 625
550
Adjustments/reductions 485
442
End of the year
$ 4,842
4,702
Current Portion
$ 441
429

Note 8: Bonds, Notes and Leases
As of June 30, 2011 and 210, the categories of long-term obligations are detailed in Table 8.2, Bonds,
Notes and Leases Payable. Table 8.3, Changes in Bonds, Notes, and Leases Payable, presents the
changes in bonds, notes, and capital leases payable for the years ended June 30, 2011 and 2010.
Revenue Bonds
A general description of each revenue bond issue, original issuance amount, and the amount outstanding
as of June 30, 2011 and 2010 is detailed in Table 8.4, Revenue Bond Detail.
The School’s fixed rate revenue bonds are payable semi-annually, have serial maturities contain sinking
fund requirements and contain optional redemption provisions. The School’s variable rate demand
bonds are payable annually, contain sinking fund requirements and contain optional redemption
provisions. The optional redemption provisions allow the School to redeem, at various dates, portions of
the outstanding revenue bonds at varying prices. All School revenue bonds are special limited
obligations of the Board. The revenue bonds are not secured by any encumbrance mortgage, or other
pledge of property, except pledged revenues and do not constitute general obligations of the Board or
School.
The revenue bonds are secured by a pledge of all net revenues as defined by the bond documents. As of
June 30, 2011 and 2010, net auxiliary pledged revenues, total net pledged revenues, and the associated
debt service coverage are shown in Table 8.1, Net Pledged Revenues. The School’s net pledged
revenues will continue to be pledged for the life of the associated revenue bonds as detailed in Table 8.2,
Bonds, Notes, and Leases Payable. The outstanding principle and interest of the related pledged debt is
detailed in Table 8.5, Revenue Bonds Future Minimum Payments. The School believes it is in
compliance with all existing pledged revenue requirements of its outstanding bonds.
TABLE 8.1 Net Pledged Revenue (in thousands)
Source of Net Pledged Revenue
2011 2010
Auxiliary Revenue Bonds


Net auxiliary facilities
$ 5,679
5,692
Student fees
3,586
3,183
Renewal and replacement fund
493
420
Net auxiliary pledged revenues
9,758
9,295
Prior obligation auxiliary debt service
2,030
2,038
Prior obligation auxiliary debt service coverage
4.81%
4.56%

34

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010




TABLE 8.1 Net Pledged Revenue (continued) (in thousands)
Source of Net Pledged Revenue
2011 2010
Institutional Enterprise Revenue Bonds


Student tuition
$ 11,179
9,934
Student facility fees
2,826
1,691
Federal indirect cost recovery
10,238
9,712
Federal interest subsidy
1,080
500
Capital gifts
-
1,387
Net Institutional Enterprise Pledged Revenues
25,323
23,224
Total Net Pledged Revenues
35,081
32,516
Total Debt Service
11,718
6,455
Total Debt Service Coverage
2.99%
5.04%
% of Pledged Revenue to Total Revenue
87%
85%

The Auxiliary Facility Enterprise Revenue bonds specify debt service coverage requirements for the
auxiliary facilities. The debt service coverage provisions require net pledged revenues to be equal to 110
percent of the combined principal and interest payments, excluding any reserves, on the Auxiliary Bonds
and any additional bonds due during any subsequent fiscal year. The Auxiliary Facility Enterprise
Revenue bonds are payable from net pledged revenues on parity with the other bonds and the note
payable.
A master resolution adopted by the Board includes a covenant by the Board which provides, in summary,
that, while the Bonds are outstanding, and subject to applicable law, the Board will continue to impose
such fees and charges as are included within the Gross revenues and will continue the present operation
and use of the Institutional Enterprise and the Facilities. The Board will continue to maintain such
reasonable fees, rental rates and other charges for the use of all facilities and for services rendered by the
Institutional Enterprise as will return annually Gross revenue sufficient to pay the prior bond obligations,
to pay operation and maintenance expenses, to pay the annual debt service requirements of the bonds and
any parity obligations payable from the net revenues. In addition, the Board will make any deposits
required to the reserve fund. The debt covenant includes provisions relating to other matters such as
maintenance of insurance coverage for the facilities. The Master Resolution prohibits the Board from
selling, destroying, abandoning, otherwise disposing of or altering at any time the property comprising a
part of the facilities until all bonds payable out of net revenues have been paid or provision has been
made to pay all such bonds. The School believes it is in compliance with these covenants.
The Series 2009B, 2010B, and 2011 bonds qualify as Build America Bonds for purposes of the
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) signed into law on February 17, 2009.
Pursuant to ARRA, for the Series 2009B and 2010B bonds, the School expects to receive a cash subsidy
payment from the United States Treasury, referred to as Federal Direct Payments, equal to 35 percent of
the interest payable on the bonds on or around each interest payment date. For the Series 2011 bonds,
the School expects to receive Federal Direct Payments equal to 70 percent of the interest payable on the
bonds on or around each interest payment date. Pursuant to the Colorado Recovery Act, the Board may
pledge any Federal Direct Payments received to the payments of the bonds. The Board has pledged such
payments to the payment of the Series 2009B bonds. In Fiscal Years 2011 and 2010, the School
received $ 1,080,000 and $500,000, respectively, in Federal Direct Payments.

35

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010



The Series 2009A, 2009B, 2009C and 2009D revenue bonds qualify for the State Intercept Program
established pursuant to Section 23-5-139 CRS. The State Intercept Program provides for the payment by
the State Treasurer of principal and interest due with respect to the revenue bonds issued by state
supported institutions of higher education if such institution will not make the payment by the date on
which it is due. For Fiscal Year 2011, the School did not invoke the State Intercept Program.
The following table provides a summary of the School’s long-term debt obligations as of June 30, 2011
and 2010 (in thousands):
TABLE 8.2 Bonds, Notes, and Leases Payable (in thousands)


Final
Balance
Balance
Type
Interest Rates
Maturity
2011
2010
Auxiliary Facilities Enterprise Revenue Bonds
2.5% - 5.4%
2038
$ 20,409
21,183
Institutional Enterprise Revenue Bonds




Variable Rate Demand Bonds
0.825%*
2038
31,169
45,066
Fixed Rate Bonds
3% - 6.29%
2041
105,153
94,702
Capital Leases Payable
3.25% - 7.5%
2014
319
98
Notes Payable
4.5%
2012
432
712
Total Bonds, Notes and Leases Payable


$ 157,482
161,761





* Variable rate demand bonds are set at an adjustable rate as discussed below. The rates reflected in the table are as of June 30, 2011.

The interest rate on the Series 2008A variable rate demand bonds was calculated weekly and the interest
rate on the Series 2008B variable rate demand bonds was calculated daily based on the Securities
Industry and Financial Markets Association (SIFMA). The interest rate on the Series 2008A as of
June 30, 2010 was 0.28 percent. The interest rate on the Series 2008B as of June 30, 2010 was 0.18
percent. The interest rate on the Series 2010A variable rate demand bonds is calculated weekly based on
67 percent of the London interbank offered rate (LIBOR) plus a spread factor of 0.70. The interest rate
on the Series 2010A as of June 30, 2011 was 0.825 percent.
Table 8.3, Changes in Bonds, Notes, and Leases payable presents the changes in bonds, notes and leases
for the years ended June 30, 2011 and 2010.
TABLE 8.3 Changes in Bonds, Notes, and Leases Payable (in thousands)
Balance
Balance
Current
Type
2010 Additions
Deductions
2011
Portion
Revenue bonds payable
$ 167,747
57,338
53,570
171,515
3,580
Plus unamortized premiums
958
-
161
797
-
Less unamortized discounts
114
-
9
105
-
Less deferred loss
7,640
8,499
663
15,476
-
Total revenue bonds
160,951
48,839
53,059
156,731
3,580
Notes payable
712
-
280
432
432
Capital leases payable
98
366
145
319
143
Total Bonds, Notes and Leases Payable
$ 161,761
49,205
53,484
157,482
4,155




36

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010




TABLE 8.3 Changes in Bonds, Notes, and Leases Payable (continued) (in thousands)
Balance
Balance
Current
Type
2009 Additions
Deductions
2010
Portion
Revenue bonds payable
$ 115,188
68,464
15,905
167,747
4,180
Plus unamortized premiums
82
921
45
958
-
Less unamortized discounts
123
-
9
114
-
Less deferred loss
5,337
2,562
259
7,640
-
Total bonds
109,810
66,823
15,682
160,951
4,180
Notes payable
993
-
281
712
283
Capital leases payable
4,402
-
4,304
98
20
Total Bonds, Notes and Leases Payable
$ 115,205
66,823
20,267
161,761
4,483



TABLE 8.4 Revenue Bond Detail (in thousands)

Original



Issuance
Outstanding
Outstanding
Issuance Description
Amount
Balance 2011
Balance 2010
Auxiliary Facilities Enterprise Revenue Bonds:



Capital Appreciation, Series 1999 -



Used to fund capital improvements for residence halls,



residential housing, student center and fraternity housing



facilities
$ 7,794
9,485
9,002
Refunding and Improvement Series 2002 -



Used to refund a portion of the Auxiliary Facilities



Refunding and Improvement Series 1993, Auxiliary



Facilities Enterprise Series 1997, and acquire and equip



certain auxiliary facilities
32,040
6,245
6,350
Refunding and Improvement, Series 2004 -



Used to refund the Auxiliary Facilities Refunding and



Improvement Series 1993, Auxiliary Facilities Series 1996,



and construct and equip recreational and health facilities
17,450
4,690
5,810
Total Auxiliary Facilities Enterprise
Revenue
Bonds
57,284 20,420 21,162

37

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010




TABLE 8.4 Revenue Bond Detail (continued) (in thousands)

Original
Outstanding
Outstanding

Issuance
Balance
Balance
Issuance Description
Amount
2011
2010
Institutional Enterprise Revenue Bonds:



Variable Rate Demand Refunding Series 2008A -



Used to current refund the Refunding and Improvement



Series 2007
$ 43,200
-
42,860
Variable Rate Demand Improvement Series 2008B -



Used to fund capital improvements to Brown Hall and other



campus capital projects
34,075
-
7,000
Refunding and Improvement Series 2009A -



Used to refund the Colorado School of Mines Development



Corporation Refunding Variable Rate Demand Bonds,



Series 2005, refund a portion of the Variable Rate Demand



Improvement Series 2008B, make a payment in connection



with modifying a portion of an existing swap agreement for



the Series 2008B Bonds, and acquire certain real properties



located in Golden, Colorado
28,720
27,815
28,720

Series 2009B -



Used to fund construction or renovation of certain campus



capital projects including a new residence hall, Weaver



Towers, wellness center and other capital improvements
42,860
42,860
42,860
Refunding Series 2009C -



Used to refund a portion of the Series 2008B and terminate



an existing swap agreement for the Series 2008B bonds
16,745
16,275
16,745
Series 2009D -



Used to fund construction of Marquez Hall
8,400
7,640
8,400
Variable Rate Demand Refunding Series 2010A -



Used to current refund the Refunding Series 2008A
42,860
42,510
-
Series 2010B - Taxable Direct Payment Build America Bonds.



Used to construct, improve, renovate and equip new



academic wing to Marquez Hall and provide additional



facilities
11,195
11,195
-
Series 2011 - Taxable Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds.



Used to finance one or more qualified conservation



improvement projects
2,800
2,800
-
Total Institutional Enterprise Revenue Bonds
230,855
151,095
146,585
Total Revenue Bonds
$ 288,139
171,515
167,747
Plus
Premiums
797 958
Less
Discounts
105 114
Less Deferred Loss

15,476
7,640
Total Outstanding Revenue Bonds

$ 156,731
160,951




38

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010



Letter of Credit for Series 2008A
Under an irrevocable Letter of Credit issued by Dexia, a European financial institution, through its New
York branch the trustee or the remarketing agent (Morgan Stanley) may draw an amount sufficient to
pay (a) the principal, the redemption price and (if not paid from remarketing proceeds) the purchase price
of the Series 2008A Bonds, plus (b) up to 35 days’ accrued interest on the Series 2008A Bonds
computed at a maximum rate of 12 percent per annum. The School could not terminate the Letter of
Credit agreement prior to March 5, 2010, except upon the payment by the School of a termination fee
equal to the facility fees payable. Facility fee is a quarterly payment in arrears equal to the per annum
rate associated with the rating as specified in the agreement. During Fiscal Years 2011 and 2010, the
School paid a total of $64,000 and $191,000, respectively, in facility fees at 0.44 percent rate.
Under a Reimbursement Agreement dated March 1, 2008, and subsequently amended October 17, 2008,
between the Board of Trustees of the Colorado School of Mines and Dexia, reimbursement by the
School to the Bank for advances under the Letter of Credit shall be payable in semiannual installments
on each amortization payment date (the first business day of the sixth calendar month immediately
succeeding the amortization commencement date and the first business day of each sixth calendar month
occurring thereafter). The amortization commencement date is 186 days from the related purchase date
of the bonds.
Colorado School of Mines had a Remarketing Agreement for the Series 2008A Bonds with Morgan
Stanley & Co. Incorporated. The School paid a quarterly remarketing fee in arrears equal to 0.10 percent
per annum of the weighted average for the principal amount of bonds outstanding during each three-
month period. For Fiscal Years 2011 and 2010, the remarking fees paid were $32,000 and $32,000
respectively. The remarketing agreement was terminated with the refunding of the 2008A bonds.
In conjunction with the issuance of the Series 2010A Bonds, the paying agent was authorized to draw
$42,871,707 on the existing letter of credit agreement to provide for the purchase of the bonds. An equal
amount of funds were received by the paying agent to reimburse the letter of credit. No amounts were
disbursed by Dexia under the Letter of Credit Agreement as of June 30, 2010. With the issuance of the
2010A refunding bonds, the letter of credit with Dexia was cancelled.
Letter of Credit for Series 2008B
Under an irrevocable Letter of Credit issued by Dexia, through its New York branch, the trustee or the
remarketing agent (Morgan Stanley) may draw an amount sufficient to pay (a) the principal, the
redemption price and (if not paid from remarketing proceeds) the purchase price of the Series 2008B
Bonds, plus (b) up to 35 days’ accrued interest on the Series 2008B Bonds computed at a maximum rate
of 12 percent per annum. The School could not terminate the Letter of Credit agreement prior to
June 19, 2009, except upon the payment by the School of a termination fee equal to the facility fees
payable. Facility fee is a quarterly payment in arrears equal to the per annum rate associated with the
rating as specified in the agreement. During Fiscal Years 2011 and 2010, the School paid a total of
$19,000 and $73,000, respectively at a 0.55 percent rate.

39

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010



Under a Reimbursement Agreement dated June 1, 2008, and subsequently amended October 17, 2008,
between the Board of Trustees of the Colorado School of Mines and Dexia, reimbursement by the
School to the Bank for advances under the Letter of Credit shall be payable in semiannual installments
on each amortization payment date (the first business day of the sixth calendar month immediately
succeeding the amortization commencement date and the first business day of each sixth calendar month
occurring thereafter). The amortization commencement date is 186 days from the related purchase date
of the bonds.
Under the terms of the Series 2009A bonds, a portion of the proceeds were deposited into a Series 2008B
Refunding Account, sufficient without investment thereof, to enable the Series 2008B paying agent to
current refund a portion of the Series 2008B bonds. The paying agent was authorized to draw on the
Letter of Credit for the payment of the principal and interest due on May 1, 2009 and then use the
amounts deposited in the 2008B Refunding Account to reimburse the Letter of Credit. No amounts were
disbursed by Dexia under the Letter of Credit Agreement as of June 30, 2010. The letter of credit was
terminated effective November 1, 2010 when the remaining Series 2008B bonds were retired.
Colorado School of Mines had a Remarketing Agreement for the Series 2008B Bonds with Morgan
Stanley & Co. Incorporated. The School paid a quarterly remarketing fee in arrears equal to 0.10 percent
per annum of the weighted average for the principal amount of bonds outstanding during each three-
month period. For Fiscal Years 2011 and 2010, the remarking fees paid were $31,000 and $9,000
respectively. The remarketing agreement was terminated with the payoff of the 2008B bonds.
Refunding Revenue Bond Activity
In November 2010, the School issued Variable Rate Demand Institutional Enterprise Revenue Refunding
Bonds Series 2010A to refund the Variable Rate Demand Refunding Series 2008A bonds and entered
into a three year agreement with Wells Fargo NA for the purchase of $42,860,000 in outstanding bonds
associated with Series 2008A. The demand feature of the bonds applies at the end of an interest rate
mode period. This period can range from weekly to long-term. As a result of the agreement with Wells
Fargo, the demand feature is not applicable until October 2013.
The Swap Agreement associated with the Series 2008A Bonds remains in effect and is now associated
with the Series 2010A Bonds. The refunding resulted in no change in the cash flows to service the debt,
there was no economic gain or loss and because of the associated swap, the variable rate Series 2010A
Refunding bonds have a synthetic fixed rate of 3.59 percent and therefore there are no risks associated
with interest rate fluctuations. The deferred loss on refunding recorded when the Series 2008A bonds
were issued was included in the calculation of the loss on refunding with the issuance of the Series
2010A bonds and a total deferred loss on refunding of $3,333,000 is being amortized over the life of
Series 2010A bonds.
On November 3, 2009, the School issued $16,745,000 in Institutional Enterprise Revenue Refunding
Bonds, Series 2009C. The proceeds were used to current refund $14,400,000 of the School’s Variable
Rate Demand Enterprise Improvement Revenue Bonds, Series 2008B. The current refunding resulted in
a decrease in the cash flows to service the new debt versus the old debt of $2,959,719, an economic loss
of $1,148,080 and a book loss of $117,727 that is being amortized as an adjustment to interest expense
over the remaining life of the new debt.

40

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010



Debt Service Requirements on Revenue Bonds
The future minimum revenue bonds debt service requirements as of June 30, 2011, are shown in Table
8.5, Revenue Bonds Future Minimum Payments.
TABLE 8.5 Revenue Bonds Future Minimum Payments (in thousands)
Years Ending June 30
Principal
Interest
Total
2012
$ 3,580
8,012
11,592
2013 4,350
7,856
12,206
2014 4,505
7,700
12,205
2015 4,645
7,553
12,198
2016 4,755
7,399
12,154
2017 – 2021
25,415
34,253
59,668
2022 – 2026
23,185
30,437
53,622
2027 – 2031
28,145
25,395
53,540
2032 – 2036
37,050
19,779
56,829
2037 – 2041
42,195
14,342
56,537
Subtotal 177,825
162,726
340,551
Unaccreted interest -1999 Bonds
(6,310)

Total Debt Service
$ 171,515


Interest Rate SWAP Agreements
In Fiscal Year 2008, the School entered into a floating to fixed interest rate swap agreement (Swap
Agreement) in connection with the 2008A issuance. The Swap Agreement was entered into with the
objective of protecting against the potential of rising interest rates. With the issuance of the Series
2010A Refunding Bonds, the swap agreement was not terminated and was associated with the Series
2010A Refunding Bonds. The Swap Agreement has an original notional amount of $43,200,000, which
amortizes in accordance with the associated debt, and a fair value of ($6,182,000) and ($7,778,000) at
June 30, 2011 and 2010, respectively. The Swap Agreement provides for certain payments to or from
Morgan Stanley equal to the difference between the fixed rate of 3.59 percent payable by the School and
67 percent of one month USD-LIBOR-BBA, 0.185 percent at June 30, 2011, payable by Morgan
Stanley. The fair value of the swap is classified as a noncurrent liability and the change in fair value of
the swap is classified as either a deferred outflow or deferred inflow at June 30, 2011 and 2010. On the
date of the refunding of the Series 2008A Bonds, the fair market value of the swap was ($8,301,000) and
was included in the calculation of loss on refunding and is being amortized over the life of the Series
2010A Refunding Bonds. The change in fair market value of the swap agreement from the date of the
refunding to June 30, 2011 of $2,006,000 is reported as a deferred inflow on the Statement of Net Assets.
Morgan Stanley, counterparty to the Swap Agreement, determined the fair value as of June 30, 2011 and
2010, using a discounted forecasted cash flows; however, the actual method and significant assumptions
used are proprietary. The Swap Agreement has an effective date of March 5, 2008 and a termination
date of December 1, 2037.

41

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010



In Fiscal Year 2009, the School entered into a floating to fixed interest rate swap agreement in
connection with the 2008B issuance. The Swap Agreement was entered into with the objective of
protecting against the potential of rising interest rates. The Swap Agreement, with an original notional
amount of $34,075,000 that amortizes with the associated debt, provides for certain payments to or from
Morgan Stanley equal to the difference between the fixed rate of 4.21 percent payable by the School and
the USD-SIFMA Municipal Swap Index payable by Morgan Stanley under the 2008B Swap Agreement.
In conjunction with the Series 2009A bonds, a $1,693,000 swap modification payment was made to
Morgan Stanley to reduce the nominal amount of the original swap agreement by $12,675,000 to a
nominal amount of $21,400,000. As part of the Series 2009C bonds, a swap termination payment of
$2,444,000 was made to Morgan Stanley to terminate the 2008B swap agreement. The swap
modification and termination payments are being amortized over the shorter of the life of the old or new
debt issuance.
There can be risks inherent to interest rate swaps that the School addresses and monitors pursuant to
entering into interest rate swap agreements:
Termination Risk – The need to terminate the transaction in a market that dictates a termination
payment by the School. It is possible that a termination payment is required in the event of
termination of a swap agreement due to a counterparty default or following a decrease in credit
rating. In general, exercising the right to optionally terminate an agreement should produce a
benefit to the School, either through receipt of a payment from a termination, or if a termination
payment is made by the School, a conversion to a more beneficial debt instrument or credit
relationship.
Credit Risk – The risk that the counterparty will not fulfill its obligations. The School considers
the swap agreement counterparty’s (Morgan Stanley) credit quality rating and whether the
counterparty can withstand continuing credit market turmoil. As of June 30, 2011, Morgan
Stanley’s credit rating is A2 by Moody’s, and A by Standards & Poor’s & Fitch.
For the outstanding swap agreement the School has a maximum possible loss equivalent to the
swaps’ fair market value at June 30, 2011 and 2010 related to the credit risk. However, the
School was not exposed to this loss because of the negative fair market value of the swaps as of
June 30, 2011 and 2010. In addition, these agreements required no collateral and no initial net
cash receipt or payment by the School.
Basis Index Risk – Basis risk arises as a result of movement in the underlying variable rate
indices that may not be in tandem, creating a cost differential that could result in a net cash
outflow from the School. Basis risk can also result from the use of floating, but different,
indices. To mitigate basis risk, it is the School’s policy that any index used as part of an interest
rate swap agreement shall be a recognized market index, including, but not limited to, the
Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association (SIFMA) or the London Interbank
Offered Rate (LIBOR).
As of June 30, 2011, the aggregate debt service payments and net swap cash payments, assuming current
interest rates remain the same, for their term are reflected in Table 8.6, Future Revenue Bonds and Net
Swap Minimum Payments.

42

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010




TABLE 8.6 Future Revenue Bonds and Net Swap Minimum Payments (in thousands)
Years Ending June 30
Principal
Interest
Interest Swap (net)
Total
2012
$ 550
365
1,435
2,350
2013 575
360
1,415
2,350
2014 600
355
1,395
2,350
2015 625
349
1,374
2,348
2016 625
344
1,352
2,321
2017 – 2021
3,350
1,627
6,397
11,374
2022 – 2026
4,800
1,453
5,711
11,964
2027 – 2031
11,250
1,100
4,323
16,673
2032 – 2036
14,100
508
1,996
16,604
2037 – 2041
6,035
27
105
6,167
Total Debt Service
$ 42,510
6,488
25,503
74,501

Extinguishment of Debt
Previous revenue bond issues considered to be extinguished through in-substance defeasance under
generally accepted accounting principles are not included in the accompanying financial statements. The
amount of debt in this category, covered by assets placed in trust to be used solely for future payments,
amounted to $23,800,000 as of June 30, 2011 and 2010.
Note Payable
As of June 30, 2011 and 2010, the School had an outstanding note payable with the Foundation issued
for the construction of the School’s Student Recreation Center. In addition to principal payments made
by the School, the outstanding amount due shall also be reduced by the amounts of any restricted gifts
made by donors for the benefit of or use by the School’s Student Recreation Center during the term of
the agreement. The agreement is unsecured.
Future minimum payments of the note payable to the Foundation are shown in Table 8.7 Future
Minimum Note Payments.


Table 8.7 Future Minimum Note Payments (in thousands)

Year Ending June 30
Principal
Interest
Total

2012
$ 432
17
449
Total Notes Payable
$ 432
17
449

For Fiscal Year 2011 and 2010, $0 and $14,000, respectively, of the total principal payments made
represented gifts received by the Foundation that were applied to the note.
Capital Leases
The School has entered into a lease agreement for athletics’ team transportation bus with a purchase
option at the end of the lease. The monthly lease payments are $2,256. The School is expected to
purchase this bus at the end of the lease in 2014.

43

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010



The School has entered into a three year lease agreement for a piece of equipment. Annual principal
payments of $121,000 are due each October.
Future minimum payments on the capital leases are shown in Table 8.8 Future Minimum Capital Lease
Payments.
Table 8.8 Future Minimum Capital Lease Payments (in thousands)
Year Ending June 30,
Principal
Interest
Total
2012
$ 143
13
156
2013 144
7
151
2014 32
6
38
Total Capital Lease Payments
$ 319
26
345

The underlying gross capitalized asset costs for the capital leases are $498,000. Accumulated
amortization as of June 30, 2011 and 2010 is $84,000 and $40,000, respectively.
State of Colorado Certificates of Participation
In Fiscal Year 2008, State of Colorado Senate Bill 08-218 made Federal Mineral Leasing (FML) monies
available for capital construction at institutions of higher education. FML money is derived from
ongoing leasing and production activities on federal lands within Colorado and approximately half of
these payments go to the State of Colorado. The State used part of this money on November 6, 2008 and
issued Certificates of Participation (COP) to support some higher education construction and
maintenance projects. The School received $6,748,000 for a portion of the support in the construction of
an addition to the Brown Hall building. The State of Colorado is responsible for making the principal
and interest payments on the COP.
Note 9: Other Liabilities
Table 9.1, Other Liabilities, details other liabilities as of June 30, 2011 and 2010.
TABLE 9.1 Other Liabilities (in thousands)
2011
2010


Current

Current
Type
Total
Portion
Total
Portion
School

Interest rate swap
$ 6,182
-
7,778
-
Amounts due to the Foundation
2,476
81
2,195
104
Funds held for others
115
115
28
28
Pollution remediation
1,190
605
1,849
1,558
Miscellaneous 666
666
641
641
Total Other Liabilities - School
$ 10,629
1,467
12,491
2,331
Discretely Presented Component Unit

Colorado School of Mines
$ 14,482
-
12,097
-
Other trust funds
966
-
856
-
Obligations under split-interest agreements
5,257
-
5,258
-
Obligations under gift annuity agreements
4,801
-
4,983
-
Refunded advances
120
-
96
-
Other liabilities
128
-
117
-
Total Other Liabilities - DPCU
$ 25,754
-
23,407 -

44

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010



Direct Lending
The School began participation in the Direct Student Loan program operated by the Federal government
in the spring of Fiscal Year 2010. This program enables eligible students or parents to obtain a loan to
pay for the student’s cost of attendance directly through the School rather than through a private lender.
The School is responsible for handling the complete loan process, including funds management, as well
as promissory note functions. The School is not responsible for collection of these loans or for defaults
by borrowers, and therefore these loans are not recognized as receivables in the accompanying financial
statements. Prior to participating in the Direct Student Loan Program, the School participated in the
Federal Family Education Loans (FFEL) program. Under the FFEL program, students obtained loans
from private lenders. Lending activity during the years ended June 30, 2011 and 2010 under these
programs were $22,290,000 and $16,546,000, respectively.
Note 10: Pension Plan
Plan Description
Virtually all the School employees participate in a defined benefit pension plan. The plan’s purpose is to
provide income to members and their families at retirement or in case of death or disability. The plan is
a cost-sharing multiple-employer plan, administered by the Public Employees’ Retirement Association
(PERA). PERA was established by State statute in 1931. Responsibility for the organization and
administration of the plan is placed with the Board of Trustees of PERA. Changes to the plan require an
actuarial assessment and legislation by the General Assembly. The State plan and other divisions’ plans
are included in PERA’s financial statements which may be obtained by writing PERA at PO Box 5800,
Denver, Colorado, 80217 or by calling PERA at 1-800-729-PERA (7372), or by visiting
www.copera.org.
PERA also administers the Voluntary Investment Program that administers two defined contribution
plans (Note 11).
New employees, excluding four-year college and university employees, are allowed 60 days to elect to
participate in PERA’s defined contribution retirement plan. If that election is not made, the employee
becomes a member of PERA’s defined benefit plan. Prior to legislation passed during the 2006 session,
higher education employees may have participated in social security, PERA’s defined benefit plan, or the
institution’s optional retirement plan. Currently, higher education employees, excluding community
college employees, are required to participate in their institution’s optional plan, if available, unless they
are active or inactive members of PERA with at least one year of service credit. In that case they may
elect either PERA or their institution’s optional plan. Community college employees hired after
January 1, 2010, are required to become members of PERA’s defined benefit or defined contribution
plan.
PERA members electing the PERA defined contribution plan are allowed an irrevocable election between
the second and fifth year of membership to use their defined contribution account to purchase service credit
and be covered under the defined benefit retirement plan. However, making this election subjects the
member to rules in effect for those hired on or after January 1, 2007, as discussed below. Employer
contributions to both defined contribution plans are the same amount as the contributions to the PERA
defined benefit plan

45

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010



Based on changes in the 2010 legislative session slightly different plan requirements were in effect until
December 31, 2010. The following requirements were effective at June 30, 2011.
Plan members are eligible to receive a monthly retirement benefit when they meet age and service
requirements based on their original hire date as follows:

Hired before July 1, 2005 - age 50 with 30 years of service, age 60 with 20 years of service, or age
65 with 5 years of service.

Hired between July 1, 2005 and December 31, 2006 – any age with 35 years of service, age 55
with 30 years of service, age 60 with 20 years of service, or age 65 with 5 years of service.

Hired between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2010 – any age with 35 years of service, age 55
with 30 years of service, age 60 with 25 years of service, or age 65 with 5 years of service. For
employees hired before January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2010 if the member has less than five
years of service credit as of January 1, 2011.

Hired between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2016 – any age with 35 years of service, age 58
with 30 years of service, or age 65 with 5 years of service.

Hired on or after January 1, 2017 – any age with 35 years of service, age 60 with 30 years of
service, or age 65 with 5 years of service.
Members with five years of service credit at January 1, 2011, are also eligible for retirement benefits
without a reduction for early retirement based on their original hire date as follows:

Hired before January 1, 2007 – age 55 and age plus years of service equals 80 or more.

Hired between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2010 – age 55 and age plus years of service
equals 85 or more. For members hired before January 1, 2007, age plus years of service increase
to 85 for members with less than five years of service credit as of January 1, 2011.

Hired between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2016 – age 58 and age plus years of service
equals 88 or more.

Hired on or after January 1, 2017 – age 60 and age plus years of service equals 90.
Most members automatically receive the higher of the defined retirement benefit or money purchase
benefit at retirement. Defined benefits are calculated as 2.5 percent times the number of years of service
times the highest average salary (HAS). For retirements before January 1, 2009, HAS is calculated as
one-twelfth of the average of the highest salaries on which contributions were paid, associated with three
periods of 12 consecutive months of service credit and limited to a 15 percent increase between periods.
For retirements after January 1, 2009, four periods are used and are ranked from lowest to highest with
the maximum increase between years limited to 15 percent. For members hired on or after January 1,
2007, the maximum increase between ranked periods is 8 percent. Notwithstanding any other
provisions, members first eligible for retirement after January 2, 2011 have a maximum increase
between periods of 8 percent.
Retiree benefits are increased annually in July after one year of retirement based on the member’s
original hire date as follows:

Hired before July 1, 2007 – the lesser of 2 percent or the average of the monthly Consumer Price
Index increases.

46

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010




Hired on or after January 1, 2007 – the lesser of 2 percent or the actual increase in the national
Consumer Price Index, limited to a 10 percent reduction in a reserve established for cost of living
increases related strictly to those hired on or after January 1, 2007. (The reserve is funded by 1
percentage point of salaries contributed by employers for employees hired on or after January 1,
2007.)

The upper limits on benefits increase by one-quarter percentage point each year when the funded
ration of PERA equals or exceeds 103 percent and declines by one-quarter percentage point when
the funded ratio drips below 90 percent after having exceeded 103 percent. The funded ratio
increase does not apply for three years when a negative return on investment occurs.
Members who are disabled, who have five or more years of service credit, six months of which has been
earned since the most recent period of membership, may receive retirement benefits if determined to be
permanently disabled. If a member dies before retirement, their eligible children under the age of 18 (23
if a full time student) or their spouse may be entitled to a single payment or monthly benefit payments.
If there is no eligible child or spouse then financially dependent parents, beneficiaries, or the member’s
estate, may be entitled to a survivor’s benefit.
Funding Policy
The contribution requirements of plan members and their employers are established, and may be
amended by the General Assembly. Salary subject to PERA contribution is gross earnings less any
reduction in pay to offset employer contributions to the state sponsored IRC 125 plan established under
Section 125 of the Internal Revenue Code.
Historically, most employees contributed eight percent (10.0 percent for state troopers) of their salary, as
defined in CRS 24-51-101(42), to an individual account in the plan. Effective July 1, 2010 Senate Bill
10-146 requires members in the State and Judicial Divisions to pay 2.5 percent additional contributions
through June 30, 2011. Senate Bill 11-076 continued these increased contribution rates through June 30,
2012.
From July 1, 2010, to December 31 2010, the School contributed 11.35 percent of the employee’s salary.
From January 1, 2011, through June 30, 2011, the School contributed 12.25 percent. During all of Fiscal
Year 2011, 1.02 percent of the employees’ total salary was allocated to the Health Care Trust Fund.
Per Colorado Revised Statutes, an amortization period of 30 years is deemed actuarially sound. At
December 31, 2010, the division of PERA in which the State participates has a funded ratio of 62.8
percent and a 47 year amortization period based on current contribution rates. The funded ratio on the
market value of assets is lower at 61.3 percent.
In the 2004 legislative session, and amended in the 2010 legislative session, the general assembly
authorized an Amortization Equalization Disbursement (AED) to address a pension-funding shortfall.
The AED requires PERA employers to pay an additional 2.6 percent in 2011 (2.4 percent in 2010 and
2.2 percent in 2009) of total member salaries. The AED is scheduled to increase by 0.4 percent of salary
through 2017 resulting in a cumulative increase of five percent.
In the 2006 legislative session, and amended in the 2010 legislative session, the general assembly
authorized a Supplemental Amortization Equalization Disbursement (SAED) to address a pension-funding
shortfall. The SAED requires PERA employers to pay an additional two percent in 2011 (1.5 percent in
2010 and one percent in 2009) of total member salaries. The SAED is scheduled to increase by 0.5 percent

47

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010



through 2017 resulting in a cumulative increase of five percent. For State employers, each year’s one half
percentage point increase in the SAED will be deducted from the amount available for increases to State
employees’ salaries and used by the employer to pay the SAED.
Both the AED and SAED will be reduced by one-half percent point when funding levels reach 103 percent,
and both will be increased by one-half percent point when the funding level subsequently falls below 90
percent. Neither the AED nor the SAED may exceed five percent.
Historically, members have been allowed to purchase service credit at reduced rates. However, legislation
passed in the 2006 session required, that future agreements to purchase service credit be sufficient to fund
the related actuarial liability.
The School contributions to the three programs described above for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2011,
2010 and 2009 were $7,136,000, $7,892,000 and $7,273,000, respectively, equal to its required
contributions for those years.
CSM Foundation Retirement Plan
The Foundation participates in a defined contribution pension plan covering substantially all of its
employees. Contributions and costs are based on the number of years of service and a percentage of
regular salary. Pension expense was $91,000 and $121,000 for 2011 and 2010, respectively.
Note 11: Volunteer Tax-Deferred Retirement Plans (Voluntary Investment Program)
Defined Contribution Plan
The PERA Defined Contribution Retirement Plan was established January 1, 2006, as an alternative to
the defined benefit plan. All employees, with the exception of certain higher education employees, have
the option of participating in the plan. New member contributions to the plan vest from 50 percent to
100 percent evenly over 5 years. Participants in the plan are required to contribute 8 percent of their
salary. For Fiscal Years 2010 and 2011 the legislature temporarily increased the required contribution rate
to 10.5 percent. At December 31, 2010, the plan had 3,479 participants.
Deferred Compensation Plan
The PERA Deferred Compensation Plan (457) was established July 1, 2009, as a continuation of the
State’s deferred compensation plan which was established for State and local government employees in
1981. At July 1, 2009, the State’s administrative functions were transferred to PERA, and all costs of
administration and funding are borne by the plan participants. In calendar year 2010, participants were
allowed to make contributions of up to 100 percent of their annual gross salary (reduced by their 8
percent PERA contribution) to a maximum of $16,500. Participants who are age 50 and older may
contribute an additional $5,500 for total contributions of $22,000. At December 31, 2010, the plan had
18,215 participants.
PERA also offers a voluntary 401(k) plan entirely separate from the defined benefit pension plan.
Certain agencies and institutions of the state offer 403(b) or 401(a) plans.

48

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010



Note 12: Other Postemployment Benefits and Life Insurance
Health Care Plan
The PERA Health Care Program began covering benefit recipients and qualified dependents on July 1,
1986. This benefit was developed after legislation in 1985 established the program and the Health Care
Fund; the program was converted to a trust fund in 1999. The plan is a cost-sharing multiple-employer
plan under which PERA subsidizes a portion of the monthly premium for health care coverage. The
benefits and employer contributions are established in statute and may be amended by the General
Assembly. PERA includes the Health Care Trust Fund in its Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,
which may be obtained by writing PERA at PO Box 5800, Denver, Colorado 80217, by calling PERA at
1-800-759-PERA (7372), or by visiting http://www.copera.org.
After the PERA subsidy, the benefit recipient pays the balance of the premium through an automatic
deduction from the monthly retirement benefit. Monthly premium costs for participants depend on the
health care plan selected, the PERA subsidy amount, Medicare eligibility, and the number of persons
covered. Effective July 1, 2000, the maximum monthly subsidy is $230 per month for benefit recipients
who are under 65 years of age and who are not entitled to Medicare; and $115 per month for benefit
recipients who are 65 years of age or older or who are under 65 years of age and entitled to Medicare.
The maximum subsidy is based on the recipient having 20 years of service credit, and is subject to
reduction by 5 percent for each year less than 20 years.
Employees are not required to contribute to the Health Care Trust Fund, which is maintained by
employer’s contributions as discussed in Note 11 above. The School is required to contribute 1.02
percent of gross covered wages to the Health Care Trust Fund. The School contributed $617,000,
$620,000 and $593,000 as required by statute in Fiscal Years 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively. In each
year the amount contributed was 100 percent of the required contribution.
The Health Care Trust Fund offers two general types of plans: fully-insured plans offered through health
care organizations and self-insured plans administered for PERA by third party vendors. As of
December 31, 2010, there were 48,455 enrolled participants, including spouses and dependents, from all
contributors to the plan. At December 31, 2010, the Health Care Trust Fund had an unfunded actuarial
accrued liability of $1.35 billion, a funded ratio of 17.5 percent, and a 42-year amortization period. The
actuarial valuation was based on the entry age cost method, an 8 percent investment rate of return, a 4.5
percent projection of salary increases(assuming a .75 percent inflation rate), a 3.5 percent annual medical
claims increase, no postretirement benefit increases, and a level dollar amortization on an open basis
over 30 years.
In addition, the School has a Health Insurance Assistance Program for tenured faculty. This program
was initiated in 1993 and was stopped July 1, 2004. The program was provided in conjunction with a
Retirement Agreement negotiated between eligible faculty members and the School. For Fiscal Years
2011 and 2010, the School had four retired faculty members under this program with payments of
approximately $6,000 each year.

49

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010



Colorado Higher Education Insurance Benefits Alliance Trust (CHEIBA)
Retired faculty and exempt-administrative staff are eligible to participate in the Colorado Higher
Education Insurance Benefits Alliance Trust (CHEIBA). CHEIBA is a cost-sharing multiple-employer
insurance purchasing pool, which allows for post-employment health coverage until the retiree is eligible
for Medicare. As of June 30, 2011, there were 20 participants in post retirement coverage from the nine
member higher education institutions. For Fiscal Year 2011, the School had three retired faculty
administrative participants under CHEIBA.
CHEIBA financial statements are prepared under accounting principles generally accepted in the United
States using the accrual basis of accounting following governmental accounting standards for a business-
type activity. The financial statements can be obtained by contacting Marshall Parks, Treasurer,
CHEIBA Trust. Contributions are recognized in the period due. Benefits and refunds are recognized
and paid when due according to the participating plans. The fair value of the Trust’s investments is
based on quoted market prices from national securities exchanges.
There are no long-term contracts for contributions to the plan. Participating schools can withdraw their
participation in the plan with at least one year’s notice to the CHEIBA board.
Note 13: Discretely Presented Component Unit
Colorado School of Mines Foundation
Distributions made by the Foundation to the School during the years ended June 30, 2011 and 2010 were
approximately $23,151,000 and $10,413,000, respectively. These amounts have been recorded as
contributions from the Foundation and as capital grants and gifts and Component Unit operating
expenses in the accompanying financial statements. As of June 30, 2011 and 2010, the School has
recorded an accounts receivable from the Foundation of $1,965,000 and $1,430,000, respectively.
The School is the ultimate beneficiary of substantially all restricted and trust funds held by the
Foundation and is the income beneficiary of the majority of endowment funds held by the Foundation.
The Foundation also manages a portion of School’s endowments. The School has endowments and other
assets held by the Foundation approximating $14,295,000 and $12,097,000 as of June 30, 2011 and
2010, respectively. The Foundation retains an investment management fee equal to 2 percent.
Note 14: Commitments and Contingencies
Commitments
Contracts have been entered into for the purpose of planning, acquiring, constructing and equipping
certain building additions and other projects, with outstanding amounts totaling approximately
$45,738,000 as of June 30, 2011. These commitments will be funded or financed by donor
contributions, state appropriations, existing revenue bonds, and other campus resources.

50

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010



Claims and Litigation
In November 1992, the School and numerous other potentially responsible parties (PRP’s) were notified
by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of potential liability pursuant to the
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980, as amended
(CERCLA). Such potential liability results from costs associated with the investigation and cleanup of
hazardous substances at a site owned by the School and leased to the Colorado School of Mines
Research Institute (CSMRI), which performed mining research for a variety of private and governmental
entities. CSMRI, a not-for-profit corporation, was established in 1949 as a separate corporation under
the laws of the State of Colorado. CSMRI ceased active operations during 1987 and sold most of its real
estate in 1988. Upon dissolution, subject to certain provisions, the net assets of CSMRI may be
transferred to the School. Negotiations with the EPA, the enforcement agency related to past costs, have
been resolved. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) and EPA have
reserved their rights as to future costs of investigation and cleanup. Investigation and remediation of the
site are ongoing.

In relation to the site above, the CDPHE issued Radioactive Materials License Number 617-01
Amendment Number 7 (Amendment No. 7) to CSMRI in 2006. Amendment No. 7 contains a provision
requiring CSMRI to provide an enforceable financial instrument to CDPHE within 60 days of issuance
of Amendment No. 7. Amendment No. 7 states that the financial instrument must allow CDPHE access
to a Colorado School of Mines bank account and/or other financial assets necessary to complete
decommissioning of the site discussed above in an amount not less than $2,780,000. On January 12,
2007, CSMRI filed a notice of appeal and request for hearing which objects to the Amendment No. 7
provision regarding provision of a financial instrument. The appeal was tabled while investigation and
monitoring of the site continued.

CSMRI filed a Site Assessment and Characterization Plan to further license decommissioning. This plan
describes an investigation in response to ground water monitoring results. The School executed a
contract, and recorded a liability at June 30, 2010, in the amount of $1.8 million to implement the plan.
Work began in late 2010 and continues as of June 30, 2011. As work on the plan progresses, the School
continues to monitor key benchmarks in the plan and will adjust the pollution remediation liability as
appropriate. As of June 30, 2011, the liability was $1,190,000. The School is currently negotiating with
PRP’s regarding the cost of the remediation work. It is unknown at this time how much, if any, the
School will be able to recover from other potential responsible parties.

In the normal course of its operations, the School is involved in various litigation matters. Management
believes that any future liability that it may incur as a result of these matters, including the EPA matter
discussed above, will not have a material effect on the School’s financial statements.

Government Grants
The School is currently participating in numerous grants from various departments and agencies of the
Federal and State governments. The expenditures of grant proceeds must be for allowable and eligible
purposes. Single audits and audits by the granting department or agency may result in requests for
reimbursement of unused grant proceeds or disallowed expenditures. Upon notification of final approval
by the granting department or agency, the grants are considered closed. Management believes that any

51

Colorado School of Mines
Notes to Financial Statements
June 30, 2011 and 2010



future liability that it may incur as a result of audits by the granting department or agency will not have a
material effect on the School’s financial statements.
Note 15: Risk Management
The School is subject to risks of loss from liability for accident, property damage and personal injury.
These risks are managed by the State Division of Risk Management, an agency formed by statute and
funded by the Long Appropriations Bill. Therefore, the School is not required to purchase insurance for
such risk of loss. Commercial insurance coverage is purchased for employee health benefits. There has
been no reduction in coverage nor have any settlements exceeded coverage in any of the three preceding
years. The School does not retain risk of loss except for damage incurred to property belonging to the
State, limited to a $1,000 deductible per incident.
The State Division of Risk Management is deemed to be a public entity risk pool; therefore, under the
Governmental Immunity Act, the School is protected from suit by the Doctrine of Sovereign Immunity
except under certain circumstances in which immunity is waived.
Note 16: Legislative Appropriations
The Colorado State Legislature establishes spending authority to the School in its annual Long
Appropriations Bill. The Long Bill appropriated funds may include an amount from the State of
Colorado’s General Fund, as well as certain cash funds. Cash funds include tuition, certain fees and
certain other revenue sources.
For the years ended June 30, 2011 and 2010, appropriated expenses were within the authorized spending
authority. For the years ended June 30, 2011 and 2010, the School had a total appropriation of
$102,760,000 and $93,933,000, respectively. For years ended June 30, 2011 and 2010, the School’s
appropriated funds included $5,039,000 and $3,746,000, respectively, received from students that
qualified for stipends from the College Opportunity Fund and $15,547,000 and $6,848,000, respectively,
as fee-for-service contract revenue, as well as certain cash funds as specified in the State’s annual
appropriation bill. All other revenues and expenses reported by the School represent non-appropriated
funds and are excluded from the annual appropriations bill. Non-appropriated funds include certain
grants and contracts, gifts, indirect cost recoveries, certain auxiliary revenues and other revenue sources.


52